Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00284
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello, Fla
Publication Date: November 25, 2009
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00284
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text

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Z'rI-'


ONTICELLO


Wednesday, November 25, 2009


NEWS

50 46< +4


Regional

Transit

Group

Shares

Study's

Findings
LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
Members of a con-
sultant group conducting
a transit study of the re-
gion in preparation for
the development of a re-
gional transit plan held
an open house in Monti-
cello on Tuesday, Nov. 17,
both to share the study's
preliminary findings and
to solicit public input.
It was the consensus
of the consultants in-
volved in the project that
Tuesday's event, at the
public library was one of
the best attended of the
several they had held
here and elsewhere dur-
ing the nine months of
the study, with about 30
people in attendance..
Sponsored by the
Capital Region Trans-
portation Planning
Agency (CRTPA) -
which encompasses four
counties, including Jef-
ferson County the
study takes a broad and
comprehensive' view of
the region in terms of its
transit needs 50 years
out.
Dan Nelson,
spokesman for the con-
sultant group, said the
study, carried out in coor-
dination with other ongo-
ing studies, looked at all
modes of transportation
- from foot trails to light
rails and looked at
three tiers of improve-
ment: the near term, mid
term and long term. He
said the study was also
looking at possible
sources of funding for,
and governance of, the
envisioned transit sys-
tem.
"We're looking at all
components of regional
transit," Nelson said.
He said their study
took data on demograph-
ics, populations, existing
transit and such and
compiled it to determine
the everyday mobility
patterns of the area and
develop a model of peo-
ple's travel patterns.
"We also developed a
cost estimate for im-
provement on ongoing
operations that took into
account current rider-
ship trends and desired
services," Nelson said,
He shared some of
the study's preliminary
findings, based on sur-
Veys administered to a
broad cross-section of
current transit riders,
non-riders and other area
stakeholders.
"Seventy-four per-
cent indicated that they
would support regional
transit service provided
between the City of Talla-
hassee and Gadsden, Jef-
ferson and Wakulla
counties," Nelson said.
"Sixty-one percent indi -
Please See Regional
Transit Page 4A


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
The Economic Development Coun-
cil (EDC) on Monday, Nov. 16, gave a
tentative nod to the idea of pursuing
an Enterprise Zone designation by way
of the Florida Legislature. At the
least, the EDC instructed Economic
Development Director Julie Conley to
investigate the matter further and de-'
termine exactly what steps were neces-
sary to move forward with the request.
Enterprise zones are special geo-
graphic areas that the state targets for
economic revitalization. Such zones
offer tax breaks and other incentives
that induce businesses to locate within
their boundaries. The tax breaks and
incentives also apply to existing busi-
nesses within the zone if they expand.
"It's another tool in your toolbox to
attract and expand businesses," is the
way Conley describes enterprise zones.


Florida currently has 56 such
zones, 28 of them in rural areas. The
problem, as local officials see it, is that
the designations seem arbitrary. They
cite, for example, that neighboring
Madison County and other small coun-
ties in the region have such zones and
some large counties have several, but
Jefferson has none. Too, the state will
not increase the number above 56. The
only way to get the designation
presently, in fact, is when one of the
current holders drops out of the pro-
gram a situation that occurs rarely.
Getting the designation also en-
tails a very complex and complicated
application process that involves com-
pleting a lengthy and detailed form,
getting the County Commission on-
board the proposition, and also getting
the public behind the idea.
Jefferson County reportedly has
an application that is 75 percent com-
Please See Zone Page 4A


County Receives More
LAZARO ALEMAN piled since 193'2i of 54.68 last 12 month
Monticello News inches, representing a 12- Neighbc
Senior Staff Writer month ra infall deficit of son County,
With the exception of 4.-9 inches. received 2.7
Jefferson County, coun- The above summa. October, co
ties in the Suwannee rizes the conditions inches in (
River Water Manage- across the SRNWMD in and its Octc
ment District (SRWMD) October. as indicated on of 3.24 inch
received below average the latest hydrologic con- County ha
precipitation in October, editions report, released 54.26 inches
giving the region an av- on No\: 5. last 12 montl
erage rainfall of 2.18 Specific to Jefferson Overall
inches, or 72 percent of County, the statistics district, rivi
its long-term monthly av- show that it received 3 68 some to wh
erage of 3.03 inches. inches of rain in Octo- ered norma
Meanwhile, the dis- ber, compared with .3.28 this timeor
trict's past 12 months inches in October 2008 ers signific
total rainfall was 50.19 and the October average their norma
inches, compared with of 3.07 inches. Jefferson itored lake
the historical 12-month County has received dropped an w
average (a statistic com- 55.57 inches during the feet across


a Ib


SIbuas


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
Several Jefferson County
property owners will be getting
an early Christmas present of
sorts in the fotm of a little tax
relief in the coming weeks,
compliments of Property Ap-
praiser Angela Gray and the
County Commission.
At Gray's urging, county
commissioners on Thursday
evening, Nov. 19, agreed to re-
turn a combined $25,000 to prop-
erty owners who either are
100-percent war-disabled veter-
ans or who are being charged


U ______________________________________________________________


Than Share Of Rainfall


hs.
>ring Nladi-
meanwhile.
'1 inches in
mnpared .3.58
)ctober 2008
>ber average
es. Madison
is received
during the
hs.
across the
er flows fell.
at is consid-
il levels for
year and oth-
antly below
I levels. Mon-
levels also
average of 0.3
the district,


according to the report,
which further notes that
"a number of lakes with
known aquifer interac-
tions... remained dry or
extremely low."
Specific to Jefferson
County. Sneads Smoke-
house Lake in the north-
ern part was below
average. No data is pro-
vided for the Aucilla
River.
Per the report,
groundwater levels de-
creased in 78 percent of
the district's monitored
wells, but 71 percent re-
inained above the 25th
percentile. "n a range
normal for October".


The percentile is defined
as the percentage of his-
toric levels that are equal
to, or below, the observed
value.
The report notes that
the 12-month Standard-
ized Precipitation Index,
which is based on long-
term precipitation pat-
terns that impact
streams and groundwa-
ter, indicates below-nor-
mal conditions for the
district. Even so, long-
term forecasts from the
National Weather Serv-
ice reportedly predict
above-average precipita-
Please See Rainfall
Page 4A


1 Section. 16 Pages
Around Jeff. Co. 4-9A Football Contest 12A
Black Friday 9A Legals 15A
Church 10-A-11A Sports 12A-13A
Classifieds 14A Viewpoints 2-3A


Tue 61
11/24


Mostly cloudy. High 68F. Winds
light and variable.


Wed
Wed 71/47
11/25


Thu 6840
11/26


Few showers. Highs in the low 70s Partly cloudy. Highs
and lows in the upper 40s. 60s and lows in the Ic


in the upper
iw 40s.


141st Year No. 48


LocCaomwiiunty May Seek


EnterpriwZoire DVweD


C'- -- --------,------





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Flortda's Enterprise Zones #M@"* 'n /
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fMQAI*Cwl O d J
__ 1 __ -"No
Cl~lllrlllll lll~lC&.M Dmft~1


Third Subway


Robbery


Suspect


Arrested
FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The third and final
suspect in the July Sub-
way armed robbery was
arrested and charged
Tuesday, Nov. 17. with
armed robbery with a
firearm and grand theft.
The arrest stems
frojn an incident July 6,
when the Monticello Po-
lice Department investi-
gated an armed robbery Antwaine Donte Owens
anot Suw a n u Antwaine Donte Owens
at Subway.
Officers met with the clerk and two female
customers who advised that a gunman entered
the store armed with a sawed-off shotgun and the
gunman was able to keep his face concealed.
They reported that the gunman took the store
phone and disabled it, then robbed the clerk at
gunpoint of an undetermined amount of cash.
Subsequent investigation led to the arrest of the
getaway driver, Jerrico Brown, 19, of Monticello.
for traffic charges, and as an accomplice in the
armed robbery of the restaurant.
An inventory and search of Brown's vehicle
revealed gloves, masks and identification for
Antwaine Donte Owens, 19, of Valdosta, GA, and
Larry Michael Hall. of Jeffersdn County.
Officers saw two men walking near the Sub-
way when responding to the scene and inter-
viewed them. The two were Owens and Hall.
MPD reported that information at Brown's resi-
dence put Brown, Hall and Owens together ear-
lier in the day, and they were seen with a
sawed-off shotgun, which was the type weapon
seen on video in the robbery and described by
witnesses. 12-gauge ammunition was recovered
from a search of Brown's bedroom.
Please See Robbery Page 4A


I ______________________


Qkywwr










2A Monticello News


www. ecbpublishing. com


Wednesday, November 25, 2009


VIEWPOINTS &


PINIONS


"Fa T4 LztlA '

Kitty Brqksq r

Jeffersoni ,, tiry

NE EXEGuest Columnist

NEW [xPERleCES mn NEW people


Last week I logged
on to a webinar hosted
by Joan Frye Williams, a
nationally recognized
expert on libraries. The
topic was "Revitalizing
the Library Experience."
It was an insightful hour
that flew by and left me
thinking about how we
connect with our
patrons, the future of
reading, and practicing
"hyperlocalism."
I decided to share my
experience with our
newest staff member,
Natalie Binder, and to get
some of her perspec-
tives. Binder is working
on her Master's in the
FSU College of
Information and
Communication with a
concentration on tech-
>nology and networking.
She is also a part of the
so called Millennial
Generation or
Generation Y, the first
generation to have
grown up entirely with
technology at the fore-
front of their develop-
ment.
So what's a young,
hip, technology savvy
young woman going to
share with me? How
about this-a passion for
libraries as sacred
places, the value of read-
ing and the critical
importance of customer
service. Yup, got me too!
,m"


"To me, the library is
such a sacred place.
People have a feeling of
being connected, anyone
can come in, no one is
ever turned away and
everything is free. That's
amazing." This is of
course our raison d'etre,
why we exist. As for feel-
ing connected, Williams
in her webinar speaks
about "hyperlocalism" ,
how libraries in small
communities should
revel and celebrate their
unique local history Of
course our Keystone
Genealogical Library
with their incredibly
knowledgeable staff fills
a large part of that tall
order.
Binder continued
"What does the public
library have left to offer
after the rise of Google?"
This question fits in
neatly with part of the
webinar discussion on
getting people back into
the library Why do you
come to the library?
What can we do to
ensure you return often?
Her three part answer:
teaching people to under-
stand and use technolo-
gy responsibly; practic-
ing the aforementioned
hyperlocalism and a
reaffirmation of the
library as a welcoming
and empowering part of
their lives. Treat people
I i-


right, give them what
they need and hopefully
they will want to come
back.
Also, as a student
and passionate reader
Natalie remembers
being frequently asked
"Don't you get bored just
sitting there" by class-
mates. Seeing reading
as a boring activity is
not a new thing but the
pace of life now coupled
with much less free time
for students and a dizzy-
ing array of leisure time
choices is giving the act
of reading a real run for
its money. "Our capacity
for imaginative and cre-
ative thought" is impact-
ed when reading is not
valued.
Thanks, Ms. Binder,
for sharing your
thoughts with us. It's
wonderful to add anoth-
er person to the staff
who is passionate about
libraries and public
service. I'd like to leave
you, thanks to the webi-
nar, with my new
favorite definition of a
library. From the
Welcome Collection in
London, a free museum,
it's this' A free destina-
tion for the incurably
curious. I'd say that's
pretty much what we are
all about! Come on in
again and see if you
don't agree.

lihrani

News:

Our new Library
website is up and
running. Please set
your urls in the fol-
lowing direction:
j vvwr4ieqflglgtuqp- :
took the staff and I
about 4 months to
plan and develop the
website, and we are
still undergoing
revisions, correc-
tions and additions.
You can become part
of this venture by
Giving us some
input.
S As the website
grows, we will have
a section of g/daanu
(classics in
American and
English literature),
an o r5/cwflq
dogmn bestsellerss).
These will be avail-
able to download
straight into your I-
Spods or computers.
In addition, the web-
Ssite will now have a
section titled,
S"Jefferson County
Library Digital
Project," supervised
by Natalie Binder.
* *
ODA. * AaP*
doIldan,
Vha:

ooooo ooooooo


Enjoying a downtown Street Dance. July
1994. were Iris and Ross Land.
a .r


I I ll I 11


illhIellerT
IieIie Y III '^f$


siiln reiIIoves l


tlriiisli tlriii


silVel.


By: Del
A t'nilict


bbie Snapp
Ilo New's
1rl r


Meet Your



Neighbor


Ruby 8. Whitson
Ruby S. Whitson is a native to Florida. She
was born a farm girl to Nora and Jesse Stone on -:
October II. 1924 in Manatee County, FL. She
married Joe Whitson in 1944. moving to the
Jefferson County area in 1981.
She is very involved in her community; l
Altnisa, Senior Citizen Center, American Legion.
and is an active member of the First United
Methodist Church. Her hobbies include the up-
keep of her five acres of land, a good game of
cards, and FSU football "GO SEMINOLES!"


7'


I


r^tep l3acs rIirmne


TEN YEARS AGO
S NOVEMBER 24, 1999
Responding to the expressed
concerns of Drifton area residents,
the County Commission on
Thursday night instructed its
attorneys to explore the possibility
of challenging the proposed start-
up of the biomass plant in Drifton.
Recent High School
Competency Test (HSCT) scores on
the test taken in April, released by
the State Education Commission,
shows Jefferson County High
School students scoring 74, and
increase in communications and
60, a drop in math.
The County last week initiated
code enforcement proceedings
against Christie and Todd Hale,
the couple whose businesses and
business-related activities on their
property in the Lloyd area have
stirred a controversy.
Mitchell Larkins, president of
the Jefferson Power, L.C.-- the cor-
poration that now owns the bio-
mass plant in Drifton-- vows to the
community that black smoke will
never be emitted from the stack of
the electricity-producing plant.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
NOVEMBER 22, 1989
Although the county presently
has ample recreational facilities
and open space areas, there is still
a lack of play lots and a neighbor-
hood swimming pool which will
require addressing in the future.
Cheryl Turner, Sandra Cross,
and Kris Odahowski of the
Jefferson County Public Library
recently attended the Annual Con-'
ference of Literacy Volunteers of
America, Inc. held in Virginia
Beach, VA.
The Aucilla Christian
Academy Cross Country Team par-
ticipated in a district meet last
Saturday and placed fourth out of
nine teams. The meet featuring 57
,runners, was held at Santa Fe
Community in Gainesville. It was
,ACA's last meet.


THIRTY YEARS AGO''
NOVEMBER 21, 1979 .
Reaction here is mixed over the
ticklish question of what the lU.S.
should do to get hostages in Iran
released.
Charges that Brenda Smiley,
attempted to murder her husband
by injecting him with doses of
insulin have been dropped by the
state.
The Aucilla Warriors ended
their season with a perfect 10-0
record after downing the North
Florida Christian School Eagles 14-
0 on their home field.
FORTY YEARS AGO
NOVEMBER 21, 1969
The Kelly Store building at the
corner of Dogwood and Cherry
Street has been purchased by
Thomas L. Folsom who plans to
move his jewelry store to the new
location shortly after the first of
the year.
Chris Hamilton was the first
recipient of the check from a trust
fund set up by Mrs. Fred Mahan, to
aid deserving college students to
further their education.
Ann Floyd of Monticello was
one of 42 FFA and FHA guests of
the National Aeronautics and
Space Administration for the
launch of Apollo 12 last Friday.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
OCTOBER 23, 1959
Jefferson High Tigers bring
home the North Florida
Conference Title with their win
Friday over Madison 39-7. They
have been selected to play the
Pecan Bowl with Santa Fe, a mem-
ber of the strong Keystone
Conference as their opponents.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
NOVEMBER 25, 1949
The Tigers won over Perry in
the homecoming game 34-6. Steve'
Walker played his best game of the
season. Tommy Hamilton, Junior
Wilford, Harold Wheeler and;
James Prevatt made their presence,
known.


MONTICELLO *


NEWS mi

EMERALD GREENE and Wednesday at 12:00 p.m. for 10


vriaay-s paper. ueale teor e Legal
Publisher/Owner Advertisement is Monday at 5:00
p.m. for Wednesday's paper, and
RAY CICHON Wednesday at 5 p.m. for Friday's
paper.
Managing Editor paper.
There will be a '10" charge for Affidavits.
LAZARO ALEMAN CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Senior Staff Writer Subscription Rates:
SFlorida $45 per year
CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL ADS Out-of-State $52 per year
Deadline for classified is Monday (State & local taxes included)
at 12:00 p.m. for Wednesday's paper,


Established 1869
A weekly newspaper [USPS 361-620] designed for the express reading pleasures of the people of its
circulation area, be they past, present or future residents.
Published weekly by ECB Publishing. Inc., 180 W Washington St. Monticello, FL 32344. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post Office in Monticello, Florida 32344.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MONTICELLO NEWS, P.O. Box 428, Monticello, FL
32345.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in
the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this
newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.
All photos given to ECB Publishing, ,nc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than
6 months from the date they are dropped off. ECB Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said
deadline.


I


1 I OR alff-mon


RO. BON 428
180 W. Washington
Street
Monticello, Florida
32345
850-997-3568
Fax 850-997-3774
Email: monticellonews
@enlbar(p


'` '










Wednesday, November 25, 2009


www. ecbpublishing. com


Monticello News 3A


IEWPOINTS &


PINIONS


, , _~ ], Reader Replies To Earlier Letter:

e Halloween-A Pagan's Holiday
rL^pp/y irhd^y Che Dear Editor: fabricated and has no rel- voicing this absurd non-
I1i vc t nf all R vrancr; in cimnlpr truth abhnt topics which


This Friday,
November 27, marks the
17th birthday of my old-
est daughter, Cheltsie.
I can't let this oppor-
tunity go by without
sending out special birth-
day wishes to her and to
let her know how proud I
am, that she is my daugh-
ter.
I have been proud of
Cheltsie in many differ-
ent aspects, of her life,
over the last 17 years.
SI was proud when she
learned to tie her own
shoe. I was proud when
she learned her ABC's,
and I was proud when she
learned to write her
name.
As she grew on up




cIWhy is there a
Wi debate on cre-
ationism and theory.
Read Genesis 1:1 "In
the beginning God
created..."
(C$fJonder why
W .only appli-
cants who were civil
rights activists were
considered for the
Jefferson County Li-
brary Director.
Maybe the coordina-
tor could answer
that!"
thT !he "N w ord
Could be traced
with a polygraph of
all the staff both
black and white. The
results might be in-
teresting."
WAIhen was the
ast time you
saw a Monticello Po-
liceman walking a
beat during the day?
From their looks they
all need to do some
walking."






P.O. ox 42


into elementary school
and middle school, -I was
proud that she knew to
treat others with respect
and compassion. She
made friends with every-
one, and was a friend to
everyone.
And now here we are,
17 years old and a junior
in high school. The word
proud just doesn't seem a
big enough word. I'm
very proud of her athletic
ability, her hunting skills,


and her dancing skills,
but most of all I'm so
proud of her Christian
Ethics, her moral values,
and the young lady that
she is growing in to. She
is truly beautiful on the
outside AND on the
inside.
Happy Birthday,
Cheltsie! I Love You and
I'm So Very Proud Of
You!


Has Blessed Me


O'Quinn, let me start off
by saying I'm sorry for
your father's death and
wish you and your fami-
ly the best. Now, onto a
more relevant
topic...Paganism. It is
clear by the title you gave
your entry and the way it
was written, that you
have no concept of who
Pagans are nor what
Halloween is truly about,
and began as. Pagan,
simplified, means "coun-
try dweller/rustic," and
a person that loves and
worships nature, not one
that goes into graveyards
at night.
For that, you need to
try looking .up
Necromancy Paganism
was well established, and
a religion as well as a
way of life, far before
Christianity ever came
about. Pagans are cer-
tainly not devil worship-
pers, and your Lucifer,
fits nowhere in our eter-
nal being category; and
you certainly do not hear
of Pagans being jailed
for burning crosses and
for religious riots...that
is left to the self-pro-
claimed Christians and
Satanic cults, which
Pagans are not.
As for Halloween
being "The Devil's
Holiday", this is entirely


words, it's a lie.
Halloween, or All
Hallows Eve, was origi-
nated as representing
the Festival of Samhain
(The Feast of Saints) in
Roman times, to signify
the Celtic New Year.
Back then, calendars like
we have today weren't
regarded as accurate and
January 1st wasn't wide-
ly believed to be the
TRUE New Year.
Today, children dress
up on Halloween mostly
because it is fun, and it's
the one time that they
are allowed to be "out on
the town" late at night,
instead of getting ready
for bed for school the
next morning. It is true
that some children view
"trick-or-treating" as a
window of opportunity
to do mischief, such as
placing graffiti in trees
and on houses; however,
that is each person's
choosing, it has nothing
to do with "The
Devil"...to say The Devil
is making them do it, is
as childish as a "child"
saying a classmate
"made" them steal a pen-
cil.
It is not that people
are scared to say what
they think, and it is cer-
tainly not that people
think you are brave for


you know nothing
about...it is the fact that
Syou are WRONG and
should not be allowed to
make false accusations
about either topic.
Pagans aren't widely
known to criticize
Christians for their
beliefs, even though the
self-proclaimed
"Christians" I men-
tioned earlier, take it
upon themselves to criti-
cize and judge other reli-
gions, when the Bible
clearly states,
"Judgment is mine
sayeth the Lord"...and
ask yourself, is judging
other people the
"Christian Way?"
Again, I do feel for
you in the fact that you
have lost your father and
that you are undoubtedly
grieving a great deal,
and I do agree with you
about the city enforcing
the privacy of grave-
yards; however, this is no
excuse for you to "bash"
another culture or a fun
holiday...that is not "The
Christian Way", and
Halloween is of Roman
descent, and doesn't have
any relevance as strictly
a "Pagan Holiday".


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4A Monticello News


OUND


www.ecbpublishing.com


EFFERSON


Wednesday, November 25, 2009


COUNTY


Special Taxes


Cont. From Page 1


Regional Transit


Cont. From Page 1


some property owners
paying for second struc-
tures on their lands and
others not, and many
another paying commer-
cial rates on structures
actually being used for
agricultural, recreational
or seasonal purposes,
among other problems.
Commissioners left
the impression at their
last workshop on the sub-
ject on Oct. 22 that they
would discuss the issue
further at their next
evening meeting and
solicit public input. But
the only thing discussed
on Thursday's evening
relative to the assess-
ments was Gray's request
for the possibility of
immediate relief in the
two named categories.
She said if commis-
sioners would address the
second structure assess-
ment in particular, it
would tremendously
reduced- the number of
calls her office was receiv-
ing.
"I'm asking to go back
to the 2009 taxes and cred-
it these individuals for the
landfill assessments at
least," Gray said.
She alleviated com-
missioriers' expressed
concerns about the reduc-
tion's potential impact on
the budget by pointing out
that the refunds to proper-
ty.owners who were being
charged commercial rates
on second structures on
their ag-zoned properties


Robbery


SOn July 11, MPD
learned that Hall was
incarcerated in the
Lowndes County Jail the
evening before. Chief
Fred Mosley and Capt.
Roger Murphy drove to
Lowndes County and met
with Hall. After being
mirandized, during the
interview Hall reported-
ly admitted that he went
with Brown and Owens
to the Subway to do the
robbery He stated that
Brown instructed him to
show. Owens the layout
around the Subway
because Owens was not
from the area.
He reported that he
and Owens walked to an
area just behind the

Rainfall
tion due to strengthening
El Nino conditions in the
Pacific Ocean.
The district contin-
ues to request voluntary
reductions in water use.
"The district urges all
water users to eliminate
wasteful and inefficient
water use," the report
states. "Water is con-
served by using he mini-


St


would amount to $16,000,
well within, the 5 percent
that the law required be
held in abeyance in the
budget.
Commissioner Felix
"Skeet" Joyner said he
saw no reason why prop-
erty owners in agricul-
ture-zoned properties
with second structures
such as barns and sheds
on their lands should be
assessed a separate
assessment, especially at
commercial rates. It
made no sense, he said.
Gray agreed that it
made no sense. But it was
the way that it had been
done in the past, based on
the assumption that if the
second structure was not
residential, commercial
was the only other option,
she said. But she would be
glad to remove the assess-
ments, she said.
Commissioner Hines
Boyd agreed that the par-
ticular unfairness should
be redressed, especially as
it would not impact the
budget significantly. But
he cautioned the commis-
sion not to make a host of
exceptions absent a more
comprehensive review of
the problem and the
potential ramifications of
proposed solutions, lest
"we open a can of
worms".
The commission's
vote to correct the incon-
sistency was unanimous.
Gray next raised the
possibility of exempting


war-disabled veterans
from the two assessments.
It would be a nice gesture,
in recognition of the debt
owed to veterans and the
recent Veterans Day cele-
brations, she said.
As Gray explained it,
the total impact to the
county in lost revenues
for the latter category
would be $9,000, or $2,500
on the fire assessment
and $6,500 on the landfill
,assessment. She said the
guidelines for who would
qualify as disabled veter-
ans were very stringent
and set by the federal gov-
ernments. The guide-
lines, she said, required
that the individuals be
100-percent disabled; that
the disability be combat
related; and that the indi-
vidual be a resident of the
county granting the
exemption.
The vote to approve
the latter measure again
was unanimous.
On a related note, C.
P. Miller inquired about
the probability of church-
es no longer enjoying
exemption from the two
assessments, a point that
commissioners briefly
discussed and left hang-
ing at the Oct. 22 work-
shop.
The board's only
response came from
Joyner.
"No action has been
taken," Joyner repeated
three times: loudly, clear-
ly and emphatically.


Cont. From Page 1


Subway and he showed
Owens the path to take to
go and do the robbery
and the way to comeback.
Hall allegedly stated that
Owens went into the
Subway and committed
the robbery and came
running back and the two
headed back to Brown's
vehicle parked on the
street behind the store.
He stated that as they
approached they saw a
police car behind
Brown's vehicle and they
turned and ran alongside
a side street north of
the scene. He stated that
there were bushes and
woods along the street
and the two of them split
up until they reached the


next street.:
MPD was assisted
by officers from the
Jefferson County
Sheriff's Office, Florida
Highway Patrol and
Madison County
Correctional Institution.
Hall turned himself
in to the County Jail
Monday morning, July
20, where he was charged
with armed robbery with
a firearm and grand
theft. His bond was with-
held.
Owens was arrested
Nov. 17 and charged with
armed robbery with a
firearm and grand theft.
Bond was withheld and
he remained at the coun-
ty jail Nov. 23.


Cont. From Page 1


mum amount needed and
by irrigating only when
necessary and in the
morning before 10 a.m.
and in the evening hours
after 4 pm., when lower
temperature and wind
velocity reduce the
amount of water loss to
evaporation. The district
offers a variety of free
water conservation infor-


mation to the public via
its website and by
request."
The SRWMD com-
piles the hydrologic condi-
tions report using water
resource data collected
from radar-derived rain-
fall estimates, groundwa-
ter and surface water lev-
els, and river flows,
among other variables.


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or (704) 649-6654
rstokley@hotmail.com


cated they would use
regional transit service
occasionally or often.
Seventy-two percent of
respondents are current
StarMetro transit rid-
ers."
"As a whole, we got a
positive response," he
added.
He said the popula-
tion and employment
estimates for the region
project a 52 percent
increase between 2007
and 2050, with Jefferson
County projected to have
a population of 20,000 by
2050 and the region a
population of 554,000
from the current 343,000.
The region is defined as
Leon, Gadsden, Wakulla
and Jefferson counties.
In terms of trip
flows for all modes of
transportation (automo-
bile, transit, biking and
walking), the models
project high trip flows in
northern sections of
Leon County and the
City of Tallahassee and
low flows between
Jefferson and Leon
counties.
"But remember, this
is all still in the early
preliminary phases,"
Nelson said more than
once.
He noted that some
of the potential transit
improvements included
the expansion of exist-
ing local bus service and
the introduction of new
express bus routes con-
necting activity centers
with rural communities
such as Monticello. Of
course, capital invest-
ments would require
additional studies, fund-
ing, and engineering and
construction costs to
implement the improve-
ments and other options,
he said.
Among the possible
transit options that
Nelson touched on were
satellite transfer cen-
ters, regional park-and-
ride facilities (one is con-
templated at 1-10 and US
90), bus rapid transit,
streetcars, light rail
transit, commuter rail,
and high-speed rail.
"It's a very compre-
hensive network that
would service much of
the area," Nelson said.
He said the next step
was to refine the plan

Zone


plete, from the last time
that an enterprise zone
became available and
the county attempted to
apply For a host of rea-
sons, however, the appli-
cation was never com-
pleted.
Conley has since
learned.that under spe-
cial circumstances, the
Legislature will some-
times grant the designa-
tion by decree. When
she shared this informa-
tion with the Jefferson
Legislative Committee,
the body that lobbies the
Legislature on behalf of
the local community, the
latter encouraged her to
run the proposal passed
the EDC. That's because
whatever projects the
legislative committee
pursues must have
behind them a sponsor-
ing group that is willing
to do the necessary
information gathering
and other legwork.
Conley gave the


EDC' the same frank
assessment that she
gave the legislative com-
mittee. That assessment
was that although it was
certainly possible to get
the Enterprise Zone des-
ignation by legislative
decree, it wasn't likely
under the current eco-
nomic conditions.
That's because,
although the county
would certainly benefit
from the designation
and continue to receive
all receipts from sales
and other taxes, the
state would take an eco-
nomic hit in lost rev-
enues from the same
taxes. She said she
doubted that any law-
maker would want to
sponsor legislation that
was detrimental to the
state under the current
circumstances.
Even so, the EDC
more or less indicated
that at the least, the
community should get


and submit it to CRTPA
in final form by January
2010. Once completed,
the study would serve as
the foundation for the
launching of more
detailed studies in the
future, he said. Such
studies would include
expanding the existing
transit services through-
out the region, as well as
evaluating new types of
transit investments, he
said.
One audience mem-
ber noted that the
study's projections did
not bode well for
Jefferson County, in
terms of planned transit
systems here. She cau-
tioned that basing the
needs assessments solely
on the population .num-
bers did not do justice to
Jefferson County's tran-
sit needs.
Nelson agreed. But
he. reiterated that the
process was still in its
early stages. He assured
the speaker that her con-
cerns were justified and
would be addressed
when the more detailed
plans were developed.
He also underscored the
importance of the pub-
lic's attendance and
input at all future meet-
ings and hearings on the
issue.
"Public input is a big
component of this
process," Nelson said.
But Greg Burke,
with the CRTPA, offered
a more realistic assess-
ment. He pointed out
that population, density,
and urban form played a
significant part in deter-
mining transit planning.
"It's important to
create nodes of density,"
Burke said. "It difficult
to provide cost-effective
transit for areas that
lack density It's difficult
to provide transit if you
lack density, population
and urban form."
Commissioner
Hines Boyd, Jefferson
County's representative
on the CRTPA, granted
Burke's point. But he
offered that the designa-
tion of transit routes
was also a critical com-
ponent in the process
and could prove
extremely helpful to
rural, commuflities if
done right. He praised


the ball rolling, in
terms of completing the
application and
approaching such law-
makers as State
Representative Leonard
Bembry to get the lat-
ter's reading on the situ-
ation. That way, the
community would put
.the state on notice of its
interest in acquiring
the designation and
would also put itself in
a better position to pro-
ceed with the applica-
tion if and when anoth-
er opening came avail-
able.
The EDC instructed
Conley to determine
what she could in the
coming weeks. If war-
ranted, the group indi-
cated that it would be
willing to meet in a spe-
cial session to discuss
and formally approve
the request to be for-
warded to the legisla-
tive committee for pur-
suit.


the proposed park-and-
ride center at 1-10 and
US 90 as an example of
good thinking and plan-
ning.
Library Director
Serafin Roldan shared
an informal transit sys-
tem that he said works
perfectly well in his
native Puerto Rico.
Roldan said that system
consists of local govern-
ments licensing private
entrepreneurs who then
use their own vans to
service government-des-
ignated routes within
and between small com-
munities.
"People pay a mini-
mum fee for the licens-
es," Roldan said. "They
use private buses but
they have to get govern-
ment certification. This
would alleviate the
short-term need here.
It's a simple affair but
it's worked well in
Puerto Rico."
Nelson, Burke and
others found the propos-
al praiseworthy. And
Dorothy Inman-
Johnson, executive
director of the Capitol
Area Community Action
Agency, thought the idea
meritorious enough to
mention that her organi-
zation. was willing to
provide' micro-entrepre-
neur loans of up to
$3,000 as startup capital
for qualified individuals
who had a van and want-
ed to try the idea Roldan
proposed on a pilot
basis.
The CRTPA study is
founded on the premise
that communities can
no longer afford to be
shaped in an inefficient
manner, given rising
fuel prices and climate
changes.
"Simply widening
roads to provide for
transportation growth is
no longer the best and
only option to consider,"
states a CRTPA
brochure.
The organization
sees the study, and the
transit system it will
ultimately produce, as a
way to "reduce oil con-
sumption and traffic
congestion, improve air
quality, support econom-
ic development and pro-
vide a wider range of
mobility options".

nt. From Page 1


oNe ?aU. 7 5










Wednesday, November 25, 2009


OUND


www. ecbp u blishing. corn


EFFERSON


Monticello News 5A


COUNTY


C0MMUN I DY


IALMN0A?


November 25
A member of
Congressman Allen
Boyd's staff will visit
the Jefferson County
Public Library 9:30 to
11:30 a.m. on the fourth
Wednesday of every
month to afford local cit-
izens an opportunity to
discuss issues of con-
cern.

November 27
Community Skate Night
is held 6 to 8 p.m. on the
last Friday of each
month at the Church of
the Nazarene on 1590
North Jefferson Street.
This event is free. Bring
your own skates or bor-
row from the Roller
Club. There is a small
charge for snacks, 997-.
3906.

November 28
Fourth Saturday Gospel
Sing 7 p.m. at Lamont
United Methodist
Church. Fellowship and'
refreshments after the
music, 997-2527.


November 28
Jefferson SHARE regis-
tration 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Saturday at the
Jefferson County Public
Library on South. Water
Street, and at Central
Baptist Church in
Aucilla, on Tindell
Road. The cost of the
basic food package is
$18. Contact Martha
Creel at 445-9061 or
Leslie Blank at 556-5412
for more information. A
volunteer is someone
who is paid with a smile
and a thank you!

November 29
Alternative Gift Market
12 to 4 p.m. Sunday at
First United Methodist
Church, 325 West
Walnut Street. Select a
thoughtful gift from 12
local and international
organizations partici-
pating in this event.
This is an opportunity
to honor a loved one
with gifts that make a
lasting difference for
people and animals liv-


ANGEL ELLENBERG

PADGETT
Angel Ellenberg Padgett, age 81, passed away on
Wednesday, November 18, 2009 at Capital Regional
Medical Center in Tallahassee, FL. Mrs. Padgett
was born in Greenwood, South Carolina to the late
James Claude Ellenberg and Lessie Horton: She was
a:6hoienmaker and president of Lloyd, FL; for the
last 40 years. Mrs. Padgett was a member of the First
Baptist Church of Lloyd.
She was preceded in death by her husband, John
Paul "J.P." Padgett in 1987, and also a son, Paul Ben
Padgett.
Funeral Services were held at Joe P. Burns'
Funeral Home at 3:00 P.M. on Friday, November 20,
2009 with Bro. George Smith officiating. Interment
at Woodlawn Cemetery Family friends from 2:00
P.M. 3:00 PM. (1 hour prior to the service).
Donations may be made to the First Baptist
Church of Lloyd Building Fund (850)-997-5309.
You may sign the guestbook at:
www.joepburnsfuneralhomes.com


CHERELLE P.

FRANCIS
Cherelle P Francis, age 25, of Tifton, GA passed
away on Monday, November 16, 2009 at Medical
Center of Central Georgia.
She was born October 21, 1984 in Talahassee,
FL. She is survived by her parents, Ms. Sandra G.
Wilcox of Tifton, GA and her father Mr. Isom J.
Francis (Brenda) of Monticello, FL., her sisters,
Deann McDonald of New Symra Beach, FL,
Chenelle Francis and Jasmine Francis of
Monticello; her brothers, Willie Allen of Leesburgh,
GA, Kenneth D. James of Ft. Carlson, Colorado, Iran
Francis of Monticello, FL and Earl Tukes, Jr of
Tifton, GA; her grandparents, Hayard and Lefornia
Francis of Monticello, great grandparent Deannie
Anderson of Monticello.
Funeral Services were held Saturday, November
21, 2009 at 11 a.m. at Friendship M.B. Church. Burial
followed at Milam Cemetery in Milam, GA.
The family received friends from 7-8 p.m. at
Southview Mortuary Chapel on Friday November
20, 2009.
Southview Mortuary, Inc is in charge of
Arrangements, 229-387-7046.


ing locally, nationally,
and globally. When an
individual makes a pur-.
chase at the Alternative
Gift Market, a donation
is made to the particular
charity he/she wishes to
support. The shopper
receives a personalized
gift card that he/she
can send or give to
those being honored
with the gift. Be
assured... there's some-
thing for everyone! 997-
3571

November 30
Martin Luther King
Community Center
meets 6 p.m. on the last
Monday'of each month
at the MLK Center.
Contact Charles
Parrish at 997-3760 for
more information.

November 30
Boy Scout Troop 803
meets 7 p.m. every
Monday at the Eagles
Nest on South Water
Street. For more infor-
mation, contact Scout
Leader Paul Wittig at
997-1727 or 997-3169.

November 30
AA women meetings
are held 6:45 p.m.
Monday; AA and Al-
Anon meetings are held
8 p.m. at the Christ
Episcopal Church
Annex, 425 North
Cherry Street. For more
information, call 997-
2129 or 997-1955.

November 30
AA meets 7 p.m. every
Monday at Waukeenah
United Methodist
Church for fellowship;
the meeting is open. For
more information, con-
tact Rev. Ralph
Wrightstone at 997-2171.

December 1
Tuesday at Tup's has
moved its time back to
5:30 p.m. This fun, free
exercise class is for
walkers and runners to
come out and get mov-.
ing! Routes begin at
Tupelo's Bakery & Caf6
and will be posted on
the door for the late-
comers. John Olson and
,Kim Davis will lead the
group.

December 1
AA classes are held
every Tuesday at 8 p.m.
for those seeking help.
The classes are held at
1599 Springhollow Road
in the Harvest
Christian Center.
Contact Marvin
Graham at 212-7669 for
more information.

December 1
Overeaters Anonymous
will meet 7 p.m. on
Tuesday at Waukeenah
United Methodist


Church. This is a free
group meeting and is
open to the public. For
more information con-
tact the church at 997-
2527.

December 1
Taoist Tai Chi Class
meets 7 to 8:30 p.m.
every Tuesday for
beginners at Christ
Episcopal Church in the
fellowship hall at 425
North Cherry Street.
Improve your health,
balance, and flexibility
No special physical
requirements, and all
ages are welcome. For
more information con-
tact Mary Saunders at
850-224-5438 or 850 443
7799.

December 1 5
Beginning Metal Work
101 is one of the cur-
rent jewelry crafting
classes being held at
The Peddler'.s
Marketplace in down-
town Monticello, 11 a.m.
Tuesday through
Saturday. Reservations
may be made by con-
tacting Margie Stern at
210-4097 or 933-9540.
Different classes run
every week. Learn the
basics of wrapping a
focal bead using the
center hole as a center
to the wrap. Class proj-
ect to make and take
.home will be one com-
pleted pendant neck-
lace. There is a small
materials charge of $10
dependent on silver
cost and beads.


December 1 and 15
Jefferson County Lions
Club will meet 1 p.m. on
the first Tuesday and
5:30 p.m. on the third
Tuesday of the month
at the Rare Door
Restaurant in the meet-
ing room on North
Cherry Street. For more
information .contact
Lion Debbie at 251-1641.

December 2
Employment
Connections Career,
Coach Mobile Lab is
scheduled for 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. on Wednesdays
across from the First
Baptist Church in
Monticello. Services
include job search,
resume assistance,
assessments, and labor
market information.
For more information,
contact Diane Head at
973-2672, 973-6497, or
headd@nfwdb.org

December 3
You may qualify for
assistance from Capital
Area Community
Action Agency Call Pat
Wilson or Melissa
Watson at 997-8231 for
additional information.
They can tell you what
services are currently
being provided. CACAA
will be working 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. on the first
Thursday at Union Hill
AME Church.

S December 3
The Business,
Community Prayer
Breakfast and meeting
will be held 7 to 8 a.m.


on the first Thursday of
the month. Plan to
attend, and bring your
spouse and a friend. For
more information con-
tact Coordinator L.
Gary Wright at
lgwright39@embarqma
il.com or 997-5705, 933-
5567.

December 3
AA meetings are held 8
p.m. Thursday at the
Christ Episcopal
Church annex, .425
North Cherry Street.
For more information
call 997-2129 or 997-1955.

December 3
Cub Scout Pack 808 will
meet weekly 7 to 8 p.m.
on Thursday at The
Eagle's Nest on South.
Water Street. For more
information contact
Cub Master Greg Wynot
at 997-5366.

December 4
Ashville Area Volunteer
Fire Department meets
6:30 p.m. on the first
Friday of each month at
the fire station. Contact
Fire Chief John
Staffieri at 997-6807 for
more details.

December 4
Experience the
effects of Gentle Yoga
on mind, body, and
spirit 8 a.m. Friday
at Monticello Health
and Fitness, Center,;,
instructed by Gatei
Howell. Call 997-4400
for more information.


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Wednesday, November 25, 2009


6A Monticello News


OUND


JEFFERSON


COUNTY


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www. ecbpublishing. com










Wednesday, November 25, 2009


FOUND


www. ecbpublishing. com


EFFERSON


Monticello News 7A


COUNTY


Library Director Speaks At Woman's Club


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Guest speaker to the
November meeting of
the Monticello Woman's
Club was Serafin
Roldan, PhD, director of
the Jefferson County
Public Library. Dr.
Roldan, who has been on
the job for the past seven
months, has made
human relationships a
priority within the
library system: among
the staff, patrons and
the staff, and between
the library and commu-
nity government.
Other priorities
include the Adult
Literacy Program and
ESL and developing a
library of Spanish lan-
guage media and work-
ing on English skills.
The Jefferson
County Library has
instituted a newsletter
that is put out once a
month. There is now a
monthly Book Club and
a Writer's Club, which
meets 6:30 p.m., on the
second and fourth
Tuesday.
The library is also
proud to announce the
purchase of an Amazon
Kindle, which allows


i H..91-b -.. .-. ..a.. .-M
Monticello News Photo By Debbie Snapp, Nov. 9, 2009.
Monticello Woman's Club Member Betty Bard
covers a batch of two-pound Holiday Fruitcakes
freshly baked by the members for the annual sale.


patrons to access news-
papers from across the
country within the
library.
The Jefferson
County Public Library
is funded by the county
government at $170,000
and the state of Florida
at $115,000 annually 65
percent of these funds
go toward payroll, and
35 percent goes to books


and other media.
Dr. Roldan also
brought a guest to the
meeting from the
Writer's Club. Patricia
Swain read two of her
poems, one about turn-
ing 50-years-old and
another about her moth-
er's death.
The annual
Woman's Club holiday
fruitcake sale is under-


^t~t~t0 Q> irf


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Jefferson
County Health
Department offers some
holiday tips for healthy
eating during the holi-
days, to help avoid
weight gain.
This is the time of
year to celebrate. Food
is one of the pleasures of
parties, holiday festivi-
ties and other social
gatherings. Remember
that visiting with family
and friends should be
the primary focus and
that the food and bever-
ages are secondary You
can eat healthy and
enjoy the celebrations.
Any foods, even tradi-
tional holiday treats,
can fit into an eating
plan. The key is modera-
tion and balance.
First "of all, be real-
istic. Trying to lose
weight during the holi-
days can be a self-defeat-
ing goal. Instead, strive
to maintain your weight
by balancing party eat-
ing with other meals,
Eat small, low calorie,
low carbohydrate, and
low fat mini-meals dur-
ing the day so you can
enjoy celebration foods
without overdoing your
calorie intake for the
day. Maintaining your
weight is a- great goal.
Losing weight during
the holidays would be a
marvelous feat, but may
be unrealistic.
Be active and keep
moving. Often, our busy
holiday schedules bump
us off of our exercise
routines. Walk outdoors
if weather permits or
walk the halls of a shop-
ping mall. Exercise
while sitting in a chair.
Go on a hike with family
or friends. Organize a
touch football game.
Stay active during the
holidays.
Take the edge off
your hunger before a
party Feeling hungry
can sabotage the


strongest willpower. Eat
a very small, healthy
snack, such as low fat,
low carbohydrate yogurt
or a piece of low fat or
fat-free cheese before
you head out the door.
This will help you to
avoid rushing to the buf-
fet table when you arrive
at a party. While you are
there, take time to great
people you know.
Conversation is calorie-
free. Get a low calorie
beverage and settle into
the festivities before eat-
ing. Try sparkling
water with a twist of
lime or lemon rather
than an alcoholic drink.
Sparkling water is calo-
rie free.
Make just one trip to
the party buffet. Be
aware of foods which
you are eating, and be
selective. Choose only
the/ foods you really
want to eat and keep the
portions small. Often,
just a taste satisfies a
craving or curiosity.
Also, move your socializ-
ing away from the buffet
table. This' will elimi-
nate unconscious nib-'
bling.
Choose healthy
party foods, low calorie,
low carbohydrates and


low fat. Raw veg
with a small am
dip, just enough
the edge of the ve
is a good choice
boiled shrimp c
lops with cocktail
or lemon. Go e
fried appetizer
high carbohydra
choices.
If you are enj
sit-down dinner
be wise with
control. Make yo
helping small.
host or hostess
you to take secor
total amount v
about'the same a
mal size portion.
Following the
could help mining
mid-January
stress" that mar
dents seem to
from after the hol
i '

V 1.
''V
^ .


way. Contact Club
President Jan
Wadsworth at 997-4440 to
make a purchase, or any
club member.
Suzanne Nelson was
welcomed as a new
member to the club, and
Wadsworth invites all
women in Jefferson
County who are interest-
ed in becoming mem-
bers to give her a call.
Lunch was prepared by
Dianne Braren, Gloria
Brown, Linda Beard,
and Allene Sandell, and
consisted of lasagna,
salad, and dessert.
Charlene Beevis
Reece, 2nd vice presi-
dent for the Florida
Federation of 'Woman's
Clubs, spoke during the
brief business meeting.
Five door prizes were
awarded bringing the
meeting to a close.
A Covered Dish
Potluck Luncheon and
Christmas Auction will,
take place during the
Dec. 1 monthly meeting.
The fruitcake bak-
ing will continue as long
as there are orders.
Several members have
signed up to bake cakes
for the annual Holiday
Sale.


Big Bend

y- Hospice Sponsors

Hope for the

Holidays Progam
DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
getables Big Bend Hospice
ount of offered a two-hour program.
to coat on Thursday, Nov. 19, and
getablee will offer another on Dec. 7
e. Try from 6 to 8 p.m., that pro-
)r scal- vides practical tools for
il sauce developing coping skills
easy on while grieving through the
s and holiday season.
te food "My mother-in-law
passed away two years ago
and while we miss. her
oying a every day'the holidays are
par ty particularly bittersweet for
portion my family without
ur first her," said Ginny Burns, vol-
If the unteer department manag-
expects er of Big Bend
ids, the Hospice. "Hope for the
vill be Holidays is awonderfulpro-
s a-nor- gram of support for anyone
in the community who has
ese tips experienced the death of a
lize the loved one, no matter when
"Seam- the death occurred, and
ly resi- finds the holiday season to
suffer be a challenging time."
lidays. Hope for the Holidays
will be held at the Elaine C.
p Bartelt Hospice Center, Big
Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan
Center Blvd. in Tallahassee.
To register or for more
information,, contact
SWendy Vargo at 878-
53 1 0x7 0 4 or
-_- wendy@bigbendhos-
M pice.org


November American


Diabetes Month


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Florida
Department of Health
(DOH) stresses that
November is American
Diabetes Month, and the
importance of screen-
ing for the disease.
According to DOH,
diabetes and heart dis-
ease are closely linked,
and people with diabetes
are at high risk for a
heart attack or stroke.
Those heart attacks
tend to be more serious
and can happen early in
life. DOH said that as a
matter of fact, two out of
three people with dia-
betes die from heart
attack or stroke and
both women and men
are at risk.
This is of signifi-
cant importance to resi-
dents of Jefferson
County because accord-
ing to DOH statistics,
the county is number
one of Florida's 67 coun-
ties in strokerelated
deaths and number
three in heart attack-
related deaths..
According to DOH
statistics, there are 5.4
million undiagnosed
diabetics in the US and
50 percent of those peo-
ple have no symptoms.
Diabetes is the sixth
leading cause of death
in the US. It reduces life


.expectancy of middle-
aged diabetics by 5-10
years, and diabetes is
the leading cause of kid-
ney failure, new blind-
ness and new amputa-
tions.
The prevalence of
diabetes has multiplied
by five times since 1950,
14-15 million Americans
have type 2 diabetes and
there has been a 33 per-
cent increase in diabetes
from 1990-1998.
There are many pre-
cautions one can take to
reduce their risk of
heart disease and
stroke.
The Jefferson
County Health
Department offers free
diabetes case manage-
ment services, assis-
tance with medications,
and nutrition counsel-
ing for both newly diag-
nosed and 'present dia-
betes patients.
To receive these free
services, residents
should ask their pri-
mary physician to send
a copy of the DOH refer-
ral form on their
patient's behalf to the
Health Department.
Physicians' offices
can obtain the blank
referral forms by calling
the clinic at 342-0170 and
for the convenience of
the physicians, complet-
ed patient forms can be
faxed to 342-1257.


JEFFERSON COUNTY
DEMOCRATIC PARTY HOLIDAY
CELEBRATION SET DEC. 8


,
The Jefferson
County Democratic
Party holiday celebra-
tion will be held 7 p.m.,
Tuesday, December 8 at
St. Margaret Parish
Hall, 1565 E. Washington
St., Monticello.
Special guest speaker
will be State Sen. Dan
Gelber, candidate 'for
Attorney General.
Music will be provided
by a local choral ensem-
ble.
A baked ham supper
including sweet pota-
toes, greens, homemade
cornbread, green beans
and, dessert will be
served. Suggested dona-
tion is $10.
Reservations are
recommended and may
be made by calling


Gladys Roann, 997 5209,
or Eleanor Hawkins, 997
2863. Collection of non-
perishable food items for
the Jefferson County
Food Bank is planned.
Senator Gelber has
introduced a series of
measures that, if adopt-
ed by the Legislature,
would address the prob-
lem of corruption by
public officials, a seri-
ous problem in Florida.
Presently, more public
officials in Florida are
charged with corruption
than in any other state.
Gelber says we. have a
state government that
operates largely in the
shadows, a campaign
finance system that
gives special interests
way too much power,
and too many of our
public officials seem
totally beholden to
everyone but everyday
citizens.
He is a former feder-
al prosecutor with vast
experience fighting cor-
ruption.


of Monticolo,
175 N. Railroad St. Monticello, Florida 32344

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SEFFERSON


Wednesday, November 25, 2009


COUNTY


1lhcy B[ck
ABI VANDERVEST
A Guest Column From
The Monticello News'
The library book
club met on Monday,
Nov. 16 to discuss the
book, Back Roads by
Tawni O'Dell. Our
response to it reminded
me of the Unshelved car-
toon where the lady
comes into the library
angry at the reference
librarian, Dewey She
asks him why he sug-
gested such an awful Abi Va
book for her to read. t
Dewey asks her why she Lther KiM
read the whole thing, we meet th
and she replies, "I could- have to ch,
n't put it down!" tion, as
It was decided that library wi
our December meeting Come
would be moved to the December
second Monday since We have m
Dec. 21 is so close to ers wh
Christmas. The book but we ali
selected for the month is more. If y
moren If yc
Olive Kitteridge by to attend
Elizabeth Strout. It is a s
actually a collection of make a s
short stories, so this will two, you
S, email tc
be also a change of vest@j
genre. Since we have anme.
already made our choice yo on
of book for January, I from 6 to :
want tc invite all to public libra
bring a few cookies to
share at our 6 p.m. start S
time. I say "a few" in
hopes of keeping myself DEBBIE SN
from being tempted to Monticello N
eat too many Staff Writer
The January book USMC n
will be The Nine: inside an Richard
the secret world of the from Gree:
Supreme Court by embarked or
Jeffrey Toobin. It was raise fund
also suggested to add a Disabled
second book if you have Veterans (DI
time to read it. In Our ing 202 d
Defense: the Bill of America fro
Rights in Action by California.
Caroline Kennedy. Both journey this
are books of non- Day and w
fiction. This meeting through Men
may also be moved to the The W
second Monday, as the America be


Qublh


lay is Ma
ng, Jr. Do
at day, we
range our
'm sure
I be closet
join us
and Jan
any avid r
ots of ic
rays welc
)u're not
but wan
uggestior
can send
S avan
uno c
re hope to
nday, Dec
30 p.m. ai
ary

ik
4APP
'ews

military ve
Hunsuc
n Bay,
n a journey
Is 'for
Ameri
AV) by w
lays act
m Florida
He began
past Veter
ill conti
norial Day.
Valk Acr
egan at


JAMES P. HILTON



PUBLISHES TENTH BOOK


FRAN HUNT tor, and medical author for
Monticello News 29 years. He became a
Staff Writer member of the National
Resident James P. Association of EMS
Hilton has published his Educators (USA) in 2001
tenth book, "The People's and an honorary member
Medicine: How To Be Your of the Natural Health
Own Doctor, and it is now Society of Australia in
available for sale on CD. 1999. Hilton has also taken
Presently, Hilton 'and his formal training in medical
family are traveling hypnosis.
throughout the country to Hilton strongly cau-
artin promote that book. The tions; Always consult with
ay. If CDs are $24.95, which a competent medical doc-
will includes postage and to tor or naturopathic physi-
loca- order, send check or cian before discontinuing
the money order to James P any prescribed medication
d. Hilton, PO Box 982, or before beginning any
in Fernandina, Beach, FL, exercise program.
uary 32035, or for faster He has authored ten
read- response, contact Hilton at books and numerous wide-
deas, jimhilton911 @hot- ly circulated essays
,ome mail.com. sharply critical of the
able Allow 4-6 weeks for medical and political
t to delivery Also consider this establishment. His words
title's companion text, The have been published by
1 or People's Cookbook: USA Today, The Miami
an Healthy Mediterranean Herald, The Associated
der- Recipes on a Budget, also Press, The Washington
o m $24.95 for the CD version. Times, The Australian,
see He has worked as a and The Sydney Morning
c. 14 paramedic, including afew Herald to name just a few.
t the years serving in Jefferson He has also earned
County, a medical educa- two black belts in karate,

Across America


eter-
;ker,
WI,
y to
the
can
alk-
ross
a'to
his
rans
nue

ross
the


Duval' County War
Memorial in Jacksonville,
FL, and will take
Hunsucker through eight
states, ending at the
Balboa Park War
Memorial in San Diego,
CA.-
A pace -car, fully
decked with patriotic
memorabilia and remem-
brance of the wars, will
follow him during the trip.

Hunsucker will visit
veteran medical centers
and outpatient clinics
along the way; interview-


.- -- --

MEET -OUR DOCTORS

MEET -OuR DOCTORS


FREE SEMINAR
on DECEMBER 1
at 7:00pm
Drs. Louis Potyondy
E Peter Urban will
be performing an
informative seminar
at Nature Coast ECI.


On Tuesday, December 1st Nature Coast EyeCare Institute
is hosting a FREE informative event you won't want to miss.
Both Drs. Louis Potyondy and Peter Urban will be on hand to
discuss the latest advances in medicine and how they may
improve your lifestyle.
Dr. Potyondy is a board certified plastic surgeon with extensive
plastic surgery skills. His articles have been published in Journal
of Burn Research, Aesthetic Surgery Journal,The American Surgeon
as well is The Chronicle of Skin and Allergy.
Dr. Urban is a highly experienced ophthalmic clinician and surgeon.
He is a pioneer in modern cataract and refractive surgery and is
happy to join the world class team at Nature Coast. Dr. Urban will
be working alongside Dr. Gary Wortz.

ATTEND THE SEMINAR AND RECEIVE:
i$C|OFF PLASTIC SURGERY
.v'-; .:.O0'OFF PER EYE
L' ; .-ASIK PROCEDURE
OR
*. : d' :'.S O OFF PER EYE FOR
S ,.'i'CUSTOM-VUE LASIK!
(NORMAL LASIK PRICE IS $1500 PER EYE
CUSTOM-VUE LASIK IS NORMALLY $2000 PER EYE.)

OUR AREA OF SPECIALTIES
* FACIAL COSMETIC SURGERY FACIAL REJUVENATION
* BODY CONTOURING BREAST SURGERY GENERAL RECONSTRUCTION
" DERMATOLOGIC SURGERY SKIN CARE MEDICAL SPA
* CATARACT SURGERY HIGH PERFORMANCE/MULTI-FOCAL LENSES
* LASIK Loser Vision Correction GLAUCOMA LASER SURGERY
" OPTICAL SHOP WELL EYE EXAMS







NATURE COAST
EyeCare Institute


ing disabled veterans, doc
tors, nurses, family mem
bers, and the public.
He passed through
Monticello on Tuesday
Nov. 17 on Highway 19.
The Walk Across
America team is. com-
prised of Hunsucker and
one Internet support
member. Drivers of this
vehicle are various volun-
teers who have stepped up
to lend support through-
out the journey.
The Walk Across
America team goal is that
every family donate one
dollar. All donations will
benefit the DAV To donate,
visit www.vetwalking.org
Disabled
American Veterans, is a
non-profit organization
founded in 1920 and char-
tered by the United States
Congress in 1932. It repre-
sents this nation's dis-
abled veterans. And, is
dedicated to a single pur-
pose: building better lives
for our nation's disabled
veterans and their fami-
lies.
For more information
about this mission contact
Hunsucker at 920-562-4250
or vetwalk-
ing@vetwalking.org.


HomeCare
,DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
In recognition of
those people who bring
healing 'and comfort to
the homefront, Archbold
Health Services joins
agencies nationwide in
celebrating National
HomeCare and National
Hospice Month. The
development of modern
day homecare focuses on
the values of keeping
families together in times
of illness while maintain-
ing the delicate, therapeu-
tic environment of the
home. These values are
among the most powerful
forces of healing and
comfort.
The month-long cele-
bration pays tribute to the
dedicated homecare pro-
fessionals and volunteers
who enable elderly, dis-


555 North Byron Butler Parkway Perry, FL 32347
(850) 584-2778 ext. 647 www.naturecoasteye.com

It PAail[NW Ul OANY OmiER't f SON ONI BLF FOfR PAMENT HAS TIll Ii;1 iH R[FI ItM PA ian(l (AN(f lM I I4l iRi i[llMU IJ tnin :1W' ANY UitIr
iRvfia B.AMuNlul OR IlAIMINI WIh( IS l PIRIOMO A A REULARi u A0D WilH IN H mOIUkR OF RhPONDINb FiJ IHDE AOVIRID IM EI FOR [ii
FREn, DISI(OIjiTD Fi OR IO(REDUD ffEliVSE dMIINAIOii, 0R IIIIMME PURSUAI 10 SIUnlOi 41 1511i FlORIDA SlAnM


7*
,K-


James P. Hilton


is an Eagle Scout, was
awarded hon-
orary membership in the
Natural Health Society of


Australia and is a past
member of the National
Association of EMS
Educators.


LEutritional atieJ

of Cranberries
3 Cranberries become 12-ounce bags in
available fresh every most supermarkets.
fall and hold many bene- Canned cranberry
ficial nutrients, sauce, strained and jel-
They are high in lied or whole-berry, is
fiber, have 25 calories available year round, as
per hilf cup (fresh) and are frozen and dried
provide' Vitamins C. A cranberries in some
and B:," 'Additionally, markets.
they contain calcium, Sweetened dried
phosphorus and iron. cranberries can be used
Furthermore, cranber- like raisins in baked
ries are i great source of goods or as wholesome
antloxidachts. snacks. They can also-
Cranberries are one be used in salads, main
of the few fruits native dishes and desserts.
to North America, and According to the
'are extensively cultivat- Cranberry Institute,
ed in Irrigated'bogs is fresh cranberries
Massachusetts, should be bright, red.
Wisconsin, and Oregon. pkump. hard and shiny.
Unlike other berries, Avoid shriveled, soft,
they are not highly per- spongy or browned
ishable, 'and keep well fruits, which may pro-
for long periods of time. duce an off-flavor.
It is believed that Cranberries will keep
Pilgrims dined on cran- up to two months refrig-
berry dishes at the first erated or can be frozen
Thanksgiving feast in for up to a year.
1621; however, well Fresh cranberries
known cranberry sauce can be found in grocery
did not become a part of stores from mid-
Thanksgiving tradition September through
until the 1800's. December, most plenti-
In the fall. fresh ful in the months of
cranberries are sold in October and November.


Showcased In November
Showcased In November


abled, and chronically ill
individuals to live their
lives where they want to
most... in their homes.
Modern technology
has developed to the point
where virtually anything
that is available in a hos-
pital can be provided at
home. Many procedures
and treatments previous-
ly provided only in acute-
care facilities have been
successfully adapted for
delivery in the home.
Homecare philosophy
embodies the desire to
preserve the dignity and
independence of people
and to speed rehabilita-
tion by allowing patients
to remain at home.
Hospice and pallia-
tive care philosophy pro-
mote end of life care in
the patient's home envi-
ronment surrounded by
the people they love. It
embraces enjoying the
life one has left to live and
ensures this is done with
care, comfort, compas-
sion, and dignity
Employing over 90
nurses, aides, social work-
ers, rehab therapists, res-
piratory therapists, phar-
macists, and other care
providers, Archbold
Health Services offers
comprehensive homecare
from the most basic assis-


tance with daily living to
sophisticated high-tech
medical treatment.
Thousands of patients
are served throughout
south to southwest
Georgia and in three
north Florida counties.
Services include
nursing care, physical
therapy, occupational
therapy, speech-language
pathology, medical social
services, aide services,
spiritual and bereave-
ment counseling, and res-
piratory therapy services.
In conjunction with home
health and hospice servic-
es, pharmacy services are
offered through Archbold
High Tech Pharmacy, con-
sisting of IV therapy,
chemotherapy, nutrition-
al support, insulin
pumps, and respiratory
medications. Home med-
ical equipment and respi-
ratory equipment are
offered through the
HomeCare store.
Archbold Health
Services includes
Archbold Home Health,
Archbold HomeCare,
Archbold High Tech
Pharmacy, and Hospice of
Southwest Georgia. For
more information about
Archbold Health
Services, call 229-228-2200
or 800-762-0354.


7- **--.-7. .sdnliS illin '


vi eyvni y, J^, b








Wednesday, November 25, 2009


SHOP TILL YOU DROP'


Black Friday is a
term for the Friday
after Thanksgiving
in the -United States,
which is the begin-
ning of the tradi-
tional Christmas
shopping season.
The term dates back
to at least 1966.
Because
Thanksgiving falls
on the fourth
Thursday : in
November in the
United States, Black
Friday occurs
between the 23rd and
the 29th of
November.
Black Friday is
not an official holi-
day, but many
employees have the
day off (with the
exceptions of those
employed in retail-
ing and banking),
which increases the
number of potential
shoppers. Retailers
often decorate for
the Christmas and
holiday season'
weeks beforehand.
Many retailers open
extremely early, with
most of the retailers
typically opening at
5AM or even earlier.
Some of the larger
retailers (depending
on the location) such
as Sears, Best Buy,
i -


Macys and Walmart
have been reported
to open as early as
midnight on the
start of Black Friday
in localized areas.
and remain open for
24 hours throughout
the day until mid-
night the following
Saturday. Upon
opening, retailers
offer .doorbuster
deals and loss lead-
ers to draw people to
their stores.


Although Black
Friday, as the first
shopping day after
Thanksgiving, has
served as the unoffi-
cial beginning of the
Christmas season at
least since the start
of the modern
M a c y s
Thanksgiving Day
Parade in 1924, the
term "Black Friday"
has been traced back
only to the 1960s .
The term "Black


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Friday" originated
in Philadelphia in
reference to the
heavy traffic on that
day. More recently,
merchants and the
media have used it
instead to refer to
the beginning of the
period in which
retailers go from
being in the red (i.e.,
posting a loss on the
books) to being in
the black (i.e., turn-
ing a profit).


T' I' t
11 -1J1 -
THF )


ehlrigtlfa% arol
on Friday, December 4th
from 6:00 p.m. til 8:00 p.m.
at
The Monticello News
Hot Chocolate & other items will be for sale.
Sponsorship by




To benefit the
Jefferson County Humane Society


DISCOUNT


AD SALE!


PLACE A3N

A~l FOR


25% OFF

t '. "CE!


Sefferson 1 oufnalC
ONT CE LL EYSTONE COUNTY

.M ONTICELLO NEWS


9


II. ....-
111 1 I rrI


M 'w r ii i| r iI'i |v1


180 West Washington St.
Downtown Monticello

997-3568
www.ecbpublishing.com


-- -------- -- ---- ----- ------------------ ------


--- ----------- -- --- -------


www. ecbpublishing. comr


Monticello News 9A


I


5-c~-

,,


I










10A Monticello News


www. ecbpublishing. com


Wednesday, November 25, 2009


HURCH


325 West Washington Street
Monticello* 997-2349.
Dr. Rick Kelley, Pastor .'. .


Sunday School...... 9:45 AM
Sunday Morning Worship.........11:oo AM
Sunday Evening Worship...........6:00 PM
Wednesday Bible Study..............6:30 PM
Children's Church Ages 4-6....11:30 AM
-Nursery for all services-


FI I

CR 149- 7 miles North of US 191 mile South of FL/GA Line
Boston, Monticello Road
850-997-1596
PastorHaroldReams

Sunday Bible Study 10:ooAM
Sunday Worship 1:oo AM
Sunday Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Bible & Prayer Meeting 7:00 PM




14492 Waukeenah Hwy/ P.O. Box 411
Wacissa 997-2179 or 997-1769
Pastor James Gamble
Sunday School.............................9:45 AM
Sunday Morning 10:55 AM
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting............................6:30 PM
Youth Group 6:00 PM
Choir Practice............................... 7:30 PM





7150 Apalachee Pkwy Tallahassee
www.chbaptistchurch.org
Pastor Derrick Burrus 850-345-0425
Youth Pastor Ron Thrash 850-459-6490
Sunday School...........................:oo AM
Sunday Worship. .11:oo AM
Children's Chapel........................11:oo AM
Sunday Evening........................6:oo PM
Wednesday Evening....................7:00 PM
Prayer Meeting and Bible Study
Classes for Students




325 W. Walnut Street Monticello
Pastor Wayne Cook
Sunday Praise & Worship...........8:30 AM
Sunday School..........................9:45 AM
Traditional Worship...................11:oo PM
Youth Group................................5:30 PM
Wednesday
Bible Study................................... 4:15 PM
Music Academy...........................5:00 PM
Prayer Group...............................5:30 PM
Fellowship Meal......................6:00 PM





425 Cherry Street Monticello 997-4116
Father Mal Jopling
Sunday Morning....................... 8:30 AM
Sunday Service...........................11:oo AM




1565 East Washington Street
Monticello 973-2428
(One mile east of the Court House on US 90)
Fr. Viet Tan Huynh
Sunday Mass.............................11:oo AM
Wed. followed by Novena............7:00 AM
1st & 3rd Saturday
Spanish Mass................................ 7:00 PM




4124 Bassett Dairy Rd Monticello 997-8444
Email: ebcmonticello@hcsmail.com
Dr Dean Spivey, Pastor
Student Pastor, Don Self
Sunday: Bible Study.....................9:45 AM
Worship Service..........................11:oo AM
Choir Practice...............................6:00 PM
Worship Service...........................7:00 PM
Wednesday
Children/Student Ministry...........3:30 PM
Senior Adult Choir Practice...........7:oo PM
RA's, GA's, Mission Friends & Youth.6:3o PM
Bible Study/Prayer Meeting...........6:oo PM




625 Tindell Road Aucilla 997-2081
P.O. Box 163 Monticello
Pastor DarylAdams 850-251-0129
Sunday School.... ...... ..........9:45 AM
Sunday Worship Service............11:oo AM
Choir Practice..... ....... ........... 5:oo PM
Worship Service.......................6:00 PM
Wednesday
Fellowship Meal........................6:30 PM
Prayer Meeting/Bible Study........7:00 PM


Rev. John Jones,
pastor
First Corinthian Church
Greetings in the
name of our Lord and
Savior Jesus Christ. This
message is taken from
chapter 32 of the book of
Jeremiah; a major
prophetic book of the Old
Testament directed to the
southern kingdom of
Judea just before that na-
tion fell to thee Babyloni-
ans. The book was named
for its author and central
personality the great
prophet Jeremiah, who
faithfully delivered God's
message of judgment in
spite of fierce opposition
from his countrymen.
The book was written
approximately 590 BC,
the first 15 verses tell of
Jeremiah's imprison-
ment.
Receiving an inspira-
tion word from the Lord.
Jeremiah's persecution,


instructed him to buy a
field, for an inheritance,
and promise of restora-
tion. Is there anything too
hard for God. Verses
16-24: Jeremiah's
prayerfulness
acknowledg-
ing God as
creator of
the heaven
and earth,
God's power,
His divine
arm and -om-
nipotence, His
loving kindness,
God's greatness, God's
ways known, wonders of
God, a Devine leader, God
promises the Promised
land and a fruitful land.
What an awesome de-
scription given of the
almighty God by the man
of God Jeremiah.
Jeremiah also proph-
esied the penalty for dis-
obedience and sinful
walk. Reaping what's


oeaOusy uhnd P2ivy

Fr. Viet Tan
Huynh
St. Margaret
Church, Pastor
Jealousy and
envy are poison-
ous to the soul.
They infect the
mind and wear
down the spirit.
They turn the
good that we be-
lieve we are doing
into the means of
destruction, and
can be the cause of
death.
Thinking the
grace of God is
limited only to a
special group of peo-
ple, will destroy our Fr. Viet Tan Huynh
connection to our
God. We create division, hatred, misunderstanding,
violence, and injustice, which bring turmoil, suffer-
ing, and pain to the innocent and helpless children,
orphans, the neglected, and abandoned.
What Jesus wants us to do, is to embrace every-
one. "For whoever is not against us, is for us. (Mk
9:40) Not only should we embrace them, but also love
them, and help them in whatever way we can, to
make their lives easier on the journey to the kingdom
of God.
"Anyone who gives you a cup of water to drink in
my name, because you belong to Christ, I say to you,
will surely not lose his reward." (Mk 9:41) Everyone
belongs to Christ, even the most sinful.


US 19 N 1590 N. Jefferson Street
Rev. Timothy Hildreth 997-3906
1285 Magnolia Ave.
Debra@monticellonaz@gmail.com

Sunday School.................................. 9:45 AM
Morning Worship ..........................10:45 AM
Wednesday Evening
Supper 5:30 PM
Small Group Breakout.....................6:30 PM
Bible Study & Prayer Meeting............6:30 PM
Saturday
Spanish Church Services...................7:30 PM




415 E Pamer Mi Rd Montice o 997-1119


newhope415@yahoo
Paster Ray and Angel Hill
Sunday School...........................10:oo AM
Sunday Worship.......................11:oo AM
Sunday Prayer...........................6:00 PM
Wed. Family Training Hour........7:oo PM




780 Second Street Monticello 997-4947
Moderator J.B. Duval, Pastor
Worship Services 2nd and 4th Sundays
Sunday School (every Sunday)....9:30 AM
Sunday Worship........................11:oo AM
Children's Worship....................11:oo AM
Wednesday
Fellowship Meal..........................6:30 PM
Prayer Meeting/Bible Study.......7:00 PM


sown. and sin's misery
God's word is sure. He
gave divine direction and'
inspiration.
Is there anything
too hard for
God.
Verse 27:
God -asks
the ques-
tion, Is
there any-
thing too
hard for me?
That's the
message. The
same God that was
with Jeremiah and the
captives is still the same
God today In the midst of
trials, struggles, difficul-
ties, and etc. He will do
today as promised the
great prophet Jeremiah,
in our present time, We
must stop seeking the an-
swers from the world
which comes from the
world. Fall down on our
faces and cry out to the


Lord, acknowledge Him,
who is the beginning and
ending. The One that
holds time and eternity
Who spoke it and it came
to past.
We can't solve the is-
sues of the world but God
can because He is the au-
thor and finisher of our
faith. We must speak and
back the birth. Put on the
whole armor of God.
Stay prayed up for He is a
very present help in time
of trouble.
Of course seek His
face daily because this
journey isn't smooth.
Ups and downs through
it all you will overcome,
it is a promise. It shall
come to pass. Practice
what you preach and live
if. Stay focused on the
Lord. Prayer changes
things.
Is there anything too
hard for God. Bless be
the name of the Lord.


ANCIENT WISDOM FOR
MODERN LIFE






JTH

"fjj li TT^T


,V By faith Abraham,
when he was called to go out
into a place which he should after receive for
an inheritance, obeyed; and he went out,
not knowing whither he went.
Hebrews 11:8 (KJV)

Fear the unknown? YoU're not alone. Most of us
don't like going into something we don't know, but
that is what God asks us to do when we walk with
Him. We can't see or hear God, but He is there. All
we have to do is believe in Him and accept Jesus as
our Savior, and eternal life will be ours.



Fortress Singing Group


At Lamont Baptist
DEBBIE SNAPP times on this day.
Monticello News Music, Spirit,
Staff Writer Food!
The Lamont Baptist The church is
Church Fifth Sunday located at 121
Sing will feature River Road in
"Fortress" at 11 a.m. on Lamont. For
Nov. 29 in the sanctuary more informa-
This group is a musical tion call 997-
sensation according 2497.
those who have been
blessed to witness with
them.
A covered dish din-
ner will follow the sing.
Come and get fed three



124 St. Louis Street Lloyd 997-5309
www.fbclloyd.com
Pastor George L. Smith
Sunday
Sunday School............................9:15 AM
Praise & Worship.....................10:30 AM
AW ANA..................................... 5:00 PM
Youth Encounter..........................5:30 PM
Praise & Worship........................6:00 PM
Adult Choir................................. 7:00 PM
Wednesday
Church-wide Supper..................5:45 PM
Worship Meeting.........................7:00 PM
Joyful Sounds Children's Choir...7:oo PM
College / Career Celebration......7:30 PM
1st & 3rd Monday
WMU Mighty Monday..................6:30 PM
2nd Thursday
W.W Diners............................ 5:30 PM
3rd Thursday
Lloyd Silver Saints......................11:30 AM
3rd Saturday
Brotherhood.............................. 8:00 AM


Is There Anything Too Hard For God


v


- 77/ -7










Wednesday, November 25, 2009


www. ecbpublishing. com


Monticello News 11A


,HURCH


Church Calendar


November 27
Community Skate Night
6 to 8 p.m. last Friday of month
Church of the Nazarene
Free, bring skates or borrow from
Roller Club
997-3906

November 28
Fourth Saturday Gospel Sing
7 p.m.
Lamont United Methodist Church
Fellowship and refreshments after
997-2527

.November 29
Alternative Gift Market
12 to 4 p.m. Sunday
Choose from 12 local and international
organizations
First United Methodist Church
997-3571

November 29
First Corinthians Church Worship Service
Under the Tent
11 a.m. every Sunday
8:30 a.m. service on second and third Sunday
Corner lot at First and Lemon streets,
Monticello
Rev. John Jones, pastor, 445-0076

December 3
Business Community Prayer Breakfast
7 a.m. first Thursday Church
Speaker Gary Wright, 997-5705 or 933-5567

December 7
Prayer for our Country and Leaders


12 p.m. first Monday
First United Methodist Church, Monticello
Walnut Street entrance
997-5545

December 14
Missionary Society
5:30 p.m. Monday after the second Sunday
Greater Fellowship MBC
997-4742

December 16
Alzheimer's and Dementia Support
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., third Wednesday
FUMC Family Ministry Center
Free program and light lunch
514-2778 or 997-5545

December 18-19
Second Harvest Food Program
6:30 p.m. Friday to bag food packages
8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Saturday distribution
New Bethel AME Church
997-5605

.December 21
JOY Club
6 p.m. third Monday
Lamont Baptist Church
Just Older Youth
Enjoying Christian fellowship
997-4006

December 22
Triple L Club (LLL)
10:30 a.m. on the fourth Tuesday
First Baptist Church Monticello
Program speaker and potluck lunch
Ethel Strickland, 509-9445


* L i J ANCIENT WISDOM FOR

SB V MODERN LIFE



SBy Vivian Miles
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Like as father
pitieth his children,
so the LORD pitieth them that fear
him.
Psalm 103:13 (KJ\)

In a world wracked with conflict and disease, we
may feel silly taking our personal problems to God.
Why should we burden Him when He clearly has so
much more on His plate? Why because He loves us,
listens to our every prayer and forever
stands ready to help. f




1599 Springhollow Road Monticello
Pastor Marvin Graham
Sunday Discipleship Class...........9:30 AM
Sunday Worship ....... ..............10:30 AM
Wednesday Bible Study................7:00 PM
Wed. Young Peonle Bible Study..7:oo PM
Wed. Counseling..........5:30 PM-8:30 PM
New Life Ministry
Tuesday Bible Study.....................7:00 PM
Sunday Worship...........2:oo PM-4:oo PM
Thurs. Jail Ministry.....7:oo PM-9:oo PM
AA Tuesday..................................8:00 PM


INDIANSPRIN
^^^SAPTST CHURCHfli


5593 Veterans Memorial Drive (Hwy 59)
Tallahassee 850-893-5296
www.indianspringsbaptistchurch.com
Rev. Greg Roberts
Sunday School.............................9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 11:oo AM
Children's Worship.. 11:oo AM
Wednesday
Fellowship Meal..........................7:00 PM
Prayer Meeting ..7:45 PM


Hwy 27 South (1 mile south of Hwy 59)
Monticello 997-4226
Rev. J. W. Tisdale
Sunday Morning.........................:30 AM
Sunday Worship.......................11:oo AM
Wednesday
Prayer & Bible...... 7:oo PM


285 Magnolia St Monticello 997-2165
www.cbcflorida.org
Dr. David E. Walker, Pastor
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Morning 11:oo AM
Sunday Evening...........................6:30 PM
Wednesday Evening....................7:00 PM
Wed. TRAC Club for teens...........7:oo PM



3862 Tram Rd. Monticello 997-6774
Pastors Donnie and Nancy Thomas
Sunday School...................:.....0:00 AM
Sunday Morning Worship.........11:oo AM
Sunday Evening Worship...........6:oo PM
Wednesday Worship.................7:oo PM



Highway 259 Monticello 997-5018
Min. Tobbie Berrian III, Pastor
Sunday School.............................9:30 AM
Sunday Morning Worship.......11:oo AM
Wednesday Bible Study..............7:30 PM



7337A Old Lloyd Road Lloyd 997-TLC7 (8527)
Pastors Tim and Beverly Buchholtz
www.TransformingLifeChurch.com


Sunday 10:30 AM
Sunday Morning Praise and Worship
Children's Church
infants & Toddler Nursery
Wednesday 7:o0 PM
Adult Life Groups
Fire Wire Youth (6th-12th Grade)
Young Explorers Children (k-5th Grade)
Infants & Toddlers Nursery



446 Hatchett Road Lamont
997-4124 or 997-6135
Pastor Andy Creel
Sunday School...........................10:oo AM
Sunday Worship........................11:oo AM
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting & Choir Practice...7:oo PM



1287 South Jefferson Street 997-RGCC (7422)
www.restoredglory.org
Sunday Radio Show 8 a.m. 97.9 FM
Pastor Eddie and Elder Veronica Yon
Sunday Church Service........:....0:oo AM
Thursday Church Service............7:00 PM

L I S H
121 River Rd (Beside Hwy 19-27 E) Lamont
P.O. Box 188 997-6870
Pastor Rev. Charles F. Johnson

Sunday School 10:00 AM
Sunday Worship 11:oo AM
Nursery/ Children's Church each Sunday
Sunday Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Choir Practice/ Prayer Meeting/ Bible Study
7:00 PM
Monthly Fellowship Meal
Wednesday after 2nd Sunday..............6:oo PM
3rd Monday
JOY Club (Just Older Youth)
for anyone 50 Years or Older................6:ooPM

' EENAH UNITED METHODIST
81 Methodist Church Rd Waukeenah 997-2171
Pastor Ralph L. Wrightstone
Sunday School............................. 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship.........................11:oo AM
Youth Group................................7:00 PM
Tuesday
Overeaters Anonymous ...........7:00 PM
Wednesday
Choir Practice..............................7:00 PM
Youth Group..................................7:00 PM
Family Fellowship
2nd Thursday of each month
Thrift Store open second Saturday
of every month 8:00 AM-i:oo PM
Every Monday AA Meets..............7:00 PM


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0
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Wednesday, November 25, 2009


1.2A Monticello News


Football season is slating and have we got a contest for you! Each week we
wi post the games that wi be played and the ihlidual who makes the most
accurate predicons regarding the winner of each game will win the
following prizes: First Place will win a $20.00 check from The
Monticello News or a one year subscription. The Second Place
winner will receive 2 movie passes or a 6 month subscription
absolutely FREEI

Rules of Play
1. Write down vhich teams you think will be the winners on the entry form.
2. Submit the entry form to the newspaper no later than 5 p.m. each Friday.
3. Only one entry per week is allowed per contestant.
4. In case of a tie, the tie-breaker will be used to determine the winner.
5. The contest is open to anyone age 18 and older, except for newspaper employees and their
families.
6. The decision of the judges is final.
7. Winner will be contacted by phone and announced in the newspaper on Wednesday of each J


Steve Walker
Realty, LLC
5(0 S. Jefferson St.
Monticello
SV \ s \%\.Sie\ eWalkerRalty.com
997-4061

1.JCHS vs.
Hawthorne


& SPARKMAN
4/&atufeyd. alt as 'w
165 E. Dogwood St
Monticello
997-3503


2. FSU vs.
Florida Gators


/


1^*


/



ilC I


S1-10 CHEVRON




5185 S. Jefferson St Monticello
997-1965 ,
3. South Florida vs.




& HARDEE, P.A.
I Personal Injury &
SWrongful Death
1307 S. Jefferson Street
Monticello
850-997-8181 /
4. Georgia vs.
5 EGeorgia Tech


/


" g


SELECT
S ..... -'. ,GENT ...................
State Farm* "
Providing Insurance and Financial Service:
Home Office. Bloomington, Illinois 61710
Tommy Surles Ins Agcy I
Tommy Surles, Agent
225 N Jefferson Street
Monticello. FL 32344-1819
Bus 850 997 8282 Fax 850 997 2884
tommy.surles.bw9i@statefarm.com
9. Tampa Bay vs.
Atlanta Falcons


COLLISION
S* Collision Windows
Brakes A/C Repair
Wheels & Lift Kits
Tires
765 E. Washington St. Monticello
& 5 997-1500


1546 N. Jefferson St Monticello
997-0285 /
5. Kentucky vs.
Tennessee



UIU I


Contest Form ,
I I
Name:
I Address:
I Phone:


/


' 8. Miami Dolphins
S s s. Buffalo


nc


PO Box 428
180 W. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32345
850-997-3568
10. Indianapolis Colts
vs. Houston Texans


SWinning Teams
I 1
1 2.
I 3. I

I I
4.
.5. I
S6.
S7.

9. I


10. I
TIE BREAKER: (exact score of belov game)
| FSU vs Florida Gators
WINNERS: Week of Nov 18 Nov 25
FIRST PLACE Melvin Richardson
SECOND PLACE Anthony Ruehle
I== =mm i =m am =mm D m = ====


week.


www. ecbpublishing. com


S


BIRD










Wednesday, November 25, 2009


www. ecbpublishing. corn


Monticello News 13A


PORTS


TIGERS END REGULAR SEASON 5


-5


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Tigers, a 1B
team, lost their final
game of the regular
season, 42-12, to the
Madison Cowboys, a
2A team, among a
dense crowd of spec-
tators on both sides of
the field.
The stands on
both sides of the field
were packed to capac-
ity with cheering
fans, including the
coaches and varsity
football players from
Aucilla Christian
Academy, cheering
the Tigers on, people
were shoulder to
shoulder around the
field fences, as the
arena was bulging at
the seams, and fans
were still arriving to
a packed parking area
at halftime.
"Madison is 2A
and we are 1B, which
means they are a big-
ger school than we
are," said Assistant
Head Football Coach
Cameron Duke. "It
was great playing
them. They have an
excellent established
program over there
and we look at it with
a lot of respect. They
beat us but we got bet-
ter by playing them.
"It was great see-
ing ACA there and
having their sup-,
Wifi -. i.. ,,, ..- ,. ..* . .


Thursday


Q What's going on
this weekend?

A: Check out the movie
listings and local events.


Your source for
everything local







Sp CELLO

PO Box 428
180 W. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32345
850-997-3568


Monticello News photo by Fran Hunt November 13, 2009
For the first time in ten years, the Jefferson County Tigers and the Madison County Cowboys faced
off on the field, Nov. 13.


port," he said. "We
really appreciated it
and look forward to
continuing to support
one another. It was a
great atmosphere
here against Madison
and we hope to have
the same in our first
round playoff game
against Mayo."
The Warriors will
continue their sup-
port of the Tigers
during that first
round of the Regional
play-offs. "Most of
them (Warriors) will
be there this week
too," said ACA Head


Monticello News photo by Fran Hunt November 13, 2009
In a brotherly show of support, coaches and play-
ers from the Aucilla Christian Academy varsity
Warriors attended the game Nov. 13 and stood on
their feet throughout the game. They also plan to
attend the first round of the regional playoffs to cheer
the Tigers on.


Football Coach Scott
Scharinger. "As a mat-
ter of fact, I will actu-
ally be spending the
day with Coach
Spears and his team,
and be on the sideline
with him as well."
Prior to the begin-
ning of the game, the
Jefferson announcer
said this was the first
time in ten years that
the two teams had
faced off and that
Madison was going
into the game ranked
at the #1 team in the
state and Jefferson
was going into the


Iq( tl(O A?,Vq


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
In match #10 of
the North
Florida/South
Georgia women's A-
league tennis teams,
the Monticello
Blabalots split points
last week, 3-3 with the
Glen Arvin Classics,

ACA VB

Basketball

Roster
FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Aucilla Christian
Academy Head Varsity
Boys Basketball Coach
Dan Nennstiel has
determined the roster
for the 2009-2010 team.
Warriors include
seniors; Alex Dunkle,
Matthew Harrington,
Joe Mizell, and John
Stevens; juniors, Clark
Christy and Brandon
Darnell; sophomores
Spencer DePaola and
Josh Funderburke; and
freshmen Jay
Finlayson and Todd
McKenzie.


to remain in second
place in the league for
the second week in a
row.
Team #1, Katie
Brock and Susan
Goodwin, lost the sets,
6-3 and 6-3.
Team #2, Cindy
Wainright and Angle
Delvecchio, won the
first match, 7-5, lost
the second, 4-6, and
lost the tiebreaker, 6-3.
Team #3, Laura
Ward' and Laura
Kirchhoff, lost the
first set, 4-6, won the
second, 6-4, and lost
the tiebreaker, 6-4.
Team #4, Valorie


Stevens and Patty
Hardy, won the sets, 6-
1 and 7-5.
Team #5, Mary
Bridges and Jennifer
Ellis, won the sets, 6-3
and 6-0.
Team #6, Linsey
Taylor and Maxie
Miller, won by forfeit.
Following the con-
clusion of the tenth
round of matches, the
team standings were
as follows: Bainbridge
Different Strokes, 1st
with 40; Monticello
Blabalots, 2nd with 38;
Ace Kickers, 3rd with
36; Serve Me Another,


%aII I !
HWU 14 5.* Maisonl 32340M *Phone 850 73 1l 4172 fn IiO-i l
Industrial and Commercial Handlers



IfflilflfligenoLND1EfllrJYIr EL13Yi1inm ITu

Competitive uad Honst Priclng


SJrJJ3 J Jf J- .

1309 E. JACKSON ST. AND
THOMASVILLE, GA 31792 M !


4th with 35; Ace
Kickers, 5th with 36;
Glen Arvin Classics,
6th with 33 1%;
Thomasville Ace-N-U
and Glen Arvin Dirty


game as the #10
ranked team in the
state.
The Cowboys com-
manded the first
quarter, scoring 7 and
holding the Tigers to
,zero, and Madison
scored another 2
touchdowns in the
second, while holding
Jefferson to 6 and
ending the first half
with the Tigers at a
28-6 deficit. The
Tigers failed to score
in the third, with
Madison bringing in
another 7 for a 35-6
lead.
Jefferson scored 6
in the fourth, com-
pared to the Cowboy's
7, ending the game
with a 42-12 loss for
the Tigers.
Freshman quar-
terback Lenorris
Footman completed 7
of 18 attempted pass-
es for 57 yards and
one pass interception.
He ended the regular
season with 2,002
passing yards.
David Crumity
had 4 pass receptions
for 39 yards and 1
touchdown and
Marquice Dobson had
3 receptions for 20
yards.
In rushing,
Devondrick Nealy
had 19 carries for 121
yards and 1 touch-
down.







Dozen, tied for 7th
with 33; MatchPoints,
8th with 32; Capital
City Aces, 9th with 30;
and Killearn Lucky
Charms, 10th with 26.


- ,'Sc-~Q 9 ,*0 Home
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S 166 E. Dogwood
Monticello
0 850-997-3553
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I I. I*


14A Monticello News wrVi.cWt wi./inq.cm Wednesday, November 25, 2009



The Classifieds...

measuring up to your expectations one ad at a time.


Australian Wester
brand new with tag
comes with blanket
dies, two breastplai
tom made), and sac
Call 850-545-5764

BOOK
The Wacissa Ri
Annie Lou Giles,
for purchase at 12
Road, Monticello
997-0631 to sched
up. Cost is $18;
$23.
11/25,


*n saddle; Commercial/ Industrial
as on it; Property with state highway
, two bri- frontage. Comer lots. Fronts
both Harvey Greene Dr. and
tes (one cus- Highway 53 South. Enterprise
ddle stand. Zone, Natural gas line, 8 inch
water main, access to city
10/21,rtn,nc. utilities, fire hydrant, and service
from two power companies.
S Property has easy access to I-10,
via SR 53 & SR 14. Will build
verman, by to suit tenant for short or long
is available term lease. Call Tommy Greene
306 Gamble 850-973-4141


SCall 850-
ule for pick-
mailing cosi

12/2, 12/9,c


Hay

For Sale

in

Monticello

229-403-4032





NC MOUNTAIN VIEW
3BR/ 1 BA, Home for sale
reduced $129,000 or Monthly
rental $750 mo. + Deposit call
850-997-1582.


9/23,tfn,nc.



-a


Chickens 6 month old New
Jersey Original Black Giants.
4.00 each. 997-1582.
11/4,rtn,nc.

2 lambs, shetland, females, 6
months old. $55 each or $100
both. 997-5505.
11/20,25,c.


2/11, rtn, nc.
1BR/1BA APARTMENT.
Grove Apartments. 1400 N.
Jefferson M onticello M t u i h 1 9 M ra e
For Elderly 62+& Disabled Mitsubishi- 1994 Mirage, 2-
Forul de n O i 6 D d door, standard, $800. Firm 997-
(Equal Housing Opportunity) 0901 evenings.
850-997-5321.
6/24,tfn,c. Ford- 1987 Ranger, standard,


JEFFERSON PLACE APTS
1468 S. Waukeenah St. Office 300,
Monticello. 1 BR ($427) &-2BR
($465). HUD vouchers accepted, sub-
sidy available at times. 850-997-
6964. TTY711. This
institution is an equal
opportunity provider
and employer. |
7/22,tfn,c. .. .-.

3/br 2/bth House 925.00 month
+ security. 567-6451.
11/6-27,c.

Spacious 2 BR/ 1 BA Convenient in-
town location Washer/dryer. Low
utilities. 251-0760
Historic Home 4BR, 1.5 BA. Walk
to "everything". Many nice features.
997-2837


$800. Finn 997-0901 evenings.


ll/20,tfn,nc.


I NEED IRONING DONE!
Single man in Monticello area.
Please Call 305-393-2123.
11/20,25,pd.





MR. STUMP
STUMP GRINDING
509-8530 Quick Responses.
6/22,tfn.
Mihature Pony Rides-
For children parties or events.
Call for price and info.
850-210-3137


10/28 rtn,nc.


FISCAL OFFICER
Senior Citizens Council of Madison County Inc. is seeking
an individual with experience in Accounting and Bookkeeping.
Responsibilities includes: Payroll, expenditure reports, prepare
special accounting statements, budgets, budget revisions,
recording of receipts, inventory, regular meeting with person-
nel, monthly reporting, prepare federal and state tax reports,
backup data, medicaid waiver billing, reconciling, attend board
meetings, supervise CIRTS, supervision and orientation of new
employees.
This is a highly responsible position. High school diplo-
ma/GED, Bachelor's Degree with four to eight years experience
in accounting and completed a course in account-
ing/bookkeeping. Must have computer experience. Apply in
person with a resume. Address: Senior Citizens of Madison at
486 SW Rutledge Street of Madison, Florida 32340. Contact
number 850-973-2006.
10/9,tfn,c.


We fltwau4 Av tr e



BEST SCOOP


U S INC. STATEWIDECLASSIFIEDPROGRA


Coming: Luie country cottage. i-2
BR, I BA. Close to town. Peaceful,
private. 997-3430
11/4,rtn,c.


Guard dog, Border dog, Farm
dog. Guard property, kids, or
animals. Born 9/21/09 call
Wade 464-1352.

11/20,25,nc.




Plumbing, tile, yard work, debris
removal. No job too big or too
small. Free estimates. Call Kevin
850-210-3137.
10/16,rtn,nc.


GOING.
acessorit
J Remain

ero FOR SALE! oneoV
extras. Like new color TV' V-6 eng
note Cable/DVD readY. CD pla'
seat, Universal remote- extr
teor. Natural wood stand Awe
Ctil between 5 and 8,C
tee. inude555-00 Mu00 see




GOING.



GONE.

Have An Auction Without
Leaving Your Living Room
You'll find there's a buyer who's willing to take
or make your best offer for just about any-
thing you have to sell when you advertise in
the Classifieds. It's the best place to get the
best price for whatever you have to sell.
Rather than save it forever or store it away, let
someone get good use out of it while you
make some extra cash.
Call today...997-3568




PUBLISHING NC


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Pmotiacal maenal f den ipet pen p .se insurance cveage sut to pq te:ms
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PUBLIC AUCTION
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IMFS











Wednesday, November 25, 2009


www. ecbpublishing. com


Monticello News 15A


EGALS


IN THE CIRCLUiT COURT OF THE 'NDE JUDICIAL CIRCUIT .
IN AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 33-2008-C 1-000245
HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES INC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
IRA R WEST SR; STATE OF FLORIDA,
DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY;
SHAUN RENATE WEST; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
IRA R WEST, SR; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE AS
UNKNOWN TENANTS) IN POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Fin:l Judgment ol ,
Foreclosure dated the 10th day of November, 2000. .nd entered
in Case No. 33-2008-CA-000245, of the Circuit Court ol the
2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Jefferson Countr Flo.ird.
wherein HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES INC is the Pljinuitl
and IRA R WEST SR; STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT
OF REVENUE; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. DEPART
MENT OF TREASURY; SHAUN RENATE \\EST.
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF IRA R WEST, SR; JOHN DOE.
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANT (S) IN POSSESSION
OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants I "ill sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash at the NORTH DOOR OF
COURTHOUSE at the Jefferson County Courthoue in
Monticello, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 10th da- ot December
2009, the following described property as set for:h in said Final
Judgment, to wit:
EXHIBIT "A"
THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LOT, PIECE OR PAR-
CEL OF LAND, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN I E F FE R-
SON COUNTY, FLORIDA TO WIT:
LOTS 14 AND 15 OF BLOCK D, SECTION III -LSO
KNOWN AS UNIT 2) LLOYD ACRES (UNRECORDED.
TOGETHER WITH THE TIGHT OF INGRESS AND
EGRESS OVER THE ROADS DESCRIBED IN THE
UNRECORDED PLAT PREPARED BY BROW'ARD DA \IS
AND ASSOCIATES, INC. DESIGNATED JOB f 72 1:0-
DATED 11/1972, AND MORE PARTICLiL ARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
LOT 14
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF'
SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE -I EAST. JEF-
FERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE R LiN NORTH '
00 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST ALONG
THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION IS A Dis.
TANCE OF 2394.74 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH Sc
DEGREES 15 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 50:10 1 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 15 MIN.
UTES 17 SECONDS WEST 208.05 FEET; THENCE RUN ,
SOUTH 00 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 18 SECONDS F \'T
597.81 FEET TO THE NORTHERNLY RIGHT OF \\ x' OF
_DOVE LANE (A 60 FOOT ROADWAY), THENCE RLUN
SOUTH 78 DEUREES U3 MINUTES 53 SECONDS E.AS
ALONG THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID DO\ E
LANE 213.33 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH -1. DEGREES
45 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 644.50 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
LOT 15
COMMENCE THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SEC-
TION 18, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 4 EAST.I EFFE R- .
SON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE R N NORTH 00
DEGREES 39 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE
EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 18 A DIS TANCE OF
2394.74 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES is
MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 708.05 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGIN-
NING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 15 NlINULTES I
SECONDS WEST 208.05 FEET; THENCE RLN SOULITH 00
DEGREES 45 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 551 13 FEET
TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF DO \ E LANE I
60 FOOT ROADWAY); THENCE RUN SOLTH 'S
DEGREES 05 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE
NORTH RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID DOVE LANE 213 23
FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES -I5 MINLiTES
18 SECONDS WEST 597.81 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY. THE APN
IS SHOWN BY THE COUNTY ASSESSOR AS I-IN--IE.
0112-000D-0140; SOURCE OF TITLE IS BOOK 55c. P.\GE
533 ( RECORDED 01/26/05)
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER TH AN THE
PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PEN-
DENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DA'\ S -FTER
THE SALE.
In accordance with the Americans with Disjhilitie, \i ,Il
1990 (ADA), because of their disabilities, disjbk-d pcr,.,ni
who, need the ADA Coordinator at Room 10, Mb..I'. llnlI. FL
32344 or Telephone (904) 342-0218 prior to such prl.-ceding
special accommodation to participate in this proteedir ,.i h'.uld
contact
Dated this 10th day of November, 2009.


Submitted by: Law Office of Marshall C. Watson
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Kirk Ream0
Telephone: (954) 453-0365 Clerk Of Th: _C.r.:u.I C.-.u.il
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052 By: Sherry S....-r.
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 Deputy Clerl


11 l II1 c


en


1,250o Acres in 19 Tracts with 8 Tracts SellingAbsolute Hendon, TN
17 waterfront tracts on a private 80 acre lake 3 miles of
lake frontage Abundance of recreational opportunity Ideal
for building a second home or private retreat Located 1 hour
north of downtown Chattanooga
[Saturdaj, December 5 at 11:0 AM (CT)]



JP King Auction Company, Inc. 256-546-5217;Jerry Craig King, #1525; J P King Auction Company, Inc., #123,
Lanny G. Thomas #6296: J. P King Auction Company, Inc., #123.10% buyer's premium


I


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 09 74-PR
Division


IN RE: ESTATE OF
GERALD FREDERICK TAYLOR
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Gerald Frederick
Taylor, deceased, whose date of death was July 22, 2009, is
pending in the Circuit Court for Jefferson County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of which is Probate Division, 1
Courthouse Square, Monticello, Florida 32344. The names and
addresses of the personal representative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of
this notice is required to be served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of thie decedent and other persons hav-
ing claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PRO-
BATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOT WITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is day November
25, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Representative:
TIMOTHY J. WARFEL
Attorney for Angela King Taylor
Florida Bar No. 0398659
2015 Centre Pointe Boulevard Suite 105
Tallahassee, FL 32308
Telephone: (850) 942-1919 Personal Representative:
Fax: (850) 942-0313 ANGELA KING TAYLOR
Post Office Box 536
Monticello, Florida 32345

11/25,12/2/09,c.


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Contact Lion Debbie Snapp

997-3568







Offered in Tracts From 1 Acres to 415 Acres
Prime Lake Oconee Real Estate
SELLING ON SITE Greene County. GA
Friday -:- December 4 -:- 10:00 a.m.I-
1^ 800-323-8388 Il I
RF i Rowell Auctions, Inc. .Li
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~in







Wednesday, November 25, 2009


16A Monticello News


I',


)


* 6
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* Nb
* *
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* *

* *





Custom
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Additions
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