Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00283
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello, Fla
Publication Date: November 18, 2009
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00283
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text






















141st Year No. 47


'ICELLO

Wednesday, November 18, 2009


Send in your favorite
Thanksgiving recipes for publication... We
will feature local Thanksgiving Recipes in
our Friday, November 20th, newspaper.
S Send them to Monticello News, P.O. Box .;
i 428, Monticello, FL, 32345 or email them:' /
to monticellonews@embarqmail.com.
: Deadline for recipes is
Wednesday No\. 1S at 2 p.m.


LAZARO AL6IAN
SJiloniicello NJtews
; Senior Staft II riicr
Bob Cooper, manager of the Jefferson
Conmmunities Water System Inc. IJCWSi. re-
ported on Friday. Nov. 1.3. that phase 2 of the
expansion project is nearing completion.
*. Cooper said the contractor was expected
to complete installing the water pipes on
Bassett Dairy Road the same da.: and on -
SCooley Road soon after: Completion of the
Stwo roads would end the pipe installation
part of the project, he said He said that all
that remained to do afterw ards 'as fis
the contractor to put in the water taps.
test the system, and get the state ap-
Sproval to begin Lusinl the system He said it
w as the hope to have phase 2 completed and
in service by the end of Januar\:
Please See 'Water Page IA

mW-.I 6, ire is m tAimlniiiii im ` I A


Miller Takes Commission
LAZARO ALEMAN commission-
Monticello News ers briefly
Senior Staff Writer discussed
Firmly yet diplomat- the possibility buil
ically, C. P. Miller took of no longer exempting la builngs
latter were
the County Commission churches from the fire
#nd its chairman to task special assessment. worship
on Thursday, Nov. 5, for Miller objected to Wh
turned to ti
alleged inconsistency the proposal, saying unr
and arbitrariness in the commissioners should the lter
application of the rules be ashamed for even pro- to the discu
governing citizens' input posing to go there, at the iscu
during public meetings. which point Commis- that Miller
Miller's grievance sion Chairman Gene say and the
stemmed from a commis- Hall responded that in- not engage
bion workshop the previ- surance companies did- ments.
bus week, during which n't exempt church


Monticello Seeking $700,000


For Housing Rehabilitations


( Money Should Address.10 Units)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
Favorable conditions in
the availability of state and
federal funding for the cre-
ation and rehabilitation of
affordable housing projects
is inducing city officials to
seek a Community Develop-
1ment Block Grant (CDBG)
in the housing rehabilita-
tion category.
Citr oftfriialsl cal'- Den.
nsl Dinmiran th,:. eoahead
to applk for a 'a.;Il:10.Iii (CDBG
hous.in gianrl on Tiie'dait.
No.\. -, lollh:, ing the hIou:LI-
!in rehabilitation -_pc,. il
lt's preI-entatior, to the Cit
Couilncil Dinllgnlllt; i ia vi le
presldetit of Sutinii Pro.
[,'-'. ional Se I i. ianc, i." ,
ionumltant iitnll tiht ha.
pre:i'.,:s!\ s,:'tured CDBGL
cLrnt.s If:r the Cit\
Di)i1n i1an told rhlie o-i in.
cil mernbetl that changed
conidlitiOn in the- r'-qL[irl'
mni-t l, r i_ id tlih,- .: -.i% ;i hilit'


of additional funding made
it an opportune time for the
city to reapply for a CDBG
grant, even though its pre-
vious application had
scored low.
Among the changed
conditions that Dingman
cited:
The- federal govern-
ment .had increased its
funding for the Small Cities
CDBG Program as part its
economic [tiI.ilu._ plan
voin! fiom .$3.9m billion in
the plrevioui- fiscall \'1i tio
$ -15 billion f;:, r the c-omin
fls~,al -year
"l'MI ? f'undin e nitaii
10ior'e coniun'iIll itiei will ret-
c \lle grant io aLrds." Ding
Comn1111 nitie that ire
cel,\ied CDBG fuLnd ilii in the
iast fiscal ,-earl \"ere prei
venei t't ll f i applyehi a.ainl
frt a p-lr'l of, t' '.'o ,ear's .
meaning t rha those apply
ing n'. i ttitood a better
chance t-o _fettinl approved


"This makes the city's
application more competi-
tive," Dingman said.
The Florida Depart-
ment of Community Affairs
(FDCA), which oversees the
program at the state level,
was removing the require-
ment that cities have a
housing code enforcement
program in effect, a defi-
ciency that caused Monti-
cello to lose points on its
t ire pre[ it-'Iuily.
'The FDCA i.as under,
,a tiaht i.'hediiile and wa\
prepar-id to complete t i.o
tlfindiritn c i ,l v;. within 3
.ear'Sl p )!l itn. one riiht
after the otlt r.
"'it ha3 :,een over 1l
'ear-'S sin>,e thlerr .re .\o
cycle.< in one \ear.j'" Dinrt
man said. Thi g i.'e tlhe
city even miole- tof a chance
of being funded "
It itould cst the cite'
zert, to appl\, nothing \en-
Please See Housing
Page 4A


' *. 'COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT -.
0' Op Thl P ift IRoad -*


To Task Over Public Input
mission on .1"
Thursday
that he had
come to the mi-
because the
hecauses of crophone as a gentleman
houses of
on thp previous occasion'
n,- to state his. objection.
rMeller re- O


he podium to
oil's comment,
aveled an end
ssion, saying
had had his
board would
e in argu-

old the com-


CORRECTION







In honor of1 In honor of
Staff Sgt Capt. Charles
RoberSchmidt L. Ringe Jr.
Schmidt WWII Army
Army Aircore. Air Corp
Veteran C
WWII Doctor





The names of these two men were

printed incorrectly in the November 11th

edition of The Monticello News.

The Monticello News regrets the error.


The rules gave him up to
three minutes to state
his case, he said. Instead,
he had used 1% 'minutes
of his allotted time, he
said.
He had not asked for
a response from the com-
mission, Miller said.
What's more, the rules
clearly stated that com-
missioners weren't to re-
spond to citizens during
the public input seg-
ment. But the chairman
having responded, then
he (Miller) was entitled
to answer him, he said.
"I was denied that
right," Miller said. "My
question to you is, are
you abiding by your res-
olution or do you create
it as you go along?"
Commissioner
Hines Boyd, who largely
crafted the resolution
that sets forth the rules
and protocol for commis-
sion meetings and public
input at these affairs,
said that in his view, the
chairman had acted cor-
rectly.
"The chairman has a
lot of responsibility and
authority," Boyd said.
"The citizen has one
turn to speak on a single
issue. That's why the
Chairman was correct.
The idea is that it's not
productive to get into a
debate at a public meet-
ing. The other day, he
was trying to avert a ar-
gument that could go on
and on."
Miller said he "re-


-I t--t.


1 Section2, 18 Pages


I


Around Jeff. Co.
Church
Classifieds
Dining Out
Football Contest
Legals


4-7A Money & Finance
10A-11A National
16A SmokeoutWeek
15A Outdoors
13A Sports & School
17A Viewpoints


9A

8A
18A
12A-15A
2-3A


Wed 74/47 -
11/18 -
Cloudy skies early, followed by
partial clearing. High 74F.


;;w IL


C.P. Miller


buked the word argu-
ment". Why was it an ar-
gument if a citizen came
before the board to ex-
press his or her views?
Or was it that the board
classified certain people
as argumentative and
others not?
He had returned to
the podium following
Hall's comment not to
argue but to clarify his
original comment,
thinking from Hall's re-
mark that the board per-
haps had not understood
his point, he said. What's
more, he had still been
within his three-minute
timeframe. But he had
been denied his right to
speak, Miller said.
He noted that he had
been coming to commis-
sion meetings for more
than 20 years and previ-
ous boards had allowed
citizen to participate and
voice their opinions. But
now the present board
was trying to stifle citi-
zen input, while giving
others special privileges,
he said.
"Then when I talk
about something that
Please See Miller
Page 4A


Thu 74/51
11/19 -
A few clouds. Highs in the mid 70s
and lows in the low 50s,


Library

Wants Its

Own

Bookmobile
Unit Would Offer
Everyday Service
Here, Per Director
LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
A little more than a
month after the Jefferson
County Commission
stopped its contribution
to the Wilderness Coast
Public Libraries' (WILD)
bookmobile at the. urging
of Library Director Ser-
afin Roldan in order to
make up a.budget short-
fall, the latter is now pro-
posing that his
organization l acquire its
own bookmobile to con-
tinue the service.
Roldan approached
the County Commission
with his proposal on
Thursday morning, Nov.
5. He shared with com-
missioners that Clay
County had discontinued
its library outreach serv-
ice and was willing to do-
nate its bookmobile, a
1994 Ford-Grumman 26-
foot-long mobile unit
with 105,000 miles on its
odometer.
"All we have to do is
deal with the salary,"
Roldan said. "We could
do trial runs with the
staff that we now have."
He said he had talked
with the management at
Simpson's Nursery and
the latter was open to the
idea of offering ESL
(English as a second lan-
guage) classes on the
premises to its Hispanic
employees. He had also
talked with the Road De-
partment superintendent
and the latter was willing
for his operation to pro-
vide parking for the bqok-
mobile and do any major
maintenance it might re-
quire, Roldan said. He es-
timated that the cost to
the county to provide the
service, in terms of fuel
and salary for a part-time
person, would be $15,350
annually.
Roldan figured the
unit would be fully func-
tional within three to
four months, visiting a
minimum of 16 to 20 sites
in the county during any
month. He said the serv-
ice would operate a maxi-
mum of four hours per
day, Monday through Fri-
Please See Library
Page 4A


Fri
11/20


75/57


Mix of sun and clouds. Highs in the
mid 70s and lows in the upper 50s.


i


as~
-s~5
.,,,
Z5F rini.


500 460-+40


IrJiLiul Jle


I
b
-e


r/









2A Monticello News


www.ecbpublishing.com


Wednesday, November 18, 2009


IEWPOINTS &


PINIONS


JOTeIIrsO
It is better to give
someone a bouquet of
flowers now than after
wards when he/she dies
This is the reason why ]
want to congratulate the
library staff today They
have all been wonderful
workers, faithful to their
duties and to the com-
munity they serve
Though I have been in
Monticello for eight
months, I have noticed
their dedication to their
work even though we
may have some internal
differences on and off
We are happy and com-
mitted to serve the
Jefferson County com-
munity and its people.
Firstly, let me men
tion my "Person in
Charge," Angela Scott
She has been working in
the library for 18 years
As the Learning Center
Manager and our princi
pal cataloguer, she has
excelled in her work as I
have personally noticed.
She can be seen during
the day helping patrons
with computers, teach-
ing them search strate-
gies, attending the circu-
lation desk, cataloguing
books, and other innu-
merable chores. She is
my top performlnr.
Then we have Doris
Andrews. In my opinion,
she is the library's work
horse of the entire oper-
ation. One can call her
at any time, and she will
be available to substi-
tute, to tackle the circu-
lation desk single-hand-
ed with vivacity and
cheerfulness, no ques-
tions asked, and she also
helps patrons fill out
forms and answer ques-
tions. She has been
working in the Library
for 10 years, always
striving to do her best.
Doris is a key person in
the library's working
scenario.
Nancy Stover is
there to heln me under-


F Guest Columnist
1 wI a MAMlA L

SCoully Lirary Staff
stand better how much offering advice, check-.
f we have left in our book ing in/out books and
Budget or what office other materials, print-
Ssupplies we need in the ing out copies, faxing
[ library, everything from documents, picking up
paper clips and copy the phone, and helping
S, paper to bestsellers that out patrons with the
Swe need to purchase. computers. The circula-
SShe is the bookeeper- tion desk is the busiest
- accountant-acquisition area in the library We
worker. When we have a all chip in on the circu-
' disagreement on some- lation desk, regardless
t thing budget-wise, I lis- of one's degree or posi-
Sten closely and some- tion. Everyone helps out
r times change my posi- when needed.
tion. Her assistance has Mary has a Masters
I been of great value degree in Education and
Always. is a retired elementary
Kitty Brooks, our school teacher, so she
active and extremely has great patience and
Energetic Children and temperance dealing
Youth Services librari- with library patrons.
San, is always looking for Natalie is our newcom-
new programming ideas er. She was a Fulbright
Sand ways she can serve Scholar in Indonesia,
Sour younger community teaching English as a
We have faith that with second language in a
the acquisition of a rural community. But
Sbookmobile she will be she is also presently tak-
Sable to visit the children ing on a graduate
at various centers in our degree, a Masters in
SCounty at least 10 or Library Science. I have
more times a month entrusted the Jefferson
which is my projection. County Library's Digital
S Marsha Jopling is Project to her since she
* our adult literacy and has worked and has
* ESL coordinator and experience with digiti-
instructor. The library zation and web design-
has had this important ing. My final comments
i "literacy" comnponnt, in i.s jt stjt is: What a
S'-our qountv for 0) StaafT!' .r r l
time he antlYthe i .. -, . *.R
unteers.thiat she m .n-..i --.Library,-ews
ages are always creating The JCPL will be hav-
fascinating learning ing a Christmas
strategies to teach the Dinner from 12:00 -
basics of reading and, 2:00 pm on December
English as a second lan- 22. The entire commu-
guage to various seg- nity is welcome. It
ments of the communi- will be completely
ty Quite educated and free of charge: young
cultured, Marsha also and old, poor or rich,
does outreach in the just come and have a
County in order to iden- feast. If you are plan-
* tify possible literacy ning to bring a
needs. Potluck of some kind,
Finally, the library please let us know in
counts with two magnif- advance. Everyone is
icent circulation -staff welcome to bring in a
I workers, Mary Helen sidedish if you wish.
Ringe and our newcom- Call us for informa-
er, Natalie Binder. They tion: 850-342-0205.
are both always busy at We will announce it
- the circulation desk. further in December.


Monticello News
Staff Writer.


Meet Your


Neighbor


Anne Davs

Anne Davis retired to Jefferson County in
1997 from Miami, FL with her husband Joe.
They have four children, three living locally.
and one in Miami. They are also the proud
grandparents of five.
She has been actively and passionately in- -
volved in the Lions Club since age 14, when | .
she joined the auxiliary. '- '*- 1
Her hobby is creating table centerpieces
and other like crafts.





3t~p I3aels fn~i nC


MONTICELLO .0


NEWS


EMERALD GREENE .nd Wedneja. 1 IIIn pm lor
FndD%.' piper Deidline for Legal
Publisher Owner \a..,i,m,nii ,.. ,, t .,,
p nT fI.r \\ ,l i .p r.,I
RAY CICHON ,\I-J,,... P. o r. .p i Fi,'-
Managing EEdilir
LAZARO ALEMAN 'ir<~ IL-Ti.'N [i[i .Ti4
Sernor Stafi \\ t ier hI rl .. I' Jr..l
Ii.,dj 9 4.4 r',i ,.. j i
CL.AS infIt) i ANrD L .ul.ul. i 'JI 'I i '
Deadline for clah sicdils r4 :.rn ..,.. IS. Ir i.1al i.,t -IJud lj
3a 12 00 p rm Ifr 'Wcdne-.di ppcr


Established 1869
A weekly newspaper [USPS 361-620] designed for the express reading pleasures of the people of its
circulation area, be they past, present or future residents.
Published weekly by ECB Publishing, Inc., 180 W Washington St. Monticello, FL 32344. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post Office in Monticello, Florida 32344.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MONTICELLO NEWS, P.O. Box 428, Monticello, FL
32345.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in
the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this
newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.
All photos given to ECB PubliUhing, Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than
6 months from the date they arc dropped off. ECB Piblishilg, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said
deadline.


TWENTY YEARS AGO
S NOVEMBER 15, 1989
The Florida Highway Patrol
'held graduating ceremonies last
Thursday for its 83rd academy
class. Stewart Smith, a Monticello
trooper and Tyrone R. Crim, a
Lamont trooper were among the 48
troopers getting their badges.
The Jefferson County Tigers
lost their chance to win their fourth
consecutive district title Friday
when the Port St. Joe Sharks ousted
Jefferson 26-6 for the 2-AA football
championship.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
NOVEMBER 15, 1979
The City Council passed a
$743,515.61 budget Friday for the
1979-80 fiscal budget year. It is
retroactive to Oct. 1.
The 1979 JCHS Homecoming
Parade boasted 45 entries. Residents
of Jefferson County lined
Monticello's downtown streets
Friday afternoon to view the 35th
Homecoming Parade.
FORTY YEARS AGO
NOVEMBER 14, 1969
Judge B. Shuman recently
retired from his traveling store
;after roaming the by-ways of
Jefferson County for a quarter of a
century The body of the truck is the


same one which started out in 1944
but two trucks and two extra motors
have gone by the board during this
time.
Rev. Newcomb is spending this
week attending the Florida Baptist
Convention in Miami.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
OCTOBER 23, 1959
The Kiwanis Club is promising
an evening of real fun for every
member of the family next
Thursday night when the Radio-TV
party is presented in the school
auditorium. Jack Bailey, star of
"Queen for the Day" and Tom
Brennen are sending gifts for the
affair. President Lawrence
Crampton states that proceeds will
be used to carry on the Club's work
with boys and girls.
The PTA Halloween Carnival
was a huge success with nearly
$512.48 being banked in the
Association treasury. Winners in
the costume parade were Carolyn
Martin, Mary Todd, Ross Bailey.
Nada Bishop, Debbie Lucas, Billy
Bassett and Josephine Stokley
SIXTY YEARS AGO
NOVEMBER 18, 1949
The Lloyd community exhibit'
won first place in the Jefferson
County Fair.


P"FK TKIXIWa^ |


P.O. [lox 428i
180 W. Washington
n
Stre]
'xet


'8
Monticello, Florida
32345 gton
850-997-3568
Fax 850-997-3774
o c sa
@embary ail coIII
Email: monticellonews











Wednesday, November 18, 2009


www. ecbpublishing. com


Monticello News 3A


V IEWPOINTS


PINIONS


FRAN HUNT charges there.
Monticello News Stephen Lane. 66. of
Staff Writer Jefferson County, was
'1Kenneth Monroe, 19, arrested Nov. 12. and
of Monticello, was charged with disorderly
arrested Nov. 10, and intoxication. Bond was
charged with possession set at $250 and he bonded
of cannabis under 20 out of jail the same day.
grams. Bond was set at Patricia Ann
$500 and he bonded out Richardson. 43. of
of jail the same day. Jefferson Count,\ was
Brian Craig Dollar, arrested Nov\ 14. and
41, of Albany, GA, was charged with simple bat-
arrested Nov. 11, and terry. Bond was set at
charged with aggravated $500 and she rema ined at
battery with bodily the county jail Nov. 16.
harm. Bond was set at Richard Allen
$10,000 and he remained Hawkins, -15. of
at the county jail Nov. 16. Monticelo. was arrested
John Arthur Nov. 1I4. and charged
Humus, 57, of with failure to appear on
Tallahassee, was arrest- the charge of passing
ed Nov. 11, and charged worthless bank checks.
with violation of com- Bond was set at $119 and
munity control on the he bonded out of jail the
charge if felony driving same day.
under the influence.
Bond was withheld and
he remained at the coun-
ty jail Nov. 16.
Harvey Lee Merritt.
32, of Tallahassee. was
arrested Nov. 11 on out-
standing Jackso n
County warrants charg-
ing him with burglary of
a structure and grand
theft. He was turned
over to Jackson County
authorities the follow ing
iaTh tb face charges
" rrSarahi Marinert
Stephenson, 30. of
Jefferson County. was
arrested Nov. 11 on out
standing Wakulla
County warrants charrg-
ing him with driving
while license suspended
or revoked and violate ion
of probation on the
charge of petit theft. She
was turned over to
Wakulla County author ri-
ties Nov. 13 to face


UITo sting or not to
I sting, that is the
question."
L$ he Obama admin-
Iistration has spit
in the face of the Amer-
ican people and the vic-
tims of 9-11 by bringing
the terrorists to the
United States for trial."
l( bama fiddles as
WAfgha n istan
burns and U.S. soldiers
die."
CfiThe stinger that re-
I quested a larger
venue for Allen Boyd's
town halls didn't need
to worry. The few that
showed up fled in dis-
gust when he at-
tempted to perform the
democratic sidestep."
|ilt's time for Presi-
Ident Obama to
come back to Washing-
ton and do some work
and get off his tax paid
year long vacation. He
hasn't done anything
yet to earn his keep."


Thought Of The Week


Three things in life that, once

gone, never come back


ci


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4A Monticello News www.ecbpublishing.com







AROUND EFFERSON


Wednesday, November 18, 2009







COUNTY


Housing


Cont. From Page 1


Library


Cont. From Page 1


tured, nothing gained,
Dingman suggested.
"This is a once in a
longtime opportunity,"
Dingman said. "I can't
guarantee that you will be
funded. But if you're not
funded in the first cycle,
then we'll try for the sec-
ond."
He explained that the
program was intended to
assist low and moderate-
income residents with
improvements to their
dwellings in the areas of
code and safety items pri-
marily, but it would also
allow for the demolition
and replacement of struc-
tures that were severely
damaged.
"The goal is to rehabil-
itate substandard housing
units located in the city
limits and bring them up to
a. minimum acceptable liv-
ing standard," Dingman
said.
He said houses had to

Water


"This will add 450
new customers," Cooper
said.
As for the boil drink-
ing water alert that the'
JCWS issued recently,
Cooper said the alert,
which resulted from a
broken main, had now
been rescinded. '
He gave it to under-
stand that the situation
had not been as dire or
critical as the notice
appeared to make it. He
said the break affected
only of 110 of the cur-
rent 875 customers and
it had been repaired
within, a matter of
hours.
"Whenever the pres-
sure drops below 20 lbs
in the main, we are
required to issue a boil
drinking water alert,"
Cooper said.
The Gadsden
County-based Solomon
Construction Company
is doing the phase-2
work, which it started in
late June. The phase-2
expansion adds another
40 miles of water lines to


Miller


you don't want to hear,
you cut me off?" Miller
said indignantly. "You
have to be consistent
with your rules or you
need take the rules and
toss them out the door.
I'm a businessman. I
hire five to 15 people. I
volunteer on various
boards. I don't come
here to argue. I'm con-
cerned about this com-
munity as much as you.
So when I speak before
you I have to be muzzled
because you don't want


be owner-occupied to be
eligible for the program
and all work performed
had to meet the Florida
Building Code require-
ments. He estimated that
on average, and at a mini-
mum, the $700,000 would
allow for the rehabilitation
of 10 units, depending on
the degree of the rehabili-
tations, and with the stipu-
lation that three of the
units had to be in the very
low-income category.
Dingman said eligibili-
ty for the program depend-
ed on income limits (as
defined by the Department
of Housing and Urban
Development); age; and dis-
ability, with applicants
ranked accordingly.
"To participate, all
applicants must meet the
income requirement,"
Dingman said. "Household
income must be less than
80 percent of the median
income."


The median income
for Jefferson County is
$63,600, according to the
figures Dingman provided.
This means that a single
person would be classified
as extremely low income at
$13,350 annually; very low
income at $22,250 annually;
and low income at $35,650
annually A family of four
would be classified as
extremely low income at
$19,100; very low income at
$31,800; and low income at
$50,900.
"Persons must stay in
the house for five years
after the rehabilitation,"
Dingman said. "If they sell
the house within the five
years they have to pay the
state the money back at a
prorated rate. The lien is
forgiven after the five
years."
The council voted 5-0
to give Dingman authority
to proceed with the appli-
cation.


Cont. From Page 1


the system's existing 94
miles and raises the cus-
tomer base to 1,350 hous-
es. The Solomon
Construction Company
bid $2.7 million to do the
project.
SAreas that will bene-
fit from the expansion
are those along the fol-
lowing roads:
Barrington; Old Lloyd,
or CR-158A, up to Main
Avenue near US 90;
Murmuring Creek;
Osprey; Thompson
Valley; Curtis Mill;
Aucilla; Kinsey; Big Joe;
Cooley; Blue Lake;
Hatchett; Jordan; Boyd
Farm' arid Ebenezer
Church Road.
Rural Development,
an agency of the US
Department of
Agriculture (DOA), is
funding the expansion,
as it did the greater part
of the first phase of the
project. The federal
agency awarded the
Jefferson Communities
Water System $4.62 mil-
lion in.early 2007 for the
expansion. The award


consisted of a $1,206,000
grant and a $3,414,000
low-interest loan. One of
the conditions for
receipt of the money
was that the system
must sign up an addi-
tional 400 customers
upfront, which it did.
Rural Development,
in partnership with the
Florida Department of
Environmental
Protection (FDEP), fund-
ed the first phase of the
system, which was com-
pleted only a few years
ago. Phase one allowed
for installation of the
basic centralized water
system, which now
serves such outlying
communities as Aucilla,
Boland, Lamont,
Wacissa and
Waukeenah.
Other -accomplish-
ments of phase one
included construction of
three water wells, erec-
tion of two elevated stor-
age tanks, and installa-
tion of 494,000 linear
feet of distribution
lines.


Cont. From Page 1


to hear it?"
The chairman took
the cue.
"I apologize if I
offended you," Hall
said. "We appreciate
your volunteer work."
Outside the meet-
ing, Hall thanked Miller
for his tact and diploma-
cy in stating his case.
Miller has a long
history in the public
and political arena,
going back at least 20
years, when he co-
founded Concerned


United People (CUP), a
community group large-
ly involved with social
and political issues. He
has run for the office of
County Commission at
least twice, most recent-
ly against Boyd. He is a
member of 'the
Planning Commission
and has been a member
of the Economic
Development Council
and the redistricting
committee several years
ago, among other organ-
izations.


day, and be operational
four weeks a month.
Roldan made a point
to say that the annual
$6,500 that the commis-
sion previously con-
tributed to the WILD
bookmobile only got the
bookmobile here twice
a month. By compari-
son, a county-owned
bookmobile would be
able to provide a fuller
and more comprehen-
sive service, he said.
"This is a dream
come, true," Roldan'
said. "And they're offer-
ing it free."
Commissioner
Hines Boyd expressed
astonishment at the
request. He noted that it
was at Roldan's request
that the commission a
month and a half or so
earlier had cut the con-
.tribution to the WILD
bookmobile, which had
been providing the serv-
ice for years. He didn't
see how the county
could afford $15,000
annually for the service,
when it had been unable
to provide the $6,500 to
WILD.
"I'll be candid,"
Boyd said. "With Cheryl
Turner (head of WILD)
coming before this
board earlier and now
-this request, it's evident
there's a problem here,
which distresses me. I
just don't see the sense
of us going into book-
mobile services when
Clay County, which is
three times our,' size;:
can't do it.'"
Boyd's mention of'
Turner referred to the
latter's earlier appear-
ance before the board,
when she accused
Roldan of irrational
and confrontational
behavior and essential-
ly asked that the board
set a public hearing to
address her allegations.
Ironically, Boyd and
Turner were- two of
Roldan's strongest advo-
cates and supporters
when the latter was
being considered for the
position some six
months earlier.
County Coordinator
Roy Schleicher offered
that Roldan's request
warranted more consid-
eration to determine if.
there was a demand or


need for the service;
and if so, what the.
extent of that demand
and need were.
"Let us give it more
thought," Schleicher
said.
Not one to let a
point go unanswered,
Roldan returned to
Boyd's earlier comment,
countering that no dis-
crepancy existed
between his request and
the county's previous
contribution to WILD,
as the first would pro-
vide for 15 to 20 visits
monthly and the latter
had only provided for
two days of service
monthly.
"It's just a propos-
al," Roldan said finally.
"We can continue to
study it. I leave it up to
you, but I think it's a
good idea."
Turner next
addressed the commis-
sion again. She
explained that WILD
determined the num-
ber and, frequency of
visits based on the
monetary contribution
of the three participat-
ing counties in the con-
sortium. Last year, she
said, Jefferson County
had contributed $6,500
and. Wakulla $24,000
(Franklin has dropped
out of the arrange-


ment), which
explained the greater
number of the bookmo-
bile's visits to Wakulla.
If Jefferson County
were to contribute
more, the number of
stops would, be
increased, Turner
said.
She offered that the
$6,500, that Jefferson
County contributed
last year would allow
the service to be con-
tinued here through
December, at which
time WILD would roll
over some of its
remaining funds into
the account to allow for
continuation of the
service through
March. But after
March, it was a big
question mark whether
the bookmobile would
be able to continue.
"We're trying to get
all kinds of grant in
the interim," Turner
said. "But we don't
know what will happen
after March. If we had
$15,000, I'd .guarantee
more trips here."
Schleicher reiterat-
ed that the bookmobile
proposal would be
given more thought.
"We may need to do
nothing, or to give
WILD another chance,"
he said.


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Wednesday, November 18, 2009


OUND


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Monticello News 5A


COUNTY


COMm4iNT I


z7~ 0 A9__


November 18 and 25
Employment
Connections Career
Coach Mobile Lab is
scheduled for 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. on Wednesdays
across from the First
Baptist Church in
Monticello. Services
include job search,
resume assistance,
assessments, and labor
market information. For
more information, con-
tact Diane Head at 973-
2672, 973-6497, or
headd@nfwdb.org

November 18
Alzheimer's and
Dementia Support is
held 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
on the third Wednesday
of every month at the
First United Methodist
Church in the Family
Ministry Center on West
Walnut Street in
Monticello. A light
lunch will be served.
This is a free monthly
program. Call 514-2778
or 997-5545 for more
information.

November 19
AA meetings are held 8
p.m. Thursday at the
Christ Episcopal
Church annex, 425
North Cherry Street.
For more information
call 997-2129 or 997-1955.

November 19
Cub Scout Pack 808 will
meet we r 77rto 8 ,t
on Thursday at The
Eagle's btst:pn South,
Water Street. For more
information contact
Cub Master Greg Wynot
at 997-5366.

November 19
The Savvy Senior
monthly outreach pro-
gram, sponsored by
Capital Health Plan, will
begin at noon on the
third Thursday at the
Monticello Opera
House. This free month-
ly program is for older
adults who want to
learn more about creat-
ing and maintaining
healthy, happy, and
active lifestyles. Melissa
Dancer-Brown, RD,
LD/N will present a pro-
gram on the Medicare
Advantage (HMO) Plan,
hosted by Anna Johnson
Riedel. There will also
be health screenings
and exhibitors avail-
able. Soft drinks will be
provided; bring a bag
lunch. Make reserva-
tions by calling 523-7333.
Contact Dancer-Brown
at 523-5631 or


mgbrown@chp.org for
more information about
this program.

November 19
You may qualify for
assistance from Capital
Area Community
Action Agency Call Pat
Hall or Melissa Watson
at 997-8231 for additional
information. They can
tell you what services
are currently being pro-
vided. CACAA will be
working 9 a.m. to 2 p.m..
on the third Thursday at
the First Baptist Church
of Lloyd.

November 19
The Tallahassee
Automobile Museum
will offer "Florida
History" 5 to 8 p.m. on
the third Thursday of
each month. Call .942-
0137 for more informa-
tion and directions.

November 20
Experience the effects of
Gentle Yoga on mind,
body, and spirit 8 a.m.
Friday at Monticello
Health ahd Fitness
Center; instructed by
Cate Howell. Call 997-
4400 for more informa-
tion.

SNovember 20 and 21
Second Harvest Food
Program will welcome
volunteers to bag food
packages 6:30 p.m.
, Friday fe t-di#io"t 99
to !i a.m. Saturday at
the Ne- Betfiel A-ME
Church, 6496 Ashville
Highway. Contact Nellie
Randall at 997-5605 or
Essie Norton at 997-5683
for more information.

November 21
Pilates Fitness Class 8
a.m. Saturday at
Monticello Health and
Fitness Center. A body
shaping and body
sculpting workout per-
fect for beginners. Call
997-4400 for more infor-
mation.

November 21
Big Fundraiser Sale at
Transforming Life
Church 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Saturday at 7337 Old
Lloyd Road, 1-mile east
of the flashing light in
Lloyd. Check out the
quality antiques, new
and used household
items, bicycles, crafts,
and much more.

November 21
The Dixie Community
Center will sponsor the
Opry every first and


third Saturday from 7 to
10 p.m. Each Saturday
will feature a different
band. For more informa-
tion and directions con-
tact Kenneth Price at
229-263-7231 or 229-263-
7383.

November 21
Girl Scouting is fun, and
builds girls of courage,
confidence, and charac-
ter, who make the world
a better place. Join
Junior Troop 150, girl's
ages 8 to 12, from 10 a.m.
to 12 p.m. on the first
and third Saturday of
each month at the
Greenville United
Methodist Church to
learn more about Girl
Scouts. For more infor-
mation contact co-lead-
ers Janice and Sean
Carson at 948-6901 or
contact the Girl Scout
Council of the Florida
Panhandle, at 386-2131.

November'21
Jefferson SHARE volun-
teers will be at the
Church of the Nazarene,
1590 North Jefferson
Street, from 8 to 9:30
a.m. Saturday .with the
monthly food delivery
orders. Turn in registra-
tion copy when picking
up orders. Cash dona-
tions will be accepted
for the cost of fuel for
the volunteers. Contact
Martha Creel at 445-9061
for more. information.
To learn more about
SHARE go to
www.shareflorida.org

November 23
Masonic Lodge #5 meets
7:30'p.m. on the second
and fourth Monday of
the month at the Hiram
Masonic Lodge, 235
Olive Street in
Monticello. Contact Roy
Faglie at 933-2938 for
more information.

November 23
Boy Scout Troop 803
meets 7 p.m. every
Monday at. the Eagles
Nest on South Water
Street. For more infor-
mation, contact Scout
Leader Paul Wittig at
997-1727 or 997-3169.

November 23
AA women meetings are
held 6:45 p.m. Monday;
AA and Al-Anon meet-
ings are held 8 p.m. at
the Christ Episcopal
Church Annex, 425
North Cherry Street.
For more information,
call 997-2129 or 997-1955.


November 23
AA meets 7 p.m. every
Monday at Waukeenah
United Methodist
Church for fellowship;
the meeting is open. For
more information, con-
tact Rev. Ralph
Wrightstone at 997-2171.

November 24
Tuesday at Tup's has
moved its time back to
5:30 p.m. This fun, free
exercise class is for
walkers and runners to'
come but and get mov-
ing! Routes begin at
Tupelo's Bakery & Cafe
and will be posted on the
door for the latecomers.
John Olson and Kim
Davis will lead the
group.

November 24
AA classes are held
every Tuesday at 8 p.m.
for those seeking help.
The classes are held at
1599 Springhollow Road
in the Harvest Christian
Center. Contact Marvin
Graham at 212-7669 for
more information.

November 24
Overeaters Anonymous
will meet 7 p.m. on
Tuesday at Waukeenah
United Methodist
Church. This is a free
group meeting and is
open to the public. For
more information con-
tact the church at 997-
2527.

November 24
Taoist Tai Chi Class'
meets 7 to 8:30 p.m.
every Tuesday for begin-
ners at Christ Episcopal
Church in the fellow-
ship hall at 425 North
Cherry Street. Improve
your health, balance,
and flexibility No spe-
cial physical require-
ments, and all ages are
welcome. For more
information contact
Mary Saunders at 850-
224-5438 or 850 443 7799.

November 24
Jefferson County
Community Coalition
meets 9:30 a.m. on the
last Tuesday of the
month in the public
library conference
room, to share services.
For more information,
contact Cindy Hutto,
business manager for
Healthy Start Coalition
of Jefferson, Madison
and Taylor counties, at
948-2741 or email her at
c j h u t
to@healthystartjmt.org


November 24
Triple L Club (LLL)
meets at 10:30 a.m. on
the fourth Tuesday of
each month in the fel-
lowship hall of the First
Baptist Church
Monticello for a meeting
with a program, speak,
er, and potluck lunch.
Contact Ethel
Strickland at 509-9445
for more information.

November 24
Silver Dome Chapter of
the American Business
Women's Association
meets 6 p.m. on the
fourth Tuesday of the
month for dinner and a
program. Contact Vann
Holmes at
adams731@aol.com for
more information.

November 24 -.28
Beginning Metal Work
101 is one of the cur-
rent jewelry crafting
classes being held at The
Peddler's Marketplace
in downtown
Monticello, 11 a.m.
Tuesday through
Saturday Reservations
may be made by contact-
ing Margie Stern at 210-
4097 or 933-9540.
Different classes run
every week. Learn the'
basics of wrapping a
focal bead using the cen-
ter hole as a center to
the wrap. Class project
to make and take home
will be one completed,
pdrdant Aecklace. There.
is a small materials
charge of $10 dependhet'
on silver cost and beads.

November 25
A member of
Congressman Allen
Boyd's staff will visit
the -Jefferson -County
Public Library 9:30 to
11:30 a.m. on the fourth
Wednesday of every
month to afford local cit-
izens an opportunity to
discuss issues of .con-
cern.

November 26
You may qualify for
assistance from Capital
Area Community
Action Agency Call Pat
Hall or Melissa Watson
at 997-8231 for additional
information. They can
tell you what services
are currently being pro-
vided. CACAA will be
working 9 a.m. to 12
p.m. on the fourth
Thursday

November 27
Community Skate
Night is held 6 to 8 p.m.


on the last Friday of
each month at the
Church of the
Nazarene on 1590 North
Jefferson Street. This
event is free. Bring
your own skates or bor-
row from the Roller
Club. There is a small
charge for snacks, 997-
3906.

November 28
The regular last-
Saturday-of-the-month
Crochet and Chat meet-
ing of the Tallahassee
Crochet Guild is held 10
a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday
at the Jefferson Arts
Gallery, 575 West
Washington Street. It's
a free meeting.
Participants bring
their own projects or
work on some of the
club projects. No chil-
dren please. Contact
Coordinator Melanie
Mays Randall at
http://www.divacroche
t.com for updates and
for more information.

November 28
Fourth Saturday Gospel
Sing 7 p.m. at Lament
United Methodist
Church. Fellowship and
refreshments after the
music, 997-2527.

November 29
Alternative Gift Market
12 to 4,p.m. Sunday at
First United Methodist
Church, 325 West
Walnut Street. 'Sel&ct.'.a
thoughtful gift from .12
local ifd' international
organizations partici-
pating in this event.
This is an opportunity
to honor a loved one
with gifts that make a
lasting difference for
people and animals liv-
ing locally, nationally,
and globally. When an
individual makes a pur-
chase at the Alternative
Gift Market, a donation
is made to the particu-
lar charity he/she
wishes to support. The
shopper receives a per-
sonalized gift card that
he/she can send or give
to those being honored
with the gift. Be
assured... there's some-
thing for everyone! 997-
3571

November 30
Martin Luther King
Community Center
meets 6 p.m. on the last
Monday of each month
at the MLK Center.
Contact Charles
Parrish at 997-3760 for
more information.


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850-997-9199

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Monticello News Photo By Debbie Snapp, Nov. 10, 2009.
Main Street of Monticello Secretary Margie Stern recognizes Becky Asburn
and Monticello Florist & Gifts, as winner of the Halloween Decorating Contest. She
accepted a certificated and a gift basket in honor of the ghoulish window display.


I I


II










6A Monticello News


OUND


www.ecbpublishing.com


EFFERSON


Wednesday, November 18, 2009


COUNTY


UNJ IN

CO ENTRY'
DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Join the Jefferson
County United Way
Campaign Team at its
first "Low Country Boil"
7 to 11 p.m. Friday, Nov.
20 at The Mays House, on
East Washington Street
in Monticello.
The cost is $35 per
ticket, which will
include food by Carrie
Ann & Co., raffles, and
music by The Chaotics
and Jimmy Gillis. All
proceeds will benefit
local United Way agen-
cies.
Contact Dean Jerger
at 510-7666 or Nan
Baughman at 556-7279
with questions or to
make a donation.


'Bethlehem In Monticello' Dec. 4 +5


Monticello News photos by Fran Hunt Dec. 5, 2008
At the manger, the three wise men, Roger Stadin, George Cole and Dean
Jerger, kneel before Jesus Mary (Rebekah Dibble) Joseph (Robbie Slack) and the
Angel (Maddie Powell.) During last year's pagent.


Sarah and Martha (Pat Miller and Marilyn Youtzy)
see and discuss the north star.
r


At the well, villagers Pat Frye, Jeri Kimbrel and Buck Bird, discuss the proph-
esied birth of the Messiah.


Cane Grinding
Fresh Cane Juice
SArts 'n Crafts* Wagon Rides
Live Country Music
*Cloging b the
"Mountain Dew joggers"
*Children's Play Area

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H ,^' Home
THE PRESCRIPTION rR Health
( C ,1,,f /II Care


Kings Roger Stadin and George Cole walk
Jeremiah, an old pro when it comes to Bethlehem in
Monticello.
FRAN HUNT Members from area
Monticello News churches and organiza-
Staff Writer tions have already begun
The eleventh annual preparing for the event.
"Bethlehem in Coordinator Billie
Monticello" is planned 7 McClellan said last year's
p.m. until 8:30 p.m., Friday event was the largest to
Dec. 4 and Saturday Dec. 5 date, drawing more than
on South Water Street 1,600 spectators, and 200
behind the First United local volunteers, includ-
Methodist Church, across ing actors and those
from the former JCHS behind the scenes.
campus.


I MedicalServce


Beggar Rebecca Bird
greeted those entering
the gates of Bethlehem
with chants of "Alms,
alms for the poor."

Event volunteers, as
well and First United
Methodist Church Pastor
Wayne Cook, hope to see
even bigger groups in
attendance during the
event this year.
"There have always
been positive reactions
and comments made dur-
ing and about the event,"
said McClellan. "Many
have been brought to
tears."
Attendees will be able
to walk through the streets
of Bethlehem and experi-
ence life during the time of
the birth of Jesus and see
the realistic sets, authen-
tic clothing of the time,
the angel coming to the
shepherds in the field, the
inn, the carpenters, the
story teller, the three wise
men, the women at the
well, net menders, the
market place, a beggar
and tax collector black-


smiths, and the live nativ-
ity
All actors in the dif-
ferent scenes are spread-
ing the word of the prom-
ised Messiah's birth in a
stable. There will also be
a variety of live anrials,'
including every l oTe"S
favorite resident camels
Jeremiah in his sixth
appearance, and his
friend Gracie in her third,
with both wearing new
royal costumes of many
colors, currently being fit-
ted for the occasion.
Gracie has changed
considerably since her
first appearance two
years ago; last year, she
grew from approximately
chest high at the hump to
about six foot three at the
hump, an average of
about one inch per month,
and owner Joanne Brown
says that she is even larg-
er this year. She is cur-
rently undergoing the
final touches on her train-
ing for the event.
Sheep, goats, don-
keys, chickens, pigeons,
and white doves will also
be on hand.
Several area church-
es, schools and organiza-
tions have already com-
mitted to being in the
scenes and volunteering,
and more are encouraged
to participate.
Among volunteers
this year are students
from both Aucilla and
Monticello Christian
academies and local 4-
Hers.
The event if free, and
is a Christmas gift to the
community
After touring
Bethlehem, all are invited
to the First United
Methodist (FUMC)
Family Ministry Center
and enjoy free refresh-
ments, including home-
made cookies, with musi-
cians providing music of
the season.
To participate contact
FUMC at 997-5545 or
McClellan at 997-1285.


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Wednesday, November 18, 2009


OUND


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Monticello News 7A


COUNTY


TOYS FOR TOTS


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Gelling's Floral Designs, located
at 190 East Dogwood Street, is the'
Jefferson County drop-off location for
the US Marine Corps Reserve Toys
For Tots collection.
Anyone wishing to donate, or to
advertise this year's service program,
may contact Kim Kennedy at 997- 2015,
Kennedy hopes for a good show-
ing of sup-
port, as this is
the first time
in a long time
that the
Jefferson
County com-
munity has
collected for
Toys For Tots.
The mission of the U S Marine
Corps Reserve Toys for Tots Program
is to collect new, unwrapped toys dur-
ing October, November, and December
each year, and distribute those toys as


I


Christmas gifts to needy children in
the community in which the cam-
paign is conducted.
The primary goal of Toys for Tots
is to deliver, through a new toy at
Christmas, a message of hope to less
fortunate youngsters that will assist
them in becoming responsible, pro-
ductive, patriotic citizens.
The objectives of Toys for Tots are
to help less fortunate children
throughout the United States experi-
ence the joy of
Christmas; to
play an active
role in the
development
of one of our
Nation's most
valuable
resources, our
children; to unite all members of local
communities in a common cause for
three months each year during the
annual toy collection and distribution
campaign; and to contribute to better
communities in the future.


ICA Rnnual Boord Iame


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The annual Aucilla
Christian Academy
Board Raffle and dinner
held Friday at the ACA
Wilmer Bassett gym was
a huge success, which
sold $18,700 in tickets for
the event.
Attendees enjoyed a
meal of prime rib with all
of the trimmings, includ-
ing garlic mashed pota-
toes, garden salad, home-
made desserts, sour
cream tolls, and iced tea
or coffee, and a chance to
win one of several great
prizes.
The prizes are donat-
ed to the school each year
at a very substantial dis-
count. Those prizes
include; Kawasaki Bayou
KLF 250 ATV, purchased
from Deep South Cycle,
located-at 14558 US 19


south, in Thomasville.
The value of this prize is
$3,099, and it was won by
Morris Petroleum of
Monticello.
A truck accessory
package, which included
an aluminum toolbox,
step bars, and a cargo car-
rier, valued at $620 and
was completely donated
by United Welding of
Perry, was won by Leon
Green of Perry
Clint Rogers of
Madison won $1,000 cash
from Aucilla Christian
Academy, which was an
unrestricted prize.
Steve and Joyce
Wurgler of Perry won a
32 TV and entertain-
ment package which
included a 32 Samsung
LCD HD TV and Blue Ray
Player. The value of the
prize is $1,100,. and was
purchased at a 50 percent
discount from Badcock


uge Success
Home Furniture & More
in Monticello.
Shane and Lisa
Roland of Greenville won
a blue Acer Network com-
puter purchased by ACA,
valued at approximately
$500. It had 1 GB of RAM,
an atom processor, 160 GB
hard drive, double layer
DVD RW with a wired and
wireless adapter, a web-
cam, a media card reader,
Windows 7, Anti-virus
and Antispyware protec-
tion and full Office 2007
Professional.
Event spokesperson
Cathy Jackson said the
school would like to thank
their catering team of
Katrina and Jay Walton,
Christi Besmears,
Bradley Williams, and all
of the people who bought
tickets for the event, sold
tickets, donated items,
and the servers and crew
who worked the night.


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Wednesday, November 18, 2009


Vit~~


Great American Smokeout November 19
000000000000000000000


Are you a smoker? Are
you considering quitting
because of financial,
health or other reasons?
Well, here's your chance.


Every November, the American Cancer Society invites smokers to participate in the
Great American Smokeout and quit smoking for a day, and hopefully, forever. If you're
thinking of quitting and ready to give it a try, take part in the Great American Smokeout
and join the millions of smokers who will be saying no to cigarettes for 24 hours.
You may not quit smoking entirely, but you will do it for a day. Thats a great step in
pursuing a tobacco-free life.


* .i


Need an 'i..'.e.nt to ui
Need an ,on.en ,'.re"to quit?

I';:' .i. i
' ...i ...".., . *,[: ,,
Need an incentive to quit?


Consider these facts:
'* Cigarettes contain 43 cancer-causing chemicals.
* In addition to cancer, smoking causes lung disease, heart disease, strokes
Sand other serious diseases.
j* One in every five deaths in the United States is related to smoking.
* More than 440,000 Americans die each year from smoking.
* More Americans die from smoking than from AIDS, murder, suicide,'fire anCt
illegal drugs combined.


Less Smoking Leads to More Birthdays


As the official sponsor
of birthdays, the American
Cancer Society marks the
34th Great American
Smokeout on November 19
by encouraging smokers to
use the date to make a plan
to quit, or to plan in
advance and quit smoking
that day By doing so, smok-
ers will be taking an impor-
tant step towards a healthi-
er life one that can lead to
reducing cancer risk and
creating more birthdays.
Researchers say that quit-
ting smoking can increase
life expectancy smokers
who quit at age 35 gain an
average of eight years of
life expectancy; those who
quit at age 55 gain about
five years; and even long
term smokers who quit at
65 gain three years 1 .
Smokers who want to quit
can call the American
Cancer Society Quit For
Life Program operated
and managed by Free &


Clear@ at 1-800-227-2345 for
tobacco cessation and
coaching services that can
help increase their chances
of quitting for good.
Research shows that
people who stop smoking
before age 50 can cut their
risk of dying in the next 15
years in half compared
with those who continue to
smoke. Smokers who quit
also reduce their risk of
lung cancer ten years
after quitting, the lung can-
cer death rate is about half
that of a continuing smok-
er's. Some of the health
effects of quitting are
almost instant, too heart
rate and blood pressure
drop 20 minutes after quit-
ting.
The Great American
Smokeout Web site
(www.cancer.org/GreatAm
ericans) contains user-
friendly tips and tools
towards a smoke-free life.
In addition to tip sheets


and calculators, the site
also offers downloadable
desktop helpers to assist
with planning to quit and
succeeding in staying
tobacco-free. The Quit
Clock allows users to pick a
quit day within 30 days,
then counts down the
selected day with tips for
each day; and the Craving
Stopper helps smokers beat
cravings by offering a fun
distraction.
The American Cancer
Society created the trade-
marked concept for and
held its first Great
American Smokeout in
1976 as a way to inspire and
encourage smokers to quit
for a day. One million peo-
ple quit smoking for a day
at the 1976 event in
California. The Great
American Smokeout
encourages smokers to
commit to making a long-
term plan to quit smoking
for good.


Do you avoid holding hands with your date?

Do you hate to shake hands with strangers?

If sweaty hands keep you from expressing yourself, there may be a solution....
A new procedure offered by a Board Certified Physician is available in Tallahassee.
Call 850-877-5569
to learn the details that may change your life.



Harry M. Rosenblum, M.D.


North Florida Center


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Wednesday, November 18, 2009 www.







MONEY


ecbp


iublishing.com Monticello News 9A







FINANCE


Practical Money Matters

Be Realistic About Holiday Expenses


Pitch: The holiday sea-
son is the hardest time
of year to control
expenses and stick to a
budget. In this Practical
Money Matters piece,
Mr Alderman shares
tips for determining
how much you can real-
ly afford to spend and
ways to trim expenses
without trimming the
fun.
By Jason Alderman
When I was a kid,
Christmas club savings
accounts were quite
common. Like their
close cousin, the lay-
away plan, these
accounts encouraged
people to start saving
fai in advance for
expenses they knew
were coming.
In these tough eco-
nomic times, a return
to savings methods that
worked so well for our
parents might not be a
bad idea. The basic fun-
darentals they under-
stood included know-
ing what things really
.cdst, (including taxes
,and finance charges).
prioritizing your
expenses, and being
willing to postpone or
forgo purchases that
Will upset your overall
budget.
The holidays are
the most challenging
time of year to curtail
spending, thanks to
long gift lists, frantic
last-minute shopping
and higher-than-usual
travel and -entertain-
ment expenses. Here
are a few tips that can
help you rein in holiday
spending:
Add up expected
holiday-related expens-
es including gifts (for
family, friends and
coworkers), decora-
tions, new clothes and
accessories, gift-wrap-


ping paper, cards, spe-
cial meals and year-end
gratuities. Don't forget
travel-related expenses
if you plan to leave
town, and try to recall
unanticipated expenses
from last year that
might recur.
The flipside and,
more important aspect
of holiday budgeting
is to calculate how
much you can actually.
afford to spend. If you
are deeply in debt, hav-
ing trouble paying reg-
ular monthly expenses,
worried about being
laid off or haven't
saved an emergency
fund, this isn't the time
to rack up additional
debt.
So, revisit your list
and look for items to
trim. A few thoughts: '
Arrange gift lotter-
ies with family mem-
bers and close friends
so each of you can con-
centrate your time,
effort and money on
getting fewer, nicer
gifts. ,
SSpeak candidly
with friends, coworkers
and extended family
about placing a morato-
rium on exchanging
gifts. They're probably
feeling the pinch too.
SIf the gift-giving
gesture is important to
you, suggest pooling
your resources with
others to make a size-
able contribution to a.
charitable cause yowuall-
believe u ....... -
SIf you're traveling
just to get away, consid-
er a "staycation" this
year.
Give the gift of
time. Older relatives-
and friends don't need.
another box of choco-
lates, but they could
probably use your help
with household chores,


running errands or
taking them to doctor's
appointments. Plus,
they would probably
appreciate your com-
pany. For harried
young parents, offer to
babysit so they can run
a few errands or sim-
ply recharge their bat-
teries.
If you need to scale
back on purchases, try
making some gifts and
get your children
involved. Whether
you're creating home-
made cards or baking
cookies for the neigh-
bors, they'll appreciate
being able to spend
more time together.
Plus. you can use it as
an opportunity to dis-
cuss the need for better
budget management -
and why gifts from the
heart are so important.
If you need help
creating a holiday
budget. visit Visa's free
personal financial
management program,
Practical Money Skills
for Life,
(www.practicalmoneys
kills.corn/holiday)
where you'll find easy-
to-follow budgeting,
holiday entertaining
and travel planning
tips as well as interac-
tive calculators to
track your spending.
Take a page from
your parents' book:
There are plenty of
ways to enjoy the holi-
days without breaking
'thebdn. -,-'-
Jason Alderman
directs Visa's financial
education programs.
To sign up for a free
monthly personal
finance e-Newsletter,
go to www.practical
moneyskills.com-
/newsletter.


By Michael Curtis
Greene Publishing, Inc.
In a recent online
discussion forum,
numerous comments
protesting the growth of
Life Settlement invest-
ments were being
issued. One comment
noted, "Bankers are
interested in buying life
insurance policies from
senior citizens and criti-
cally ill people. A $1 mil-
lion paid-up policy
might yield $400,000."
Commenting on a
New York Times story,
the author continues,
"The plan is to bundle a
bunch of these deals to
attract investors looking
for the next big wind-
fall."
Then quoting one
source, "We're hoping to
get a herd stampeding
after the first offering,
said one investment
banker not authorized
to speak to the news
media."
The commentary
goes on to say, "The idea,
Reuters reported, has
been around for a long
time but went nowhere.
'If a small fraction of
policy holders do sell
them, Reuters reported,
some in the industry
predict the market could
reach $500 billion.'"
The Dow Jones
News Agency sheds
more light, stating, "A
growing corner of the
insurance market, in
which people collect
cash for selling their


life-insurance contracts,
requires more scruti-
ny...Greater oversight is
particularly needed
because Wall Street
firms have begun to
securitize the financial
product, known as life-
insurance settlements.
"In a life settlement,
a life-insurance policy-
holder sells an existing
contract to a third party
for more than its cash
surrender value but less
than its net death bene-
fit. For policy owners,
the transaction can be a
way of raising cash if
they no longer need the
policy or can't afford the
policy premiums.
"The Securities and
Exchange Commission
has set up an agency-
wide task force to exam-
ine life insurance settle-
ments amid concerns
that buyers and sellers
of the product may not
know exactly what they.
are getting. The task
force will be looking
into whether company
sponsors of life-settle-
ment securitizations are
providing clear disclo-
sure of the risks of their
business model. SEC
Associate Director of
the Division of
Corporation Finance
Paula Dubberly notes,
'Many securitizations in
general, and life settle-
ment securitizations in
particular, are complex
financial instru-
ments...Investors need
the information neces-


sary to understand these
products, including the
structure of the transac-
tion and issues related
to that such as proVi-
sions for payment of
policy premiums.'
"'The life-insurance
settlement industry has
grown from $2 billion in
2001 to $16 billion in
2008, according to
Dubberly's prepared
remarks, in which she
cites an unnamed indus-
try source.'"
"Investment banks
expect to buy life insur-
ance policies that ill and
elderly people sell for
cash, then package hun-
dreds or thousands of
them into bonds.
Institutional and other
buyers would be the pri-
mary buyers of these
bonds, receiving a pay-
out when people with
the insurance die," the
New York Times report-
ed in its online edition.
"With $26 trillion of
life insurance policies in
force in the U.S., the
market for these "life
settlements" bonds
could be immense, the
Times said. Investment
banks stand to profit
from the creation, sale
and trading of the
bonds. Wall Street has
been searching for a
product to replace the
once-lucrative mortgage
business, and life settle-
ments policies are being
seen as the answer, the
Times added.
"The report further


China Has Big Stake In US Deficit

Many Chinese Entrepreneurs Hopeful That

Obama Can Forge Lasting Partnership


According to reports
posted on chinadai-
lycom, China hopes that
the United States will
keep its deficit to an
appropriate size to
ensure basic stability in
the US dollar exchange
rate, Chinese Premier
Wen Jiabao said recent-
ly.
"We have seen some
signs of recovery in the
US economy ... I hope
that as the largest econo-
my in the world and an
issuing country of a
major reserve currency,
the United States will
effectively discharge its
responsibilities," Wen
told a news conference
in Egypt.
"'Most importantly,
we hope the United
States will keep an
appropriate size to its
deficit so that there will
be basic stability in the
exchange.rate, and that
is conducive to stability
and the recovery of the
global economy,' he
added.
"The premier had
expressed concern in
March that massive US
deficit spending and
near-zero interest rates
would erode the value of
China's huge US bond
holdings. China is the
biggest holder of US
government debt and
has invested an estimat-
ed 70 percent of its more
than $2 trillion stockpile
of foreign exchange
reserves, the world's
largest, in dollar assets.
"'I follow very close-
ly Chinese holdings of
US assets because that
constitutes a very
important part of our
national wealth. Our
consistent principle
when it comes to foreign
exchange reserves is to
ensure the safety, liquid-


ity and good value of the
reserves,' Wen said.
In a BBC report fol-
lowing President Barack
Obama on his overseas
tour that includes
China, "'The United
States does. not seek to
contain China,' Mr
Obama said. 'On the con-
trary, the rise of a strong
and prosperous China
can be a source of
strength for the commu-
nity of nations.'
"The fact of China's
growing influence on
the world stage is some-
thing President Obama
is having to grapple
with. On Beijing's
Tiananmen Square, the
symbolic centre of the
Chinese nation, people


seemed sure this presi-
dential visit would be
different from previous
ones.
"'Because of .the
current economic crisis,
the United States needs
China's co-operation in
many areas,' said Mr.
Ma, who works in the
shipping business.
'Previous US presidents
came to China with an
arrogant attitude, lec-
turing us. But with
President Obama it's dif-
ferent, he's coming to
China to seek our help.'
"And 27-year-old Wang
Xiongbin, who works in
real estate, agreed: 'After
staging the Olympic
Games and our 60th
anniversary parade
here, foreigners now see
China as a strong power.
Obama is definitely
hoping to build better
relations with China,
trade-wise, diplomacy-
wise, co-operation-wise.
He's definitely going to
be softer than President
Bush was.'"


Have You Built Your

Investment Pyramid?
Provided by Robert J. Davison
Of the "Seven Wonders of the Ancient World," the
only one still ir existence is the Great Pyramid of Giza.
This tells you something about the strength of the pyra-
mid structure, but it also suggests that the pyramid may
be a good metaphor for other endeavors that you wish
to endure- such as your investment strategy.
In fact, by creating an appropriate "investment pyra-
mid," you could address your key financial needs and
goals. What might this pyramid look ike? Consider the
following "layers":
*Cash and cash equivalents The "base" of your pyra-
mid should consist of cash and cash equivalents -
short-term investment vehicles that are highly liquid.
Without sufficient cash available, the rest of your
pyramid could crumble because you might be forced to
liquidate longer-term investments to pay for short-
term or emergency needs.
Income The next level up of your pyramid might
contain income-oriented investments, such as bonds
and Certificates of Deposit (CDs). While these in-
vestments may not offer sizable rates of return, they
can offer reliable income.
*Growth and income The middle layer of your pyra-
mid should include investments, such as dividend-pay-
ing stocks, that offer the potential for both growth and
income. (Keep in mind, though, that companies are
not obligated to pay dividends and can reduce or elim-
inate them at any time.)
*Growth The second layer from the top of your
pyramid is reserved for growth-oriented investments,
such as the stocks of companies whose earnings are
expected to grow at an above average rate, relative to
the rest of the financial market. As you'll note,
though, the key word is "expected," because growth
stocks can, and do, produce negative returns as well as
positive ones.
*Aggressive At the very top of your pyramid are the
most aggressive investments. While these investments
may offer the highest growth potential, they also usu-
ally carry the greatest risk level.
Your total investment mix may include investments
from every part of the pyramid, but how much should
go into each layer? There's no one right answer for
everyone. In filling out your investment pyramid, you'll
need to consider your risk tolerance, time horizon,
short- and long-term goals and other factors. So, if you
are a fairly conservative investor, you might place fewer
investment dollars in the "aggressive" layer than some-
one who was willing to take more chances in exchange
for potentially higher returns.
However, the various weightings within your invest-
ment pyramid will likely change over time. As you near
retirement, for example, you may want to move some
- but certainly not all of your investments from
the "growth" layer to the "growth and income" or "in-
come" layers. An investment professional can help you
review your evolving family and financial situations
and make recommendations on what changes you may
need to make to your pyramid.
Pyramids last a long time. And if you build and main-
tain your investment pyramid with care, you can keep
it working efficiently for many years to come.


Robert J. Davison EdwardJones
Financial Advisor
205 E. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32344
Bus. 850-997-2572 Fax 866-462-9184
Cell 850-933-3329
robert.davison@edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com

Making Sense of Investing


noted that investment
banks are following the
model used with the
packaging of subprime
mortgages, which were
supposed to be high-
quality and less risky,
but proved otherwise.
But the Times noted that
Standard & Poor's and
Moody's, which gave out
many triple-A ratings
for subprime mortgage
securities, are more
wary about life settle-
ments bonds. Yet if. its
efforts are successful,
Wall Street's gain could
come at the expense of
the insured."
The commentary
concludes, "Experts on
life settlements told the
Times that insurance
premiums could rise in
the short term if insur-
ers have to pay out more
death claims than they
had expected. The arti-
cle explained that poli-
cyholders often let their
life insurance lapse
before they die, and in
that case the insurer
does not have to make a
payout. But if a policy is
part of a securitized
bond, investors continue
to pay the premiums.
With more policies on
the books, insurance
companies could make
more payouts and less
money, the Times report
said.
Michael Curtis can
be reached at
michael(ii)Wreenepublishi
ng.com.


Life Settlements Present Great

Investment Opportunity And Threat









10A Monticello News


www. ecbpublishing. com


Wednesday, November 18, 2009


HURCH


325 West Washington Street
Monticello 997-2349
Dr. Rick Kelley, Pastor
Sunday School.......... 9:45 AM
Sunday Morning Worship.........11:oo AM
Sunday Evening Worship...........6:oo PM
Wednesday Bible Study............6:30 PM
Children's Church Ages 4-6....11:30 AM
-Nursery for all services-




CR 149- 7 miles North pf US 191 mile South of FL/GA Line
Boston, Monticello Road
850-997-1596
PastorHarold Reams

Sunday Bible Study lo:oo AM
Sunday Worship 11:ooAM
Sunday Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Bible & Prayer Meeting 7:oo PM




14492 Waukeenah Hwy/ P.O. Box 411
Wacissa 997-2179 or 997-1769
Pastor James Gamble
Sunday School.............................9:45 AM
Sunday Morning 10:55 AM
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting....... ............... 6:30 PM
Youth Group 6:00 PM
Choir Practice 7:30 PM





7150 Apalachee Pkwy Tallahassee
www.chbaptistchurch.org
Pastor Derrick Burrus 850-345-0425
Youth Pastor Ron Thrash 850-459-6490
Sunday School.. ..10:oo AM
Sunday Worship 11:oo AM
Children's Chapel 11:00 AM
Sunday Evening...........................6:00 PM
Wednesday Evening....................7:00 PM
Prayer Meeting and Bible Study
Classes for Students




325 W. Walnut Street Monticello
Pastor Wayne Cook
Sunday Praise & Worship...........8:30 AM
Sunday School .......9:45 AM
Traditional Worship...................11:oo PM
Youth Group ..5:30 PM
Wednesday
Bible Study...................................4:15 PM
Music Academy...........................5:00 PM
Prayer Group...............................5:30 PM
Fellowship Meal 6:00 PM





425 Cherry Street Monticello 997-4116.
Father Mal Jopling
Sunday Morning .....................8:30 AM
Sunday Service...........................11:oo AM




1565 East Washington Street
Monticello 973-2428
(One mile east of the Court House on US 9o)
Fr. Viet Tan Huynh
Sunday Mass...............................11:oo AM
Wed. followed by Novena.............7:00 AM
1st & 3rd Saturday
Spanish Massc...............................7:00 PM




4124 Bassett Dairy Rd Monticello 997-8444
Email: ebcmonticello@hcsmail.com
Dr Dean Spivey, Pastor
Student Pastor, Don Self
Sunday: Bible Study.............:.....9:45 AM
W orship Service..........................11:oo AM
Choir Practice............................6:00 PM
Worship Service...........................7:00 PM
Wednesday
Children/Student Ministry...........3:30 PM
Senior Adult Choir Practice...........7:00 PM
RA's, GA's, Mission Friends &Youth.6:30 PM
Bible Study/Prayer Meeting...........6:00 PM




625 Tindell Road Aucilla 997-2081
P.O. Box 163 Monticello
Pastor Daryl Adams 850-251-0129
Sunday School..............................9:45 AM
Sunday Worship Service............11:oo AM
Choir Practice.......................5:00oo PM


Worship Service........................6:00 PM
Wednesday
Fellowship Meal..........................6:30 PM
Prayer Meeting/Bible Study........7:00oo PM


DEBBIE SNAPP
llonticello News
Staff Writer
-Big Bend Hospice
and the Jefferson County
Advisory 'Council will
host the annual Serv ice of
Remembrance 6 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 8 at the
First United Methodist
Church Family Life Cen-
ter, 324 West Walnut
Street in Monticello.
"This service has be
come part of my holiday
tradition and 1 look for
ward to it each year." says
Barbara Sheats. ad% isory
council member. "Every.
one in the community is
welcome to attend. re
gardless of whether
they've used Hospice
services."
The service features
music, words of comfort,
and a candle lighting cer.
emony where the names
of loved ones lost may be
spoken aloud.
The Trees of Remem-
brance are adorned, for a
donation, with gold rib.
bons, porcelain bells and
angels, each bearing a
personal handwritten
message, providing an op-
portunity to recognize
and remember those who
are close to our hearts.
SDonations made go
directly to providing care,
comfort, and hope to Big
Bend Hospice patients
and their families in Jef-
ferson County, and can be
made at Tupelo's Caf6 &
Bakery and Farmers &
Merchants Bank, Monti-
cello. Donations may
also be made the evening
of the Service.
Refreshments will be
available following the
service, which is free and
open to everyone in the
community.
For more informa-
tion contact Michele
Brantley at 850-566-7491 or
micheleb,. bigbendhos-
pice.org


Biblial


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Do you have questions
like: Why is Jesus the only
way to God? or, How can I
know that God exists? or,
What is the Holy Spirit?
Readers with ques-
tions similar to this are
asked to respond to Evan-
gelist Patti Bennett, associ-
ate pastor at Mt. Pleasant
MB Church in Capps at
997-3612 or email to pat-
tomben2@aol.com


Evangelist Patti Bennett


.-*''




AI.I .4is G odC nss


Rev. Eddie Yon, pastor
Restored Glory Christian
Center
Exodus 33:19 And the
LORD said, "I will cause
all my goodness to pass
in front of you, and I will
proclaim my name, the
LORD, in your presence.
I will have mercy on
whom I will have/
mercy, and I will /
have compass
sion on whom
I will have
compass
sion."
When
was the last
time you
asked God .,
to show you -,:~
all of His .j
goodness?
I'm sure that
many of you
will say,
"Brother Yon, I
see enough of
His goodness
every day. Shouldn't
that be enough?" Well,
it might be enough to get
you through the day, but
is that amount of good-
ness the same proportion
that God desires for you
to see?
If we take a look at
our text, we'll notice that
Moses asked God to show
him two things: His ways
(v.13) and His glory (v.18.)
While most of us would
agree that this request
was a great one, God did-
n't. Actually, to God, it
was quite meager, just
the tip of the iceberg.
Perhaps Moses was ex-
pecting God to say, "Here
are my ways, and Here is
my glory," but He didn't.
Instead, God responded,
"I will cause all my good-
ness to pass in front of
you..." (v. 19.)
So did God answer
Moses' request? Yes, He
did. However, because it
is His nature (His way) to
do exceeding abundant
above all His children
can ask or think (Eph-
esians 3:20,) Moses re-
ceived the answer to.his
request AND THEN
SOME! But guess what?
God desires to do the
same for you! You see,
God doesn't want you to
barely get by He desires
for you to have the ex-
ceeding abundant above
all you can ask or think
as well.
The Bible tells us
that it's the "goodness"
of God that leads men to
repentance (Romans 2:4.)
In this scripture, I see
two important revela-
tions. First of all, men
have to "see" God's good-
ness in order to repent,
and secondly, God has to
manifest that goodness


415 E Palmer Mill Rd Montice10o 997-1119
newhope415@yahoo
Paster Ray and Angel Hill
Sunday School........................0lo:oo AM
Sunday Worship.........................11:oo AM
Sunday Prayer.............................6:00 PM
Wed. Family Training Hour........7:00 PM




780 Second Street Monticello 997-4947
Moderator J.B. Duval, Pastor
Worship Services 2nd and 4th Sundays
Sunday School (every Sunday)....9:30 AM
Sunday Worship.........................11:oo AM
Children's Worship.....................11:oo AM
Wednesday
Fellowship Meal..........................6:30 PM
Prayer Meeting/Bible Study.......7:00 PM


FIFE

AFTER


through someone in
order for men to "see" it
and repent. I hope you're
receiving this word in
your spirit right now.
Someone needs to be the
recipient of all of God's
goodness, and it
might as
well be

IOU.


.~~ -
j~'lll~tZi~;lE~~:; '~ .


You
don't
have to
be a pos-
sible candi-
date. No, No, No! Today,
you can move from possi-
ble candidate to poster
child. This day, I pro-
claim that wherever you
go, people will look twice
and wonder, "What is it
about him/her? What is
this thing that he/she
has that I don't have?"
And you'll know that
that thing will be "all"
the goodness of God.
I'm talking about
you getting the answers
not only to situations
you've prayed over but
also to circumstances
you haven't prayed
about. I'm talking about
all of God's goodness
over your family so that
not one person is without
the salvation of Jesus
Christ.
I'm talking about di-
vine strategies over your
life to chart your route to
the destiny that God has
for you. I proclaim all of
God's goodness over
every area of your life to
ensure that nothing will
be incomplete, undone,
unfinished, lacking, mea-
ger, menial, mundane, or
missing because God de-
sires for you to see all His
goodness!


Dr. Raymond L. Verrier
Yes, I do believe in life
after death. And, I believe
in the kingdom of God. I
do believe that you have
to pass through Jesus
Christ before you reach
the destination of the Fa-
ther, in the kingdom. I do
believe that in order to
pass through Jesus Christ
one must be cleansed, and
how that is done is deter-
mined by Jesus Christ,
and as a Roman Catholic,
I believe 'in the purging
and cleansing prior to
passing through Christ,
which we call purgatory.
I do believe that faith,
it is a gift from God and it
shall be handled properly,
and the fruits of our
works reflect and that
faith we continue to have
in relationship with
Jesus Christ and the
Trinity, the Holy Spirit
and Father God.
The fruit's the walk
that we carry, and
through this does mirror
and does reflect that rela-
tionship with God.
Jesus is all about joy;
and that joy He'wants in'
us. He does not-want ut iri
pain; He does not want us
to be ill. Suffering brings
us closer to Him; so does
sorrow. I do believe that if
we keep vigil on Him, that
when we pass from this
body and seek His light,
that our spirit and soul
will be just as they are
now, here on earth.
A moment with
Christ, a moment with
God here on earth, is al-
lowing Him to take up the
cross of worry, the stress
and anxiety,.and to let the
Holy Spirit fill us with
joy; the joy that will be
eternal, that will govern
us and fill us up iii the
kingdom.
He stated that in the
Bible His mother was full
of grace. She was one
human being that was
definitely full of joy


US 19 N 1590 N. Jefferson Street
Rev, Timothy Hildreth 997-3906
1285 Magnolia Ave.
Debra@monticelloiaz@gmail.com

Sunday School..................................9:45 AM
Morning Worship........................10:45AM
Wednesday Evening
Supper 5:30 PM
Small Group Breakout....................6:30 PM
Bible Study & Prayer Meeting............6:30 PM
Saturday
Spanish Church Services....................7:30 PM




124 St. Louis Street Lloyd 997-5309
www.fbclloyd.com
Pastor George L. Smith
Sunday
Sunday School..............................:15 AM
Praise & Worship....................10:30 AM
AWANA..................................... 5:00PM
Youth Encounter..........................5:30 PM
Praise & Worship......................6:00 PM
Adult Choir................................. 7:00 PM
Wednesday
Church-wide Supper.....................5:45 PM
Worship Meeting.........................7:00 PM
Joyful Sounds Children's Choir...7:oo PM
College / Career Celebration.......7:30 PM
1st & 3rd Monday
WMU Mighty Monday...............6:30 PM
2nd Thursday
W.W. Diners.................................5:30 PM
3rd Thursday
Lloyd Silver Saints....................11:30 AM
3rd Saturday
Brotherhood..............................8:00 AM










Wednesday, November 18, 2009


www. ecbpublishing. com


Monticello News 11A


CHURCHH


wounto
lom e


(2rior


the


y ZSinger & c


Jeff Willis Testifies.Prayer Saved His Life


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
A former country-
western singer, self-
acknowledged. "ballplayer
for the devil" and twice-
saved Christian proved to
be a popular and enter-
taining quest speaker at
the monthly Business
Community Prayer
Breakfast, held 7 a.m.
Thursday, Nov. 5, at the
Monticello Presbyterian
Fellowship Hall.
A storyteller at ease
and with a knack for pub-
lic speaking, Jeff Willis
told his life's story with
humor, good will and a
degree of show biz, cap-
ping his presentation with
the singing of two faith-
based songs.
Born into a Christian
church-going family in
Pavo, Georgia, in 1945,
Willis said he was "saved"
at age 10 and "walked in
the Lord's footsteps" until
about age 30, when he
"decided to play ball with
the devil".
It happened about the
same time that he got into
country music, started his
own band, and hit the
road. Country music was-
n't the cause of his back-
sliding, Willis said. But it
may well have facilitated
the process, if not con-
tributed to his downfall.
"I was on a first name
basis with the devil,"
Willis said.
For seven years he
traveled the road in pur-
suit of fame and glory and
managed to attain a meas-
uepf success as a country
singer by his own telling,
serving as the opening act
for many a well-known
country star. One of the
high points of his career,
he said, was playing before
a crowd of 12,000 and get-
ting a standing ovation -
a point he returned to later
in his presentation. But if
his new lifestyle was wild,
exciting and rewarding, it
also exacted a toll in terms
of destroying his mar-
riage and causing him to
lose touch with his kids
during their growing
years, he said.
Willis didn't go into
what finally convinced
him to amend his ways,
give up the road, and reset-
tle in his hometown after
seven years. But his
return eventually led to
his marriage to "Kate",
with whom he has
remained the last 23 years
and who facilitated his
return to the church, in
his case the First Baptist
Church in Thomasville,
where he now sings in the
choir.
Willis made it clear,
however, that his goal was-
n't to promote any particu-
lar church, creed or
denomination. Rather, it
was to promote churchgo-
ing and prayer in general,
no matter how, when or
where one worshipped. In
that respect, he praised the
interdenominational
nature of the prayer
breakfast, which brought
together ministers and
worshippers from all
faiths and walks of life.
Willis told of being
diagnosed with throat can-
cer five years ago. When
his general physician first
mentioned the possibility
and referred him to a spe-
cialist, Willis said he
prayed as he had never


prayed before.
"If we prayed all the
time like we pray when
we're sick, we wouldn't
have the world's prob-
lems," Willis said, drawing
appreciative laughter from
the audience.
He said when the spe-
cialist's initial assessment
indicated that the growth
was benign, he immediate-
ly gave up praying, figur-
ing he "had done healed
myself". But just to make
sure it was benign, the spe-
cialist decided to do a biop-
sy, with the devastating
result that it turned out to
be throat cancer.
"He told me you will
never be able to sing again,
and if you do, you will be
out of pitch," Willis said.
Notwithstanding that
prognosis, Willis said he
was happy to report that
after much praying and 63
treatments at Shands
Hospital in Gainesville,
FL, he was cancer-free and
singing again.
"This was in July 2004
that I underwent the treat-
ments," Willis said. "I cele-
brated my fifth year' of
being cancer free in July."
His message to the
sizeable and mixed gather-
ing of business, communi-
ty, church and elected lead-
ers and ordinary citizens
was that prayer was the
answer to life's many prob-
lems.
"Take your burden to
the Lord and leave them
-there," Willis said. "The
rest of the ordeal will be
lighter."
He said that since his
confrontation with cancer,
he had comforted many
another with the same
affliction and taken
numerous friends to
Shands, not all meeting
with the same happy
result as himself.
He shared an incident
that had particularly
touched him, relating to a
longtime friend whom he
called "Missy" and who
apparently died of cancer.
Willis said Missy loved to
hear him sing and her hus-
band requested that he
sing to her in the last
hours of her bedridden Ill-
ness at the hospital. He
said when he arrived at
the hospital, Missy was


said 'thank you'. That
topped my 12,000 people
standing ovation. I still
sing the same songs today
as I did then, but there's a
difference. Before I sang
for me and God; today I
sing for God and me. I
reversed it. Since Shands I
promised God that I would
either sing for him or
speak for him."
Assisted by an elec-
tronic device that provid-
ed background rhythm
and choral accompani-
ment, Willis proceeded to
sing two faith-based songs,
one an upbeat number
about deliverance, titled
"He'll Deliver Me"; and the


Jeff Willis, a former
country singer and twice
saved Christian, conclud-
ed his testimonial with his
singing of two faith-based
songs. Here he sings,
"He'll Deliver me."


Attendees at the Business Community Prayer
Breakfast prepare to enjoy a hearty breakfast at 7 a.m.
Thursday, Nov. 5, in the Monticello Presbyterian
Fellowship Hall.


Businessman Jack Carswell, foreground, and
Sheriff David Hobbs, background, were among the many
community leaders attending the breakfast.


Listening to the speaker at the Business Community Prayer Breakfast on
Thursday morning are, from left to right, Rev. Timothy Hildreth of the Nazarene
Church; retired Methodist minister, Rev. Carl Hanks; and Paul Ellis, a member of the
Presbyterian Church.


barely able to open her
eyes, had all kinds of tubes
in her nose, and the only
other people in the room
were her husband and
mother.
"I sang Amazing
Grace to her," Willis said.
"When I finished, Missy's
swollen eyes came open
and she looked at me and


Enjoying the singing of Jeff Willis at the conclusion
of his testimonial at the Business Community Prayer
Breakfast are, from left, Extension Office Director John
Lilly and Commissioner Felix "Skeet" Joyner.


second a slower tempo
piece, titled "We Are
Standing On Holy
Ground."
The crowd of 75 or so
appropriately gave Willis a
standing ovation, and the
event's sponsors extended
an invitation for him to
return another time and
share more of his stories
and music. Willis came as


the quest of Bill Bippus,
who did the introduction.
"Notwithstanding his
testimonial of his walk
with the Lord, he's as dys-
functional as the rest of
us," is the way Bippus
humorously introduced
his friend, drawing laugh-
ter from the audience and
showing a comfortable
level of familiarity
between the two.


Monticello News Photos By Lazaro Aleman, Nov. 5, 2009.



1599 Springhollow Road Monticello
Pastor Marvin Graham
Sunday Discipleship Class...........9:30 AM
Sunday Worship......................10:30 AM
Wednesday Bible Study................7:00 PM
Wed. Young People Bible Study..7:oo PM
Wed. Counseling..........5:30 PM-8:30 PM
New Life Ministry
Tuesday Bible Study....................7:00 PM
Sunday Worship...........2:00 PM-4:oo PM
Thurs. Jail Ministry.....7:00 PM-9:oo PM
AA Tuesday.................................. 8:0 PM


oallPlayer

r7P


Every Monday AA Meets..............7:00 PM


I


u


IAPR IS
^~~BAPTIulST HURCH


5593 Veterans Memorial Drive (Hwy 59)
Tallahassee 850-893-5296
www.indianspringsbaptistchurch.com
Rev. Greg Roberts
Sunday School.... ...9:45 AM
Sunday Worship. 11:oo AM
Children's Worship .11:oo AM
Wednesday
Fellowship Meal...........................7:oo PM
Prayer Meeting ...7:45 PM



Hwy 27 South (1 mile south of Hwy 59)
Monticello 997-4226
Rev. J. W. Tisdale
Sunday Morning 9:30 AM
Sunday Worship......................11:oo AM'
Wednesday
Prayer & Bible............................... 7:00 PM



285 Magnolia St Monticello 997-2165
www.cbcflorida.org
Dr. David E. Walker, Pastor
Sunday School.............................9:45 AM
Sunday. Morning 11:oo AM
Sunday Evening...........................6:30 PM
Wednesday Evening....................7:00 PM
Wed. TRAC Club for teens...........7:oo PM




3862 Tram Rd. Monticello 997-6774
Pastors Donnie and Nancy Thomas
Sunday School..........................10:oo AM
Sunday Morning Worship.........11:oo AM
Sunday Evening Worship...........6:00 PM
Wednesday Worship...................7:00 PM




Highway 259 Monticello 997-5018
Min. Tobbie Berrian III, Pastor
Sunday School............................:30 AM
Sunday Morning Worship..........11:oo AM
Wednesday Bible Study...............7:30 PM



7337A Old Lloyd Road Lloyd 997-TLC7 (8527)
Pastors Tim and Beverly Buchholtz
www.TransformingLifeChurch.com

Sunday 10:30 AM
Sunday Morning Praise and Worship
Children's Church
infants & Toddler Nursery
Wednesday 7:00oo PM
Adult Life Groups
Fire Wire Youth (6th-12th Grade)
Young Explorers Children (k-5th Grade)
Infants & Toddlers Nursery




446 Hatchett Road Lament
997-4124 or 997-6135
Pastor Andy Creel
Sunday School 10:00 AM
Sunday Worship.....................11:oo AM
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting & Choir Practice...7:oo PM



1287 South Jefferson Street 997-RGCC (7422)
www.restoredglory.org
Sunday Radio Show 8 a.m. 97.9 FM
Pastor Eddie and Elder Veronica Yon
Sunday Church Service........o.....:oo AM
Thursday Church Service............7:oo PM


121 River Rd (Beside Hwy 19-27 E) Lament
P.O. Box 188 997-6870
Pastor Rev. Charles F. Johnson

Sunday School 10:00 AM
Sunday Worship 11:oo AM
Nursery/ Children's Church each Sunday
Sunday Evening 6:00 PM
Wednesday
Choir Practice/ Prayer Meeting/ Bible Study
7:00 PM
Monthly Fellowship Meal
Wednesday after 2nd Sunday..............6:00 PM
3rd Monday
JOY Club (Just Older Youth)
for anyone 50 Years or Older... ...6:ooPM


81 Methodist Church Rd Waukeenah 997-2171
Pastor Ralph L. Wrightstone
Sunday School............................9:45 AM
Sunday Worship... ........11:oo AM
Youth Group..................... ........... 7:00oo PM
Tuesday
Overeaters Anonymous ...........7:00 PM
Wednesday
Choir Practice....... .......................7:oo PM
Youth Group..... ...................... 7:00oo PM
Family Fellowship
2nd Thursday of each month
Thrift Store open second Saturday
of every month 8:00 AM-1:oo PM










12A Monticello News


www.ecbpublishing.com


Wednesday, November 18, 2009


SCHOOL




County 4-11 School Clubs Begin New Year


Jefferson County School Clubs have begun the
new 4-H year. Once a month John Lilly, County 4-H
Coordinator Gladys Nealy, program assistant, and
Nancy Scarboro go into the classroom of the third,
fourth, and fifth graders, to conduct 4-H Club meet-
ings.


Students complete 4-H Club applications in the
beginning of the school year. Each class elects offi-
cers that will lead the club in that class, for the
school year. Project books are developed at the 4-H
office for each grade level, except for the fifth
grade.



~(i~x~ Ai X=U


A typical 4-H Club meeting consists of a busi-
ness meeting, working in project books, and recre-
ation. Students focus on learning the history of 4-
H, food and nutrition, agriculture adventures,
exploring citizenship, safety, earth connections,
and leadership skills.
AYk


Mrs. Whitty's and Mrs. Clark's Fourth Grade Classes: Anthony Thompkins,
president; Lorenzo Geathers, vice-president; Yalhana Howard, secretary; Tamia
Kellogg, asst. secretary; and Arissa Bennett, sgt.-at-arms.


Mrs. Parrish's Fourth Grade Class: Dylan Rudlaff, president: Sara Mcelveen.
vice-president; Kentyra Mclntosh, secretary; Naya Thompson, asst. secretary;
and Makayla Brown.


Ms. Barnhart's Fifth Grade Class: Jasminie Jaimes, president: Clevan
Greene, vice-president; Alison Rutschike, secretary: Delondra Nealy, asst. secre-
tary; and Alonzo Darity, sgt.-at-arms.


Mrs. Howard's Fourth Grade Class: Jasminie Jaimes, president; Clevan
Greene, vice-president; Robert Lee, secretary; Delondra Nealy, asst. secretary;
and Alonzo Darity, sgt.-at-arms.


S E E I N.--G I S
.- ..- g-. '-* ,L .


B--E L I E V I N G


MEET OUR DOCTORS


Mrs. Bradley's Fifth Grade Class: Mikeria Andrews, president: Jabriya Oliver,
vice-president; Emmerald Graham, and Cody Oates. sgt.-at-arms.


, j I I.. I

FREE SEMINAR
on DECEMBER 1"
at 7:00pm
Drs. Louis Potyondy
t Peter Urban will
be performing an
informative seminar
at Nature Coast ECI.


Ms. Wilson's Fifth Grade Class: Bernard Huggins, president; Ta'Mye Madry,
vice-president; Gabby Lewis, asst. secretary; Kheica Jones, sgt-at-arms.


On Tuesday, December 1st Nature Coast EyeCare Institute
is hosting a FREE informative event you won't want to miss.
Both Drs. Louis Potyondy and Peter Urban will be on hand to
discuss the Latest advances in medicine and how they may
improve your lifestyle.
Dr. Potyondy is a board certified plastic surgeon with extensive
plastic surgery skills. His articles have been published in Journal
of Burn Research, Aesthetic Surgery Journal,The American Surgeon
as well as The Chronicle of Skin and Allergy.
Dr. Urban is a highly experienced ophthalmic clinician and surgeon.
He is a pioneer in modern cataract and refractive surgery and is
happy to join the world class team at Nature Coast. Dr. Urban will
be working alongside Dr. Gary Wortz.

ATTEND THE SEMINAR AND RECEIVE:
$B0 0OFF PLASTIC SURGERY
$600 OFF PER EYE
FOR A LASIK PROCEDURE
S' OR
$1000 OFF PER EYEFOR
CUSTOM-VUE LASIK!
(NORMAL LASIK PRICE IS $1500 PER EYE
CUSTOM-VUE LASIK IS NORMALLY $2000 PER EYE.)

OUR AREA OF SPECIALTIES
" FACIAL COSMETIC SURGERY FACIAL REJUVENATION
" BODY CONTOURING BREAST SURGERY GENERAL RECONSTRUCTION
" DERMATOLOGIC SURGERY SKIN CARE MEDICAL SPA
" CATARACT SURGERY HIGH PERFORMANCE/MULTI-FOCAL LENSES
" LASIK Loser Vision Correction GLAUCOMA LASER SURGERY
* OPTICAL SHOP WELL EYE EXAMS


NATURE COAST
TyeCare Institute


555 North Byron Butler Parkway Perry, FL 32347
(850) 584-2778 ext. 647 www.naturecoasteye.com

THE PATIENT AND ANY OTHER PERSON RESPONSIBLE FOR PAYMENT HAS THE RIGHT TO REFUSE TO PAY, CANCEL PAYMENT OR BE REIMBURSED FOR ANY OTHER
SERVICE, EXAMINATION OR TREATMENT WHICH S PERFORMED AS A RESULTOF AND WITHIN 72 HOURS OF RESPONDING TO THE ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE
:iif [ir'.ijiiNiL FIii DI Pif ll(tji tij I R(E i s ViR [XAMINAP N OR T'imtN A I I SilIANTII J %ii I[ Illn A l ''. !|i] IhuR I DA tTarui


I 7Nj ^*-,'';,,,.4,. ^










Wednesday; November 18, 2009


www. ecbpublishing. com


Monticello News 13A


PORTS


Jefferson Lady Tigers Tigers, Warriors Named Big Bend Leaders


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Jefferson County
Girls' Head Basketball
Coach, Sabrenia Douglas,
reports the schedule for
the varsity team. There
will be no junior varsity
girls' basketball team this
year. Assisting Douglas
on the hardwood will be
Valarie Thompson.
Hoop action
begansin the Tip-Off
Classic 2:30 p.m.,
Saturday Nov. 14 at West
Gadsden High, and con-
tinues with Aucilla
Christian Academy, 5:30
p.m., Nov. 17, here; Taylor
County 6:30 p.m., Nov. 23,
there; Maclay, 6 p.m., Nov.
24, here; and Godby, 6:30
p.m., Nov. 30, there.
John Paul II, 6 p.m.,
Dec. 3, there; Hamilton
County 5:30 p.m., Dec. 4,
here; Mayo, 5:30 p.m., Dec.
8, here; Maclay, 3 p.m.,
Dec. 11, there; Madison
County, 6 p.m., Dec. 12,
there; North Florida
Christian, 5:30 p.m., Dec.
15, here; Chiles, 6 p.m.,
Dec. 17, there; and begin-
ning Dec. 19 through
Dec. 22 is the Christmas
Tournament, to be host-
ed in Macon, GA, times


to be announced.
SJohn Paul II, 6 p.m.,
Jan. 6, here; Taylor
County, 5 p.m., Jan. 8,
here; Godby, 4 p.m., Jan.
9, here; Mayo, 5:30 p.m.,
Jan. 12, there; Wakulla,
5:30 p.m., Jan. 14, there;
Hamilton County, Jan.
15, there; Chiles, 6 p.m.,
Jan. 20, here; Arnold,
noon, Jan. 23, here; and
winding up the regular
season, Madison County,
6 p.m., Jan. 30, here. -
The District
Tournament will be held
Feb. 1-6, times and loca-
tions to be determined.
Douglas is a gradu-
ate of Godby High
School, where she par-
ticipated in basketball
and track. She received
her Bachelor's of
Science degree in physi-
cal education from
Florida A&M University
Currently she is pursu-
ing a master's degree in
Sports Administration
from Central Michigan
University
Douglas returned to
the area from- Atlanta,
where she.taught physi-
cal education and
coached high school
basketball. She has 13
years of coaching girls


and boys' basketball at
the high school and
Amateur Athletic Union
(AAU) level.
Her experience also
involved coaching with-
in the Leon County
school system and the
community
Her accomplish-
ments include manag-
ing her own travel bas-
ketball program for the
past eight years while
traveling across the
United States, and com-
peting in sanctioned
tournaments. She has
won national and state
champions hi p s
throughout her coach-
ing career. She has suc-
cessfully paved the way
for former players
under her leadership to
receive college scholar-
ships while competing
in basketball.
Douglas believes in
emphasizing the impor-
tance of academics and
excelling in the class'-
room to her students
and athletes. She has a
strong passion for teach-
ing, coaching and men-
toring youths.. She is
excited to become a part
of the Jefferson County
High School staff..


ACA MSB Basketball Schedule


^* WARFIIWRS

Wilson Lewis

FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
For. the seventh
week .straight, Tiger,
Warrior athletes have
been named Big Bend
Leaders.
In rushing,
Devondrick Nealy
(Jefferson) remained at
#1 for the seventh week
,with 137 carries for 1,305
yards and 19 touch-
downs; Kendrick
Huggins-Footman
(Jefferson), #37 with 26
carries for 260 yards and
2 touchdowns; Alex
Dunkle (ACA), #39 with
79 rushes for 241 yards
and no touchdowns;
Todd McKenzie (ACA)
was #52 with 31 rushes
for 162 yards and 3
touchdowns; and Phillip
Watt (ACA) #54 with 26
carries for 148 yards and
1 touchdown.
In passing freshman
Lenorris Footman


Basketball Schedule


(JCHS) remained at #1
with 109 pass comple-
tions of 180 attempts,
with 4 interceptions, for
1,969 yards and 18 touch-
downs; Hans Sorensen
(ACA), #17 with 37 com-
pletions, of 49 attempts,
with 5 pass intercep-
tions, for 444 yards and 6
touchdowns; Trent
Roberts (ACA), #21 with
35 completions of 102
attempts for 330 yards,
and 1 touchdown; and
Marquice Dobson
(Jefferson), #26 with 3
pass completions of 3
attempts for 146 yards
and 3 touchdowns.
In receiving, David
Crumity (Jefferson)
remained in the #1 slot
with 37 pass receptions
for 814 yards and 12
touchdowns; Marquice
Dobson (Jefferson), #5
with 43 receptions for
733 yards and 7 touch-
downs; Alphonso
Footman (Jefferson),
#19 with 19 receptions
for 305 yards, and 2
touchdowns; Wilson
Lewis (ACA), #20 with
21 pass receptions for
296 yards and 1 touch-
down; Clark Christy
(ACA), #24 with 18
receptions for 250 yards,
and 3 touchdowns; and
Devondrick Nealy
(Jefferson), #38 with 8
receptions for 185 yards.
On the defensive
side of the field, in tack-
les, Tyler Evans (ACA)


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff. writer
'Auicilla Christian
Academy has released
tho- basketball schedule
for the- middle school
boys. Coaching the team
this year is Daryl Adams.
Action on the hard-
wood begins against


Maclay, 2 p.m., Nov. 24,
there; Community
Christian, 4 p.m., Dec. 1,
there; Maclay, 3 p.m.,
Dec. 3, here; Munroe, 4
p.m., Dec. 4, here;
Madison Academy, 6
p.m., Dec. 7, here;
Munroe, 2:30 p.m., Dec. 8,
there; Seven Hills, 6 p.m.,
Dec. 10, there;


Brookwood, 3:30 p.m.,
Jan. 7, here; Georgia
Christian, 5 p.m., Jan. 8,
here; Madison Academy,
4:30 p.m., Jan. 14 at Lee;
Brookwood, 5 p.m., Jan.
15, there; Community
Christian, 5 p.m., Jan. 21,
here; and winding up the
season, Seven Hills, 6
p.m., Jan. 29, here.


BLABALOTS SLIP INTO SECOND


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
In match nine of the
North Florida/South
Georgia Women's A-
League Tennis teams,
held Nov. 5, the Monticello
Blabalots lost their first
place slot and slipped into
second place after losing
to the Bainbridge
Different Strokes, 4-2.
Team #1, Katie Brock
and Susan Goodwin, lost
by forfeit.
Team #2, Angle
Delvecchio and Cindy
Wainright, lost the match-
es, 6-3 and 6-1.
Team #3 Laura
Kirchhoff and Laura
Ward, lost the matches, 6-2
and 6-4.
Team #4, Valorie
Stevens and Patty Hardy,
lost the first match, 2-6,
won the second, 6-2 and
won the tiebreaker, 6-4.
Team #5, Jennifer
Ellis and Mary Bridges,
won the sets, 6-1 and 6-3.
Team #6, Maxie
Miller and Linsey Taylor,


lost the first match, 4-6,
won the second, 6-1 and
lost the tiebreaker, 6-3.
Following the results
of the matches,
Bainbridge Different
Strokes was #1 was 36;
Monticello Blabalots #2
with 35; Ace Kickers, #3
with 33; Glen Arvin
Classics #4 with 30 /2;
MatchPoints #5 with 30;
Serve Me Another,


Thomasville Ace-N-U, and
Glen Arvin Dirty Dozen,
were tied at #6 with 29;
Capital City Aces, #7 with
28; Killearn Lucky
Charms, #9 with 24;
Golden Eagle Screaming
Eagles, #10 with 21;
Golden Eagle Wings, #11
with 20; Capital City
deuces, #12 with 19 %; and
Killearn Hot Flashes, #13
with 14.


I 00"s of Tires i
Wheels in Stock





S, 20yrs
iding, 1c Combined
dSiding, Inc Experience
3.03


'- ;.' ^ .- "-.Ti " .. Y

* New Construction Screen Rooms
* Re-modeling Decks
*Additions Soffit & Facia
* Replacement Windows Repairs
S Vinyl, Wood, Fiber Cement Siding

Licelnxed l& Insuiire

Mitchell Morgan Rodney Roberts
(850) 251-6505 (850) 251-4588


was #12 with 37 solos
and 38 assists; In quar-
terback sacks, Trent
Roberts (ACA), #3 with
9:5; and Tyler Evans
(ACA), #11 with 3.5.
In pass intercep-
tions, David Crumity
(Jeffprson) was #2 with
6; and Wilson Lewis
(ACA) and Marquice
Dobson (Jefferson) were
tied at #3 with .5 pass
interceptions each,
In kicking points,
Lane Fraleigh (ACA)
was #11 with no comple-
tions of 1 attempt in
field goals and 9 comple-
tions of 13 attempted
extra points. In punting,
Trent Roberts (ACA)
was #9 with 31 punts for
1,018 yards; and Lane
Fraleigh (ACA) was #15
with 9 punts for 250
yards;
Jefferson did not
play last week, retaining
the same statistics for
two weeks.


J EEPM- RESIDENTS



H1N1 SWINE FLU

V"CCMNES4 AVMIEdA


W//VN- /X/E PlZA SdARfW4fA'

NOV. 22 8 AM- 12 PM



S t is very important
that the following
people be
vaccinated:
SPregnant women
S Parents, caregivers
and people living
With infants under
7 '1 6 months old
Anyone 6 months to
24 years old
Persons aged 25 through 64 years who have health
conditions associated with higher risk of medical
complications from influenza
H1N1 Swine Flu Vaccines are now available

at the Jefferson County Health Department

Clinic located at 1255 West Washington

Street.

Clinic hours:

Monday Friday: 8:00 AM 12:30 PM

and 1:00 PM- 4:30 PM.

H1N1 Swine Flu Vaccines are FREE

No appointment is necessary

For more information,

please call: (850) 342-0170, Extension # 3

FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF








wnmw. ecd ublishin. comr


Fodbal season is sbatig admlhave we got a contest for you! Each w
wl post the games that wil be played and the nivikkud who makes t
accurate predictions leganing the winner of each game will w
following. prizes: First Place will win a $20.00 check fro
Monticello News or a one year subscription. The Second
winner will receive 2 movie passes or a 6 month subsc
absolutely FREE!

Rules of Play
1. Write down which teams you think will be the winners on the entry form.
2. Submit the entry form to the newspaper no later than 5 p.m. each Friday.
3. Only one entry per-week is allowed per contestant.
4. In case of a tie, the tie-breaker will be used to determine the winner.
5. The contest is open to anyone age 18 and older, except for newspaper employees and
families.
6. The decision of the judges is final.
7. Winner will be contacted by phone and announced in the newspaper on Wednesday o
week.


Steve Walker
Realty, LLC
'7250 S. Jefferson St.
Monticello
S\\ \\ .Ste eWalkerRealty.com
997-4061

l.JCHS vs.
Lafavette .


& SPARKMAI
4#o4aneapt at1?ao
165 E. Dogwood S
Monticello
997-3503


2. FSU vs.
Maryland


of Miami, Inc.
&1MV67S42
850-997-0200
Foreign & Domestic
Car Light Truck 4x4 Repair
6. FAMUI vs.
Bethune Cookman


S 997-2459
7. Tennessee vs.
Vanderbill


ticello


//


UHflmI 0

COLLISION
Collision Windows
Brakes A/C Repair
Wheels & Lift Kits
Tires
765 E. Washington St. Monticello
997-1500 /
8. Indianapolis Colts
SE~LECT ^ ^s. Baltimore Ravens
State Famrm '
I Prowjir a] Ir a r,.'- dn1 F l ; -', 'F
HomeP UOT B tiLc b jnIIl,,, r, I ,...III. .1 l10 \
Tommy Surles Ins Agcy Inc
Tommy Surles, Agent
225 N Jefferson Street
Monticello. FL 32344-1819
Bus 850 997 8282 Fax 850 997 2884
tommy.surles.bw9i@statefarm.com
9. Tampa Bay Bucs vs. i .'
New Orleans Saintsl -
efferson urnal
1.1 1
^^*a~ea^^A A &i


IVIONTICELLO NEWS


S 154116

5



I
I

I

Name:
IAddress:
I Phone:
I


Winning


I 1.
S2.
I3.
4.
I

5.
I 6.



$


PO Box 428 9
180 W. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32345 10.
850-997-3568 TIE BRI
10. NY Giants i
vs. Atlanta WINNEF
I W I
-


reek we
he most
rin the
m The
Place
ription







I.their

S1-10 CHEVRON
fea ch I



5185 S. Jefferson St Monticello
997-1965
3. Florida Gators vs.
FL International
it.
CAMINEZ
& HARDEE, P.A.
I Personal Injury &
Wrongful Death
1307 S. Jefferson Street
Monticello
^"~. 850-997-8181
S4. Georgia vs.
Kentuck%



N. Jefferson St Monticello
997-0285
;. Miami Hurricanes
vs. Duke






Contest Form







Teams
















EAKER: (exact score of below game)


FSU vs Maryland
IS: Week of Nov 11 Nov 18
FIRST PLACE Stephen Pimental
SECOND PLACE Arlene Virgil
im l i m m a o a 1 I - I -


Wednesday, November 18, 2009


14A Monticello News










Wednesday, November 18, 2009


www. ecbpublishing.com







SCHOOL


Monticello News 15A


SAucilla Christi

2nd Six Weeks
K-5 (Clark)
Honor Roll
Caitlin Bates, Caroline
Beshears, Kasey Chmura,
Jacob Green, Kenzie Key,
Jenna Lindsey, Carl
Mattheus, Mason
McCord, Trent Rabon,
Addison Shiver, Courtney
Smith, Tristan Walker,
Hunter Watson,
Benjamin Whiddon,
Taggert Williams, Joshua
Wurgler
First Grade (Stephens)
All A's
Natalie Andrews, Justice
Black, Abby Bowen, Joey
Davis, Lindsey Davis,
Cole English, Keira
Evans, Kolton
Grambling, Cheyenne
Hilbert, Sarah Plain,
Jordan Swickley, Ramsey
Wisenbaker
All A's and B's
Xander Ames, Emmaleah
Hooppell, Hunter
Hughes, Cloe Ozbun,
Krishan Patel, Maddie
Sears
First Grade (Roberts)
All A's
Jeb -Beshears, Selina
Drawdy, Dean Forehand,
Riley Hamrick, Riley
Rowe, Mary Rose
Schwier, Tyler Slaughter,
Will Sullivan, Olivia
Walton
All A's and B's
James Austin Hightower,
Jackson Olson, Amber
Ozbun, Alissa Roland,
Jarrett Roland, Wyatt
Stafford, Travis Wheeler,
Ginger Whiddon
Second Grade
(Whiddon)
All A's
Ansley English, Brandon
Hannon, Mylie Rogers
All A's and B's
AbbiGayle .. ..- Cope,
Jamieson Dalzell, Carl
Hall, Austin Hebert,
Anna Key, Hannah
Sprenkle, Austin wheSplpr
Second Grade (Love)
All A's
Carson Leigh Olson,
Abby Reams, Ben
Wurgler
All A's and B's
Jacob Barker, Dawson
Bishop, Kinsey Clark,
Nathan Green, Julianna
Lindsey, Bailey McLeod,
Pierce Powers, Hope
Randle
Third Grade (Aman)
All A's
Andrew Burrus, Gabe
Rouse
All A's and B's
Alexis Alexandrou,
Brandon Bates, Grace
Beshears, Woods Collins,
Emily Forehand, lan
Hutsell, Ryan Jackson,
Hayley Lewis, Maggie
Mall, Ayush Patel, Chloe
Reams, Ashlyn Rogers,
Megan Schofill, Dilyn
Stowers, Mackenzie
Wirick
Third Grade (Falk)
Multi-Age
All A's
R.B. Bowen Nicolas
Swickley, Katherine
Whichel
All A's and B's
Austin McCord, Evan
Courtney, Levi Stafford
Fourth Grade (Brown)
All A's
Timothy Finlayson,
Elizabeth Hightower,
Mickaela Whiddon
All A's and B's
Elliot Dalzell, Walker
Davis, Jessica Giddens,
Summer Jenkins, Ryals
lee, Hanson Ozbun, Grace
Rouse, Joe Walton, Tedo
Wilcox, Ria Wheeler
Fourth Grade (Falk)
Multi-Age
All A's
Katie James, Carly
Joiner, Abigail Morgan,
Cannon Randle, Brandon
Slaughter, Daniel
Wurgler
All A's and B's
Evan Hocking, Haley
James
Fifth Grade A
(Burkett)
All A's
Traynor Barker, Jenny
Jackson, Kirsten Reagan


All A's and B's
Dena Bishop, Brittany
Hughes, Peyton


an Honor Roll Jefferson County High

200W-2010
Scharinger, Ramsey Schoolmates Reunite In Madison
Sullivan. Hank Wirick


Fifth Grade B
(Hughey)
All A's
Stephanie English
All A's and B's
Meagan Beaty, Call
Burkett, Cassie Davis,
Joe Hannon, Erica
Keeler, Kate Whiddon
Sixth Grade (Tharpe)
All A's
Abby Hettinger, Justin
Welch, Emma Witmer
All A's and B's
Taylor Copeland, Sam
Hogg, Savannah Jenkins,
Erin Lee, Ally Mall,
Taylor McKnight, T.J.
Swords, Sarah Tharpe,
Gaige Winchester
Seventh Grade
All A's
Sarah James
All A's and B's
Austin Bishop, Timothy
Burrus, Morgan Cline,
Maddie Everett, Ricky
Finlayson, Carson
Nennstiel, Kelsi Reams
Eighth Grade
All A's
Aimee Love,
All A's and B's
Cole Davis, Hunter
Home, Ashlyn Mills,
Jessica Webb, Jessica
Welch
Ninth Grade
All A's
Ashli Cline, Jay
Finlayson, Kaley Love,
Whitney McKnight,
Hadley Revell, Audrey
Waters, Josh Wood
All A's and B's
Alexis Burkett, Tres
Copeland, Jeffrey Falk,
Russell Fraleigh, Jared
Jackson, Austin Malloy,
Daniel Shadrac, Ashley
-Schofill,-Hans Sorenseir-
Pamela Watt
Tenth Grade
All A's
Josh Funderburke,
Shelby Witmer
All A's and B's
Brittany Borriague, Levi
Cobb, Tyler Jackson, Tori
Self

Eleventh Grade
All A's
Nikki Hamrick, Kaitlin
Jackson, Taylor
Pridgeon, Abigail
Vasquez
All A's and B's
Chase Bozeman, Clark
Christy, Taryn Copeland,
Anna Finlayson, Tiffany
Funderburke, Jessica
Hagan, Kent Jones, Lisa
Kisamore, G.H. Liford,
Caroline Mueller,
Elizabeth Riley, Ceira
Roland, Sarah Sorensen,
Nathan Williams
Twelfth Grade
All A's
Brooke Stewart, Dana
Watt
All A's and B's
Kalyn Brown, Lane
Fraleigh, Tyler High,
Jessica Hunt, Wilson
Lewis, Sydney Plummer,
Ryan Pricher, John
Stephens


Adrienne Byrd, who
took early admission
and graduated from
Jefferson County High
School in 1980, began
making her home in
Australia in 1985. Living
in Western Australia,
she has picked up a
charming Aussie accent.
She currently works in
an administrative posi-
tion at a hospital in
Perth.
She was visiting her
father in Gainesville
recently and stopped in
Madisoh on Thursday,
Nov. 5, to see Jacob
Bembry, editor of The
Madison County Carrier
and The Madison
Enterp'rise-Recorder
newspapers. She was on
her way to visit relatives
and friends in Georgia
when she stopped in
Madison to see Bembry,
who graduated from
Jefferson in 1982.
She and Bembry
attended school together
in Monticello where
they played on the tennis


(Greene Publishing, Inc. Photo by Michael Curtis, Nov. 5, 2009)
Former Jefferson County High School friends Jacob Bembry, left, and
Adrienne Byrd, center, visited in Madison on Thursday, Nov. 5. Adrienne's father,
Philip Byrd, accompanied his daughter on the trip.


team, coached by Clyde
Cruce of Greenville.
They also had several
classes together. They
caught up with each


Area Educators Attend

NFCC Math Summit


Aucilla Christian Academy's James Burkett. left,
was among 28 area educators attending the NFCC
Math Summit. Speaking is
NFCC instructor Bonnie
Littlefield, of Jefferson -
County.

North Florida
Community College
hosted it 9"th Regional
Math Summit in
October. A total of 28
middle and high school
math teachers from
NFCC's six-county serv- I
ice area attended the
summit.
Participants enjoyed
networking, sharing
ideas and various pre-
sentations. Vince
Verges, FCAT
Mathematics
Coordinator for the C
Florida Department of
Education and Melinda
Milles from the Florida
Division of Colleges
were among the guest
speakers. "It was a very
successful day," said Se~fO0
Daniel Harris, NFCC
math instructor. tM r


other on Facebook.
Adrienne's father,
Philip Byrd, accompa-
Snied her on the trip. The
three of them enjoyed a


meal at O'Neal's
Country Buffet, where
Jacob and Adrienne
shared almost 30 years
worth of news.


HwN 1g.-Mpdll n.R32340 F PhDone 860 13-412 Fart i 73-415 .
Industrial and Commercial Handlers'

IH,1J f.a 1

i' a1 iii jii '-J'iiM.^1U'-F

SIand Honest Pricling
,:Y.


Florida Property Insurance Crisis
Three Questions
i. Why are insurance companies non-renewing your
homeowners policies?
1992 -'2006: Florida home insurers paid an estimated $10.4 billion
more in claims than they received in premium.
Florida remains a money-losing proposition for most home insurers.
2. If my insurance company cannot pay for my
hurricane loss, will I be paid?
Th Florida Insurance Guaranty Association (FIGA) pays covered claims
up to a maximum amount of $300,000: and for homeowners claims FIGA will
pay an additional $200,000 for damage relating to structure and content.
3. Is there a solution to the Florida property crisis?
YES!
lHawaii found the solution after Hurricane Iniki struck in 1992. Most
insurers were non-renewing business and were not writing new business.
SThe solution is a form of the Hawaii Hurricane Relief Fund, which only
wrote coverage for hurricanes as a separate policy
All other coverages can be written by the industry which will vigorously
compete for the business.
FLORIDA CANNOT AFFORD TO WAIT the time to act is now.
Call your state representative and state senator to urge them to support a llawaii-tvpe
plan for Florida TODAY!


Morrow Insurance

850-997-3912

Ferd Naughton


_ _









16A Monticello News


www. ecbpublishing. corn


Wednesday, November 18, 2009


The Classifieds...

measuring up to your expectations one ad at a time.


Australian Western saddle;
brand new with tags Bn it;
comes with blanket, two bri-
dles, two breastplates (one cus-
tom made), and saddle stand.
Call 850-545-5764
10/21,rtn,nc.

Hay

For Sale

in

Monticello

229-403-4032




NC MOUNTAIN VIEW
3BR/ 1 BA, Home for sale
reduced $129,000 or Monthly
rental $750 mo. + Deposit call
850-997-1582.
9/23,tfn,nc.



-a
Guard dog, Border dog, Farm
dog. Guard property, kids, or
animals. Born 9/21/09 call


Wade 464-1352.


Um


Commercial/ Industrial
Property with state highway
frontage. Corner lots. Fronts
both Harvey Greene Dr. and
Highway 53 South. Enterprise
Zone, Natural gas line, 8 inch
water main, access to city
utilities, fire hydrant, and service
from two power companies.
Property has easy access to I-10,
via SR 53 & SR 14. Will build
to suit tenant for short or long
term lease. Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141
2/ll, rtn, nc.

1BR/1BA APARTMENT.
Grove Apartments. 1400 N.
Jefferson Monticello
For Elderly 62+& Disabled
(Equal Housing Opportunity)
850-997-5321.
6/24,ttfn,c.
JEFFERSON PLACE APTS
1468 S. Waukeenah St. Office 300,
Monticello. 1 BR ($427) & 2BR
($465). HUD vouchers accepted, sub-
sidy available at times. 850-997-
6964. TTY711. This
institution is an equal
opportunity provider
and employer. 7
7/22,tfn,c. EQUAHOUSNG
OPPORTUNITY
3/br 2/bth House 925.00 month
+ security. 567-6451.
11/6-27,c.
2 BR/ 1 BA single wide mobile
home at 470 Lonnie Rd. $425 per
month 352-359-2647
ll/11,13,18,20,pd.


Spacious 2 BR/ 1 BA Convenient in-
11/11,13,nc. town location Washer/dryer. Low
utilities. 251-0760
SHistoric Home 4BR, 1.5 BA. Walk
to "everything". Many nice features.
997-2837


St Jude- may the sacred heart of ComiLg: cute c
Jesus be adored, glorified, loved BR, 1 BA. Clos
and preserved throughout the private. 997-343
world now and forever. St Jude
sacred heart of Jesus pray for us.
St Jude worker of miracles pray Mobile home
for us. St Jude help of the Double wideI
Hopeless pray for us. Thank you $400,Adults w o
forreia a a5n3red2
'm ,)'r -182.... ;; ,5.,.--3 42- ,
* .:",,. '.. y;lNA 8,20,pd., , .


country cottage. 1-2
e to town. Peaceful,
0
1 l/4,rtn,c.

es- in Monticello
$450; single wide
inly, no pets., 850-
. ., 11/4,11,18,c.


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info@national-classifieds.com


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Announcements

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100 Papers through-
out Florida.
Ad v e r ti s i n g
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edu, (888)986-2368
or email patri-
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Building Supplies

METAL ROOFING
TAX CREDIT! 40
yr Warranty. Direct
from manufacturer.


Cars for Sale

1999 Honda C
$200! 2001 Nis
Altima $350! 2
VW Jetta $4
P O L I C
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listings
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Police Impoun
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Offered In Tracts Fru2m 1: acres to 41=: Acre.
Prime Lake Oconee Real Estate
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Friday -:- December 4 -:" 10:00 a.m.J
R 8p0-323-8388
Rowel Auctions, Inc.



Man Works 84 Straight Days After
Using Thera-Gesic
BEXAR COUNTY- Torn W., a carpenter who specializes in building
high-end chicken coops, applied Thera-Gesic to his sore shoulder and
back, and worked 84 straight ten-hour days. When
asked why he didn't take a few days off, he painlessly
replied: "None of your dang business"



Go painlessly with Thera-Gesic& w' :


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Chris (816)582-1193
o r
chris @ yourcashouL.c
om


woods/ horse farm.
Possible subdivide.
Excellent financing.
Call owner now
(912)67 03 20
www.GAforest.com


Miscellaneous


995. Help Wanted
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ssan (877)740-6262.
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W00!.
E Homes For Rent
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call Bank Foreclosures!
ext 3 Br only $199/Mo!
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ids! @8%apr. for listings
ivic (800)366-9783 ext
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Homes For Sale

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HOME AUCTION
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Homes Auction: Dec
5 REDC I View Full
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RE No. CQ1031187

Lots & Acreage


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from Home.
*Medical,
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Real Estate
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MR. STUMP
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Minature Pony Rides-
For children parties or events.
Call for price and info.
850-210-3137
10/28 rtn,nc.





Chickens 6 month old New
Jersey Original Black Giants.
4.00 each. 997-1582.
11/4,rtn,nc.




Player Piano- with stool and
Scrolls, pecan/walnut wood, one
owner. Great Christmas gift! Call
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^^^^m
Plumbing, tile, yard work, debris
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small. Free estimates. Call Kevin
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Brffln


DOG- Hound/mix male. Found
11/11/09 near Highway 90 West
at Water Street South. Call 850-
510-7583 or 668-1004 to identify
and reclaim:




Huge Yard Sale- 6840 Old
Lloyd Road, Saturday 11/21, 8
am to 2 pm. Men's clothing (L
and XL) Bicycles, misc. Harley
Davidson gear, and house hold
items.
11/18,20 pd.


FISCAL OFFICER
Senior Citizens council of Madison County Inc. is seeking an individ-
ual with experience in Accounting and Bookkeeping. Responsibilities
includes: Payroll, expenditure reports, prepare special accounting state-
ments, budgets, budget revisions, recording of receipts, inventory, regular
meeting with personnel, monthly reporting, prepare federal and state tax
reports, backup data, medicaid waiver billing, reconciling, attend board
meetings, supervise CIRTS, supervision and orientation of new employees.
This is a highly responsible position. High school diploma/GED,
Bachelor's Degree with four to eight years experience in accounting and
completed a course in accounting/bookkeeping. Must have computer expe-
rience. Apply in person with a resume. Address: Senior Citizens of Madison
at 486 SW Rutledge Street of Madison, Florida 32340. Contact number
850-973-2006.
10/9,tfn,c.
FULL TIME SYSTEM ENGINEER
Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc. has an opening for a full-time System Engineer in our Madison
Office. The candidate is required to have a Bachelor Degree in Electrical Engineering (BSEE) or
Electrical Engineering Technology (BSEET) from an ABET accredited curriculum. Two or more
years of responsible electric utility experiences preferred.
The candidate must also have solid problem solving skills and be able to plan, design, prepare and
organize technical projects or new organization initiatives.
The Cooperative offers competitive salary and benefits.
Tri-County is an EOE and DFWP.
Please send resume and completed Tri-County Employment Application Form, which is available at
any TCEC office or online at www.tcec.com, before December 7 to:


Stephanie Carroll
Tri-County Electric Cooperative, Inc.
P. 0. Box 208
Madison, FL 32341


11/6,11,13,18,c.


Aga B B IIS III.

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Wednesday, November 18, 2009


www.ecbpublishing.com


Monticello News 17A


_U ALE S


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2009-CA-253
LLOYD ACRES, INC.;
PLAINTIFF
vs.
DONALD C. MATHIS; CYNTHIA D. LUMPKIN A/K/A
CYNTHIA KING; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DONALD C.
MATHIS; RANDY ERIC KING; and UNKNOWN TENANTS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DONALD C. MATHIS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DON-
ALD C. MATHIS and UNKNOWN HEIRS OF DONALD C.
MATHIS
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for foreclosure on
the following property in Jefferson County, Florida:
Commence at an old iron pipe marking the Southeast'cor-
ner of Section 18, Township 1 North, Range 4 East, Jefferson
County, Florida, and run thence North 00 degrees 39 minutes 49
seconds West along the East boundary of Said Section 18 a dis-
tance of 1282.81 feet to a concrete monument on the Southerly
boundary of the 120.00 foot right-of-way of the Seaboard Coast
Line Railroad, thence South 76 degrees 38 minutes 00 seconds
West along said Southerly right-of-way boundary 1733.50 feet
to a concrete monument for the PONT OF BEGNNING. From
said POINT OF BEGINNING continue thence south 76 degrees
38 minutes 00 seconds West along said Southerly right-of-way
boundary 207.43 feet to a concrete monument, thence leaving
said Southerly right-of-way boundary run South 13 degrees 22
minutes 00 seconds East 630.11 feet to a concrete monument on
the Northerly right-of-way boundary of a proposed 60.00 foot
roadway, thence North 76 degrees 38 minutes 00 seconds East
along said Northerly right-of-way boundary 207.43 feet to a
concrete monument, thence leaving said Northerly right of way
boundary run North 13 degrees 22 minutes 00 seconds West
630.11 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to it on ANDREW J. POWER.
ESQUIRE, SMITH, THOMPSON. SHAW & MANAUSA,
P.A., Plaintiff's attorneys, 3520 Thomasviile Road, 4th Floor,
Tallahassee, Florida 32309-3469, no more than thirty (30) days
from the first publication date of this notice of action, and file
the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a
default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
DATED this 30th day of October, 2009.


Smith, Thompson, Shaw & Manausa
3520 Thomasville Rd, 4th Floor
Tallahassee, Fl 32309
893-4105


Kirk Reams
Clerk of Courts
By: Sherry Sears
Deputy Clerk


11/4,18/09,c.

5isi- a Ut t.l .h T' *, 7. .- I .JI I. tS. U J --:Man.
S IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY.
| FLORIDA
S PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE .tJr
File No. 09-68-PR
WILLIAM KEVIN WALKER
Division
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of William Kevin Walker,
deceased, whose date of death was April 9, 2009, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Jefferson County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 1 Courthouse Square,
Monticello, Florida 32344, The names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and.the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of
this notice is required to be served must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons hav-
ing claims or demands against decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PRO-
BATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is November 11,
2009.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
TIMOTHY J. WARFEL Personal Representative:
Attorney for Renee' G. Walker RENEE' G. WALKER
Florida Bar No. 0398659 3401 Peter Brown Lane
2015 Centre Pointe Boulevard Monticello, Florida 32344
Suite 105
Tallahassee, FL 32308
Telephone: (850) 942-1919
Fax: (850) 942-0313

| 11/11,18/09,c.


NOTICE

In accordance with Florida Statue p public auction will be held
on December 10th at 10:00 a.m.

For 1995 Jeep VIN 1J4FT28S7SL632749
1998 Cadi VIN 1G6KS5184HU803194

To be sold AS IS for towing and storage charges condi-
tions and terms at auction. Stewart's Towing 175 South
Jefferson Street Monticello, FL 32344 Phone: 850-342-1480.

11/18/09,c.



Got Newll!^ls?12 Calle Us!^W! 997-3568Il^i


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 33-2008-CA-000245
HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES INC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
IRA R WEST SR; STATE OF FLORIDA,
DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY;
SHAUN SENATE WEST; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
IRA R WEST, SR; JOHN DOE; JANE DOE AS
UNKNOWN TENANTS) IN POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE -IS HEREBY-GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated the 10th day of November, 2009, and entered in Case
No. 33-2008-CA-000245, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial
Circuit in .and for Jefferson County, Florida, wherein HSBC MORT-
GAGE SERVICES INC is the Plaintiff and IRA R WEST SR; STATE
OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY; SHAUN RENATE
WEST; UNKNOWN.SPOUSE OF IRA R WEST, SR; JOHN DOE;
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANT (S) IN POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at the NORTH DOOR OF COURTHOUSE at the
Jefferson County Courthouse in Monticello, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on
the 10th day of December 2009, the following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:
EXHIBIT "A"
THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF
LAND, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA TO WIT:
LOTS 14 AND 15 OF BLOCK D, SECTION II (ALSO KNOWN
AS UNIT 2) LLOYD ACRES (UNRECORDED), TOGETHER WITH
THE TIGHT OF INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER THE ROADS
DESCRIBED IN THE UNRECORDED PLAT PREPARED BY
BROWARD DAVIS AND ASSOCIATES, INC. DESIGNATED JOB #
72.085 DATED 11/1972, AND MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
LOT 14
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION
18, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 4 EAST, JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 39 MINUTES
25 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID
SECTION 18 A DISTANCE OF 2394.74 FEET; THENCE RUN
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 500.00
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 17
SECONDS WEST 208.05 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00
DEGREES 45 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 597.81 FEET TO THE
NORTHERNLY RIGHT OF WAY OF DOVE LANE (A 60 FOOT
ROADWAY), THENCE RUN SOUTH 78 DEGREES 05 MINUTES
53 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY OF
SAID DOVE LANE 213.33 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00
DEGREES 45 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 644.50 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
LOT 15'
COMMENCE THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 18,
TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 4 EAST, JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 39 MINUTES
,25 SECONDS- WEST ALONG -THE EAST BOUNDARY-OF. SAID
SECTION 18 A DISTANCE OF 2394.74 FEET; THENCE RUN
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 708.05
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 17
SECONDS WEST 208.05 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00
DEGREES 45 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 551.13 FEET TO THE
NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF DOVE LANE (A 60 FOOT
ROADWAY); THENCE RUN SOUTH 78 DEGREES 05 MINUTES
53 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY OF
SAID DOVE LANE 213.23 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 00
DEGREES 45 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 597.81 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY; THE APN IS
SHOWN BY THE COUNTY ASSESSOR AS 18-IN-4E-0112-000D-
0140; SOURCE OF TITLE IS BOOK 559, PAGE 533 (RECORDED
01/26/05)
'ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990
(ADA), because of their disabilities, disabled persons who, need the
ADA Coordinator at Room 10, Monticello, FL 32344 or Telephone
(904) 342-0218 prior to such proceeding special accommodation to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should contact
Dated this 10th day of November, 2009.


Submitted by: Law Office of Marshall C. Watson
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Kirk Reams
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Clerk Of The Circuit Court
Telephone: (954) 453-0365 By: Sherry Sears
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052 Deputy Clerk
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
11/18, 11/25,c.

NOTICE OF PROPOSED ORDINANCE

The City Council of the City of Monticello proposes to adopt
the following ordinances:
ORDINANCE 2009-05 AN ORDINANCEBOF THE CITY
OF MONTICELLO. FORIDAADOTING THE EVALUATION
AND APPRAISAL REPORT (EAR) OF THE COMPREHEN-
SIVE PLAN CONTAINED IN EXHIBIT "A"' AUTHORIZING
VANSMTITAL OF THEREPORTTOTHEDEPARTMENTOF
COMMUNrTY AFFAIRS PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS
OF THE LOCAL GOVERN ENT COMPREHENSIVE PLAN-
NING AND LAND DEVELOPMENT REGULATION ACT
PROVIDING FOR SEVERABIUTY; PROVIDING FOR
REPEAL OF INCONSISTENT PROVISIONS; PROVIDING
FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE
ORDINANCE 2009-06 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY
OF MONTICELLO, FLORIDA, AMENDING SECTION 38 OF
THE CITY CODE OF THE CITY OF MONTICELLO, FLORIDA
CLARIFYING THE DEFINITION OF PUBLIC NUISANCES
RELATING TO REAL PROPERTY; ESTABLISHING A PUBLIC
NUISANCE ABATEMENT PROGRAM; PROVIDING FOR
NOTICE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES; RENUMBER-
ING CHAPTER PROVISIONS RELATING TO ABANDONED
AND NONOPERATING VEHICLES; PROVIDING FOR SEV-
ERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
ORDINANCE 2009-07 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY
OF MONTICELLO, FLORIDA AMENDING CHAPTER 26 OF
THE MONTICELLO CITY CODE CHANGING THE TERM
"OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE" TO "BUSINESS TAX"; DEFIN-
ING THE TERM"RECEIPT" AS IT RELATES TO BUSINESS
TAXES; AMENDING PROVISIONS TO CONFORM WITH
CHAPTER 205, FLORIDA STATUTES; PROVIDING FOR SEV-
ERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE
The entire text of the ordinance may be inspected at City Hall,
245 S. Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida between the hours of
8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Public hearing
on the ordinance will be held on Tuesday, December 1, 2009, at
7:00 p.m. at Monticello City Hall. Interested persons may appear
at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance.


SECTION 00100
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID


PROJECT:CR 158B (Nash Road) Resurfacing
Jefferson County, Florida

OWNER: Jefferson County
City Clerk Office
1 Courthouse Circle
Monticello, FL 32344
Telephone: (850) 342-0218

ENGINEER: Darabi and Associates, Inc.
4140 NW 37th Place, Suite A
Gainesville, Florida 32606
Telephone: (352) 376-6533

1.0 WORK DESCRIPTION

The Project is located in Jefferson County, Florida.

The Work is generally described as furnishing all labor, materials,
equipment, tools, transportation, services, and incidentals and perform-
ing all work necessary to provide the Owner with roadway improve-
ments to CR 158B from CR 259 to US 19. The roadway improvements
include resurfacing 1.9 miles of CR 158B at 20.5 feet wide, turnout
construction, pavement striping, grassing, and maintenance of traffic.
All work shall be in accordance with the construction drawings,
specifications, and contract documents.

2.0 RECEIPT OF BIDS

All Bidders shall be roadway contractors pre-qualified with the Florida
Department of Transportation in Tallahassee, Florida.
Bidding and contract documents may be examined at Darabi &
Associates, Inc.; 4140 NW 37" Place, Suite A; Gainesville, FL, 32606.
Copies of the documents may be obtained at Engineer's office for
$250.00 dollars per set; which constitutes the cost for reproduction and
handling. Checks shall be payable to.Engineer. Payment is non-refund-
able.
Bids shall be completed on the enclosed Bid Form as set forth in
the Instructions to Bidders and otherwise be in compliance with the
Bidding Documents. Sealed bids will be received at the City Clerk
Office, 1 Courthouse Circle, Monticello, FL 32344 until 2:00 PM (local
time) on December 11, 2009 at which time and place all bids will be
publicly opened and read aloud. Any Bids received after the specified
time and date will not be considered. Only prospective bidders on the
Engineer's Plan Holder's list may submit a bid.
For further information or clarification, contact Frank'Darabi @
352-376-6533.

11/18/09,c.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING
The North Florida Broadband Authority ("NFBA") announces a
public meeting to which all interested persons are invited. The
NFBA is a legal entity and public body created pursuant to the pro-
visions of Section 163.01, Florida Statutes, and an Interlocal
Agreement among: Baker, Bradford, Columbia, Gilchrist,
Hamilton, Jefferson, Lafayette, Levy, Madison, Putnam,
Suwannee, Taylor and Union Counties and municipalities of Cedar
Key, Cross City, Lake City, Live Oak, Monticello, Perry, White
Springs and Worthington Springs, Florida. The regular meeting
will be held at 2:00 p.m. E.T. on Wednesday, December 2, 2009
at the Lake City Community College, Medical Center
Auditorium, Building 103, 132 S.E. Foundation Place, Lake
City, Florida. The NFBA Board will address general operating
issues of the NFBA. If a person decides to appeal any decision
made by the NFBA with respect to any matter considered at the
meeting, such person will need a record of the proceedings and may
need to ensure that a verbatim record is made, including the testi-
mony and'evidence upon which the appeal is to be made. In accor-
dance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing
special accommodations or an interpreter to participate in this pro-
ceeding, or if you have any questions regarding this meeting, please
contact the Clerk to the NFBA Board at (877) 552-3482, at least
two business days prior to the date of the meeting.
11/18/09,c.


SECTION 00100
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID


PROJECT: CR 149A (Dills Road) Resurfacing
Jefferson County, Florida

OWNER: Jefferson County
City Clerk Office
1 Courthouse Circle
Monticello, FL 32344
Telephone: (850) 342-0218

ENGINEER: Darabi and Associates, Inc.
4140 NW 37th Place, Suite A
Gainesville, Florida 32606
Telephone: (352) 376-6533

1.0 WORK DESCRIPTION

The Project is located in Jefferson County, Florida.

The Work is generally described as furnishing all labor, materi-
als, equipment, tools, transportation, services, and incidentals and
performing all work necessary to provide the Owner with roadway
improvements to CR 149A from CR 149 to intersection of Brock
Road.
The roadway improvements include resurfacing 6.1 miles of
CR 149A at 18 feet wide, turnout construction, pavement striping,
grassing, and maintenance of traffic.

All work shall be in accordance with the construction drawings, spec-
ifications, and contract documents.

2.0 RECEIPT OF BIDS

All Bidders shall be roadway contractors pre-qualified with the
Florida Department of Transportation in Tallahassee, Florida.
Bidding and contract documents may be examined at Darabi &
Associates, Inc.; 4140 NW 375' Place, Suite A; Qainesville, FL,
32606.
Copies of the documents may be obtained at Engineer's office
for $250.00 dollars per set; which constitutes the cost for reproduc-
tion and handling. Checks shall be payable to Engineer. Payment is
non-refundable.
Bids shall be completed on the enclosed Bid Form as set forth
in the Instructions to Bidders and otherwise be in compliance with
the Bidding Documents. Sealed bids will be received at the City
Clerk Office, 1 Courthouse Circle, Monticello, FL 32344 until 2:001
PM (local time) on December 11, 2009 at which time and place all
bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. Any Bids received after
the specified time and date will not be considered. Only prospective
bidders on the Engineer's Plan Holder's list may submit a bid.
For further information or clarification, contact Frank Darabi @
352-376-6533.


11/18/09,c.


11/18,20/09,c.












18A Monticello News


www. ecbpublishing. corn


Wednesday, November 18, 2009


OUTDOORS


All About Bees, Beekeepers And Possibly A little More


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
Talk about economic
development and tourism
all rolled into one:
Monticello a week and a
half ago was abuzz with
professional beekeepers,
beekeeping enthusiasts,
and not few stray bees.
It's estimated that
between 150 and 200 pro-
fessional, sideline -and
hobbyist beekeepers,
along with others in allied
industries, gathered in
town between Thursday
and Saturday, Nov. 5-7, for
the 89th annual statewide
meeting of the Florida
State Beekeepers
Association (FSBA) and
its related activities,
including a Bee College
and bees-themed festival.
"Our little group got
people into the motels,
bed-and-breakfasts and all
over town," enthused one
local member of the
Apalachee Beekeepers
Association (ABA), the
area chapter of the FSBA
and the group that spon-
sored the event.
If the aforementioned
beekeeping enthusiast
was overstating the case in
terms of the event's eco-
nomic impact, the assess-
ment wasn't likely far off
the mark, judging from the
noticeable uptick in activi-
ty around town during the
three days. And at least
one 1-10 motel owner
reported a significant
number of room reserva-
tions that he attributed
directly to the beekeepers'
convention.
The fact is that
Monticello hosting the
FSBA affair represented
quite a coup for the ABA,
one of the fastest growing
beekeeping organizations
in the state, with numer-
ous of its members being
Jefferson County resi-
dents. Indeed, believe it or
not, Jefferson County
reportedly has more bee-
keepers than any other
county in the state.
But back to the FSBA
convention, which started
with a one-day Bee College
at the Green Industries
Institute on Thursday. An
offering of the UF Honey,
Bee Research and
Extension Laboratory, the.
Bee College bills itself as
the most extensive honey-
bee educational event in
Florida, designed to teach
people with little or no
knowledge about bees how
to keep hives.
The Florida Master
Beekeeper Program, an
offering of the Bee
College, is the equivalent
of a master's, according to
Lloyd resident and ABA
member David Hall. Hall
proudly pointed out that
seven of the 20 people in
the first group of the
Master Beekeeper
Program, now in its third
year, are Jefferson County
residents.
"We have more people
in the advanced program
than any other county,"
Hall said.
Which explains
Thursday's activities at
Green Industries.
Participants in the Master
Beekeeper Program spent
the first half of the day
studying and preparing
for the exam that they
then took in the second
half of the day, preparato-
ry to earning their Master
Beekeeper certification.
Hall explained that such
exams are given twice a
year once during the bee-
keepers' annual conven-
tion and a second time in
the spring. Individuals
who successfully complete
the program's four levels
of expertise ultimately
attain the Master
Craftsman Beekeeper des-
ignation.
On Friday, FSBA
members from across the
state gathered in the
Opera House for a full day
of organizational business


Town Abuzz 1


Participants in the 2009 Bee College with their cer
Drake, Becca Hale, and Ellyn Hutson. Back row: Bob
Heather Gamper, Lucy Patrick, Denny Chevillot and Ro


and industry-specific pre-
sentations aimed at the
serious-minded profes-
sional beekeeper, or seri-
ous-minded wannabes at
least. Indeed, the list of
speakers included scien-
tists, professors and
researchers; and the pre-
sentations dealt with such
diverse and esoteric topics
as the function of the
Bureau of Apiary
Inspection, fungal
pathogens as microbial
control agents, integrative
morphology of the small
hive beetle, and the use of
ozone as a fumigant for
honeybee combs.
On Saturday, the activ-
ities moved back to Green
Industries and'took on a
more festive turn, with
activities that ranged from
candle making, folk-art
painting and cooking with
beeswax, to honey judg-
ing, proper care of bee
stings and lectures on Best
Management Practice
(BMP) for beekeeping,
among other things.
Which brings us to
Jerry Hayes, the impor-
tance of bees in general,
the importance of honey-
bees in particular, and the
overall resurgence of bee-
keeping in Florida and
elsewhere.
Hayes is Florida's
chief apiary inspector
with the Bureau of Apiary
Inspection, established in
1923 in recognition of hon-
eybees' importance to
Florida agriculture.
Among other things, the
bureau advises beekeep-
ers on the'identification
and treatment of honey-
bee diseases and pests; cer-
tifies-honeybees for ship-
ment to other states for
use in honey production
and pollination; and con-
ducts some honeybee
research in conjunction
with the University of
Florida (UF).
According to Hayes,
Florida presently has 1,400
registered beekeepers,
from hobbyists who keep a
single hive to commercial
beekeepers who maintain
tens of thousands hives.
Of the 1,400 registered bee-
keepers, 300 are commer-
cial beekeepers, account-
ing for 80 percent of
colonies. All told, Florida
has 235,000 hives, he said.
"And Jefferson
County has more beekeep-
erm than any other coun-
ty" Hayes confirmed.
He attributed the cur-
rent resurgence in bee-
keeping to a number of
factors that he said inter-
sected to form "the perfect
storm of interest and abil-
ity".
Some of these factors,
as Hayes named them,
have to do with demo-
graphics, i.e.. baby
boomers coming of an age
when beekeeping and
other such natural pur-
suits become appealing; a
level of affluence among
this age group that allows


for indulgence in such
activities; the Internet;
and a growing awareness
of the importance of bees
to pollination and the food
supply
"The increase is phe-
nomenal," Hayes said.
"We've gained more than
400 registered beekeepers.
There's been a tremen-
dous resurgence of inter-
est."
The interest is not
limited to rural areas
either. Much of the inter-
est, in fact, is occurring in
urban areas such as
Miami, according to
Hayes.
"We have beekeeping
in downtown Miami," he
said.
Yet, notwithstanding
the newfound apprecia-
tion of bees; the resur-
gence of interest in bee-
keeping; the fact that
honey represents a $15 to
$20 million industry to
Florida; and the fact that
the value of bees' pollina-
tion to agriculture can't be
overstated, Hayes said the
industry is facing tough
times. The. reasons for the
tough times, he said,
involved a multitude of
factors, including urban
encroachment; the use of
pesticides; nutritional
stress occasioned by
monoculture agricultural
operations that don't allow
for a diversified bee diet;
ignorance and fear of bees
on the part of the general
population, a situation
exacerbated by media
reports of Africanized
"killer" bees; and a host of
microbial diseases and
pests that are decimating
bee colonies at an alarm-
ing rate across the state
and the country
The good news is that
more state and federal
money has been thrown at
bee research in recent
years than.at any other
time in the past, and that
.the research is beginning
to produce results, he said.
Encouraging too is a grow-
ing, if still limited, aware-
ness on the part of many
in the general population'
of the importance of bees
to pollination and the food
supply, Hayes said.
Even so, he said, the
bottom line was that the
world wasn't likely to
change that dramatically
in term of its appreciation
or understanding of bees;
nor was science likely to
come up with a fix-all mag-
ical solution to the many
disease and pests afflicting
bees. Which explained the
formulation, and his
office's promotion, of Best
Management Practices
(BMP). The idea for the
BMP, Hayes said, was so
"that beekeepers could
manage their colonies in
the best way possible to
mitigate the problems"
Hayes averred that a
scary scenario was the US
Department of
Agriculture's (USDA) pro-


Monticello News Photos By Lazaro Aleman, Nov. 5 & 6, 2009
Booths were set up inside the Opera House during Thursday and Friday's program.
The booths disseminated information about the industry and offered products for sale.


Ill- -r-.-
Monticello News Photos By Lazaro Aleman, Nov. 5 & 6, 2009
Vendors and others associated with the industry displayed their products in the
Opera House during Thursday and Friday.


l.,l ili:]- ll] I i :'". I-'l i ,,r B., L )..jf .n 1R iii ,in II j .r . '. 1 -i.i'-l
Beekeeping enthusiasts and members of the Florida State Beekeepers Association
gathered in the Opera House on Thursday night for a barbecue dinner and program.


Same from; and what's
Tfi ee ee e^rS more, they didn't care, so
i long as there was a ready
and steady supply of food,
he said.
"Most people think
food comes from Publix,"
Hayes said.
But consider, absent
bees' pollination, many of
i Bthe fruits, vegetables and
nuts that people now
enjoyed and took for grant-
a ed wouldn't be so readily
or cheaply available, he
said. Important as was
Shone it was a byproduct
of pollination, which was
the real value of bees to
agriculture,, he said. Until
a o b the general populace made
That connection and
SI t 11 understood that food
: prices and availability
were tied to bees, the situa-
tion wouldn't improve, no
Smatter people's present-
say "warm fuzzy feelings"
i toward bees, he said.
tificates. Left to right, front row: Charles Futch, Susan "Most people still
Livingston, Ed Bowman, Tony Hogg, Katherine Hogg, have a NIMBY (Not In My
oger Twitchell. Backyard) mentality when
it comes to bees," he said.
jection that 40 percent of tion levels; and general On the positive side of
vegetables will be coming reduction in crop produc- the ledger, Florida attract-
from abroad eventually If tivity really didn't matter, ed beekeepers from else-
the country as a whole did- except to beekeepers and a where because of its favor-
n't care where its food few others like himself, he able climate and profusion
came from, then possibly suggested.
the concerns about the The sad fact was that of flowers, he said. Too,
decimation of bees, the too many people still did-been
Sable to sustain devastating
resulting drop in pollina- n't know where their food losses of 30 to 50 percent of
losses of 30 to 50 percent of
1, their colonies and keep
S going because they were
o able to split and grow new
-,I colonies, he said. But
could they continue to sus-
tain such losses indefinite-
ly? Not likely, he said.
""So the concern is
always there that there is
not enough beekeepers,"
Hayes said. "But if 40 per-
cent of vegetables are to
come from Asia eventual-
ly it may not matter. There
are 1,400 beekeepers in
Florida and 17 million
Katherine Hogg, a student at Aucilla Christian who don't care. Wh:. 1
Academy, is the youngest member in the adunc ii d on' t care about agricul-on
beekeepers program and reportedly scored the high- ture or where food comes
est grade in the recent exams at the Bee College at from or about beekeeping,
the Green Industries Institute. it's a scary future."




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