Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00280
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello, Fla
Publication Date: October 28, 2009
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00280
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text



















1


/ COunty Doubles Sur charge
LIS On Civil Traffic Citations


Homecoming photos and stories*


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
City officials want to be kept in-
formed henceforth of whatever is hap-
pening with the several
fuel-contaminated sites that petroleum
cleanup companies are monitoring and
cleaning up around town.
The issue came up at the Oct. 6
City. Coui1cil meeting, during which
the council transferred the contract for
the monitoring and cleaning of the
various contaminated sites from Han-
dex Consultant Remediation LLC to
Advanced Environmental Technolo-
gies (AET), which bills itself as a na-
tionally recognized provider of
comprehensive environmental solu-
tions.


Suwannee District


I


2 Sections. 26 Pages


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
knior Staf Writer
As expected, the County Commission last week
approved a measure that makes speeding and other
vehicle traffic violations in Jefferson County a little
more expensive.
Ordinance 2009-101509-01, which commissioners
approved on Thursday, Oct. 15, essentially doubles the
surcharge that the county imposes for non-criminal
traffic infractions from $15 to $30,
As Clerk of Court Kirk Reams explained it, the
Legislature in 2004 revised Article 5 of the Florida
Constitution, allowing counties to impose a $15 sur-
charge on non-criminal infractions as a way of gener-
ating money for the maintenance, repair and
restoration of their courthouses.
That's because, the net result of the revisions to
Article 5, which pertains to the judiciary system, is
that the state no longer funds many of the court and
court-related functions that it used to fund previ-
ously.
Which brings-us to the current economic down-
town and the drop in sales and fuel taxes and other
revenue sources for local governments. Recognizing
that many local governments were facing economic
hard times, lawmakers in June 2009 amended the
originallawtoallowforthesurchargetobeuppedto
eno-
Since then, Gadsden, Leon and Wakulla, among
other counties in the region, have increased, or are
in the process of increasing, their surcharges, ac
ad tso R wBHake the place of property tax
monies," Reams said, adding that 85 to 95 percent of
the traffic citations that law enforcement officers
issue locally are1ssued on the interstate.
"So it won't affect cotmty residents much," Reams
said. "Other counties around us are doing it. In lean
y&ars, this money can be used for the cleaning and
maintenance and miilor repairs of the courthouse."
County officials, in fact, are in the process of so-
liciting bids to have a contractor repair the court-
house's roof and exterior, a project that is being made
possible by some $300,000 that accumulated in a spe-
cial account since the county began collecting the sur-
charge in 2004. Officials reason that if the $15
surcharge produced $300,000 in nearly five years, the
$30 surcharge will bring in that much more.
Per the ordinance that commissioners adopted,
every person who pays a fine or a civil penalty for any
violation of a non-criminal traffic infraction in Jef-
ferson County, as well as every personwho pleads
guilty or no contest or whois convicted (regardless of
adjudication) of a violation of a non-criminal traffic
infraction or criminal violation will be assessed a $80
surcharge.
The commission approved the measure with very
little discussion after a brief public hearing.


141sPtea No44Wedesayctoer8,209


Ho Decision
i best.t n there
that are being assessed
at half the commercial
rate, when- the struc-
tures are more appropri-
ately recreational and
used only during the
hunting season.
Commissioners
quickly realized that the
inequities were more
varied and difficult to
Please See Taxes
Page 4A


00uty
aWHMM





FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Stqff Writer
A Jefferson County
nan was killed over the
weekend in a Tallahas-
see s) b n County
Sheriff's Office (LCSO)
reported that on Satur-
day morning, Oct. 24, at
7:40 a.m., LCSO
deputies were called to
a Miccosukee Road res-
dence in reference to a
subject who had been
stabbed.
When deputies ar-
ived, they discovered
othy J. Cobb, 31,'of
Jefferson County, in-
side the residence-
Deputies administered
CPR and Cobb was
transported to a local
hospital for treatment'
where he died a short
Itime latet:
Violent Crimes and
pime Scene Detectives
responded to the scene
ynd began the investi-
gation of his death'.
,"The preliminary inves-
gigation has revealed
.Rt Cobb was the for'
mer boyfriend of
Esthryn Hill, 47, who -
was -inside the resi-
tence with Anthony
Mhck, 40, also of Jeffer-
9;on County
It was reported that
Cobb was upset that
Please See
Stabbing Page 4A

Library
.
Greevance
fgage
d *


fire and -landfill special
assessments and under
what circumstances
some might be exempted
or pay reduced rates. .
In the process, offl-


I


Officials Discuss Fire, Landfill Taxes But Reach
LAZ ROoAd]VLAN TWO TGIES Fund Fire, Solid Waste Departments
SeniorStaff Writer cialstouchedonwhether ance on the application gle fire assessment for
County commission- churches, nonprofits, of the two assessments. multiple buildings on
ers were all over the government buildings The problem that Gray their properties, while
place on ThursdaY and disabled veterans pointed out was that the others are being as.
morning, Oct. 22, as they should continue to be ex- assessments weren't messed for each individ.
discussed who should emptied from the two being applied fairly or ual structure, according
and shouldn't pay the taxes. consistently. In fact, the to Gray. Yet other prop-


practice historically has
not been in keeping with
the language of the ordi-
nance, Gray said.
For example, some
residents now pay a sin-


erty owners are paying
commercial rates on
structures that are more
appropriately agricul.
tural in nature and that
are uqed on a temporary


Property Appraiser
Angela Gray triggered
the reevaluation when
she asked commission-
ers several weeks ago for
clarification and guid-


e rre
*
CGtattOR
LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
The commission's
quasi-judicial hearing to
decide on a grievance
that one Jefferson
County Public LibrarY
employee filed against a
co worker has been post"
potted indefinitely.
Commissioners post-
poned the hearing, which
Was scheduled for 1 p.m.
Thursday Oct. 22, at the
request of County Attor-
ney Buck Bird, who said
the employees preferred
fo resolve their differ"
ences outside the lime-
light.
"We have an appoint-
inent to get the expertise
e need to get this re-
( u cda poc i etroate:
than in a public setting,"
18ird said on Oct. 15. "I'd
rike to see what services
there are.
He added that the
person who had filed the
grievance had specifi-
cally asked for' mediation
as a way of resolving the
conflict, rather than ma
public format.
If we can't get it re-
Please See Library


Two reasons stand behind the city
officials' decision. .
The first was dissatisfaction.with
the previous provider, whose represen-
tatives, according to officials, rarely
appeared in the city, at the same time
that the AET representatives were
being very visible and proactive.
"We haven't heard much from the
other cothpany," City Manager Steve
Wingate said on Wednesday, Oct. 21.
"Meanwhile, Advanced Environmental
Technologies was showing us other
ways that we could go with the
cleanup to our advantage." '
The second reason was that the
city could do it make the change,
that is.
"The city has the right to change."
Please See Petroleum Page 4A


Sept. Rainfall levels
LAZARO ALEMAN released by the SRWMD
Monticello Neu)s on Oct. 7, shows the dis-
Senior Staff Writer trict received 4.58 inches
Rainfall across the of rainfall on average
SuwanneeRiver Water during September,
Management District which is 82 percent of
(SRWMD) during Sep- the long-term monthly
member was generally average of 5.58 percent.
above average along the The figures.indicate that
coasts and below average rainfall for the past 12
inland. months was 50.75 inches,
The latest hydro- which is 93 percent of
logic conditions report, the long-term average of


s
Vary Acro
54.68 inches, represent-
ing a 12-month deficit of
3.93 inches.
Jefferson County, for
its part, received 7.06
inches of rainfallin Sep-
tember, compared with
6.60 inches in August
and 5.31 inches last Sep-
tember. JeiTerson
County has received
54.82 inches during the
last 12 months.


mal conditions at the
end of September:
Coastal rivers, on the
other hand, fared better
andendedwithnearnor-
mal flows at the end of
the month. No statistics
are given for the Aucilla ,
River,
Lake levels, mean-
while, varied, with some
Please See Rainfall
Page 4A .


Madison County,
meanwhile, received 4.67
inches in September,
compared with 8.()8
inches in August and
4.62 inches last Septem-
ber.10adison Cotuity has
received 54.99 during the
last 12 months.
The report indicates
that inland rivers in the
district tended to decline
and end with below nor-


Thu
85/68 .,.,
-
Isolated thunderstorms. Highs in
the mid 80s and lows in the upper
60s.


Ar Jeff. Co.
Breast cancer
Classified
Dining Out Guide
Football Contest


4-10A
8A
16A
5A
11A


Home improvement 18A
JCMHSHomecoming 12A-15A
Legals 17A
Sports 11A-15A
VIewpoints 2-3A


50#46+4


Harold Ingram, Jr., and Klerra White were named


Officials Want Better Accounting of PollutedSites


Wed
8767 ,i
nn n ,;,
PSft y 0 0udy with isolated thunder-
St0fmS Ossible. Humid. High 82F.


-ri
84/67
10/30
Mix of sun and clouds. Highs in the
mid 80s and lows in the upper 60s.




















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Publisher/0wner resemseme to.';"'','"
RAY CICHON wedona...s ern or na....
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Alanagmg Ether ilea sa nt o* a...age s....11sis.,
LAZARo ALEMAN Cluel.1mON DisruntalN'
Senior StalT Water 'sub phon iture.
C'l.Assineo to treat Aus g l10 -i yenjur
Drodlme for ches.villeds in Monday 1518tedlocallates neuded)
ar 12.00 p m. for Wednesdays paper.


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Estabashed ina9
A weekly newspaper [USPS 361-620) designed for the express rending plensures of the people of its
circulatiTbahren, they ast, present < r fu two re c sY/ashington St. Monticallo, FL 32344. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post Office in Montiedlo, Florida 32344.
POSTMASTER: Sand address changes to MONTICHLLO NEWS, P.O. Box 428, Monticello, FL
32345.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in
the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this
newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.
All photon given to ECB Publishing, Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no Inter than
6 months from the date they are dropped 017. ECB Publishing. Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said
acadline


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Wedneisda~y, )c~tobecr 28, 2009)!


2A- Mlonticello, News


www. ecbpublishing. com


LeurerS to me annlor are rypea woura or woora, cormma or conmma, as sent~ w wals newspaper.


the role that the Holy
Scriptures requires. Isn't
it? -
Coincidently, his face
' was one of the first that
you could expect to see at
the City of Monticello
Council meetings asking
for the city to seek more
. grants to benefit our sen-
iors and youth. Moreover,
he would make his face
present at Jefferson
County School Board
meetings to monitor the
budget, and fiscal audits
to ensure that our kids
were receiving more than
their pro rated share of
education benefits. He
truly believed in "No Child
Left Behind". President
Obama and former
President Bush would be
proud. I am sure that our
esteemed Governor
Charlie Crist promotes
those values as well.
Additionally, Rev.
Barnhart worked tireless-
ly and left his family farm
just in time on many
Thursday to participate
at County Commission
meetings. While there, he
would be one of the first
individuals to speak on
behalf of the Girls and
Boys Club, the Refuge
House, the local veterans
(he had previously served
as Post Commander for
VFW 51), as well as being
one of the few ministers to
demand economic devel-
opmentandthecreationof
new jobs for all of our citi-
zens
Rev. Byron respected
the Word of God and the
pursuit of life, liberty and
gappinessforhis fgaily.as...
well as our fanutes..too.
Just ap important was.. his vision the- the


BY GENE HALL
County Commissioner
A good friend and
mentor of mine passed on,
and is now enjoying the
good times in paradise
with our Lord and Savior
Jesus Christ. Rev. Byron
Barnhart lived a life that is
not only worth celebrat-
ing, but also duplicating.
Whether it was rallying
members of his church as
well as any group of visi-
tors who were willing to
participate for a voters
registration drive... or just
taking time out to mentor
kids, Rev Byron was dedi-
cated to the cause.
Essentially, as I recall
during conversations that
we held after Jefferson
County Ministerial
Association meetings, Rev.
Byron was true to the
word of God when it came
to being a servant. He was
not one of the many
"Cadillac Preachers" who
only sought more money
for himself and his family
at the expense of the
church as some have done.
He realized that being a
servant of the Lord meant
not threatening to leave
the congregation should
they not pay him a large
salary .
Furthermore, he was
not one to be greedy and
demand more for himself
at the expense of the holy
temple by just seeking
another annual Pastor's
Anniversary program that
provides gifts for the pas-
tor and his wife only. No,
my good friend and role
model, Rev Byron thought
and acted to improve the
plight of others, He saw
his role as Pastor as the
role of a servant. That is .
HyEDebbie Snimpp
Monticello New .
StafWriter'*\
..


future of Jefferson County
aild its kids. He told me a
few days prior to his pass-
ing that we must focus on
making a better quality of
life for our children.
Basically I encourage our
young men and women to
follow the sterling exam-
ples that Byron set. He
certainly exemplified serv-
ice and commitment to the
young and the young at
heart.
Accordingly, he
demonstrated both quality
of service as well as the
personal characteristics of
a positive role model for
our youth. If Jefferson
County citizens ever
decide to issue a Citizen of
the Year award, I would
nominate Byron for its
highest consideration
posthumously. For indeed
Rev. Byron Barnhart
exemplified what it means
to personally commit to
helping those who often
times were in no position
to help themselves-
Finally, I encourage
other Pastors who are still
alive and well to attend our
local civic meetings and to
give tirelessly of their
time and talent as Byron
has done, and to even give
half of your Pastor's
anitiversary bonus checks
to help some worthy
benevolent cause here in
Jefferson County
Rev. Byron. may the
philanthmpicworky6u've
done continue to speak vol.
umes for you and for our
kids.

A. $119 M
.. .- Chairman
..fgOky.-u last .
ournmi.vion-


Serqfin Roldan
It is sad that in a
country like the United
States, a country that was
founded on the christian
prmciples of the Bible
and the Pilgrim Fathers,
there are still some people
that do not apply the
Golden Rule to them-
selves: "And as ye would
that men should do to
you, do ye also to them
likewise. This simple
rule can guide us in our
relationship with others
around us, whether in
school, in public spaces,
or in our workplace. All
around us we can see this
golden rule applied to
yes, but we also see it
broken everywhere, lam-
entably
About 7 months ago, I
was invited, as the recent-
ly appointed Director of
the Jefferson County
Public Library, to talk to
the Rotary Club about
something interesting
and worthwhile. At the
time, I spoke about the
importance of having
your employees or staff
members content, happy,
cordial, and respectful
towards themselves and
towards customers and -
silients 4 informed this
1p o business people
titiff'titibalterns should be
treated with respect and
kindness, with dignity
and worth. That supervi-
sors and managers should
avoid chit-chats, rumors,
gossip and the like, and
treat everyone equal.
Managers should manage
with temperance and
patience, not htas preju-
dice or hearsea .", In
fact, a bit of Wisdom
would not hurt. I still
firmly believe in this.
Living in society
means people interacting
with other people at dif-
ferent levels: family,


church, work, home. In
each and every one of
these "spaces" there will
be, no doubt, friction, con-
troversy or misunder-
standings. Wars and
rumors of wars have
come about, since the
beginning of time,
because there was a lack
of efficient and truthful
communication, and per-
haps, misunderstanding.
Something went wrong
somewhere in the
scheme: a word or phrase
was misinterpreted, a
look or gesture might not
have been appropriate,
even a simple, honest
smile might have been
interpreted as something
malicious or evil.
Whenever people get
.together to work and play,
there is bound to be mis-
information and misun-
derstanding. It is part of
our lot as human beings
to misinterpret inten-
tions. And we need to
realize that we do not live
our lives alone; a social
connection is always pres-
ent with human beings.
We are intimately con-
nected one to another,
even if you don't like the
widearAnd it-is a responsi-
bilit-y as civilized, sockil
beings to be able to apply
the Golden Rule, even
though it is not always
applied to you by others.
You cannot extin-
guish hatred with more
hatred, or anger with
more anger, fire with
more fire. You move on
and treat everyone with
respect and dignity. with
kindness and patience.
You enter a workplace
with a "good morning"
regardless if anyone else
does not respond. You
smile even though no one
.else smiles. You do not
judge, nor do you "jump
the gun" with false inter-


pretations. You do your
job and you do it well. A
worker will always find
someone that does not
connect to him/her in a
kindly manner. But just
go on; treat everyone with
kindness; don't rile back;
don't backbite. It's bad for
your internal organs.
These are simple
things which are impor-
tant in our everyday life,
when we walk, when we
talk, when we deal with
people of different pedi-
gree. Walk with your head
up high; but let the sweet-
ness and mellowness of
your character be reflect-
ed to everyone. The
Golden Rule is something
that must be handled and
displayed by every per-
son, young and old, espe-
cially in the workplace,
whether in the private or
the government sectors,
silch as schools, county
offices, and most impor-
tantly, public libraries.

LibraryNews
Madame Isabelle De
Sercey hat set up a high-
ly formidable and excit-
ing exhibition in the
Library of rare and
exquisitely crafted
Quilts. You arr invited
to visit the Library and
take a look at her exhi-
bition. As you know, the
Quilters meet every
Wednesday from 1 to 4
p.m.

The JCPL bookstore
will open its doors on
Wednesday, November 4
at 10:00 a.m. The book-
store will have the fol-
lowing schedule:
Wednesday and
Saturday from 10:00
a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Everyone is invited to
browse the shelves and
purchase as many books
as you want.


.
9 UM
.


-



Sergeant Chicola Barrington is a 1997
aduate of Jefferson County High School and
nded North Florida Community College in
ison.
She has served in the United States Army for
years and is an automated Logistical Special-
She has completed two tours of duty in Iraq,
.
served m Korea and Hawaii, and is currently
stationed in Afghanistan.
She is the daughter of Mary and OC Barrington, of Montwello,
and the mother of Ka-Shala, an eighth grade student at JCMHS.
he enjoys..hearihg from, and receiving packages from. her
. ,and mdhy friends. It is the highlight of her day! She asks that
obvontinkle to keep in contact with her at: 14HC-57-ESB, APO AE
09355,


TEN ARS AGO
October 27, 1999
Representatives of the Oakland
plantation Homeowner's
Association were back before the
County Commission on Thursday,
reiterating their request that the
county undertake the maintenance
of private roads on a per-contract,
per-fee basis.
The homeowners association's
strongest advocate is
Commissioner Felix "Skeet"
Joyner, who thinks it's high time
the county amends its policy and
provides the service at cost.
The county expects to have its
revised Comprehensive Plan ready
for a second submission to state by
mid-November.
Mary Beth and Mac Finlayson
will represent the county at the
North Florida Fair Association's
45th Outstanding Farm Family
Weekend, Nov. 13 and 14. .
TWENTY YEARS AGO
October 25, 1989
Each school day, many county
students are bused to surrounding
counties for special education pro-
grams estimated to cost the district
about $38,000 yearly.
If all goes according to plans, a
Veteran's of Foreign Wars post will
he installed in the county within
ye next few weeks.
Savannah IVfiller-of Monticello
188 been selected as a North
Florida Junior College Sentinel
Choerlander.
The Farmers Horne
SminiStration last Thursday
approved the city for the remainder
Of the funds required to construct
? 8 lieW city sewer project.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
October 25, 1979
20r the first time in the 25-year
history of the North Florida Fair
Outstand Wig Farm Family Awned,
two families from Jefferson County


have been chosen to represent a
county,
Sen. Pat Thomas will be the
guest speaker at the aiinual
Chamber of Commerce dinner set
for tonight at Bentley's Lake House
Center may reopen its customer
service office in Monticello.
Aucilla's Warriors gave Florida
High a 41-18 thrashing Friday nigby
to highlight their homecoming fed
tivities.
FORTY YEARS AGO
October 24, 1969
Mrs. W.M. (Ouida) Anderson
received her appointment and com-
mission Saturday as a member of
the Jefferson County Board of
Public Instruction from Governor
Claude Kirk to serve out the
remainder of the term of the late
L.O. Morris.
The First United Methodist
Church of Lloyd held its annual
homecoming Sunday, Oct. 26, with
dinner on the grounds.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
October 23, 1959
The Key Club is sponsoring the
dance after the Jennings-
Monticello football game tonight.
Refreshments will be served. Prices
are 75 cents drag and 50 cents stag.
The Aucilla PTA is sponsoring
their annual Halloween Carnival
on Thursday evening from 6-9 p.m.
The Jefferson Tigers suffered
their first loss of the year by falling
24-19 to Donaldsonville, GA, They@
play Jennings here tonight.
Fred A. Mahan opened a branch
nursery near Tallahassee on U.S.
27.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
October 28, 1949
Sgt. George Mays was stationed\
with the Marine Corps on Unbrador. \
The Garden Club heht n joint \
meeting. Mrs. EJ. Conklin, Sr., was
president; Mrs. Dorothy W.
Shephard. secretary.


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Moniticello News :3A


W~ednesdaLy, Oct-ober 28, 2009


I t1
humorous, but yet dis-
turbing, how the White
House is striking out at
Fox News.
Humorous in the
sense that it is a proven
knowledge that those
you oppose are the ones
you fear the most.
Disturbing in the
sense that Freedom of
Erns is one of the
things that this country
is founded on, it is writ-
ten in our Constitution,
Yet, the White
House tried to ban a
Fox News correspon-
dent from a press event
with one of Obama's
czars, last Thursday.


M
Aesop's Fable
As it Applies
Today
in The Small
Town of
Monticello
A few and select
will understand

The Dog And
The Shadow
A DOG, crossing a
bridge over a stream
with a piece of flesh in
his mouth, saw his own
shadow in the water and
took it for that of anoth-
er Dog, with a piece of
meat double his own in
size. He immediately let
go of his own, and fierce-
ly attacked the other Dog
to get his larger piece
from him. He thus lost
both: that which he
grasped at in the water,
because it was a shadow;
and his own, because the
stream swept it away.
Moral greed and
envy lose all; or
Greediness is always a
losing game; or By
wanting more you may
lose what you have.




(gAlien Boyd is run-
Mning tv spots
about his stand for vet"
erans and.childrens is-
sues. But not a word on
his current position on
health care. Is is blue
dog yellow dog or lap
dog? Call him!"
Eg g hear nothing but
Agood things about
our current Clerk of
Court- Good job Kirk!"


w -nin


Freedom of Speech Is


ev h e d oldO s
other networks stood ABC that Fox News was "gag order?" The better
their ground, and not a real news organi- question is..... What
refused to participate nation and they (the gives him the IDEA thai
in the press conference other media) should he CAN?
unless Fox News was "ought not to treat them In socialized coun-
admitted also, the that way." And again I tries, the President can
White House adminis- say "Kudos to the other dictate what the press
traction relented and media for standing up can, and cannot, say. In
granted access to the for Freedom of Press." socialized countries.
reporter. Kudos to the Our country's the President can dic-
other four major net- Freedom of Sueech was tate what individual
works for standing up attacked last month, by companies can, and
for our country's free- the White House, when cannot, say.
dom. It is this freedom the Obama administra- This is America, the
that seems to be what tion told health insur- Land Of The Free. Why
the Obama administra- ance companies to stop is it that our President
tion is trying to take warning elderly cus- and his administration
away. tomers of the draw- seem to have a problem
This latest contro- backs of the "Obama with that?
versy came after White Care" plan. The ques- Until then....see you
House senior adviser, tion is.... How is our around the town.


I *


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Wednesday, October 28, 2009


4~A Monlticello News


cont. From Page 1


Cont. From Page 1


correct than they inifiel-
ly assumed, with e h
proposed solution rais g
new questions or br g-
ing up exceptions, contra-
dictions or variations
that forced them to delve
deeper into the matter,
And so the discussion
ranged far and wide, with
the suppositions many
and oftentimes contradic-
tory. And this was prima-
rily in dealing with the
fire special assessment;
commissionersbarelygot
to the landfm special
assessment before run-
ning out of time.
Round and round and
round went the free-
wheeling discussion,
with no real sense that it
was achieving consensus,
except in the broadest
terms.
Thus, regarding the
fire assessment, commis-
sioners somewhat agreed
that homesteaded proper-
ties that paid the fire
assessment on the pri-
mary dwelling unit
shouldn't have to pay the
tax for auxiliary build-
ings on the same proper-
ty. But hold a minute, the
law allowed for home-
stead properties to be as
much as 160 acres each,
said one commissioner,
Suppose a property
owner had a house on one
corner of such a large
property and an auxil-
lary structure like a barn
% of a mile or farther
away. Didn't that auxil-
lary structure in essence
represent an altogether
different location and
shouldn't it be assessed
the tax separately?
Remember, commis-
stoners reminded each
other, the purpose of the
assessment was to f\md
the fire department so
that property taxes didn't
have to fund it, a point
that Commissioner Felix
,'Skeet" Joyner ham-
mered repeatedly If a fire
truck had to respond to a
fire % miles away ftom
the makin dwelling unit,
didn't that constitute a
new location? Didn't it?
Gray offered that the
assessment should be tied
to 911 addresses, as 911
addresses signified differ-
ent locations. County
Attorney Buck Bird, how-
ever, proposed that that
the assessment should be
tied to parcels; but then
Joyner pointed out that
his own business consist-
ed of one building that
was located on three sep-
arate parcels. Possibly
the parcels could be con-
solidated for the purpose
of the assessment only,
someone else suggested.
Commissioner Hines
Boyd th g at
ng
make the application of
the assessments fair,
easy and equitable, and
he believed it was
doable. What's more, the
calculations that he had
n indicateditt icioe
wouldn't significantly
impact the bottom line
in terms of the revenues
the two taxes generated,
he said.
"If we can fix what
the citizens perceive is
unfair with the system, I
don't see where we will
reduce the revenues that
nauch, Boyd said.
Citizens just want to
tehdat the are abehles
the last thing we want to
do is shift the burden
back to property taxes."
And what about
dilapidated buildings?
Gray asked.
She showed commis-
stoners a photo of an
abandoned dilapidated


structure that currently


with Hall and Mack,
Violent Crimes
Detectives are exploring
the possibility that
Mack acted in self-
defense.
No criminal charges
havebeenfiledhowever,
when the investigation
is completed it will be
forwarded to the State
Attorney's Office for
review,

ant. From Page 1


separate parcel.
Commissioners more or
less agreed that it should
continue paying the
assessment, since if it
caught on fire, the fire
department would have
to respond. Otherwise,
the woods would catch
on fire and cause a
greater problem.
Joyner offered that
the application of the
assessment on auxiliary
buildings should be tied
to electricity. Auxiliary
buildings that had elec-
tricity should pay the
assessment even if they
were vacant or on home-
steaded property, he
said. Why? Because
these structures stood a
greater chance of catch-
ing on fire, he said. But
would the fire truck go
any farther if the auxil-
iary structure were in
close proximity to. the
main dwelling unit?
someone else asked. And
what about people who
operated businesses out
of outbuildings in their
backyards? Shouldn't
they pay the commercial
rate and pay it even if
they paid the residential
rate on the main
dwelling unit? But who
would establish that it
was a business, as
opposed to a hobby, and
who would do the moni-
toring? Gray wanted to
know.
Then there were the
plantations with their
thousands of acres,
main headquarters and
numerous barns, out-
buildings and workers'
houses throughout. How
were they to be assessed?
And what about the
nurseries and other agri-
cultural operations that
were paying commercial
rates when in fact they
were really agricultural
operations and some of
the structures were used
only seasonally. Was that
fair? Maybe new classifl-
cations needed to be cre-
ated for agricultural and
recreational uses,
And what about
churches and disabled
veterans? The ordinance
said they should be pay-
ing the assessments, but
they weren't at present.
Commissioners felt that
disabled veterans
wounded in the service
of their country should
be exempted. But when it
came to the churches,
commissioners drifted
into potentially troubled
waters, finding that the
churches probably


should pay the assess-
ments. After all, if a
church caught on fire,
the expectation was cer-
tainly there that the fire
department should
respond.
C. P. Miller took
issue with the sugges-
tion,
"People are being
taxed to death and
you're talking of taxing
a place of worship,
Miller said indignantly.
"You should be
ashamed. You don't need
to go there. You need to
leave that alone."
Another citizen who
addressed the board did-
n't provide her name.
She too was concerned
about the application of
the assessment to the
churches, she said.
Beyond that, it was her
contention that resi-
dents in outlying areas
of the county should be
given a rate reduction in
the assessments, as any
benefits that such resi-
dents derived from the
county's services were
minimal at best.
As for the landfill
assessment, commis-
sioners barely got into
discussing it before run-
ning out of time. They
generally agreed, how-
ever, that occupiable
,,
structures (commis-
sioners' own term)
should be assessed the
landfill tax. By occupi-
able commissioners
meant those residential
units that the buildings
inspector certified as
capable of being occu-
pied. or structures that
otherwise had electrici-
ty, running water, etc.,
and that were capable of
being occupied, whether
they were or not each
Jan. 1, when the proper-
ty appraiser had to make
the determination of
occupancy.
The way the discus-
sion ended, commission-
ers asked Gray to pre-
pare a matrix of -the var-
ious ideas proposed,
along with figures show-
ing how much it might
cost the county in terms
of lost revenues under
each scenario.
"The last thing we
want to do is put the bur-
den for the funding of
the fire department back
on property owners,"
was the one point that
all the commissioners
agreed on,
Commissioners set
no date for the next dis-
cussion of the issue.


Mack was at the resi-
dence and demanded to
be let inside. Fearing
that violence would
occur, Hall and Mack
refused to allow Cobb
inside the residence.
They reported that
Cobb then forced open
the locked back door of
the residence, entered
and attacked Mack.
During the violent
e
Library


attack, Mack armed
himself with a kitchen
knife and stabbed Cobb
several times,
On Sunday, Oct. 25,
an autopsy was per-
formed on Cobb and con-
firmedthathediedasa
result of multiple stab
wounds. Based on the
results of the autopsy,
an investigation at the
scene and interviews


solved by mediation we
ivill come back before the
board," Bird said.
The grievance appar-
ently involves Kitty
Brooks, the youth servic-
es librarian, and Angela
Scott, the technical serv-
ices manager.
In his initial presen-
tation of the matter to
the County Commission
on Oct. 1, Coordinator
Roy Schleicher explained
that both he and Library

Petroleum


Director Serafin Roldan
had attempted to resolve
the conflict, as called for
in the county's personnel
policy. He further
explained that once these
steps were exhausted, the
policy called for the com-
mission to handle the
matter, if no resolution
had been achieved.
Which was where things
stood at that point,
Schleicher said.
"This will be like a


court proceeding," he
said of the commis'
sion's hearing of the
matter. Meaning that
commissioners were not
to discuss the issue with
anyone and that the par-
ticipants could engage
legal counsel if they
wanted.
The board's deci-
sion was to be final and
binding on all the par-
ties, per the stipulations
of the personnel policy.


Cont. From Page 1


taminated by leakage
from underground or
aboveground petrole.
um storage tanks.
The way the pro.
gram works, the
Bureau of Petroleum
Storage Systems of the
FDEP scores contain'
nated sites based on
the potential risk to
the groundwater; the
higher the score, the
more likely that the
FDEP will address the
site. Remediation can
take the form of
mechanical extraction,
such as drilling to
draw out the contami-
nated material, or
excavation,
Indications are
that the contamination
in Monticello is not a
single underground
plume that is moving
and contamination
other sites; rather, the
available information
indicates that the con-
taminated sites are
separate and apart.
Florida supposedly
was one of the first
states in the country to
reguhite underground
and above ground stor-
age tank systems
beginning in 1983.
Since then, the FEDP
reports that nearly
30,000 facilities have
reported discharges of
petroleum products
from their storage tank
systems.
The program is
critical because
Florida relies on
groundwater for about
92 percent of its drink-
ing water needs'


City Attorney Bruce
Leinback advised the
council. "The city can
change the contractor
as much as twice a year
but no more than
twice."
In fact, Handex rep-
resentatives had the
opportunity to appear
before the council and
make their case but
apparently had chosen
not to do so, Mayor Tom
Vogelgesang said.
Councilman George
Evans alone took issue
with the change to a
degree. He argued that
it was the city's respon-
sibility, and more specif-
ically that of the city
manager, to monitor the
petroleum-cleanup com-
panies, niake sure they
were doing what they
were supposed to be
doing, and keep the
council informed of
what was happening at
the various cleanup
sites.
"It's incumbent on
the city manager to
monitor the situation so
that it doesn't go a year
without reporting to the
council," Evans said.
"It's our job to monitor
the contractor so that
another contractors
doesn't have to come
and report to us that the
Other contractor isn't
doing the work."
Wingate having the
flu at the time of the
meeting, he was not
there to respond to
Evan's comments. What
the council members
failed to understand,
Wingate said

Rainfall


Wednesday, is that the
city really has very little
say over what the con-
tractors do, as the rela-
tionship is primarily
between the latter and
.
the Florida Department
of Environmental
Protection (FDEP),
which pays for the
cleanup.
As it was, however,
the council on Oct. 6 got
a commitment front the
AET representative that
his company would
periodically report to
city officials on the sta-
tus of the various proj-
ects around town. As
Vogelgesang noted, the
cleanup have been pro-
ceeding for the last 10 or
so years. Part of the
problem, he acknowl-
edged, was that the com-
position of the council
had changed, and much
institutional memory
had departed with the
outgoing members. He
thought the periodic
reporting of the status
of the different cleanup
sites by the company
would go a long ways
toward safeguarding
against this problem in
the future.
The cleanup of
petroleum-contaminat-
edsites-manyof them
former gasoline stations
- is a statewide pro-
gram that the FDEP
administers. The pro-
gram encompasses the
technical oversight,
management and
administrative activi-
ties necessary to prior-
itize, access and clean
up sites largely con-


Cont. From Page 1


remaining above aver-
age, others showing lit-
t1e change, and yet oth-
ers staying below their
long-term averages.
Snead's Smokehouse
Lake in Jefferson
County was the excep-
tion. It recorded 7.4
inches of rainfall in
eight hours which
exceeded the one per-
cent (100-year) storm.
The lake was above
average at the end of
the month. Cherry
Lake in Madison
County remained
unchanged.
Groundwater levels
decreased in half the
district's monitored
wells, but 78 percent


were in a range consid-
ered normal for
September, according,
to the report.
"Average ground-
water levels remained
near the 370' percentile
for the second month in
a row," the reported
states. The percentile is
the percentage of his-
toric levels that are
equal to, or below, the
observed value.
The SRWMD con-
tinues to urge the vol-
untary reductions of
water use. It advises
water users to elimi-
nate wasteful and inef-
ficient water use and to
practice conservation
whenever possible.


The SRWMD's
monthly report is a
compilation of water
resources data, includ-
ing radar-derived rain:
fall estimates, river and
spring flows, and gener-
al hydrological and
meteorological infor-
mation.
The SRWMD covers
7,640 sq. miles and takes
in all or part of 15 coun-
ties and 13 river basins
in north-central
Florida. Counties in the
district are Columbia,
Dixie, Gilchrist,
Hamilton, Lafayette,
Madison, Suwannee,
Taylor, Union, Alachua,
Baker, Bradford, Levy,
Putnam and Jeffersbn.


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OCTOBER 28 31
Pumpkin Patch Sale is
open from sun up until
sun down daily through
October at Waukeenah
United Methodist
Church, at the corner of
highways 259 and 27
south. Come support the
fundraising efforts for
the church youth group.
Youth meet every
Wednesday and Sunday
and welcome all with
loving and smiling
Christian faces.
OCTOBER 28 31
Jefferson Arts Gallery is
open free to the public 10
a.m. to 2 p.m.
Wednesday and
Saturday, or by
appointment. The
Gallery is located at 575
West Washington Street
in Monticello and is a
non-profit group with a
goal of promoting art
and art education in the
Monticello area of
North Florida and South
Georgia. For informa-
tion contact the Gallery
at www.jeffer sonarts-
gallerycom or 997-3311.
Become a member and
support the arts in
Jefferson County
OCTOBER 28 31
Loop d'Loop is one of
the current jewelry
crafting classes being
held at The Peddler's
Marketplace in down-
town Monticello, 11 a.m.
Tuesday through
Saturday. Reservations
may be made by contact-
ing 191argie Stern at 210-
4@f or 933-9540.
Different classes run
everyweek.Learnthe
basics of metal curves
and shapes as a prelude
to Wire Wrapping and
Metal Chain
Construction. The class
project to make and take
home wn be a copper
(or silver may be pur-
chased) loop earring set
as well as the knowledge
to make your own sim-
ple matching metal
chain. This is not a
beginner's class; you
must have knowledge on
how to make an earring
eye pin and an ethic
wrap. Beading 102 -
Learn how to string,
make findings, crimp,
and finish a completed
bracelet. The class proj-
ect to make and take
h oemeed wmbeoneL
with the knowledge to
complete from start to
finish necklace and
bracelet sets at home,
and at your convenience.
101 Class is required
before taking this class.
OCTOBER 29
AA meetings are held 8
p.m. Thursday at the
Christ Episcopal Church
annex, 425 North Cherry
street. For more infor-
mation call 997-2129 or
997-1955.
OCTOBER 29


SDay 948-4816 Night 973-8286


A;Guide to the rela's Best Restarnts.


Nov e 20
at
Jefferson County.
Country .Club

Starts at 1 p.m. with

GIFIRJ 100 a four-man scramble.

11 to R5VP b> ENTRY FEE IS $50 PER

PERSON OR $200 PER TEAM.

hp for more information or to donate at1860) 808.4868)


caresof.


www. ecbpublishing. com


Montlice~llo Ne~ws ,BA


Wedcne~sdlay, O)ctober'l 28, 200g


p.m. on the first Sunday
of each month at the
'Learning Center on
Marvin Street for a
meeting. Contact
Commander Ned Hill at
339-5524 for more infor-
mation.
NOVEMBER 2
VFW Ladies Auxiliary
Post 251 meets 6:30 p.m.
on the first Monday of
each month at Memorial
MB Church. Contact


Mary Madison at 210-
7090 for more informa-
tion.
NOVEMBER 3
Monticello Woman's
Club meets on the first
Tuesday of every month
at noon at the clubhouse
on East Pearl Street for
lunch and a meeting.
Contact President Jan
Wadsworth at 997-4440
for more information.


Roundtable Discussion
Group at Tupelo's
Bakery & Cafe Thursday
evening 6 p.m. for those
who have just stared on
the path toward a more
organic way of eating
and living but have expe-
rienced bumps along the
way, 997-2127.
OCTOBER 29
Cub Scout Pack 808 wA
meet weekly 7 to 8 p.m.
on Thursday at The
Eagle's Nest on South
Water Street. A
Halloween Pizza Party
will be enjoyed on this
date with the hope for
lots of scouts and
prospective scouts
attending since the Cub
Scout Roundup earlier
this month. For more
information contact Cub
Master Greg Wynot at
997-5866.
OCTOBER 30 AND 31
Bring Your Own Praz 09
(B.Y.O.P. 09) Fall Youth
Explosion 7 p.m. Friday
at Bethel AME Church,
410 East York Street in
Monticello. Guest speak-
er is Min. Victor L.
Sweet, foundei- of
Redemption Outreach
Ministry of Quincy, FL;
Special musical guests
will include Min. Febe
and The Chosen Ones
Mass Choir and Dance
Ministry, Evangelist
Kechia Robinson, The
Spiritualettes, and more.
At 4 p.m. on Saturday,
festivities will conclude
the annual Hallelujah
Fall Festival with food.
fun, and games for the
entire family! For more
information contact
Althera Johnson at 850-
933-2012.
OCTOBER 30
Community Skate Night
is held 6 to 8 p.m. on the
last Friday of each
month at the Church of
the Nazarene on 1590
North Jefferson Street.
This event is free. Bring
your own skates or bor-
row from the Roller
Club. There is a small
charge for snacks, 997-
3906.
OCTOBER 30
Vermigardening with
Cynthia Connally 6:30 to
8 p.m. Friday at One
Heart Earth Center, 450
West Madison Street in
Monticello. Raising


worms, in a raised bed,
for raising vegetables.
Also, learn to make a
salad table, a torso-
friendly way to garden.
Connally has .a PhD in
Agricu 1 tura 1
Engineering and is
owner of Monticello
Vineyards and Ladybird
Organic. She will lead
this informative pro-
gram and teach partici-
pants hqw to heal our
Earth Mother the natu-
ral way. She will bring
worm castings and
worms, which will be
available for purchase.
Also, instructions on
salad table construction
will be given. Bring your
friends. RSVP to sal-
lieindia@yahoo.com or
call 997-7373.
OCTOBER 31
Monticello MainStreet
invites everyone to its
Haunting Halloween 6 to
8 p.m. Saturday evening
in the downtown area.
There will be trick-or-
treating at all local busi-
nesses, face painting,
popcorn and cider sales,
bobbing for apples, bal-
loons, and just tons of
bargains fun for every-
one. Any business locat-
ed outside the downtown
area is welcome to set up
tables on the streets,
pass out candy to the
children, and join in all
the fun. Contact
President Claire Olson
at 510-0942, or any other
MainStreet Board
Member
OCTOBER 31
JCHS Mass Class 1980-
1989 is planning a
Holiday Party December
26. In preparation for
this grand event there
will be a meeting at 1
p.m. Saturday at the
Memorial Missionary
Teen Center, 780 Second
Street in Monticello. All
classmates are asked to
join in the planning. For
additional information
contact Teresa (Penny)
Thompson at 850-363-
4699 or Valarie (Diane
Brown) William or
Helen Cuyler at 850-591-
5039.
OCTOBER 31
The regular last-
Saturday-of-the-month
Crochet and Chat meet-
ing of the Tallahassee


Crochet Guild is held 10
a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday
'at the Jefferson Arts
Gallery, 575 West
Washington Street. It's a
free meeting.
Participants bring their
own projects or work on
some of the club proj-
ects. No children please.
Contact Coordinator
Melanie Mays Randall
at http://www. divacro-
chet.com for updates
and for more informa-
tion.
OCTOBER 31
Monster Mash Dance at
the Monticello Opera
House Saturday featur-
ing The Chaotics. Doors
open at 7:30 p.m. and
music begins at 8:00 p.m.
with a cash bar and cos-
tume contest. The cost is
$15 for advance pur-
chase and $20 at the
door. This is a Main
Street of Monticello Jail
House fundraiser with
limited table seating.
For more information
call 997-4242
NOVEMBER 1
Planting the Fall
Garden with B O'Toole 2
p.m. Sunday afternoon
at One Heart Earth
Center. 450 West
Madison Street in
Monticello. November is
not too late to plant. B.
O'Toole of O'Toole's
Herb Farm in Madison,
FL will teach all you
need to know about
planting for the cool
weather season. Plus,
she will bring the ingre-
dients. Purchase your
herbs, vegetables, pot-
tingsoil.mushroom
compost. and worm
castings ft-om her Come
with all your enthusias-
tic gardening compan-
ions. Learn to be totally
organic. RSVP to sal-
lieindia@yahoo.com or
chll 997-7373.
NOVEMBER 1
VFW Post 251 meets 5


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OUNT~Y


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850.997


www. ecbp~ublishinlg. com


Wednlcsdaly, O)ctoberl 28, 2009)!


6At- M/onticello News


Huge S

1
.. o
Eg
LOW SMOKED BOSTON BUTT!
PICNIC HAMS
TURKEY BREAST
'"
Mr'k 850-997-5622


Hal Bennett and his """"""""
"
JCSO staff, as well as res-
idents in the community
who supported the event,
for their support of the
Jefferson Senior Center
and the Jefferson County
Sheriff's Office, in mak-
ing the fundraiser the
huge success that it was.
.
-
JCSO staffers, and Hal (
Bennett take a moment to
smile for the camera dur-
Ing the Boston Butt sale
last week, which raised
roughly $2,000+ for the as
Jeffbrson County Senior '
Citizen's Center. Left to
right are Sheriff David "
Hobbs, Hal Bennett, Rick
Knowles, Dawn Stiff,
Pepper Norman, and Erin
Mays.


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Stay Writer
This year the
Jefferson County
Sheriffs Office gold pre-
cooked Boston Butts for
their annual fundraiser
for the Jefferson Senior
Center, which proved to
be a hilge success, raising
roughly $2,000+ for the
county's elderly citizens.
County Sheriff David
Hobbs reported that
approximately 220 Butts
were sold for a $25 dona-
tion.
The Boston Butts
were prepared and pro-
vided by Johnston's Meat
Locker.
Hobbs wishes to
thank Johnston's owner


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The Florida State
Beekeepers Association
and North Florida
Community College's
Green Industries
Institute are sponsoring
a free community event.
"A Day in the Bee Yard"
is planned from 8:30 a.m.
to 3 p.m.. Saturday Nov


7 at Green Industries
Institute in Monticello.
The event will fea-
ture a variety of events
for the entire family.
"Stop by, and enjoy the
beautiful Green
Industries grounds, par-
ticipate in a variety of
activities, and have a
fun day learning about
the amazing life of
bees," said Patricia
Garner, Director of
NFCC's Green
Industries Institute.
Bees, beekeepers
and a variety of activi-


ties, classes, demonstra-
tions, vendors, food and
art will be on hand.
Some highlights of the
day are: How to Become
a Beekeeper demonstra-
tion with an Ask the
Experts and Kids
Corner component, a
live beehive under glass
for close viewing, free
honey sticks for chil-
dren, honey and
beeswax candles and
other items for sale, as
well as food vendors, art
work. and more.
Green Industries


will also showcase its
facilities and grounds;
its indoor and outdoor
classrooms, greenhous-
es, fruit and nut gar-
dens, and the observato-
ry featuring a 16" Richie
Creighton telescope will
all be open to the public
during the event.
Folk artist Janet
Moses will offer a "Bee
Themed" Folk Art
Painting Class at the "A
Day in the Bee Yard"
event. There is a $45
charge for the painting
class and those interest-
d tt


admission and free park-
e -.e.
and important little
creature the bee.
Green Industries
Institute is located at
2729 West Washington
Street in Monticello. For
more information, con-
(act Patricia Garter at
(850) 973-1668, email gar-
nerp@nfec.edu or visit
www.nfec.edu (search:
Green Industries).


1


24 years old
Persons aged 25 through 64 years who have health
conditions associated with higher risk of medical
complications from influenza
HIN1 Swine Flu Vaccines are now available
at the Jefferson County Health Department
Clinic located at 1255 West Washington
Street.
Clinic hours:
Monday Friday: 8:00 AM 12:30 PM
and 1:00.PM 4:30 PM.
HIN1 Swine Flu Vaccines are FREE

No appointment is necessary
For more information,

please call: (850) 342-0170, Extension # 3


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Wednelllsdayl, O)ctober~i 28t, 2009 '




























































































































Our company would IIke to recognize

All survivors and the memory

Of those who lost the battle.

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Wednlcsdaiy, O)ctlober 28~, 2009)!


HA\ M'onticclloi NewMs


October is Breast Cancer


s
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.
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-
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-
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my rununua ranume
On Saturday, October 17. Big Bend Horseman'
Association hosted a horse show for the Tough Enoug
to Wear Pink campaign for breast cancer awareness
This show was to benefit our own local Sharon Ewin
Walker Breast Health Center. 200 plus spectator
watched while over 65 different horses and riders partic
ipated in the horse show "We had a great show. W
knew it would be a success, but had no idea it would b
to this magnitude. We want to thank everyone who sup
ported anti sponsored this show and we look forward t
doing this again next year" commented a spokesperson
from BBHA. The BBHA was able to raise over $2,000 fo
the Sharon Ewing Walker Breast Health Center.
"It was a great feelirig to know that we had a part in
helping the cause" said one show participant. "This i
the first time we have been to this show and we had a
great time, can't wait until next month!"
Big Bend Horseman's Association is a new club
based in Monticello. Although just forming this year, the
club has already made tremendous strides to give bac
to the community. One show raised money and dona
tions for the Jefferson County Humane Society and dur
ing this month's show the Equine Resche &
Rehabilitation Ranch of Tallahassee, Florida provided
the concessions and raised almost $500 for the horse

The public is invited to attend our shows. There is
no admission charge and the club fosters good family
fun and fellowship. For more information and pictures
please see our website at: www.BigBendHorse.com


RAY CICHON
, Monticello News
Managing Editor
Local resident
Becky Howell is a breast
cancer survivoI; who has
been cancer freesince
February 2006. It was
July 2005 when a lump
was discovered in her
breast. *
This happened on a
weekend, and on
Monday Howell saw her
primary caregiver who
assessed thq situation,
and immediately
referred her to a sur-
geon. Ultimately, an
ultrasound and MRI
showed that there was a
larger lump, along with
two smaller ones. and a
biopsy determined that
these were cancerous.
Ironically, Howell
had her annual mammo-
gram in March 2005, just
a few months before the
lumps were discovered.
Apparently, these lumps
were located in a posi-
tion, which did not allow
them show up on the
mammogram, she said.
Despite the fact that
the lumps were located
in the same breast,
Howell opted for a dou-
ble mastectomy,
"because most often if
there is cancer in one
breast, it will eventually
show up in the other
breast," she explained.
The cancer was ulti-
mately diagnosed as
estrogen fed breast can-
cer, which is reported to
be of the type that
spreads rapidly. Howell
was fortunate that her
cancer was discovered
before it spread to other
parts of the body.
She opted for breast
reconstruction, and is
currently taking anti-
cancer medication,
which she will continue
to take until she remains
cancer-free for five

io^t that flilme th
reassessed and the deter-
mination made of


whether or not the med-
ication needs to be con-
tinued.
Howell strongly
urges women to do self
breast exams and
promptly discuss any-
thing they find unusual
with their physiciqng: "I
did not do this, Wild?)iers
is no history of cancer
in my family, however; as
I look back, I wish I had
done it, she
Likewise, stress-
es the value of rt
group for cancer vic-
tims, whether the group
consists of friendswho
have had a similar expe-
rience, or family mem-
bers, ol- a more formal
group.
Howell relates this
story that took place
while she was undergo-
ing her cancer treat-
ment: "191y dad asked
me, how I can be so
upbeat during this time?
"I replied that I had
two choices. I could
either have a pity party
for myself, or regard my


situation as a temporary
setback and be positive.
The choice was mine,
'-

-


and I chose to be posi-


Enls ieu uigtehreso.


Becky Howell


Above and below: Some of the costume contest


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Wednlesdlay, Octo~ber 28, 2009


Monticello Nens Photo By
v. Debble Snapp Oct 9 2009
An Open House and
Ribbon Cutting will be held
at the Jefferson Senior
arizen center so..m.,o
2 p.m. Thursday. Oct.
29, at 1155 North
Jefferson Street.
Director Bobbie Krebs,
the staff, and all
Involved with the center
invite the community to
tour the facility and enjoy
light refreshments. From
left to right seated are Alberta
Neeley and Lee Goodman,
and standing is JSCC Board
Member Rev. Jimmy Brookins.
-


S~h~b.


A 11$ O
U MU U

80HAMity

MV01VOMORI



.
*

DEBBIE SNAPP
: Monticello News
I Sta/J Writer
*
* Cross Landings
: Health &
Rehabilitation Center
1::"p.sor s'::Jil
:10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday Nov. 14, at
1780 North Jefferson
Street.
The festival will
include yard sale ven'
dors, trade fair partic-
: pants, health fair
associates, face paint-
ing artists, and fun
and games for the
entire family. There
wU be prizes and
: giveaways for all.
Also planned for
: this event is the
Smoke House, offer.
ing fire demonstra-
tions throughout the
day, with help from
: the Red Cross and the
( area fire depart-
I ments.
( Music throughout
( the day will include
: Holy Ghost Revival,
1 the Monticello Line
5 Dancers, the
1 Mountain Dew
( Loggers, the Rick
( Knowles Band, and
( the musical duo
: Jhimeirra and
: Jhimeika Barrington.
: Big Bend Hospice
volunteers will hold
cake walks and AJ
Smith will be cooking
hotdogs and ham-
burgers throughout
the day, free to all
those attending the
festivities; and
dietary staff associ-
ate Jeannie
McGovern wm be
serymg.help to make
: this yearly event a
I success, the commu-
( nity is invited to par-
( ticipate by hosting a
: table of their own...
I there is no charge.
: Volunteers, churches,
orh o n.i a ionsr:
chants, are all invited
to participate in sales
: or giveaways.
Contact Paul
Kovary, administra-
tor, Mae Kyler, social
services director, or
Voncell Edwards,
: activity director, at
I 997-2313 for more
I information.
'. .*
*


* :
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Monticello
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DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
StgffWriter
Hiram Ledge No. 5
had the distinct honor
and privilege of receiv-
ing three of the Grand
Lodge Officers, and
Grand Tyler.of the Most
Worship Grand Lodge of


Free and Accepted
Masons of the State of
FloridaSept.28. .
Attending were
Deputy Grand Master
Right Worshipful J. Dick
Martinez, Senior Grand
Warden Right
Worshipful Jim J.
Harris, Junior Grand
Warden Right
Worshipful J.L. "George"
Aladro and Grand Tyler
Right Worshipful Rick
Kasten.
With approximately
50 brethren observing
this historic event, the
Grand Lodge officers
presented aprons, and
Bibles to four of Hiram's
newly raised Master


Masons. The Deputy
Grand Master also pre-
sented three silver, one
green, and one blue
Certificate of
Qualification for being
proficient in the various
ceremonies and esoteric
work of Freemasonry
A wonderful time
was had by all, as the
participants enjoyed
great fellowship, fine
food, and brotherly love
that bonds all regular
Masons in peace and
harmony.
Bob Montpellier is
Worshipful Master,
Hiram Lodge No. 5 Free
and Accepted Masons,
Monticello, Florida.


WE TAKE THE


M/onlicetllo News 93A


JEFFERSON


COUNTY


.OUND


Debbie Snapp
1110aticello News
StatT 11riter
The .k-fferson Count.\
High School Mass Class of
is pPanJung for a
Saturday. Dec 26.
in ,,-,season co, mis
grand event there \till be a
meeting at 1 p.m. Saturday:
Oct. 31 at the Alemonal
Missionari Teen Center.
780 Second Street in
Monticello
To help with the
organuallon of this
reunion type event, ur for
additional Information,
contact coordinators
Teresa a Penny a Thompson
at 850 363-4699. Valarle
and Helen Cuyler at 850
591-5039.


~f~roh





Big Bend LeadeRs


Florida Property Insurance Crlsis

- I. Mya HNC OM e your
homeowners poncies?
@2 2006: Ronda but mam pard an esnmakd $104thion
n a me f 2 or mass homa insum
2. If my insurance company cannot pay for my
hurricane loss, will I be paid?
neoFknidainsurasonGomainyAssocusionglG,9papcomedclaims
up to a ext...........or voo.con as for someowns ans no, pay m atma son.coo rer amage rests to usecure manatents.
3. Is there a solution to the Florida property crisis?
,
I i found he sohnion aier Humcanc Inib sauck in 1990tost
insures arre non-anewing business and won not writing sw bushm
neason is a remorse awail nonse.ne user ame nsch only
"weenwage c..==u em wweimmy
comperorsetsusiness.
FLORIDA CANNOT AFFORD TO WAff -se time to act is now.
Cabour state representative and state satator to age &cm to support a Hawail-wpe
plan tiw Borida TODAY!

MOTTOW THSUTRHCe

850-997-3912
Ferd Naughton


I


minum a mammm


first place in the league
with 27; MatchPoints, rd2
with 24; Ace Kickers. #3
with 23; Bainbridge Dif-
fe rent Strokes, #4 with
21, Capital City Aces, #5
with 20; Glen Arvin as-
sics, #6 with 17 %; Sene
Me Another, #7 with 17,
Golden Eagle Scream-
ing Eagles and Killearn
Lucky Charms tied at
#8 with 15; Killearn Hot
Flashes, #10 with 14;
Capital City Deuces, #11
with 13 %; Glen Arvin
Dirty Dozen, #12 with
12; and Golden Eagle
Wings, #13 with l0.

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Wednelsda~y, O)ctobcr- 28, 2009!;'


10Ai Mont~icello News


rowrs CHOO


Florida Prepaid College Plans Annual

OpersEnrollmentBegan0tt.19
There aren't many available through families to prepay
things in life that are Florida Prepaid College tuition, tuition
guaranteed.But begin- Plan comprising of differential fee, local
ning October 19, parents tuition, tuition fees and dormitory
can purchase a Florida differential fee, local fees housing at today's plan
Prepaid College Plan and dormitory housing prices.
that is financially to help cover the cost of When a child is
guaranteed by the state a college education. ready for college, the
of Florida. With this safe "In current times of Florida Prepaid College
and secure way to save economic uncertainty Plan covers the actual
for children's higher and rising prices, the cost at any Florida
education, families don't peace of mmd for a public university or
have to worry about family with a Florida community college. If
tuition increases or the Prepaid College Plan is the student decides to
credit crunch, and they more valuable than ever, attend a private college,
cannot lose their money You don't have to worry out-of-state college or
when they purchase a about the economy when technical school, the
Florida Prepaid College it comes to college value of the plan may be
PleThe Florida Prepaid pna C e on t r stitut on. a
College Board beans its financially guaranteed qualify for a plan, the
2009-2010 annual by the State of Florida. child or child's
enrollment period on And once your family parent/guardian must
Monday, October 19. The has purchased a Prepaid be a Florida resident.
nety Florida Prepaid College Plan, your Parents, grandparents,
College Plan prices, payments are fixed and friends and even
e
pre id.coT C m nerease, Dus d businesses can purchase
available from October Ottenstroer, of the Families can sign up
19 until the sign-up Florida Prepaid College online for a Florida
deadline of January 31, Board. Prepaid College Plan at
2010. One out of 10 www.myfloridaprepaid.c
With college tuition Elorida children from om or call 1-800-552
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representmg just 16 newborns to high school GRAD (4723) to request
t
percent of the total cost students has a Florida an Enrollment Kit in
for attending a public Prepaid College Plan. English or Spanish and
university in Florida, The Florida Prepaid speak with a customer
four flexible plans are College Plans allow service representative.


downs.
Trent Roberts
(ACA) was #18 with 34
pass completions of 95
attempts with 2 inter-
qeptions, for 322 yards
and 1 touchdown; and
Marquice Dobson (Jef-
ferson), was at #20 with
3 pass completions of 3
attempts, with no inter-
ceptions for 146 yards
and 3 touchdowns.
Ju rushing, Devon-
drick Nealy (Jefferson),
was #1 with 96 carries
for 990 yards and 15
touchdowns. Kendrick
Huggilis-Footman was
#22 with 26 carries for
260 yards and 2 touch-
downs; Alex Dunkle
(ACA) was at #34 with
69 carries for 196 yards
and no touchdowns; and
Todd McKenzie (ACA)
was #41 with 25 carries
for 155 yards and 2
touchdowns.
In receiving, David
Crumity (Jefferson) was
#1 with 29 paris recep-
tions for 606 yards and 9
touchdowns; Marquice
Dobson was #3 with 33
receptions for 517 yards
and 3 touchdowns;
Alphonso Footman (Jef-
ferson) was #23 with 14
pass receptions for 196
yards and 1 touchdown;


Trent Roberts
FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
For the fourth week
running, gridiron ath-
letes from both Aucilla
Christian Academy and
Jefferson High School
have been named to the
list of Big Bend Leaders
on the football field.
In passing, fresh-
man quarterback
Lenorris Footman (Jef-
ferson) was inadver-
tently omitted from the
#3 week listings. In
week #3, Footman was
at #1 in passing with 66
pass completions out of
109 attempts, with 4 in-
terceptions, for 1,194
yards and 8 t(iuch-
downs. In week #4,
Footman remained #1
with 87 pass comple-
tions of 143 attempts,
with 4 interceptions, for
1,414 yards and 10 touch-


uevenurson arousy
Devondrick Nealy (Jef-
ferson) was #24 with 8
receptions for 185 yards;
and Clark Christy
(ACA) was #26 with 9
pass receptions for 164
yards and 1 touchdown.
On the defensive
side of the field, Tyler
Evans (ACA) was #12
with 20 solo tackles aud'
33 assists for a total of
53 tackles; in quarter'
back sacks, Trent
Roberts (ACA) was tied
at #2 with 8: and Tyler
Evans (ACA) was tie at
#6 with 3.
For pass intercep-
tions, David CrumitY
(Jefferson) was #1 with
6; Marquice Dobson
(Jefferson) was #2 with
5; and Wilson Lewis
(ACA) was #4 with 3.
For punting, Trent
Roberts (ACA) was #9
with 23 punts for 765
yards,


tinctly "Navy" flavor was
designed to take into ac-
count what it means to be
a Sailor
Lingle is a 2005 grad-
uate of Jefferson ~'ounty
High School.


Navy Seaman Adam
J. Lingle, son of Debbie S.
and Mark J. Lingle of
Monticello, recently com
plated (IS. Navy basic
training at Recruit Train-
ing Command, Great


:Ma

IE ""ddn
customs, first aid, fire
fightmg. water safety and
sturival, and shipboard
andailtraft safety Empha-
sis was also placed on
physicalfltness.
The capstone event of
boot camp is "Battle Stan
tions". This exercise gives
recruits the skills and con.
fidence they need to suc-
ceed in the fleet. "J3attle
Stations" is designed tO
galvanize the basic war-
rior attributes of sacrifice.


dedication, teamwork and
endurance in each recruit
through the practical ap-
plication of basic Navy
skills and the core values
of Honor: Courage and
Commitment. Its dis-


FRAN HUNT
Moriticello Netos
Stg/f Writer -
In match #6, held
Oct. 15, the Monticello
Blabalots defeated the
Killearn Hot Flashes, 4-2
in the North Florida
South Georgian Tennis
A-league.
Team #1, Katie
Brock and Susan Good-
win, woh the sets, 6-4 and
6-3.
Team #2, Cindy
Wainright and Angie
Delvecchio, lost the first
set, 6-4, won
the econd,

akettie-
1-6. Team

#3, Laura
Ward and
Laura
Kirchhoff,
lost the
first set,
4-6, won
the seco
ond, 6-3
and lost .
t h e
tiebreaker,
4-6.
Team #4,
Valorie Stevens
and Trisha
Wirick, lost the
first set, 3-6, won
the second, 6-4, and won
the tiebreaker, 6-1.
Team #5, Patty


Hardy and Jennifer
Ellis, lost the first set, 0-
6, won the second, 6-1,
and won the tiebreaker,
6-2.
Team #6, Mary
Bridges and Laura Mar-
tin, won the sets 6-4 and
6-3.
When the Blabalots
went into match #7, held
Oct. 22, they ended up
splitting points, 3-3.
Team #1, Brock apd
Goodwin, lost by forfeit.
Team #2, Wainright and
Delvecehio, lost the first
set, 7-6, won the
cond, 6-2 nd
Hebreaker,

Ten #3, Ward
and Kirch-
hoff, lost
the sets, 6-4
and 6-4. '
Team
, #4, Stevens
and Hardy, won
the sets, 6-1 and 6-
1.
Team #5,
Bridges and Ellis,
won the sets, 6-1.
and 64.
Team #6, Maxie
Miller and Linsey
Taylor, won the
sets, 6-3 and 6-4.
As of* match #61,
team standings and
their points wefe: the
Blabalots remained in


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Monticcllo o News 11A


Wiednelcsda,, Oc~tober~l 28, 2009


FoolluA season is slarlbig aml have we got a contest for youl Each week we
wH post the genes that wH be played and the buivishaal who mdres the most
accurate predictions regaling the winner of each game will win the
following prizes: First Place will win a $20.00 check from The
MontIcello News or a one year subscription. The Second Place
winner will receive 2 movie passes or a 6 month subscription
absolutely FREEl

Rules of Play
1. Wrke down which teams you think will be the winners on the entry form,
2. SubmR the entry form to the newspaper no later than 5 p.m.each Friday.
3.0nhy one entry per week 8 albwed per contestant.
4. In case of a tie, the tie-breaker will be used to determine the winner.

Thencontest is open to anyone age 18 and older, except for newspaper emptyees and their
6. The decishn of the judges is final.
7. Winner will be contacted by phone and announced in the newspaper on Wednesday of each
week.


~I~(Y""4CiL


* monscene


Steve Walker


www.Seve~lkeredit~com


E CAMINEZ
8 HARDER, P.A.
Personal Injury &
Wrongful Death
1307 S. Jefferson Street
Monticello
850-997-8181
4. FAMU vs
Morgan State


mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm


700 E. Wash n StS* Monticello

7. Georgia Tech
vs Vanderbilt

DANNY'

00USIGH
Collision Windoses
Brakes A/C Repair
Wiseels & Lift Klts
TIres
765 E.Washington St. Monticello

rU 997-1500
SELECT 8. Auburn vs
sqAGENT Mississippi
Providing insurance and Hnancial Services
Home Office, Bloomington, Illinois 61710


: sserddA


I


I


I One:


Winningleans


t
2'
04
4.


ii


Tommy Suries Ins Agcy Inc
Tommy Suries. Agent
225 N Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32344-1819
Bus 850 997 8282 Fax 850 997 2884
tommy.suries.bw9i@statefarm com
9. Miami Hurricanes
vs. Wake Forest ,a


1.


10.


[ MONTICELLO EWS
PO Box 428
180 W. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32345
850-997-3568
10. Duke vs ,
Virginia ,


TIE BREAKER: (exact score of below game)
I 7. Miami Hurricanes vs Wake Forest
WINNERS: Week of Oct 21 Oct 28
I FIRST PLACE Roosevelt Jones
SECOND PLACE Anthony Rueble
l......................


A SPARK MAN
al.does
185 E. Dogwood St.
Monticello
997-5 soa
2. JCHS vs
FAMU High School/


C


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OWSOR COMMty

Ti 075)







fait Millis* MUlstirrill
Licensed& Insured* Lic# CRC1329001
Mark Kessler 850-997-4540


their parents and or
guardians. Football play-
ers did not participate in
the ceremony.
The Homecoming
game began at 7:30 p.m..
and the JetTerson Tigers
went into the game look-
ing forward to downing
the Graceville Tigers for
their third district game
of the season, which they
did with a 42-6 victory
The theme for
Homecoming was
"Blackout the Past and
Embrace The Future".
The stands were packed
with fans wearing
Blackout T-shirts, and the
cheerleaders wore the
blackout shirts with black
shorts.
Football players
entered the field under a
canopy of balloons
spelling out B-L-A-C-K-O-
U-T, and a barrage of fire-
works saw fans cheering
wildly.
The Homecoming
Court was presented dur-
ing half time. The
Homecoming Court for
2009 included Duke
Damien Crumitie,
Duchess Adrianna Noel;
Prince Andre Woods and
PrinceSS Tania
Richardson; King Mali
Carter and Queen
Kha'Teycia Norton.
Mr. Freshman Ramez
Nealy and Miss Freshman
oreMar %hon o

Sophomore Shaneice
Young; Mr. Junior
Shelderrick Duhart and
Miss Junior Myeisha
. Thomas; Mr. Senior
Donnell Williams and
Miss Senior Kassandra
Simpkins.
Miss Blue LaAshlie
Norton and Miss Orange
Janelle Bassa; Miss
Homecoming Asia
Walker; and up for Mr.
and Miss JCMHS were
Tiarra Smith escorted by
Harold Ingram, Jr., and

E :2!!" $
Mr. and Miss JCMHS
GraH d ha aim and
crowned and the slashed,
while flashbulbs flashed.
Two of the Homecoming


.


. .
.,


www/. e cbp u blish ingS. com n


Wedncsda~y,, Octobrcl 28, 2(009


12A Mlonticello News


Much school spirit was evident during Homecoming Week at Jefferson, includ-


Pictured Left to right, Dressing for Jefferson's Homecoming week Pajama Day


On Wacky Tacky Day at Jefferson, students were definitely all of that, left to right,


Court were football
starters and did not par-
ticipate,
Stepping in instead
were: Alphonso Footman.
Sr.. stepping in for his son,
Alphonso. Jr:. and Major
Dwight Mack standing in
for Shelderrick Duhart.
"The players did not par-
ticipate in halftime
because the half time
game adjustments were
more important," said
Spears, apparently not
wanting his players dis-
tracted and to remain
focused on winning the
game.
During the halftime
festivities, girls from
Jefferson Elementary
School. also wearing
Blackout T-shirts and car-
rying pom-poms, cheered
with the oldes; girls.
"There will be a spirit
bus for our district gaine
against FAMU Oct. 30.
The cost is 5$ and it does
not include admission,"
said Head Football Coach
Willie Spears. He remind-
ed that the game Friday
was for the District
Championship, and if the
Tigers win it, they win
District. Going into the
game, the Tigers are 4-4
and 3-0 in district; FAMU
was 3-3 and 2-0 in district.


girls winning the flag foot-
ball game, which was
coached by varsity foot-
ball players, and refereed
by Assistant Head
Football Coach Cameron
Duke, were awarded free
admission to the Friday
night homecoming game.
Though scores and
statistics were not kept.
the winners were the
ninth and tenth graders.
"The girls played great!
Both teams played hard,"
said Duke. "It was a fun
event and- winning girls
pulled out the win by the
performance of Samiria
Martin."
Senior Night began 7
p.m., Friday, and senior,
cheerleaders, band mem-
bers and members of the
JROTC, who have been
with the program for at
least two years, were rec-
ognized, escorted by


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Jefferson County
Middle/High School cele-
brated Homecoming last
week.
Each day had its own
theme, which was carried
out throughout the day.
The coronation of the
Homecoming Court was
held at the old high school
auditorium, and all but
Mr. and Miss JCMHS,
were crowned and slashed.
Mr. and Ms. JCMHS were
crowned at the
Homecoming Game
Friday night.
Following the
Homecoming Parade,
there -was a pep rally, fol-
lowed by the Death Valley
Powder Puff Bowl, in
which the freshman and
sophomores took on the
juniors and seniors. The


Left to right, Brianna Miller and Patas Norton as


U
Serving Madison, Jefferson, Taylor & lAfayette Counties
Freddy Pitt8 Agency Manager
Jimmy King 4one Glen King enor
231WJiastSL*Nadison*(0101813-4071
Freddy Pitte
95 W. Anderson St.* Monticello (850) 997-2213
Freddy Pitts Ryan Perry, Agent
SOLSJMembinatoastaferry*(atiodiuk23Z1
waymLance Braswell, 8ge 2 asse
24/7 Clairn Services 1-866-276-7322
"Helping You Is What We Do Best "


Some Wacky Tacky Tigers, back left to right, Keshla


Varsity Tigers, left to right, Devondrick Nealy, Kendrick Huggins-Footman and


Tisa~knr Parrra DItrSPLAlr j












































































. . ., ,,
.
Congratulations
Jefferson County
High School on
& SRCCCSSIGI Ornecoming!

DAN H Y'S CO USION
To$ E. Washington St. & Customs
--- ---
Montice FL SUI-10UU

Keep Up the Great Work
.
Jefferson COUnty High!


..""" "
leadM sPol em inme r h aM I


* *

There is an opportunity ,
waiting for you!
. .
. Linda Butler Monticello, FL .
. .
: 850-997-1225 :
! WAY TO GO JSHHSt (

Morrow Insurance Agency
Life Health Home
Auto Commercial
(850) 997-3912
Ferd E. Naughton
105 W Anderson St. Monticello


Wednesdayu Octbe 28 200 wwebpubhlis h in


g~.colh


Mn ticello;I> NewI: s *


13A


During Rat Day, left to right, Kadesiah Norton and
Deja Lewis, dumpedd" up their cheerleading outfits,
adding a little "junk in the trunk at Jefferson High
School last week.


Members of the Boys and Girls Club display their banner and participate during


Jefro asisat oobllcoces Ofnsv


Homeomig prade


Theperusson eto fteJfesnMrhn adkp h htmcba uigteana


315 1M akeenah Hth ~


'I


~~COMING~





From Honorable
Leonard Bembrf
Florida House
of Representatives
District 10

Con ratulations on a success[
lomecommy,

je rson County



reason coun*
fill feumfield Superintendent of Schools


The IIfe-size bronze TIger sculpture outside of the
main office at Jefferson High School appeared to be
lurking in the brush during Homecoming week, as if
ready to pounce on the Graceville Tigers during the
Homecoming Game and show no mercy.







omssomdag/

~ F F05:
HOH0rable All.awson


s....ar., s......ders.
Aland limer.1 Menalmer

2
[ilillfilATIONS



ON THElillllilEfilllNG!


Jefferson County --
commissioner
Stephen Fulford
District 1



sorecornise


tloww. e cbpubllish ingr. com n


Wedneficsday,' ()ctoberc 28, 2009!)


The arsty iges wee soke duingthe nnul Hmecmingpardeas hey Sheriff David Hobbs, Judge Bobby Plaines and Property Appraiser Angela Gray,
woul prve o b inFriay igh's ameaganstGraevile-wave to Tiger fans throughout the course of the Homecoming parade.~


e The ninth
and tent grade girls drew the
first blood buy chalking up the w
first points during the
Death Valley Powder
Puff Bowl Thursday following the
parade.The girls played a great
game Thursday in the first Death
valley Powder Puff Bowl and as
he winners, the ninth and tent
grade girls
. were admitted into the
Homeco Ing Game F


''"gt:_


agans,


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Jefferson
Tigers secured their
slot in the district play-
offs after mauling the
Graceville Tigers 42-6
Friday night during the
Homecoming game.
This is the first time in
five years that Jefferson
has gone into district
play-offs.
"This was a great
district win," said
Assistant Head Football
Coach Cameron Duke.
"This guaranteed a dis-
trict play-off spot for
the Tigers. The kids
played hard and broke
this game loose in the
fourth quarter. It was a
great defensive .game
after the initial drive. It
was an awesome home-
coming for the Tigers
and thanks to all the
fans for making the
Blackout a success."
The Tigers took the
field to a barrage of
fireworks and cheer-
leaders dressed in
Blackout T-shirts and
black shorts, the stands
filled with fans, most
wearing the T-shirts,


1 recovered fumble:
Keyron Bellamy. 4 tack-
les; Kamarie Young, 6
tackles. 1 quarterback
sack: and 1 assist:
Leroy Watkins. 1 tack-
le. 1 quarterback sack;
1 assist and 1 quarter-
back hurry: Breyon
Crumity. 3 assisted
tackles: Shelderrick
Duhart. 3 tackles and 1
assist; Kass Brooks, 3
tackles and 1 quarter-
back sack; Gene Noel, 1
tackle: and Chaz
Hansberry, 1 tackle and
1 quarterback hurry.
The Tigers will
play FAMU in
Tallahassee at Bragg
Stadium for th& district
championship, 7:30
p.m., Friday "We need
as much Tiger fan sup-
port in Tallahassee
Friday, as we can get,"
Duke added. If the
Tigers come out with
the victory, they win
District for the first
time in five years.
"There will be a
spirit bus for our dis-
trict game against
FAMU Oct. 30. The cost
is 5$ and it does not
include admission'
concluded Spears.


and the Tigers suited in
black uniforms for the
occasion,
Graceville drew
first blood early in the
first quarter with a
touchdown but the
Tigers swatted away
the extra-point attempt,
and on their first kick-
off, Graceville pulled
an onside kick and fell
on the ball, again gain-
ing possession. But a
wall of Tiger defense
kept Graceville from
advancing down the
field and scoring, and
that wall of defense
answered against every
move Graceville made
throughout the entire
game.
Jefferson answered
in the second with a
touchdown, but the
extra-poi8nt kick failed.
However, the Tigers
held Graceville score-
less in the second. The
Tigers racked up their
second touchdown in
the third quarter and
made the extra-point
attempt for a 13-6 lead.
Going into the fourth,
the Tigers wef-e fired up
and determined to take
a solid victory, scoring


an additional 29 points
and holding Graceville
to zip. making the final
a 42-6 victory.
Q carter bac k
Lenorris Footman com-
pleted 9 passes of 18
attempts for 214 yards
and 2 touchdowns. with
no interceptions.
In rushing,
Devondrick Nealy had
20 carries for 202 yards
and 3 touchdowns; and
in receiving, David
Crumity had 4 catches
for 113 yards and 1
touchdown; Marquice
Dobson, 3 catches for 25
yards and 1 touchdown:
and Alphonso
Footman, 2 catches for
50 yards.
On the defensive
side of the field. David
Crumitie had 1 tackle;
Devondrick Nealy, 4
tackles and I assist;
Brandon Whitfield, 9
tackles and I assist;
Demontray Johnson, 3
tackles, 1 quarterback
sack and 1 quarterback
hurry; and Regis
Johnson, 4 tackles.
Marquice Dobson;5
tackles; Alphonso
Footman, 6 tackles, 1
quarterback sack, and


14A Monlticello Newls


Ican~ks noMECOMIN


ILti


F


a1EcusIE; DI~sTRacI Stor





































































At The MontIcello News
Every Friday 11am-6pm

likI A GOOD :LIll.iTHOR, STATE FARM IS THERE
0 UVF WI Pl YOC UVE
fonuay Sales houstate Agesty, Inc
Tommy sales, was
Manucalo, n 9
Incl11W.511des,17WWWWilefinatrim
p. 850-997-8282
UKE A 0000 Natimon war swas wrotar


a .ET II /
r-------- --*-----*- 1
COngratulations Tigerst
5 HE FFIELDPE CAN 5
345 N. RAl ULOAD ST.
9' 850-567-6715 1


zwww. ecbpubcr lish ingScom


M/ont~iceclloo Ne:ws 15~A


Wednellcsdlay, Octoberl 28, 200g ~


COMING~~X


CMHSi~k HOM ~
























NC MOUNTAIN HOME
3BR/ 1 BA, for sale reduced
$129,000 or Monthly rental

1 + Deposit call 850-
9/23,tfnnc.
5 Beautiful quiet acres
North of Monticello
35,000 By appointment only
Owner will finance
EZ terms small down
approx $350 per month
(850) 997-3264
10/2-30, c.





Singer wanted for Mu'dison. FL
based southern gospel trio is
currently auditioning interest-
ed persons for the tenor or
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minded and interested in per-
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Auditions start immediately.
For more information, please
call (850) 464-0114 or (850)
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Auctions

Major Land Auction 4,466
+/- Acres offered in 26 tracts
of 10 acres to 797 acres each.
Located in New River Gorge
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meb ent Recreati Development. Auction on
November 14. Go to
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dates and auction terms, or
call (800)551-3588 for a
brochure. Jim Woltz (WV#
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Building Supplies

METAL ROOFING TAX
CREDIT! 40 yr Warranty.
Direct from manufacturer. 30
colors in stock Quick turn-
around. Delivery available.
Gulf Coast Supply &
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Business Opportunities



Hay

For Sale

jp

Monticello

228-408-4082


Smoky Mountains Tennessee
water sonusounsen vistsnews
25 Homesites / 3 Bedroom Home
Boat Sli s Walkin Trails Affordable Startin Homes


M


work, debris


Plumbing, tile, yard
removal. No job to
small. Free estimate
850-210-3137.




3 BR/ 2 HA Hou
$925 Mo. + Se
Downtown Mont
567-6451


o big or too MR. STUMP
s. Call Kevin STUMP GRINDING
10/16,rtnnc. 509-8530 Quick Respons
Miniature Pony Rides-
For children parties or events.
Call for price and info.
se for rent. 850-210-3137
purity Dep. 10/28 rtnnc
cello 850-
I .1; .... 0 .,- ...s;t;:AMMacig


Australian Western saddle;
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comes with blanket two bri-
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Call 850-545-5764
10/21,rtanc-

Computer/Entertainment
Armoir. Pecan Color with side
work table.$50. Call 997-1582.
Will deliver,
8/28,tfnnc.
Boat- 1974 Arrow Glass 17.4ft
135 hp Evinrude,.GPS, Garmine
440 S, $ 4,000 850-997-0342-

10/7-10/30, pd.

WOOD FOR SALE
1430 Willow Rd
Monticello, FL.'
Contact: Robert Scurry
850-342-4485
WillieSc tury
850-997-5473
Short Wheel Base
Reg Load:$30.00
MLYed with fat: 540.00
Long Wheel Base
Reg: $40.00 .

Willdel s Th6 anger
you can pick u^

10/2,9,14,16,21,23,28,30,11/2,pd.
FISH for stocking your pond or
lake. CopperBose bluegill,
shelleracker, channel catfish,
mosquitofish, and grass carp.
(850) 547-2215.
10/28,30,11/4,6,c.
.............................
Fish pond aerators, fountains,

'i"?K aeradoon anda vse
and they may keep you alive!
(850)547-221 /28,30,11/4,6,c..


~5~n~l~m


FISCAL OFFICER
Senior Citizens council of Madison County Inc. is seeking an individ
lual with experience in Accounting and Bookkeeping. Responsibilities
includes: Payroll, expenditure reports, prepare special necounting state
utents, budgets, budget revisions, recording of receipts, inventory, regular
sureting with personnel. monthly reporting, prepare federal and state tax
reports, backup data, medicaid waiver billing, reconciling, attend board
meetings, supervise CIRTS, supervision and orientation of new employees.
This is a highly responsible position. High school diplonut/GED,
Bachelor's Degree with tour to eight years experience in necounting and
completed a course in accounting/bookkeeping. Must have computer expe-
rience. Apply in person with a resume. Address: Senior Citizens of Madison
at 486 SW Rutledge Street of Madison, Florida 32340. Contact number
850-973-2006.


10/7-30,c.
Commercial/ Industrial Property
with state highway frontage. Corner
lots. Fronts both Harvey Greene Dr.
and Highway 53 South. Enterprise
Zone, Natural gas line, 8 inch water
main, access to city utihties, tire
hydrant, and service from two power
companies. Property has easy access
to 1-10. via SR 53 & SR 14. Will
build to suit tenant for short or long
tern ease. Call Tonuny Greene 850-
2/11, rm, nc.


twearn.
ERIOU
-11/13


e.
IBR/lBAAPARTMENT.
Grove.4partments. 1400 N.
S Jetlerson Monticello
For Elderly 62+&
. Disabled (Equal
Housing a
Opportunity)
ggg_997_g3zz

JEFFERSON PLACE! 4,th.c.
us s. wsweenus s.. one soo.
Monticello. I BR (5427) & 2BR
(5465). 1100 vouchers accepted. sub-
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0964. Frv711. Tlus Institution is an
equal opportunity provider and
employer
7 22,tfn.c
Coopers Pond lbr/Iba. w car.
port, w d Hook up Call 997.
5 0 0 7 .


L 4


8 19,th.c.
no BRM BA o en^j
nes 251 0760

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907-2837

7-2,1-----Gill;;-, o
Shon-tenn armal <*ph n. Applic.uian.
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woods/ horse farm. Possible
subdivide. Excellent tinane-
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(912)674-0320

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Cars for Sale

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16A Monticello News www.ecbpublishing.com Wednesday, October 28, 2009



The Classifieds...

measuring up to your expectations one ad at a time.


1656oo S. effersnS.


Thursday

QC What's going-on
this weekend?
A: Check out the movie
listings and local events.


Your source for
everything local





















Yi'


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY
CASE NO. 09000062CA
FLAGSTAR BANK,, FSB,
Plaintiff,

EllZABETH CLAXON et. al.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgmeqt
of Foreclosure dated Octob'er 13, 2009, and entered in Case No.
09000062CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in
and for Jefferson County, Florida, wherein FLAGSTAR BANK,
FSB. is a Plaintiff and ELIZABETH CLAXON; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF ELIZABETH CLAXON; FARMERS & MER-
CHANTS BANK; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #2 are the Defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at 11:00 a.m. on December 17, 2009, the following
described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:
LOT 2, BLOCK NUMBER 19, OF WlRICK'S ADDITION
TO THE TOWN OF MONTICELLO, AS SHOWN BY PLAT OF
RECORD INDEED BOOK "I", PAGE 66, OFFICE OF CLERK
OF CIRCUIT COURT OF JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA,
AND BEING PART OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SEC,
TION 30, TOWNSHIP NORTH, RANGE 5 EAST

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any,
Other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the sale.


" ""'""""" "'""""
-


in accordance with the Florida Statue a public auction
will be held on November 16, 2009 at 10:00 am.
For 1992 '8>you VIN 4TISlf lF5NI)055573
11> be sold AS IS for towing and sounge charges condi-
tions and terms at nuction. Stewart's 'll>wing 175 South
JetTerson Street Monticello, FI 32344 Phone: 850-342-1480-

10/28/09.e.

NOTICE

The Jeferson County Planning Commission will hold a
public meeting and a workshop for the EAR consisting of an
overall review on chapters 1-9 of the Comprehensive Plan, on
November 12, 2009 at 1:00 PM. THE MEETING WILL BE
HELD IN THE COURTHOUSE ANNEX LOCKED AT 435
WEST WALNUT STREET IN MONTICELLO. Fl., The meet-
ing ma\ be continue as necemary
Information concerning the mecong is available at the
JetYerson County Planning Department, 445 W. Palmer Mill
Road. Monticello, FL. 32344, Telephone 850-342-0223, From
the Florida "Government in the Sunshine Manual", page 36.
paragraph c: Each board. commission, or agency of this sure or
of any political subdivision thereof shall include in the notice of
any meeting or bearing, if notice of meeting or hearing is
required. of such board. commission, or agency. conspicuously
on such notice. the advice that, if a person decides to apped any
decision made by the board, agency. or commission with
respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he
or she may need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose. he or she may need to'ensure that a verbatim rtconi of
the proceedings, is made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

10/28/09.<.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 33-2009-CA-000183
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff,
VS
KELLEY C.. JONES
A/K/AKELLEY CHRISTINE JONES, et al,
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: KELLEY C. JONES A/K/A KELLEY CHRISTINE JONES
I-^ar grown I ADDRESS: 596 DILLS ROAD
1910NTICELLO, FL 32344
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
MICHAEL T. WALKER A/K/A MICHAEL TODD WALKER
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 596 DILLS ROAD
MONTICELLO, FL 32344
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY'
THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO
BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UNICNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the
following property in JEFFERSON County, Florida:
A PORTION OF TRACT 2 AS RECORDED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 0263, PAGE 0004 OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT A HALF {1/2) INCH IRON PIPE MARKING
THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 2
NORTH, RANGE 5 EAST, JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 45 SECONDS
EAST 633.61 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY
RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNTY ROAD 149-A:
THENCE RUN NORTH 51 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 45 SEC-
ONDS EAST ALONG SAID' RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A
DISTANCE OF 1610.52 FEET; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG
SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY NORTH 51 DEGREES 17
MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 477.61 FEET
TO A POINT OF CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST;
THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUND-
ARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 11509.20
FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 04
MINUTES 07 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 13.81
FEET (THE CHORD OF SAJD ARE BEING NORTH 51
DEGREES 12 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 13.81 FEET) TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGIN-
NING CONTINUE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY
AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADipS OF 11509.20
FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLEOF 02 DEGREES 16
MINUTES 03 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 455.59
FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARE BEING NORTH 50
DEGREES 03 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 455.46 FEET);
THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 16 SEC-
ONDS EAST 115.05 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF
THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUAR-
TER OF SAID SECTION 8; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00
DEGREES 13 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE
EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER A DIS-
TANCE OF 654.65 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES
46 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 350.00 FEET; THENCE RUN
NORTH 00 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 478.63
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING THERE IS A MOBILE
HOME AFFIXED TO THE SUBJECT PROPERTY. 1997 FLEET-
WOOD 4563A DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME, SERIAL #(S):
GEO999104 AND GEO999105, I.D. #(S): GAFLVO5A26404CW21
AND GAFLV05B26404CSW21, TITLE #(S): 72766669 &
72766670.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses within 30 days after the first publiention, if
any, on Florida Default Law Group, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose
address is 9119 Corporate Lake Drive, Suite 300, Tampa, Florida
33634, and file the original with this Court either'before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 14th day of
October, 2009.


10/21,2X/09,c.


www. ecbpublZishring. com


NO I ICE OF .1PPLICA'I ION FOR T.11 DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GlVEN, that Transit Rentals of IL l1.
Inc. the holder of the following certificate has filed said cerali-
cate for a tax deed.

The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of
the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as 11.1-


NOTICE OF IPPLICATION FOR T \\ DEED
N(.)TIC 1. IS HEREBY GIVEN, that Mosle, LLC. the holJ-
er oI the following certificate has filed said certificate for a
101 Jeed The certificate number and year of issuance she
Jewription of the property and the narnes in which it was


.usessedj .Ie as follows:


Yea o Isuace2003


36-1S-3E-0000-016A-0000
2.80 Acres
Lot in SW 1/4 of NE 1/4
()RB 229 PG 349 and 351

N.une in which assessed Jacqueline Huggins

All 01 -...ul property being in the County of Jefferson, State
of f k.rul.I

(lnless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law,
. .
the property described m such certificate will be sold to the
highest bidder at the Jefferson County Courthouse, north

1).sled this 29"' day of September. 2009.
K n k 8. Reums,
< lerk of Court,


Crfcae 441


Yea ofssunce 2003


Description of Property: 26-IN-4E-0000-0210-0000
2 Acres
In NE 1/4 of NW 1/4
ORB 243 PG 284
Name in which assessed Luchis and Annie Cummings

All of said property being in the County of JetTerson, State 01
Florida.

Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law, the
.
property described in such certificate will be sold to the highe I
bidder at the Jefferson County Courthouse, north door on the
18th day of November, 2009, at 11:00 AM.

Dated this 29th day of September, 2009.


skik Reartnts.


Jefersonll C ounli. f~~lJnda


By Sherry Sears


Kirk Reams


PL 81.10 ER1R E 1 'bO NCEAIL


Dated this 14th day of October, 2009. .
In accordance with the Americans with.Disabilities Act, persons
needing a reasonable accommodation to participate in this proceed-
ing should, no later than seven (7) days prior, contact the Clerk of

CoTH E TICE 38 199h7 ,im adR nN
tact (TDD) 800-955-8771 via Florida Relay System.


The Apalachee Regional Planning Council announces a public

>rt ti skii so va e C ar I ig a JeffersonmCounty
Thursday. November 5, 2009. at 10:00 am Eastern Time. at the
Jeterson County l-lealth Depanment. 1255 West Washington Suret,
tonsicello. Florida.
In addition to us wgular business, the agenda will include the
annual comdinator evaluations and rise aolo meeting schedule.
For additionni intermanon, or if you require special accommoda-
sions at the meeting because of a disability or physical impairment.con-
sact vanitu Andemon at, the Apulachee Regional Planning council.
20776 CenInd Avenue East. Suite 1. Blountstown, Florida 32424 at
Icast the working ass prior to the meeting date.

10/28/09.nc.
season-memmes.....mammonwnwar............


Submitted by:
Ben-Ezra & Katz, PA
Attorneys for Plaintiff
7901 Stirling Road, Suite 300
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33312
Telephone: (305) 770-4100
Fax (305) 653-2329


10/21,28/09,0-


Kirk Reams


By: Sherry Sears.


Montic~ello News 17A


WVednesday, October 28, 2009


1]E GAILS


10 4, 1,28 9,








































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Con~tacu~on. COtPOtssuOn


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