Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00260
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello, Fla
Publication Date: May 27, 2009
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00260
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text
326

SpeC~al C010onle Lraries compl
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ONI T CELLO


NEWS


141st Year No. 22


Wednesday, May 27, 2009


500 460l+ 40


Tourism
Development
Group Formulating
A Marketing Plan
Like Sausage Making,
It's A Messy Process.
LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
Like a wagon lurch-
ing down the road with
its two draft animals
pulling in opposite direc-
tions, the Tourist Devel-
opment Council (TDC)
continues making
progress, if in jerky fash-
ion.
The metaphor may
not be the most appropri-
ate, but it's recognition of
the divergent interests
that inform the two types
of hospitality industries
that largely compose the
TDC the bed-and-
breakfast-inns and the
hotel/motels. The first
group caters to the so-
called destination travel-
ers; the. second to the'
transient travelers. The
question for the TDC
thenibecomes, which type
of traveler does the or-
ganization expend its re-
sources trying to attract:.
the destination or the
transient traveler?
Understanding that
the two goals are not nec-
essa r ily mutually exclu-
sive or diametrically
Supposed, as TDC member
Clyde Simpson aptly
noted at the group's mar-
keting workshop on Tues-
day, May 12, it's
important to understand
the underlying tension
between the two points-
of-view to appreciate the
difficulties that the group
Please See Tourism
Page 2A
Council Extends
City Manager's
Contract
City
Manager
Steve
Wingate
is as-
sured a
measure
of peace
of mind.
LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
The City Council re-
cently gave City Manager
Steve Wingate a vote of
confidence, a gesture also
meant to give him "pea ce
of mind".
By unanimous vote,
the City Council on Tues-
day, May 5, agreed to
amend Wingate's employ-
ment contract, making it
renewal every two years,
instead of every year.
Otherwise, the document
remains the same as the
original.
Mayor Tom Vogelge-
sang said the two-year re-
newal period would give
Wingate a measure of
peace of mind, in that he
wouldn't have to worry
annually if the contract
would be renewed.!
Among other things,
the contract, which City
Attorney Bruce Leinback
describes as "very
generic", provides for an-
Please See Contract
Page 4A


County Commission To Revisit Lloyd Horse Track Application


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
Almost exactly 17
months after denying
the application for the
Jefferson Downs
horse race-
track in f
Lloyd

with
t wo
poten-
t.i a 1

suits
pending in
the wings
over the denial, a
newly constituted
County Commission de-


cided last week to recon-
sider the project.
In a 3-2 decision on
Thursday night, May 21,
commissioners voted to
rehear the racetrack ap-
plication'on June 25,
provided that
the second of
two plain-
tiffs sub-
written as-
surance
that he
also will
drop his '
threatened
lawsuit if the
board approves the proj-
ect, as the first plaintiff,
Jamaro, Inc., has done.


The second plaintiff,
Richmond Baker, has
until June 9 to submit
the written assurance.
Largely contributing
to the commission's deci-
sion to reconsider the
project were newly
elected Commissioners
Hines Boyd and Stephen
Fulford, with support
from Chairman Eugene
Hall. In the minority
were Commissioners
Felix "Skeet" Joyner and
Danny Monroe.
Triggering the deci-
sion was the plaintiffs'
May 13 settlement coUn-
teroffer to the commis-
Please See Horse
Track Page 4A


Monticello News Photo By Laz Aleman May 21, 2009.
Attorney David Theriaque, hired as special coun-
sel to represent the commission in the potential law-
suit, talks with County Coordinator Roy Schleicher
following Thursday's hearing.


Apprrest Made

SIn Fi ve YeaP-

Sk_ Eftk- .A M--__A- E -, Old Burglary


SMonticello News Photo By Fran Hunt, May 21, 2009
EMS personnel work with driver Allen Brice Bramlett of Jefferson County, to
stabilize him prior to transport to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, following a sin-
gle-vehicle crash May 21.


Monticello News Photo By Fran Hunt, May 21, 2009
This 1993 Chevrolet pickup truck sheered off five guardrail posts and portion
of the guardrail on Old Lloyd Road before coming to a rest.


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff' I'iter
A county man was
killed in a single-vehicle
crash last' week on Old
Lloyd Road.
Florida Highway Pa-
trol reported that at 2:20
p.m., Thursday, May 21,
Allen Brice Bramlett, 51, of
Jefferson County, was driv-
inga 1993 Chevrolet pickup
truck traveling northbound
on Old Lloyd Road into a
slight ciu-ve on the roadway
to the left.
Bramlett failed to nego-
tiate the curve and the right
side wheels of the vehicle
traveled onto the grassy un-
paved east shoulder of the
roadway Bramlett overcor-
rected, and the vehicle
spun counterclockwise ap-
proximately one half turn
across both north and
southbound lanes of Old
Lloyd Road and entered the
left shoulder.
The right side of the ve-
hicle struck a metal
guardrail, sheering off five'
guardrail posts and a por-
tion of the rail and came to
a rest facing south partially
against the guardrail and
southbound traffic lane of
the road.
FHP was assisted by
Jefferson County Fire Res-
cue personnel, and deputies
from the Jefferson County
Sheriff's Office, who de-
toured traffic from the
scene.
Bramlett was trans-
ported to Tallahassee Me-
morial Hospital where he
was pronounced dead.
Whether the crash was al-
cohol-related is pending
and Bramlett was not wear-
ing a seatbelt.


JES Grade 3 Reading, Math FCAT Sc


RAY CICHON
Monticello News
Managing Editor
DOE released Grade
Three Reading, Math
FCAT scores in District
schools, Thursday, May
21, with remaining grade
scores expected to be re-
leased later this week.
District Testing Co-
ordinator Orlando Burch
explained that test is
scored from level one to
level five, with level one


2 Sections, 22 Pages


U


4-H 9A Legals 13A
Around Jeff. Co. 4-7A School 11A
Classifieds 12A Sports 10A
History 8A Viewpoints 2-3A


the lowest score. Level
three is the passing
grade. Students who
scored at level one in
grade three reading
must attend summer
school.
Burch explained
that the Care Charter
School of. Excellence is
part of the District
School System, and its
scores are combined
with those of Jefferson
Elementary in the Dis-


trict Grade Three Re-
port.
A breakdown of the
schools looks like this:
At Jefferson Elementary
School, 96 students took
the FCAT Reading test.
Of these, 52 students, or
54 percent, scored a
grade of level three, or
higher.
In the FCAT Math
test, 68 students or 71 per-
cent of the 96 students
taking the test, scored at


a level three or higher.
At the Care Charter
School of Excellence, 21
students'took the FCAT
test in Reading. Of these,
six students, or 29 per-
cent scored at level three
or higher.
In the FCAT Math
test, 4 students, or 19 per-
cent, of the 21 students
taking the test scored at
level three or higher.
Scores of Jefferson
Elementary combine


Wed ,/9 Thu /\
527 N\\ 5uW8o
VaiaDe vdoud th scattered Sa rderstor posshle.
showefs and thunderstorms,
- LI -


mainy in the at


Vincent Eugene Hicks
FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Vincent Eugene
Hicks, 41, of Sarasota,
FL, was arrested Tues-
day, May 19 and charged
with first-degree felony
burglary of a structure.
The arrest stems
from Monticello Police
Please See Burglary
Page 4 A

County Man
Charged After
Bicycle Collision
FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
A county man was
charged in crash, 9:15
a.m., Saturday, May 23,
after hitting a bicyclist
and leaving the scene.
Florida Highway Pa-
trol reports that Douglas
Leonard, 65, of Jefferson
County was driving a
1989 Ford four-door
northbound on Wau-
keenah Highway, 14 miles
south of Monticello, ap-
proaching a bicycle, rid-
den by Jon S. Sewell, 48,
of Tallahassee, who was
also traveling north-
bound on the right edge
of the roadway
Leonard's vehicle
Please See Collision
Page 4A


.ores Up
with the Care Charter
School of Excellence, for
the District scores,
which are as follows: In
the FCAT Reading test, of
the 117 students taking
the test, 58, or 50 percent,
scored at level three or
higher.
In the FCAT Math
test, of the'117 students
taking the test, 72, or 62
percent, of students tak-
ing the test scored at
level three or above.


Fd 88
51298/8


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2A Monticello News


www. ecbpu blishing. comr


Wednesday, May 27, 2009


IEWPOIN'T &


PINIONS


Toursim


is experiencing in trying to
define its mission and
articulate a marketing
strategy.
As a consequence, a
workshop that ostensibly
aimed to come up with .a
marketing plan, establish
priorities and determine
the percentages of the
budget to be dedicated to
each priority, instead some-
what bogged down in a
lengthy .discussion bf bill-.
boards, transient versus
destination "travelers,; and
the need to better 'exploit
the'Internet..
Arun Kundra, owner
and operator of the Quality
Inn'injLloyd, is a yocal pro-
ponent of the point-of-view
that the TDC needs to put
greater,, emphasis on
attracting transient travel-
ers those motorists tray-
elingon 1-10 and who have
no real reason for stopping
here. Kundra believes that
billboards would go a long
ways to temping these trav-
elers to stop here, at least
overnight. He cites Tifton,
GA, a community that he
says ;is smaller than.
Monticello and 'yet has 30
billboards along 1-75, begin-,
ning right outside Atlanta.
Kundra believes that
Monticello should have a
minimum of four bill-
boards on 1-10, both east
and west of the Jefferson
County line and facing both,
the north and southbound
interstate traffic. Only
then, he argues.,, will the
county begin attracting;
tourists. What's more,-he's'
willing to share the cost of
the billboards with the.
TDC, provided that half the
advertisement is dedicated
to his motel. (The first bill-
board advertising historic
Monticello, by the way, is
now up on the westbound:
lane of 1-10 just east of the
county line in' Madison.
County)
Kundra argues that
once these transient travel-
ers have been captured -
compelled to stop otr stay,
the. night at his motel or
one of the other lodging
facilities along 1-10 then
possibly these travelers can
be enticed into exploring
more of the county. But
first they must be captured,
he insists.
Adding .heft to his
argument is that fact that
80 to 90 percent of the bed
taxes that make u-p the
TDC's budget come from
the transient travelers stay-
ing at the 1-10 motels. Yet,
Kundra argues, the focus of
the.TDC thus far has been
concentrated on Monticello
and the bed-and-breakfast
inn industry
The representatives of
the bed-and-breakfast inn
industry on the TDC board
are Pat Inmon of the
Denham House and
Gretchen Avera of the,
Clarke-Avera House. (The,
Willow Pond Plantation,
which Simpson represents,
is more or less in its own
category.)


Cont. From Page 1


Inmon and Avera don't
necessarily disagree with
Kundra and even concede
some of his points. But the.
fact is that by default, if not
by design, the thrust of the
TDC so far has tended to
favor the promotion of
Monticello as a destination
point. to the exclusion, of
other parts of the county.
Simpsoni "holds, the
middle ground, his estab-
lishment being neither a
bed-and-breakfast inninora
motel but rather a setting
for weddings and .other
social events and the'
provider of rental cabins.
And there is. TDC
Coordinator Nancy
Wideman, who" 'exhibits. a,
definite affinity fbrprombot-
ing Monticello as a destina-
tion point.
The first order of busi-
ness at thle.recent workshop'
was a decision whether to
buy a display ad in the
Watermelon booklet, which
evolved into a discussion of
whether the organization's
goal was putting "heads in
,.beds" (attracting overnight
visitors) or -promoting
tourism in general. Which
is to say that thefarganiza-
tion still appears' t be..
wrestling with the core
question of its mission. .
The' consensus finally
was to buy the ad and also
put a temporary banner on
the 1-10 billboard promot-
ing the festival. But more
germane to its mission, the
group agreed that it should.
work in conjunction with
other community groups to
formulate package deals
that promoted established
events such as the
Watermelon Festival and
Southern Music Rising
bluegrass festival, in com-
bination with overnight
stays in. the community's
lodging facilities.
The group also
approved the expenditure
of up to $1,000 for the pur-
chase of a laptop computer
and the associated software
for Wideman's .use in the
group's new office in the
Cherry Street 'Commons
building. These orders of
business out df the way, the
group finally got down to
the purpose of the work-
shop.
Wideman tried to
frame the discussion in
terms of developing mar-
keting strategies that
aimed at specific markets.\
"We're just throwing
mud on the wall novy," she
said. "We need to identify
specific markets. Who do
we want to market to, given
our limited' resources and
limited time? Who do we
want to. market to, and
then, how do we market to
them?"
That's when Kundra
brought up the issue of the
billboards, one that he has.
raised at previous meet-
ings. The issue, in-fact, is a
recurring one.
"We need to market to
people who pass through
here as opposed .to people


who live in Atlanta,"
Kundra said. "Eighty per-
cent of the funds come
from transient travelers
and we need to pay atten-
tion to them."
"Transients are not
our tourists," Wideman
countered. "That's not our
mission. It's to bring peo-
ple into Jefferson County."
Simpson offered that
the two goals weren't
mutually exclusive. He, for
instance, referred cus-
tomers he couldn't hccom-
modate at his facility to
the motels and other lodg-
ing facilities in the county,
he said. But a more salient
point, he.said, was that the
TDC was not taking advan-
tage of the wealth.of email
addresses that were avail-
able from the various lodg-
ing facilities and mounting
massive email promotion-
al campaigns.
"We all collect email
addresses but 'we don't use
them," Simpson said, a
concern that he has voiced
before.
TDC Chairwoman
Gretchen Avera noted that
the coinnmmiunity remained
fragmented in its promo-
tional efforts, with organi-
zations frequently failing
to communicate their'
*activities;, and oftentimes
their very existence, to the,
TDC. .
Kundra returned to
the issue of the billboards.
"The people,-traveling
on I-10, we need to. give.
them a reason to stop here.
"he'said. "We need more of
a presence on 1-10."
"That serves the tranr-
sients, hut how do we serve,
the destination people?"
Wideman insisted.
And so ,went the dis-
cussion,; touching at vari-
ous times and .sometimes
simultaneously on the
desirability or billboards,
the need for greater uti-
lization, of the Internet,
the need for the. formila--
tion of package deals in
.combination with estab-
lished community events,
and even the desirability of
the TDC awarding grants
to, ,community organiza-
tions. among sundry other
topics.
Which prompted
Inmon to observe at one
point that the group cer-
tainly didn't lack for input,
and Wideman to express
confusion as to her role.
"I need more focus and
direction," Wideman said.
In the end, the group
decided to regroup and
address the marketing
issue again at a later work-
shop, with one subcommit-
tee to return with a portfo-
lio of available monies for
billboards and another to
come; back with a formu-
lated marketing, strategy
for review'and approval by
the board.. .
Meaning that muchb0f
the sausage' making of the
process would be relegated
offstage, a.' good thing
maybe in this case..


By: Debbie Snapp
Monticello News A r-
Staff Wri A.. L :-


U


Cisay and Bob Benmer

Cissy and Bob Berner married in 1971.
'hey are entrepreneurs of their own busi-
less called Pistarckle Wildlife. They build
tomes and feeders for feathered and
urry friends and sell them at fairs and
festivals across the country.
They've been here just a short time,
comingg from Daytona, and have done
ust about everything two people can do
together. They've lived aboard a sailboat, sailing to wherever
he winds took them, and they've motorcycle across this
greatt country and back a time or two.
Cissy is a registered nurse by profession and Bob is an ac-
;omplished auctioneer. They have one daughter.


RTit


ITEN YEARS AGO
i 'i te May 26, 1999
i In the words of Shakespeare,
" ":All that Glistens is not Gold," and
Such is the case with the $342,744
'allocated the school district and
":identified as supplemental educa-
tional allocation, in the recent
SLegislative session.
Two businessmen who owe the
county a combined $110,000 from a
!pledge dating back to 1991 have
I reportedly been put on notice that
if they don't pay up soon the coun-
ty will take them to court.
It's official now: the structure
1 of the entity that will pursue eco-
homic development here will be the
Spublic-private partnership model.
Building permits in most cate-
Sgories fell in March and April when
compared with those of this time
i in 1998.
Commissioners approved last
| week a six-month extension on the
S$3 million borrowed from Farmers
!and Merchants Bank for the con-
i struction of the jail.
1 TWENTY YEARS AGO
May 24, 1989
The Prison ISite,' Selection
..Committee, in an early, Friday'
; morning meeting, refined the selec-
tion process to three primary sites
for state Department of
Corrections consideration.
After a 3-2 vote authorizing.
I $7,500 worth of repairs on the coun-
ty's white LaFrance pumper truck,
Sthe total repair bills on the truck
since it was bought in 1986 for'
$40.000 now stand at $18,291.-
The bean counters have fin-
ished their work and decided that-
i the Humane. Society coffers are
$4,441.55 richer in the wake of the
|May. 6 dinner, dance and auction.
The Public ,Employees
;Relations Coin.ission ..Friday
granted an. extension- to the city
and the Mntficello Professional
Si Firefighters Association Local 30,95
tein which to' filetheir objections to
jthe PERC's hearing officer's recom-
.mended order of May 1.
j THIRTY YEARS AGO
May 24, 1979
A recent completed audit of the
Accounts of. the Jefferson County
School Board shows that an over-
I- payment of $4.537.41- was made for
the new Vocational Technical cen-
ter.
CETA-Director Lousie Aligood
Surged Diversified Cooperative
-" Training (DCT) students to "be
trustworthy and try to make the


world a better place to work ancL,'
live in," when she addressed the
DCT Club's annual Employer-
Employee Banquet, May 15, at the (
Brahman Restaurant.
Failure to pass the statewide
literacy test will prevent only two'
Jefferson High School students
from receiving a diploma this year,
according to Principal Kellyl;
Kilpatrick.
Greyhound racing embarks onr
its 21st season Friday night at i
Monticello's Jefferson Countyi
Kennel Club.
Rev. Kenneth Sullivan, pastor
of the Assembly of God Church,!
was named president of the
Ministerial Association Sunday
FORTY YEARS AGO
-May 24, 1969
Sgt. Leroy Judah of the
Monticello Police Department wa5s
honored last week when he!
received a plaque designating him
as the county's leading police offi-
cer, by the Kiwanis Club.
The Jefferson County
Extension Homemakers Council:
awarded the first public service .
award to the Monticello News dur-l
ing the. Recognition Luncheon held
last Tuesday at the Woman's Club.:
Students from Monticello listed
on :North Florida Junior College
Dean's, List for Term II are Bonniei
King, Linda Logan, Sally Lott,|
Donna Reiherd, Darrell Smith and
Linda Wuerfel.
S FIFTY YEARS AGO
S..May 24, i959
Sandy; Sauls, high scoring
guard for the local basketball team,|
was notified last week that he has
-been chosen as a member of the
National High School Wisemani
Wigwam All American team. Only
120 boys throughout the nation areI
chosenfor this team.
An Hawaiian theme was used,
for thie Junior-Senior banquet last.
Friday night.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
.May 24, 1949
The Business and Professional
Woman's Club received it's charter
at L dinner meeting held at the
Veteran's Home. Mrs. Ethel Carter
is the first president; Mrs. Ophelip
Ward, Mrs. Jean Maynard, Mrs.
Alice Hughes, and Mrs. Eva Dixon.
were the other officers.
Dr. WL. Hunter has been hon->,:
ored by being elected to mfember-^i
ship in the American Academy of-/
General Pract ice.









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RO. Box 428
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Wednesday, May 27, 2009 www.ecbpublishing.com






VIEWPOINTS & (


Monticello News 3A






PINIONS


Jefeso Cunty


Fran Hunt
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Willard Reynard
Thompson, 45, of'
Monticello, was arrested
May 18, and charged
with violation of proba-
tion on the charge of
felony criminal mis-
chief, and writ of attach-
ment for non payment of
support. Bond was with-
held and he remained at
the county jail May 25.
Manwell Antwan
Davis, 20,. of Wacissa,.
was arrested May 18,
and charged with petit
theft, possession of a
short barrel shotgun,
possession 'of a .con-
trolled substance, and
possession of a con-
trolled substance with
intent to sell. A total
bond of $20,500 was set
and he bonded out of
jail the following day.
Robert. 0. Mathis,
38, of Jacksonville, FL,
was arrested May 18, on
a Miami Dade County
warrant for -failure to
appear on weapon pos-
session by a convicted
felon and possession of
a concealed firearm. He
was picked up by Miami
Dade officials May 20
for transport there.
Jesse Christopher
Franke, 27, of Trenton,
FL, tvas arrested May
19, and charged with
violation of probation
on the charge of driving
while license suspended
or revoked.. Bond was
withheld and he
remained in the county
jail May 25.
Vincent E. Hicks, 41,
of Sarasota, FL, was
arrested May. 19, and
charged with burglary
of a structure. Bond
was withheld and he
remained in the county
jail May 25.
Willie Bernard














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Bruce, 52, of
Tallahassee, was arrest-
ed May 19, and charged
with failure to appear
on.the charge of posses-
sion of cannabis, fail-
ure to appear on the
charge of driving under
the influence,, failure to
appear on the charge of
possession of drug
paraphernalia, and fail-
ure to appear for posses-
sion of a controlled sub-
stance. Bond was with-
held and he remained at
the county jail May 25.
Darla Patricia


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Robertson, 39, of Meigs,
GA, was arrested May
20, and charged with-
fraud, insufficient
funds. Bond was set at
$150, and she bonded
out of jail the following
day.
Kevin Doughton
Bare, 31, of Jefferson
County, was arrested
May 20, and charged
with violation of proba-
tion on the charge of
battery (domestic).
Bond was withheld and
he remained at the
county jail May 25.


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.* Copyrighted Material


.: ...: Syndicated Content


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4A Monticello News


UND


www.ecbpublishing.com


EFFERSON


Wednesday, May 27, 2009


COUNTY


Horse Track


Cont. Fromn Page 1


Contract


Cont. From Page 1


sion's May 4 settlement
offer, which essentially
reaffirmed the board's
Jan. 17, 2008, decision to
deny the racetrack. In
their May 13 response, the
attorneys for Jamaro
requested that the com-
mission rehear the appli-
cation and offered to drop
all potential litigation if
the board's decision was
to approve the racetrack.
In his brief com-
ments to commissioners
on Thursday night,
Attorney David
Theriaque, hired as spe-
cial counsel to advise the
board on the two potential
lawsuits, cautioned- the
officials to be careful in
what they said, given the
pending litigation.
"I am going to ask
you to avoid engaging in
discussion," Theriaque
said. "If you don't settle,
they can use what you say
in the subsequent litiga-
tion. As an attorney, that
makes me nervous. I ask
that you try not to get into
give-and-take digcus-
sions."
Theriaque recom-
mended that commission-
ers approve one of. two
motions that he provided.
One; was to accept the,
plaintiffs' counteroffer
and set a meeting date to
rehear the racetrack
application, provided that
the second plaintiff sub-
mitted written documen-
tation attesting to his
intent to ,drop all litiga-
tion if the board ruled in
favor of the racetrack.
The second was to reject
the plaintiffs' settlement
counteroffer. .
Members of the pub-
lic were allowed to speak
on the issue first, with
many of the individuals
who came forth being the,
same ones who had spo-
ken for, or against, the
project at the Jan. 17,
2008, hearing. Speaking in
support of the racetrack
were three individuals,
not counting Jamaro's
attorney. Speaking
against were seven indi-
viduals, including an
attorney who promised
litigation if the commis-
sion were to approve the.
racetrack.
Supporters of, the
project included former
Commissioner Jerry
Sutphin, the only official
to vote for the racetrack
when the application
came before the board in
2008, -and Dick Bailar,
head of a committee
involved in an effort to,
bring a central sewer sys-
tem to the 1-10 and SR-59
interchange an effort
that essentially died as a
result of the political fall-
out from the racetrack
controversy
Sutphin argued that
the issue before the com-
mission for a decision in
2008 had been about the
facility's proposed imper-
vious surface footprint,
not about gambling, envi-
ronmental issues or other
concerns that were better
left to state agencies to
decide. He said that pub-
lic feeling on the issue
had swayed some on
board, who in'turn had
swayed others on the
board and that had led to
the decision to deny
"I'm living a second
chance," Sutphin said,
referring to his near fatal
heart failure several
months back. "Tonight,
this is your second
chance to redeem your-
self."
SBailar appealed to
commissioners to accept
the plaintiffs' offer if
there existed even the
slightest probability that
the county would lose the


lawsuit, especially given
that the county's attor-
rkeys and planning official


had recommended
approval of the project in
2008.
"If it requires a race-
track to get development
started at the inter-
change, so let it be,"
Bailar said.
The project's oppo-
nents, the overwhelming
majority of whom were
Lloyd-area residents, reit-
erated concerns voiced at
the 2008 hearing. Those
concerns: the proposed
racetrack is essentially a
fig leaf to cover the devel-
oper's real intent, which
is to introduce poker
games and other kinds of
gambling; the facility
poises an environmental
threat to the area's sink-
holes and other sensitive
ecological features; and
the operation is incom-
patible with the sur-
rounding, uses, among
other things.
Typical of the com-
'ments of Lloyd area resi-
dents were those of David
Hall and Dr. George
Haedicke.
Hall enumerated
some of the previously
cited concerns and won-
dered when "no" became
understood and effective.
The Planning
Commission had told the
developer to correct cer-
tain deficiencies in the.
application that needed
correcting and the
County Commission had
said no to the project, but
here it now was before
commissioners again,
Hall said. In the interim,
the developers had done
nothing to address the:
cited deficiencies nor had
they provided the infor-
mation that they had been
asked to provide in the
original hearing.
"When is no, no?"
Hall said: "Arid by the
'way,. the notice to this
meeting was very short.
The developers were
never honest with the full
truth. I want honesty and
full truth. There -was
never a racetrack plan.,
Their intent is to put in a
gambling facility" ,
Haedicke, whose
property is 2 miles from
the, site of proposed race-
track, spoke of the moral
and virtuous aspects of
agrarian society, which
he said Jefferson County
represented. He didn't
object to growth per se, he
said. Growth was good
and necessary But as the
parent of young children,
he wanted the right' kind
of growth, as represented
by residential subdivi-
sions and other appropri-
ate development.
"I' still don't known
any more about this proj-
ect than I did 17 months
ago," Haedicke said.
"Horse racing is gam-
bling. Yes, gambling is
legal, but if they want a
gambling facility, why
don't they buy the dog
track, which is' for sale."
An attorney who
spoke as legal counsel for
one of the horse farms in
the Lloyd area essentially
threatened litigation if
the project was approved.
This attorney, whose,
name was not clear in his
introduction, argued that
the racetrack developers
had offered nothing to
show that the project mer-
ited the special exception
to the land-use require-
ments that they were
seeking. Instead, the
developers had chosen to
rattle the sabers of poten-
tial litigation via the
property owners who
stood to gain from the
sale of the land for the
racetrack, he said. Which
potential litigation didn't
make for a strong case, he


said.
Quarter horsing rac-
ing didn't make money


and the entire aim of the
facility was to introduce
alternative methods of
gambling, which is what
really generated the
money, the attorney said.
More telling possibly,
he rattled his own saber
of potential litigation
against the county
"I can assure you that
if you accept their pro-
posal, you will be in a big
quagmire," the attorney
said. "That's a guarantee
of 100 percent litigation
on the part of the coun-
ty's residents. If you
approve this, you are buy-
ing a lawsuit."
On the other side of
the equation was
Attorney D. Kent Safriet,
representing Jamaro.
Safriet: pointed out
that, the request before
commissioners was sim-
ply to rehear the race-
track application, not to
argue the merits of the
project, which would be
the putrposeof the subse-
quent hearing.'The com-
mission, he said, had
already expended $20,000
in legal fees, an amount
that would only increase
as the issue proceeded to
litigation. Yet here was a
reasonable way of resolv-
ing the potential claim of
$1.3 million without the
need of litigation, he
said.
Joyner almost imme-
diately after Safriet's-
presentationi offered a
motion. to reject the coun-
teroffer, which Monroe
seconded.
."We looked at this
before," Joyner said.
"The environmental con-
cerns still remain there.
The property is not suit-
able for development. The
attorney has advised us
that we have a. strong,
case."
Monroe concurred.
"We've heard this
before,". Monroe said.
"We made a decision to
deny. I haven't heard any-
thing different."
Joyner's motion
failed to pass, 3-2.
"This is a new com-
missioner's worst night-
marp, being faced, with
potential litigation on
two sides," Boyd said.
"Our settlement offer was
the first step oi a dance,
this is the second step.
This can be a long dance.
I respect the passion and
principle of commission-
*ers Joyner and Monroe,
but I haven't heard the
arguments. I think, we
ought to think this twice
before rejecting it."
Fulford was more
assertive in his views. He
didn't think it was the
prerogative or responsi-
bility of the board to
make judgments on gam-
bling and environmental
issues, which were better
left to the state to handle,
he said.
"I believe that the
responsibility of this
board is to uphold the
Comprehensive Plan and
the laws that it oversees,"
Fulford said.
On Friday morning,
and upon more reflection
on the issue, Boyd offered
the following:
"The continued liti-
gation of. this issue is
bleeding scarce tax dol-
lars that may not be reim-
bursed by our insurance
carrier. Though our attor-
ney feels that we have a
good case, there is also
some risk that the county
could be left with a finan-
cially devastating judg-
ment. We seem to have a
good faith settlement
offer, and we should at
least consider it. We owe
that to all Jefferson
County citizens. I believe


in fighting for a principle,
but now with other peo-
ple's money"


nual performance evalu-
ations, a three-months
severance. pay in the
event of termination,
opportunities for profes-
sional development, and
a city vehicle.
The council mem-
bers were laudatory in
their remarks regarding
Wingate's performance.
"He has always
responded to my


Burglary


Department Sgt. Tim
Hightower responding
to an alarm at 'the Petro
Time Saver, located at
1200 West Washington
Street April 8, 2004.
After arriving at the
scene, Hightower did not
find anyone in or around
the store and he checked
the entire premises and
observed a hole through
the rear concrete block
wall. Hightower collect-
ed possible evidence
from the scene, which
included some black cot-
ton fibers, and a blanket
left at the scene, and the
evidence was sent to the
FDLE Crime Lab for
analysis. -
The repair costs to
the structure and the
security equipment
inside caused by the bur-
glary exceeded $4,600.
April 24, 2004,
Tallahassee Police
Department officers
located a stolen 2004
Chevrolet Impala, at 809
Cochran Drive. '' The
vehicle had been rented'
to Hicks and when it
came due, a report was,
filed since the vehicle
had not been returned,
and Hicks was placed

Collision


struck 'the bicycle with
the right side rear view
mirror and after the col-
lision between ,the car
and bicycle, Leonard left
the scene of the crash.
The bicycle over-
turned onto its right
side and came to a rest
in the west grass shoul-
der. Sewell came to a


requests," Council-
woman Linda Butler
said.
Vogelgesang con-
curred.*
"Steve cares and
tries to address the prob-
lems," he said. "He is
vested in the communi-
ty."
The city hired
Wingate on Nov. 13, 2007,
following the resigna-


tion of longtime serving
City Superintendent
Don Anderson.
Prior to coming to
Monticello, Wingate was
a self-employed contrac-
tor. Before that, from
1990 to 2006, he was the
Public Works director
for Hilliard, a rural com-
munity of 3,000 or so in
Nassau County near the
Georgia state line.


Cont. From Page 1


under arrest for grand
theft auto.
Inside the vehicle,
officers found a scanner
tuned to Leon County
Sheriff's Office frequen-
cies, and a black bag.
containing burglary
tools including a black
mask with eye holes cut
out, black gloves, black
tennis- shoes, a black
computer bag contain-
ing a flashlight, small
grinder, a pry bar, a
strap on head lamp, dust
masks and a sledge ham-
mer. The items were
seized and" submitted to
FLDE for analysis.
Aug. 22, 2004, Hoover
Police Department
(HPD) in Birmingham,
AL arrested Hicks after
he had knocked a hole in
the rear wall of a con-
venience store there.
The FDLE Crime
Lab released a report
Aug. 23, 2005, that the
black clothing seized in
the April 24 incident, '
matched fibers recov-::
eired at the scenb of the"'-
Monticello burglary.
HPD had been alerted by
FDLE that Hicks had
traveled. from
Tallahassee to their


area. FDLE had
installed a court-ordered
tracking device on the
rental vehicle used by
Hicks and monitored the
vehicle's movements
around 'convenience
stores.
After the arrest of
Hicks, a second man was
interviewed and admit-
ted helping Hicks with
the Hoover burglary and
two others, one in
Dothan, AL, and the
other in Phenix City, AL.
Hicks plead guilty and
was sentenced to
Alabama prison with a
scheduled release date of
Dec. 2007.
Dothan Police
Department (DPD)
placed a detainer on
Hicks while he was in
prison charging him
with the Dothan conven-
ience-store burglary, and
interviewed him prior to
officially charging him,
and Hicks allegedly
admitted involvement in
the crime.
,After being
processed into. the
Jefferson County Jail,
Hicks' bond was with-,
held and he remained in
the county jail May 25.


Cont. From Page 1


rest on his back in the
northbound traffic lane
of Waukeenah Highway.
Trooper Bill Grubbs
indicated that there
were no skid marks at
the scene and Sewell
was' transported top
Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital for treatment.
FHP was assisted by


Jefferson County Fire
Rescue and deputies of
the Jefferson County
Sheriffs Office.
Leonard's vehicle was
later located and
Leonard was identified
and charged with care-
less driving and leaving
the scene of a crash with
injuries.


Make a career of it! The Classifieds
are packed ,vith possibilities,. Check out
the job listings today and give others
a helping hand.
han








Wednesday, May 27, 2009


AROUNDI


www. ecbpu blishing.com


EFFERSON


Monticello News 5A


COUNTY


CUNNLIN I if


flALS0AI


May 27 30
Jefferson Arts Gallery is
open Wednesdays and
Saturday from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m., or by appointment;
located at 575 .West
Washington Street in
Monticello. Exhibits are
free and open to the pub-
lic. Jefferson Arts, Inc. is
a non-profit group with a
goal of promoting art and
art education in the
Monticello area of North
Florida and South
Georgia. For more
Information contact the
Gallery at
www.jeffersonartsgallery.
com or 997-3311.
May 28
Altrusa meets at noon on
the second Thursday and
at 6 p.m. on the fourth
Thursday of each month
for a meal and a meeting.
Contact the Chamber at
997-5552 for more infor-
mation..
May 28
AA meetings are held 8


p.m. on Thursdays at the
Christ Episcopal Church
Anhex, 425 North Cherry
Street. For more informa-
tion call 997-2129 or 997-
1955.
May 29
Monticello Rotary Club
meets every Friday at
noon at the
Monticello/ Jefferson
Chamber of Commerce
on West Washington
Street for lunch and a
meeting. Contact
President James
Muchovej at 980-6509 for
club information.
May 29
Opera House Annual
Members Meeting and
Dinner, featuring a read-
ing by Pulitzer Prize win-
ning author Robert Olen
Butler, 6:30 p.m. Friday.
You need not be a member
to attend. The evening
will start with beverages
and dinner, followed by a
brief business meeting.
The menu includes chick-


Vera Mae Sauls
Vera Mae Sauls, age 70 passed away Friday, May
22, 2009 in Thomasville, Georgia.
Funeral services" was held at 11:00 a.m. EST
Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at Beggs Funeral Home
Monticello Chapel. Internment followed the service
at Oakfield cemetery. The family received friends
from 6 to 8 p.m. EST Monday, May 25th, 2009 at Beggs
FunerallHome Monticello Chapel (850-997-5612), 485
E. Dogwood Street,.Monticello, FL. ,
-IMrs. Sauls was a native .of Taylor County and
had lived in Thomas County Georgia before moving
to Monticello. She was a substitute mail carrier for
the Monticello Post Office. She was of Baptist faith
and a member of Olive Baptist Church.
Mrs. Sauls is survived by her husband of fifty-
three years John Sauls, Jr. of Monticello; two sons
John A (Debra) Sauls III and Richard Michael Sauls
of Thomas County Georgia; four grandchildren
Danielle Sauls, Brandon Sauls, Stephanie Sauls and
Tanner Sauls.

Allen Bice Bramlett
Allen Bice Bramlett age 51, passed away May 21,
2009 in Tallahassee.
A graveside service was held at Broomsage
,Cemetery in Wacissa, FL May 25, 2009 at 2:00 P.M.
Allen is survived by his father Malcolm
Bramlett & step mother Evelyn Louise of Wacissa;
his mother Pearl Jones of Boland Community in
Monticello, Florida; four sons Allen Bice Bramlett,
Jr,, John Malcolm Bramlett & Ricky West of
Monticello, T. J. Bramlett of Tallahassee; one daugh-
ter Geneva Powell of Monticello; one brother
Michael Eldon Bramlett of Wacissa; three sisters
Linda Elizabeth (Alton) Branch & Versie Ma Cook
of Monticello and Elena Renee (Glenn) Clark of
Blountstown, FL.
Mr. Bramlett is preceded in death by his wife
.Molly Sue Bramlett and a grandson Robert Lee
Powell.


en cordon bleu, rice pilaf,
a sauteed seasonal veg-
etable, a green salad, and
dessert. $25 per person,
reservations needed. Call
997-4242.
May 29
Community Skate, Night
is held 6 to 8 p.m. on the
last Friday of each month
at the Church of the
Nazarene on 1590 North
Jefferson Street. This
event is free. Bring your
own skates or borrow
from the Roller Club.
There is a small charge
for snacks, 997-3906.
May 30
First United Methodist
Church youth will be
holding a carwash 9 a.m.
to 12 p.m. Saturday in the
Monticello News parking
lot area.
May 30
Wag the Dog Thrift Shop
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.
One year Anniversary
Celebra-tion & -
Festivities.
May 30
Jefferson SHARE volun-
teers will be stationed at
the Church of the
Nazarene, 1590 North
Jefferson Street from 8 to
9:30 a.m. Saturday with
the monthly ifod delivery
orders. Turn in registra-
tion copy When picking
up orders. Cash dona-
tions will be accepted for
the cost of fuel for the vol-
unteers. Contact Martha
Creel at 445-9061 for more
information. To learn
more about SHARE go'to
www.shareflorida.org
May 30
The regular last-
Saturday-of-the-month
meeting of the
Tallahassee Crochet
Guild will be held 10 a.m.
to 12 p.m. at the Jefferson
Arts Gallery, 575 West
Washington Street. This
is a free meeting. Bring
your own projects or
work on some of the
Tallahassee Crochet
Guild projects. A new
project will be discussed
in conjunction with the
Monticello Methodist-
Women's Crochet Group.
It will be announced as
well as the teaching of
the stitch they plan to use
for their senior lapghans.
This is a crochet and chat
gathering. No children
p 1 e a s e
r http://www.divacrochet.c
om for updates. "Join us
for some crocheting fun,
we always have a nice
time, and keep on hook-
in'! says Coordinator


Melanie Mays Randall.
May 30 and 31
Tri-State Avian Society
Exotic and Pet Bird Fair
Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
and Sunday 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. at the North Florida
Fair Grounds in
Tallahassee. $3 adults,
children 12 and under
free. Contact Barry
Laster at 364-4666 for.
more information.
Hundreds of birds to see,
learn about, and pur-
chase supplies for. Two
Wii Nintendo video
games will be raffled.
This is, an indoor event
with free parking.
June 1
AA women's meetings are
held 6:45 p.m. Monday;
AA and Al-Anon meet-
ings are held 8 p.m. Christ
Episcopal Church Annex,
425 North Cherry Street.
For more information
call 997-2129 or 997-1955.
June 1
AA meets 7 p.m. every
Monday at Waukeenah
United Methodist Church
for fellowship to this open
meeting. For more infor-
mation contact Rev. Ralph
Wrightstone at 997-2171.
June 1
Boy Scout Troop 803
meets' 7 p.m. every
Monday at the Eagles
Nest on South. Water
Street. For more informa-
tion, contact Scout
Leader Paul Wittig at 997-
1727 or 997-3169.
June 2
AA classes are held every
Tuesday evening 8 p.m.
for those seeking help.
Located at' 1599
Springhollow Road in the
Harvest Center. Contact
Marvin Graham at 212-
7669 for more informa-
tion.
June 2
Jefferson County Lions
Club will meet 1 p.m. on
the first and third
Tuesday of the month at
Starducks on East
Washington Street. For
more information contact
Debbie. Snapp at 251-1641.


I


June 2
Monticello/Jefferson
County Chamber of
Commerce Board
Members meet at noon on
the first Tuesday of each
month. Contact Director
Mary Frances Gramling
at 997-5552, or monticello-
jeffersonfl.com
June 2 and 16
Monticello/Jefferson
Chamber of Commerce.
will host its Sales Leads
Group meeting 7 to 7:40
a.m. Tuesday, at Tupelo's
Bakery & Caf6. Meetings
will continue on the first
and third Tuesday of
each month. The purpose
of this networking group
is -for participants to
introduce possible new
contacts to each other. At
each meeting, members
are asked to bring and


introduce a new "lead" to
another participating
member. There is no cost
to participate in this new
leads group... but is you
don't bring a possible
new lead... you will be
charged a $3 fine! For
more information con-
tact Chuck Sarkisian at
997-1194.
June 4
The Business
Community Prayer
Breakfast and meeting
will be held 7 to .8 a.m. on
the first Thursday of. the
month. Plan to attend,
and bring a friend. For
speaker and location
information contact
Coordinator L. Gary
Wright at 997-5705, 933-
5567, or
lgwright39@embarqmail.
com


THE PRESCRIPTION FRon Health
Ih La, Care
"WO


U I Free Delivery For
Prescriptions
gJackson's Drug Store
166 E.,Dogwood *
Monticello
: 850-997-3553
i. ,


Free Blood
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Check

*Gifts.

Medication
Counseling


Meia 0ServicesI


180 S. Cherry St., Suite F
Monticello, FL 32344
850-997-1400


Are You In NeedOf

Chiropractic Services?

Dr. Michael A. Miller
3116 Capital Circle NE, Ste.2
Tallahassee, FL 32308
n850-668-4200


'Kids in College' Summer Camps


In Monticello Change Location


Camp Registration
Day is Saturday, May 23.
North Florida
Community College is
offering a variety of
Community Education
classes in Monticello
this summer. Classes,
being held at Green
Industries Institute
(2729 W. Washington
Street), include a num-
ber of children's sum-
mer camps as well as
adult classes in health,
horticulture, and cake
decorating .
Seven "Kids in
College" summer camps
will be offered in
Monticello for students
who completed grades 4
to 8. Camps include
Baseball/Softball 8 a.m.
to noon, June 22-25);
Fishing Techniques (8
a.m. to noon, June 29-
July 2, 8); Firefighter


Exploration (8 a.m. to
noon, July 6-9); Learn
the Music Recorder (8
a.m. to noon, July 13-16).
Musical Adventures ( 1
to 5 p.m, July 13-16);
Science Can Be Fun (8
a.m. to noon, July 20-23);
and Kids Cooking Class
(8 a.m. to noon, Aug. 3-6,
8).
A Learn the Music
Recorder camp will also
be offered 1- 5 p.m. June
15-18, for children hav-
ing completed grades K-
4 through grade 3.
"We are excited
about offering
Community Education
classes and summer
camps at the Green
Industries Institute site
in Monticello this year,"
said Suzie Godfrey,
NFCC Community
Education coordinator.
"I welcome feedback


from the people of
Jefferson County as we
look to offer more
Community Education
based courses at the
Green Industries loca-
tion in the future."
Registration takes
about 20 minutes, and
parents should bring the
child's insurance card.
For more informa-
tion, contact Suzie
Godfrey at (850) 973-9453
or gotifrevs@nfcc.edu.


Come and FIRST BTRH~Y.

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6A Monticello News


.OUNDU


www.ecbpublishing.com


EFFERSON


Wednesday, May 27, 2009


COUNTY


The Best News Of Year


Chelsea Eades, moth-
er of Natalie Eades,
relates that Natalie was
released from Shands,
Wednesday, May 20. Her
counts are not high
enough yet for visitors,
but there is comfort in
knowing that she gets to
sleep in her own house
with both her parents at
her side.
She has been through
such an ordeal, but was


surrounded by love, both
from people who knew
her, and people who did
not. A sincere thank you
goes out to all who
prayed, offered words of
encouragement, and
helped this little girl.
Natalie Eades is a joy,
a child full of laughter, a
little girl who loves to
sing'and dance, a little
one who has so much
love to give, and who is


loved by many It was
through prayer and the
grace of God, that she
will continue to share
her joy and laughter with
us.
It will be wonderful
to see her and Desiree
able to play again, know-
ing the next day she will
return i to play more.
Desiree has missed her
ladybug costume wear-
ing friend.


" ri me
" Rmoed
" -Fiewoo
" -re M lc
" iene


Her sitter, Christina
relates: "I have missed
the little girl that I came
to know and love, as well
as her mom who became
a wonderful friend.
"I am so happy that
God has returned this
family to the place they
belong-at home.
"Please continue
your prayers. Natalie
will go back next week
,*for a bone marrow test."






iness Listings









Wednesday, May 27, 2009


ROUND


www.ecbpublishing.com


EFFERSON


Monticello News 7A


COUNTY


La'va
first
Even
uill
mn m"Flo


mRececsw]


Antwon Dumarcus
Thompson
DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Antwon Dumarcus
Thompson graduated
from Ouachita Baptist
University in
Arkadelphia, AR. with a
Bachelors of Arts
Degree in Business
Administration .and


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
With the opening of
the 2009 hurricane sea-
son Monday, June 1,
Emergency Management
Director Carol Ellerbe
reminds that May 24-30 is
Florida Hurricane
Preparedness Week, and
it is not too soon to ready
for a potential emer-
gency
Basic items which
residents should stock in
their homes in case of
emergencies, include:
water, food, first aid sup-
plies, clothing and bed-
ding, tools and emer-
gency supplies, and other
special items. "Keep the
items that you would
most likely need during
an evacuation in an easy-
carry secure container,"
Ellerbe advises.
The 2009 hurricane
season is predicted to
bring 14 named storms to
the Atlantic Ocean, with
seven of them becoming
hurricanes, -according to
a university report that
forecasts an "above aver-
age' 2009 hurricane sea-
son. The annual report
was released by Colorado
State University (CSU)
forecasters."
The CSU report pre-
dicted that three of the
season's seven hurri-
canes will develop into
intense or major storms,
meaning Category 3, or
storms which have' sus-
tained winds of at least
111 mph.
There is a 63 percent
chance that at least one
major hurricane will
make landfall on the
United States, according
to the report.
Storms do not
acquire names until they
are designated tropical
storms with sustained
maximum winds of at
least 39 mph.
Ellerbe stresses to
residents that
Emergency Management
continues to offer free
resource materials and


Management, Saturday,
May 9.
The nature of OBU
is to be as unique as its
|name. Ouachita is an
excellent liberal arts
institution. The learning
takes place in a Christ
centered communi-
ty. The education and
preparation of a student
for the future is
enhanced by people of
authentic faith and gen-
uine commitment to
Christ.
Ouachita Baptist
University is a church-
related, liberal arts uni-
versity whose aims are
to meet the educational
needs of .students and to
prepare them, for the
future.
Family members
and friends traveling to
witness his special occa-
sion included his broth-
er Antaevius Walker, his
aunt Gloria Thompson,


cliZaicd EMS Coordinator Lt. Jim Iten


E02
9 I


F


I
)


information on disaster
preparedness, every-
thing from fires to floods,
to tornadoes and hurri-
canes, to poison control
and similar topics.
June' 1 the
Emergency Management
Office will relocate to the
Industrial Park, and resi-
dents are asked to call
the office, if they plan to
stop to pick up materials
or any other reason. The
office number is 342-0211.
Ellerbe offered these
tips for hurricane pre-
paredness:
For the Family:
Water, at least one gal-
lon daily per person for
three to seven days.
Food, at least enough
non-perishable food
items for each person for
three to seven days.
First Aid Kit: Assemble
a first aid kit for" the
home and one for each
vehicle containing:
-Adhesive bandages, var-
ious sizes
-Sterile dressings and
gauze pads, various sizes
-Gauze and cohesive
bandage rolls
-Alcohol-based hand san-
itizer
-Antiseptic wipes
-Latex-free gloves
-Adhesive tape
-Anti-bacterial ointment
-Cold pack
-Scissors and tweezers
-Thermometer .
-Safety pins and needles
-Sunscreen
-CPR breathing barrier
-Anti-bacterial soap
-Medicines: Stock in the
first aid kit, a supply of
common non-prescrip-
tion medications such as:
-Aspirin or non-aspirin
pain reliever
-Anti-diarrhea medica-
tion
-Laxative
Prescription Drugs:
Keep a supply on hand of
prescription drugs and
other special needs
health items such as:
Current prescription
medications for all fami-
ly members
Insulin


Photo Submitted
shia Moore, placed
at the 4-H District
ts. The title of her
strated talk was
rida 4-H History.":'
-,---



Darrell, Latasha, Jakari,
and Kamarian
Seabrooks, Lynn and
Willie Calloway, and Eric
Reddick of Tallahassee,
FL.
Also, Doris and Ed
Keaton, Shirley Reddick,
Jeanette Washington,
Lois Howell-Hunter,
Tierra and Tavaris
Thompson, Maurice
Williams, -and Deshon
Miller of Monticello,
and Jewell Reddick of
Washington, DC.
Thompson is the son
of the late Andrea 'D.
Thompson and grandson
of the late Aggie Bell
and John Henry
Thompson, and lives in
Tallahassee. with his
aunt and uncle Gloria
and Richard Thompson.
He will be moving to
Little Rock, AR. where
he will manage a
Walgreen's Pharmacy
and Drug Store.


* Denture needs
* Extra eye glasses or
contact lenses and sup-
plies
* Prescription inhalers or
nebulizers
* Personal adaptive
equipment such as
braces crutches or canes.
* Clothing: Have a bag
packed with as complete
change of seasonally
appropriate clothing and
footwear for each person.
Other items include:
-Rain gear
-Sunglasses
* Bedding: Keep bedding
supplies in a waterproof
container/bag:
* Blankets and sleeping
bags
* Pillows'
* Tools and Emergency
Supplies:
* Battery operated radio
* NOAA alert radio'
* Flashlights: Do not,
stock candles which are
the source of many fires
* Extra batteries
* Paper cups, plates and
plastic utensils
* Manual can opener or
utility knife
* Small fire extinguisher
* Small, basic hand tool
set
* Duct tape
* Compass, local map or
electric navigation
device
* Matches in a waterproof
container
* Signal flare
* Wrench to turn off
household gas and water
* Plastic sheeting
* Sanitation items such
as soap, liquid detergent,
toiler paper, moist tow-
elettes, plastic garbage
bags, disinfectant and
chlorine bleach.
* Blue ice or artificial ice
* Personal and feminine
hygiene. supplies
- Plastic bucket with
tight lid
* Plastic tarps
* Insect repellent.

For the Home:
* Portable generators
* Storm shutters
* Generator cord
* Storm shutter acces-


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Emergency Medical
Tech nician
(EMT)/Paramedic/Firefi
ghter Lt. Jim Iten, 40, of
Tallahassee, serves as the
Jefferson County, Fire
Rescue Emergency
Service Coordinator for
the county and has three
years working within the
community at the depart-
ment.
Iten, who also serves
as a member of the
department's first Honor
Guard, which made it's
appearance during the
Watermelon Festival last
year, said he has always
been drawn to the emer-
gency service field, but
had never started consid-
ering it seriously until he
was about 35 or 36 years
old.
He earned his EMT
certification in 2003 at
Florida Medical Training
Institute; obtained his
certification as a fire-
fighter in 2004 from the
Broward Fire Academy;
and earned his certifica-
tion as a paramedic at the
end of 2005 from Broward
Community College. He
began working at
Jefferson County Fire
Rescue shortly afterward,
in July 2006.
Currently, as EMS
Coordinator, Iten's job
responsibilities include
seeing that all policies


series
* Garage door brace
*Carbon monoxide detec-
tor

For the Car:
* Flashlight with extra
batteries
* First aid kit
* Maps
* White distress flag and
flares
* Tire repair kit
* Jumper cables, tire
pump and jack
* Full tank of gas with
extra gas can
For the Baby:
* Formula
* Diapers
* Bottles
* Powdered mild
For the Pets:
* Proper identification
* Immunization records
* Supply of food and
water
* Pet carrier or cage with
bedding
* Medications
* Muzzle, leash and collar
* Grooming supplies
* Waste bags
* Cat litter/box

Other Miscellaneous
Items:
* ID and insurance infor-
mation
* Important phone num-
bers


Lt. Jim Iten
and procedures as they
pertain to EMS are fol-
lowed; he serves as the
departmental liaison to
the medical director and
the Bureau of EMS; over-
seeing the overall general
day-to-'day operations of
the EMS aspect of the
department.
As EMS Coordinator,
Iten is also responsible
for quality and assurance
that all reports are done
correctly and completely
When asked about 'any
additional job related
duties, Iten responded,
"Anything the director
tells me to do."
He was very quick to
respond when asked if he
had a mentor within the
department since joining.
"That's easy Mary Jane
Dickey, because she is a
saint. She is professional
and genuinely caring, she
does not ask questions
when doing a job and she
will drop anything to help
anyone."
He finds his biggest
on the job challenge to be
juggling time and not hav-
ing enough people to com-,
plete those tasks, EMT or
paramedic.
"The most rewarding
part of my job is saving
lives and preventing
injury," said Iten. "And
my main objective is to
improve public health
through our practices."
Of the many tragic
scenes an
EMT/Paramedic/Firefigh
ter encounters, Iten had to
really think hard to recall
if he had ever been
involved with an unusual
or somewhat comical situ-
ation. The first incident


Irsim. I


20 y.
SIding, | Combined
Siding, Inc. Eperinn






Docks
Soffit & Faciae
dows Repairs


Rodney Roberts
(850) 251-4588


to come to mind was a
recent call the depart-
ment received to respond
to a local child care facili-
ty because a little boy's
head was stuck in a toilet
seat.
"He had gotten it over
his head and they could-
n't get it off," said Iten.
"We ended up having to
cut it off with a leather-
man."
He said on average,
the EMS received approx-
imately 180-185 calls per
month, and just last
month, had broken their
previous record of 204.
"Of those calls, 25 to 30
percent are true emergen-
cies," he said. Many calls
consist of checking a
patient's blood pressure,
listening to their hearts,
and even listening to
their personal problems.
In answering calls
within the community,
Iten has responded to
severe falls, severe bleed-
ing, broken bones, deliv-
ered babies, performing
CPR, managed cardiac
arrests, strokes, 1-10
motor home crashes and
multiple car crashes, and
similar serious situa-
tions.
Iten was 'asked what
it was that keeps someone
in the emergency services
field from sinking into
severe depression or even
having nightmares and he
explained that when done
on a day-to-day basis, ,one
in such a field learns to
desensitize themselves
when responding to a hor-
rific or .severalty traumat-
ic scenes. "We haVe to
keep our wits about us,
and work quickly and effi-
ciently. We don't have. the
time to even think about
getting emotional about
it."
He said his goal for
the department is to con-
tinually strive to. get bet-
ter rather than stagnate,
and over time he hopes
Fire Rescue grows and
benefits all county resi-
dents equally.
Iten has been married
to his wife, Suzanne for 15
years. They have no chil-
dren, but happily claim
two Labrador Retrievers,
Cole and Casey









,8A Monticello News
-t


www.ecbpublishing.com


Wednesday, May 27, 2009


Major Businesses Of The Early 20th Century


The colonial home of Abe Simon..


The interior of the J.T. Budd and Son Store.


ALFA HUNT
"Monticello News
. Staff Writr
: At the beginning of
the. 20th century, there
were many successful
businesses in Jefferson
County, three :of which
will be discussed in this '
article: Abe Simon and
U, Brother Store and
Warehouse, J.T. Budd and
"Sonl. Store, and the
? 'Jefferson County State
"Bank.
Abe Simon and his
brother Frank were born
, in the county and raised
in the family business of
Merchandising. They
- began their business pur-
suits on a smallscale, but
when C.T. Carroll died,
they bought out his stock
and building.
4- Over the years, they
gradually increased their
business. By 1907, they
C had become one of the
. largest dealers in
-l Monticello selling' dry
. goods, shoes, millinery,'
J notions, and groceries.
SAdjacent to their store
S was a large ,warehouse
full of furniture, carpets,
household goods, and'
3 field implemrients.
h They also, dealt with
horses and mules. The
Simon brothers employed
a large force of clerks and
Devoted much 6f their.
tiie' to the business,
which was evident by
their enormous success.
They were known for


being very, attentive to
their customers, .and,
according, to the Feb. 22,
1907 edition of the
Monticello News, "in
every way tried to please,
knowing that a pleased
customer ;is their best
advertisement."
The Simon brothers
also held interest in other
business enterprises. The
brothers came into a part-
nership with a man by the
name of McLellan and
began a large turpentine
business under the name
of Calmetto Company*
The company manu-
factured the famous medi-
cine 666,. a formula pre-
pared by. Dr. J. Dabney
Palmer, a retired, physi-
'cian who was well known
for his medical expertise.
The management of the
Calmetto Company was
entrusted to the abilities
of Abe's son, Frank A.
Simon, Jr., who attended
to the manufacturing and
traveled in the interest of
the company
The business of Abe'
Simon and Brother was
credited to be one. of the
businesses, which aided
in:, -the thriving and
growth of the town and
county.
The J.T. Budd and
Son Store were located
along Dogwood Street and
the building once served
as the old Monticello
News building. According
to the Feb. 22, 1907 edition


of the Monticello News,
"this is the oldest business
house in point of resi-
dence in Monticello."
The' business was.
established by J.T. Budd's
father .in 1847,, and was
originally -housed in the
building now used for the
Edenfield Hardware Store,
but after being forced out
by a fire, J.T. Budd Sr. relo-
cated to the Puleston block
just across .the street fron
his original location,
before finally moving to
the building on Dogwood. '
The department store
'featured more expensive
merchandise. The Budd
retailer was known to sell
the latest infashion by way
of clothes and shoes as
well as fancy goods.
J.T. Budd Jr. was born
in Monticello in-a home
along Jefferson Street. His
family would sell the home
to G.C. 'Bishop several
years later and move to a
home about a block away.
J.T. was educated at the
schools in town, and began-
working at his father's
shop at an early age.
The Jefferson County
State Bank was organized
in 1890 with a capital of
$40,000. It grew in invest-
ments in the years to come,
but would eventually close.
The bank was established
in Monticello when the
City Council began realiz-
ing the need for better
business facilities and
receiving the support of


the people of the county.
D.A. Finlayson was
the 'president -of the
Jefferson County State
Bank. He lived in the coun-
Sty, near the. present
Ashville. He was a gradu-
ate of the University of
Virginia and served as the
attorney for the Atlantic
Coast Line. He was mar-,
ried to a daughter.of John
Henry Perkins, the owner
of the Monticello Opera
House.
TM. Puleston was the
vice-president and, in
1907. was the judge of the
county court. He was born
in London. and came to
this country when he was


two years old and with his
.parents, settled in Illinois.
He eventually moved to
-Texas where his brother
lived, .and began to study
law. He was admitted to
the Bar in Waxahachie,;
TX and from there, moved
to Monticello where
another one of his broth-
ers lived.
Puleston served two
terms as Past Grand
Master of the Masons and
a member of a chapter of
the Knights of Templar.
R.R. Turnbull was the
cashier for the bank and
considered to be a vervy
popular young business-
man of the day. He was


educated in the county
schools and went into
business at an early age.
Turnbull was a member of
the City Council and treas-
urer of the Episcopal
Church. While he was
serving as cashier for the
bank, he married Carrie
Belle Tucker.
WR. Puleston and
H.B. Finlayson were
employees of the bank and
were also considered to be
popular businessmen of
the early 20th century
None of these busi-
nesses exist today'but they
helped the county to grow
and expand to become
what it is today


-~


f Rmerican FootbalI-4


pALFA HUNT
Monticello News
* Staff Writer


The history of
American football can be
traced back to the early
versions of rugby football.
Both the rugby and
American versions have
origins from a game
4 played in the United
Kingdom during the mid-
19'" century in which a
ball is kicked at a goal
and. or run over aline.
The American varia-
tion resulted from several
Major changes in the
rules of the game, most of
which were established by
Walter Camp, who is con-
sidered to be the' "Father
of American Football".
mong these noted
changes were the intro-
'I.dUi tion of the "line of
rimmage" and "down-
d-distance" rules. By
IN e early 20th century.
ame ]pay developments
by college coaches Eddie
Codhems, Amos Alonzo
-_-Stagg, Kinute Rockne, and


Glenn Warner helped
introduce the forward
pass.
Collegiate football
grew in popularity, as it
became the most preva-
lent version of the game
for the first half of the 20'"
century.
The concept of profes-
sional football can be
traced back to 1892 when
William "Pudge"
Heffelfinger purchased a
$500 contract to play in a
game for the Allegheny
Athletic association
against the Pittsburgh
Athletic Club. The first
professional "league" was
the Ohio League estab-
lished in 1903.
The first Professional
Football championship
game was between the
Buffalo Prospects and the
Canton Bulldogs in 1919.
In 1920. the American
Professional Football
Association was formed.
The first game was held in
Dayton, Ohio on October
3, 1920 with the host


Triangles defeating the
Columbus Panhandles 14-
0.
The Ohio League
would go on to change its
name to the National
Football League (NFL)
two years later and
became the major league
of American football.
Professional football
quickly became a national
phenomenon soon after I
wards.
Football's most popu-
lar occurrence was tkhj
1958 NFL Championship
Game. which has been
dubbed with the title of
the "'Greatest Game Ever
Played." The rival league
to the NFL, the AmericFahl
Football League (AFL),Q
began in 1960. and this put" @
immense pressure on the
senior league. It wo ild
eventually lead to the/ .,..
merging of the two
leagues and the creation
of the Superbowl. which
is reported to be the most
watched event in the
Unites States. ,


The Jefferson County State Bank with several men standing outside.


.0oi



















-V.


4'









.4


0

/?










Wednesday, May 27, 2009 www.ecbpublishing.com Monticello News *9A


b IfLS ETND ECOLOT FIELD DAT
I44! Ai? ---- L 1 I Y-A


Tony Hogg from the Apalachee Beekeepers County Forester Mike Humphrey shows a third
Association talks to grade three students about the grader how to use an increment borer to determine
honeybee family. 1 the age of a tree.


Steve Tuller shows third graders various soil pro-
files at the annual 4-H Ecology Field Day at Pinckney
Hill Plantation.


RAY CICHON
Monticello News
Managing Editor
Third and fifth
graders took part in the
annual 4-H Ecology
Field Day, with 95 third
graders attending
Wednesday, May 6, and
more than 69 fifth
graders attending
Thursday, May 7, at
Pinckney Hill
Plantation. Students
from Jefferson
Elementary School, and
fifth graders from the
Care Charter School of
Excellence took part in
the event.
Students went
through five rotations,
with three in the morn-


ing and two after lunch.
Among the hands
on activities for the
third graders were:
Aquatics Science pre-
sented by Steve Caton
and Sharon Fitz'Coy.
The students did lots of
seining for aquatic
insect ID in Razor Lake.
Mike 'Humphrey
from Jefferson County
Forestry .Service did' a
presentation on trees.
The students 'learned
. how to ID trees and had
an opportunity to deter-
mine the age of the
trees.
Tony Hogg, from
the Apalachee
B ee k e e p e r s
Association, showed the


children the different
equipment required to
maintain a beekeeping
operation. Steve Tullar,
Dorothy Lewis, and
Darrell Johnson, from
The Natural Resource
Conservation, showed
the students the effects
of soil erosion, and the
students also made bird
feeder using pine cones
and peanut butter.
Tom Ostertag, from
the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission, brought
reptiles, and amphib-
ians. The students had
an opportunity to learn
about their habits, and
.to touch alligators,


snakes, frogs and other
reptiles.
Fifth graders par-
ticipated in the follow-
ing hands-on activities:
Justin Chance and
Dixie Kimmey, volun-
teers from the St.
Marks Refuge, had the
students participate in
a rain cycle game that
. showed how rain affects
the earth.
Geetha Lyer and
Lindsey McConnell
graduate students at the
University of Florida,
School of Forestry and
Natural Resources. The
students learned parts
of the tree and played a
"Project Learning


Tree" game .called "How
Tree Survive in the
Forest," using poker
chips and playing cards.
John D. Fuller from
the Wildlife Turkey
Federation brought his
pet turkey. "Elwood"
and talked about
turkeys and how to
hunt for turkeys.
Tracie and Clay
Fulford from Florida
Ag. In the Classroom,
did a presentation on
"Agricu 1 tura 1
Awareness". Students
learned about where
different crops are
raised and popular
crops that are raised
here in Florida.
Barry Barnhart, a


retired biology instruc-
tor from North Florida
Community College,
brought a selection of
plants for the student to
smell and touch. He
talked to. the students
on the benefits of plants
and how plants are used
to make medicine.
The students had
lots of fun but more
importantly they
learned a lot about the
environment.
A special thank you
goes out to Steven
Demott and the staff at
Pinckney Hill
Plantation for all their
hard work preparing
the plantation for the
field day.


Tom Ostertag gives the third graders an opportunity to touch a snake.


Clay and Tracie Fulford explain to grade five students how wheat is grown
and harvested.


John Fuller points out the turkey Elwood's beard to grade five students.


18 U.S C. 707


I I I I -


'% Ar I I I X T fA A










10A Monticello News


www.ecbpublishing.com


Wednesday, May 27, 2009


SPORTS


ACA Athletic Banquet


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Athletes, coaches and
families of the Aucilla
Christian Academy varsity
sports teams came together
May 16, for the annual ACA
Athletic Banquet at First
UMC Fellowship Hall.
At the event, Luke Wit-
mer was named Male Aca-
demic Athlete of the Year,
with a 3.74 GPA, and
Michaela Roccanti .was
named Female Academic
Athlete of the Year with a
4.0 GPA. These awards are
presented to those who
earned the highest GPA
throughout their high
school years.
Stephen Dollar and
Matt Bishop were named
Male Athletes of the Year,
and Mallory Plaines was
named as the Female Ath-
lete of the Year. This award
is presented to the year's
outstanding athletes, as se-


elected by the ACA coaching
staff.
Following a dinner
provided by the Athletic
Committee, varsity football
coach Daryl Adams
awarded honors to athletes
on the team. Jacob Pitts
was named the Offensive
Lineman of the Year; Koal.
Swann, Defensive Lineman
of the Year; Luke Witmer
received the .Coaches
Award; and co-MVPs were
Casey Anderson and Matt
Bishop.
Brenda Brown pre-
sented awards to the var-
sity cheerleading squad.
Rhegan Clark was named
Most Improved; Katelyn
Levine, Most Spirited; and
Erin Kelly MVP.
Coach Dan Nennstiel
presented the awards for
the ,girls and boys cross
country team. For the
Lady Warriors, Angela Mc-
Cune was awarded with
the Leadership Award;


Hannah Haselden, Most
Improved; and Michaela
Roccanti, MVP.
For the Warriors, Jay
Finlayson was named
Most Improved; Kent
Jones, the Leadership
Award; and Russell
Fraleigh, MVP
Adams presented the
awards for the varsity girls
basketball team. Kaitlin
Jackson was named Defen-
sive Player -of the Year;
Chelsea Dobson, 'Offensive
Player of the Year; Jodie
Bradford received the 6th
man award; Savannah
Williams, Warrior Award;
and Mallory Plaines, MVP.
Nenmistiel presented
the awards for the varsity
'boys basketball players.
Randy Perry was named
Most Improved; Joe Mizell,
Leadership Award; Luke
Witmer, Offensive Player of
the Year; Clark Christy, De-
fensive Player of the Year;
and Stephen Dollar, MVP
Coach Edwin Kinsey
presented the varsity soft-
ball team with their
awards. Olivia Sorensen re-
ceived the Coach's Award;
Mallory Plaines, Offensive
Player of the Year; Taryn
Copeland, Defensive Player
of the Year; Michaela Roc-
canti, Golden Glove Award;
and Erin Kelly was named
MP..


coaches with a token of ap-
preciation for their dedica-
tion to the team.
A Power Point Presen-
tation, illustrated photos
taken during sporting
events throughout the sea-
son, illustrated with music,
and some comical shots
.taken during events such
as the Spirit Week Pep
Rally and Scavenger Hunt.
When Mallory Plaines was
recognized in the presenta-.
tion for scoring more than
1,000 points during her
high school career, ap-
M M A f M in M M


plause erupted; as it did Munroe, the number, one -,
when shots of Matt Bishop team in the district, 8-6,
on the gridiron before he April 9. The big hit came in -
was injured came up, with the bottom of the seventh
the voice over: "Matt with Aucilla standing at a
Bishop will always be Au- two-point deficit when
cilla's Superman." Stephen Dollar walloped a
Additional highlights walk-off grand slam home
during the presentation in- run to cinch the win. ..
cluded the varsity softball Following the presen- :0
team taking their sixth station of awards came a
consecutive district title; sad note: Long time Ath-
the varsity boys baseball letic Committee members
team taking their sixth dis- Demott Anderson (3 years),
trict title in the past seven Marsha Plaines (6 years)
years, and ACA winning and Liz Bishop (10 years),
the district game against were stepping down.







!


Matt Bishop and Mallory Plaines and Stephen Dollar.


LUKe WitmE
with a 4.0 GPAM


Rhegan Clark, Most Improved; Katelyn Levine, Most
Spirited; and Erin Kelly, MVP.


Angela McCune, Leadership Award; Hannah
e Haselden,Most Improved; and
r" Michaela Roccanti, MVP. .




All
* .,.,+ q


,.-...._ .;





g a *' 4
A" 4.:,: .










Jay Finlayson, Most Improved; Kent Jones, Leader-
saeFr
shp wad;an.Rsel Fali.,M P
00-.00 0-0
+ ' : 0
... = ., 0


S
0
0
S
S


Kaitlin Jackson, Defensive Player of the Year; Chelsea Dobson, Offensive Player of
the Year; Jodie Bradford, 61h Man Award; Savannah Williams, the Warrior Award; and
Mallory Plaines, MVP. Randy Perry Most Improved; Joe Mizell, Leadership Award; Luke Witmer, Offensive
.O _- * O * Player of the Year; Clark Christy, Defensive Player of the Year; and Stephen Dollar, MVP.
A~~ ~~~~ ~ ~~~~~~~~~~ 0, 0 0 0 0 ,_ __ 00 0eL~o_._


Olivia Sorensen, Coach's Award; Mallory Plaines, Offensive Player of the Year;
Taryn Copeland, Defensive Player of the Year; Michaela Roccanti, Golden Glove Award;
and Erin Kelly, MVP.


Casey Wheeler, Hustle Award; Marcus Roberts, Pitching Award; Casey Anderson,
Defensive Player of the Year; Matt Bishop, Offensive Player of the Year; and Stephen
Dollar, MVP.


'p
I

:1
'C


I









Wednesday, May 27, 2009


www.ecbpublishing.com


Monticello News 11A


SCHOOL


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Aucilla Christian
Academy hosted the
annual academic awards
program for students in
grades 7-12, Friday, May 8.
Students were award-
ed certificates for main-
taining an A or a B
throughout the year, at
every grade level, and
while 'there were too
many to mention, school
officials send congratula-
tions to all of them and
theirparents.
Receiving additional
awards were seventh
graders Aimee Love for
highest GPA in language
arts, math, science and
geography and Cole Davis


received the citizenship
award.
Eighth graders
receiving awards includ-
ed highest GPA in Math
Whitney McKnight; high-
est GPA in algebra I, his-
tory, language arts, and
science Wendy Yang; and
the Citizenship award
given to Jay Finlayson.
In ninth grade Tyler
'Jackson won the award
for highest GPA in
English I, Spanish I and
physical science; and the
freshman Citizenship
award went to Vicki
Perry.
Abigail Vasquez
received the award for the
highest GPA in English II,
biology, Spanish II and
world history; Vasquez


also received the sopho-
more Citizenship award.
Junior Jessica Hunt
received the award for
having the highest GPA in
English II; Sydney
Plummer received the
award for .the highest,
GPA in English III; Ryan
Pricher had the highest
GPA in chemistry; John
Stephens received the
award for having the
. Highest GPA in American
history; Dana Watt had
the highest GPA in chem-
istry and geometry; and
Lane Fraleigh received.
the junior Citizenship
award.
Senior Michaela
Roccanti had.the highest
GPA in advanced topics,
math, physics, and


English IV; and Byron
Love received the senior
Citizenship award.
Michaela Roccanti
was named the senior
class Valedictorian, and
Byron Love was named
the Salutatorian.
Caroline Mueller
received the HOBY
Leadership award.
Nikki Kisamore
received an Altrusa
Scholarship for $500.
Olivia Sorensen. and
Byron Love each received
a $500 Kiwanis scholar-
ship. Kisamore got the
$250 Archbold Award.
Savannah Williams gpt
the $500 JeffersonCounty
Seminole Club
Scholarship.
Love and Chelsea
Dobson each received a
$4,000 NFCC Presidential
Scholarship. Angela
McCone received a $250
NFCC Scholarship.
Kisamore and Kasey
Joiner each received a
$250 Jefferson County
Republican Women's
Scholarship. Love
received the $500 Shirley
Washington Educational
Scholarship District 3
award. Williams was
named the, Robert CF.
Byrd Scholarship nomi-
nee.


Thirteen seniors
received the Florida
Medallions Scholars
(FMS) Award which is 75
Archbold Award- Nikki Kisamore percent or $8,000 for four
years college.
Recipients of the
FMS -were: Chelsea
Dobson, Stephen Dollar,
Ashley Echols, Aaveh
Green, Kisamore, Katelyn


Levine, Love, McCune, white for honors.
Mallory Plaines, To receive the white
Roccanti, Sean Snowden, cords, students had to
Williams and Luke maintain at least a 90 per-
Witmer. cent average throughout
The class of 24 stu- their entire high school
dents was awarded red career.
cords for college prep Seniors receiving all
courses, but ten graduat- three cords included
ing seniors also received Dobson, Echols, Green,
all three honor cords, red Levine, Love, McCune,
for college prep courses, Plaines, Roccanti,
gold for Beta Club; and Williams and Witmer.


Jefferson Seminole Club- Savannah Williams


Kiwanis Award- Olivia Sorensen and Byron Love


Shirley Washington Education Award- Byron Love

NOTICE OF TOWN HALL
MEETING

The Public is invited to attend a question and
answer session to be conducted by Superin-
tendent Bill Brumfield, Dr. Kelvin Norton, and
CFO Marcia Willis of the Jefferson County
School Board. The session will be held on
Thursday, May 28, 2009 at 6:30 p.m. in the old
high school auditorium. This meeting is in ref-
erence to the state of the finances of the school
board district. The session will be limited, to
one hour.


Bright Futures Award Winners









12A Monticello News


www.ecbpublishing.com


Wednesday, May 27, 2009


-~ ~


C_


2006 Isuzu 1280, 4-door truck,
blue/gray, 22k niles, still under
warranty. Asking $13,584 Call
Mike at 850-694-4372
5/15.tfnnc.


1997 Ford F-150 4x4-
3 Inch lift, dual exhaust
All Power $4500.00 FIRM
850-210-2949 or 850-997-5293.
5/20,tfn,nc.
1990 Ford F-350 Flat Bed w/
hyd. Lift, 5 spd., Dual Wheels,
Good Condition. $ 3,900.
Call 997-1582.
5/27,tfn,nc

L^~j


Farm Trailers- single axle,
2-toll hay trailer, & produce
field trailer w/ roller tables.
Call 997-1582.
5/20,tfn,nc.
Mobile Homes;
14x60 2BrI 2Ba Fireplace, Oak
Cabinets, many, extras. Call
850-290-6192 1 or 386-362-
1171.
-. ---.-7 --.----v ----7. .
2- 14x66 set up on your property
$13,000. Call 850-290-6192,
386-362-1171.
28x64 3Br/ 2Ba, Great room,
Hinged Roof. Call 85e-290-
6192, 386-362-1171.. .
Lookiiig for a good used single
of double wide? Call 850-290-
6192, 386-362-11_71.
-- --------------
16x80 3Br/2Ba in Madison, Fl.
Call 850-290-6192, 386-362-
1171.
28x56 3Br/2Ba Great room.
Many extra's. Call 850-290-
6192, 386-362-1171.
5/27,29,6.3,5,c.




Dog 6 yrs .+,black, with mark-
ings, long hair dachsund.,Found
on Main Rd. & 90 West. Call
997-0088
5/22.27,nc.


BACKHOE SERVICE
Driveways, roads, ditches,
tree and shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @
997-3116, 933-3458.
7/4tfn, c
MR. STUMP
STUMP GRINDING


Y509-o30 Quicl
Ever need a batter
change? Ever locI
in auto? Ever need
this plus 10 otl
Largest, Indepen
Club In America
membership. Ca
7960.


Looking, to buy
cots and pop-up
997-0901msg. or


Puppies born 3-1-09,
Walkern.Hound, fath
dog/bulldog,u had firs
shots, call 997-5899
Malcolm. If no answ
trying. FREE.


*nme


JEFFERSON PLACE
1468 S. Waukeenah St. O
Monticello. 1 BR ($427
($465). HUD vouchers
subsidy available at times.
6964. TTY711. This institi
equal opportunity prov
employer.


K Responses. Commercial/ Industridl
6/22, tfn,c with state highway frontage
ry boost? Tire lots. Fronts both Harvey G
ked your keys and Highway 53, South.
ded a tow? All Zone, Natural gas line, 8 i
rher services! main, access to city util
ndent 'Motor hydrant, and service from t
a! $18 month companies. Property has e
all .85Q-321- to 1-10, via SR 53,& SI
build to suit tenant for sho
5/22,27;29,c. term 'lease. Call Tomm
M850-973-4141

Office Building across s
Post Office, Courthouse,
house Annex. in Madi
used folding Enterprise Recorder Offic
camper. Call Shelby St. Madison Newly
251-164/1,tfn. back to the 1920's era,
4/ltfn. 4141.


* Charming downtownw
toric home. 4BR, 1
Many nice features. 25
mother- '
r-set biof 400 Sq. Ft Efficiency
ask for Apartment $325 per n
k' r, First Month rent and d
er,' keep required. No Pets, No
Call 997-6492, leave r
4/29tfn 1697 E. Washington S
5
Mobile home 1`
Doublewide; large dec
bedrooms, 2 bathroom
monthly. Available
2009. Call GB at 544-2
5/15,20,:


on te


APTS CHILDREN'S DRESSES...
office 300, Size 3 white long dress, worn
) & 2BR as flower girl dress, satin bodice,
accepted, lacy overlay on bottom, built in
850-997- crinoline $50
ution is an Size 3 white long dress, worn
vider and as flower girl dress,
sequin/beadwork all on bodice,
1/28,tfn,c. sequin/beadwork/appliques on
Property bottom, built in crinoline. $50
;e. Comer Size 4 off white dress, worn as
Ireene Dr. flower girl dress, lace work
Enterprise around bodice, pretty lace work
inch water at bottom, cap sleeves $25
lities, fire Size 5 purple pageant dress,
two power with matching socks and hair
asy access bow, white sequin' and bead
R 14. Will
R 14Will work on bodice, built in crino-
rt or long line beautiful dress $50
y Greene
Size 7 red pageant dress, white
2/11, rtn. applique, sequin and bead work
on bodice and bottom, built in
street from crinoline beautiful dress $65
and court- Size 7 white and peach pageant
ison (Old dress, white ruffles with peach
e) 111 SE outline across chest,isleeves, and
' renovated bottom, never worn $35
Call 973- Size 7-8 off white dress, worn
as a flower girl dress, overlay of
rtn lace over entire dress, probably
wn" his- knee to calf length $25
.5 Bath. Size 8 white, long dress, lace
51-0760. around neck with decorative
/30,tfn,c. bodice $25
"Size 16 white long pageant
gown, cap sleeves,'white sequin
month. work across entire bodice and
eposit sleeves, buttons around neck
drugs, with circular cut-out on back,
nsg. beautiful gbwn $100 ,
t. TEEN DRESSES...
/14,tffi,c Size 7-8 Kelligreen gown, lace
overlay $40
900 SF. Size 8 red gown, sequin/bead
k, 3 or 4 work around bodice $50
ms, $7,50 Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress',
June 1, is for a teen division approxi-
2240. mately 13-15) GORGEOUS
22,27,pd. lime green dress, strapless but
with spaghetti straps that cress
cross across the back, sequins
spotted across the entire gown,
built in crinoline absolutely
gorgeous. $300 (paid over $500
Sfor it),
Call 850-973- 3497
and leave message.


------- ---------


-ma


Yard Sale/Bake Sale-,
8a.m.- 12p.m. Saturday, June
13. Fundraiser for/at'
Jefferson Senior Center.:.
Drop off donations at
Center Friday before. Call
Georgianna Williams at 510-
1629 for more information.
5/27,29,6/3,5,10,12,nc.


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Apply in person at the Monticello News office at 180 W.
Washington St. Monticello, or fax resume to 850-997-3774
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It With Our Readers

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Monticello News
P.O. Box 428
Monticello, FL 32345

"You Can't Be Without It"


Man Hurls Polecat 63 ft.
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Wednesday, May 27, 2009


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Monticello News 13A


EGALS


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO. 08-000272-CA
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.
Plaintiff,
V.
AMANDA M. DARROW F/K/A AMANDA M. TIMMS F/K/A
AMANDA M. COLLIER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF AMAN-
DA M. DARROW F/K/A AMANDA M. TIMMS F/K/A
AMANDA M. COLLIER; and all unknown parties claiming by,
through, under or against.the herein named Defendants, who are
not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties
claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors,
trustees, spouses, or other claimants; TENANT #1 and/or TEN-
ANT #2, the parties intended to account for the person or per-
sons in possession; JEFFERSON COUNTY BY AND
THROUGH THE JEFFERSON COUNTY SHIP PROGRAM
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated May 12, 2009, in this cause, I will sell the
property situated in'JEFFERSON County, Florida, described as:
A PARCEL OR TRACT OF LAND BEING A PORTION OF
THAT PROPERTY AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 482, PAGE 487 OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND
BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY RECENT
SURVEY AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE NORTH-
WEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF
SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 4 EAST, JEF-
FERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN SOUTH 346.54
FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE
JOHNSON PROPERTY AS RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF SAID JEFFERSON COUNTY IN OFFICIAL
RECORD BOOK 434, PAGE 287, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89
DEGREES 58 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE
NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID JOHNSON PROPERTY,
397.20 FEET FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE
FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 89
DEGREES 59 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE
SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID JOHNSON PROPERTY,
201.10 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-
WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 19 (STATE ROAD 57),
THENCE RUN NORTH 05 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 22 SEC-
-ONDS EAST, ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE, 157.42 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY
BOUNDARY OF THE COOK PROPERTY, AS DESCRIBED
IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF JEFFERSON COUNTY, IN
OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK 434 PAGE 223, THENCE RUN
ALONG THE BOUNDARY OF SAID COOK PROPERTY AS
FOLLOWS: SOUTH 84 DEGREES 01. MINUTES 24 SEC-
ONDS EAST 200.11 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH
05 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST 136.48
:FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CQNTA1NING 0.67
ACRES, MORE OR LESS. SAID PROPERTY BEING
BOUNDED ON THE WEST BY US, HIGHWAY 19 (STATE
ROAD 57), ON THE SOUTH BY THE JOHNSON PROPER-
TY AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK 434
PAGE 287, AND ON THE EAST AND NORTH BY THE
COOK PROPERTY AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL
RECORD BOOK 434 PAGE 223.
a/k/a 5435 S. JEFFERSON STREET, LAMONT, FL 32336
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the
North steps of the Jefferson County Courthouse located at the
intersection of US Highways 19 and 90, Monticello, Florida, at
11:00 o'clock a.m., on June 11, 2009.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other thah the property owner as of the date of the lis'pen-
dens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.

Dated at Monticello, Florida, this 131 day of May, 2009.

Kirk B. Reams, Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Sherry Sears, Deputy Clerk
Douglas C. Zahm, P.A. 18820 U.S. Hwy 19 N., #212
Clearwater, FL 33764
(727) 536-4911 phone / (727) 539-1094 fax '
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO
NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTIC-
IPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT
NO COST. TO YOU, TO- THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN
ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT THE OFFICE OF THE
COURT ADMINISTRATOR AT (850) 342-0218, WITHIN
TWO (2) WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS
NOTICE; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED,
CALL TDD (-863) 534-7777 OR FLORIDA RELAY SERVIC-
ES (800) 955-8770.
5/20,27/09,C


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA


IN RE: ESTATE OF

FRED PETER HEYSER,
Deceased.


PROBATE DIVISION
CASENO:09-33 PR


NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate of FRED PETER
HEYSER, deceased, Case No. 09 -33 PR is pending in the
Circuit Court for Jefferson County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is Jefferson County Courthouse,
Monticello, Florida. The names and addresses of the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are required to file with this Court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person on whom this notice was
served that challenges the validity of the Will, the qualifications
of the personal representative, venue, or jurisdiction of the
Court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.

Publication of this Notice has begun on May 27, 2009.


Michael A. REICHMAN
Attorney for Personal Representative
P.O. Box 41 Monticello, FL 32345
Phone: (850) 997-5100
Fax: (850) 997-3542


Joan Humphrey
FLA BAR NO:.183518


5/27/09,6/3/0).c-


NOTICE
The Wilderness Coast Public Libraries' (WILD) Governing
Board will meet on Monday June 8, 2009 at 1:30 pm, at the
Franklin County Public Library in Carrabelle located at 311 St.
James Street, Carrabelle, Florida. For more information, please
call (850) 997-7400.
5/27/09,c.


NOTICE

The Jefferson County Planning Commission will hold a
workshop on the Comprehensive Plan Amendments, Chapter 5,
on June 11, 2009 at 7:00 P.M. The meeting will be held in the
Courtroom of the Jefferson County Courthouse located at the
intersection of US Highway 19 and US Highway 90 in
Monticello, FL. The meeting may be continued as necessary.
Information concerning the meeting is available at the
Jefferson County Planning Department, 445 W. Palmer Mill
Road, Monticello, FL. 32344, .Telephone 850-342-0223. From
the Florida "Government in the Sunshine Manual", page 36,
paragraph c: Each board, commission, or agency of this state or
of any political subdivision thereof shall include in the notice of
any meeting'or hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing is
required, of such board, commission; or agency, conspicuously
on such notice, the advice that, if a person decides to appeal any
decision made by the board, agency, or commission with
respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he
,or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings, is made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.
5/27/09,c


There are no small Americ
victories in the fight .As it
against heart disease Assoc t t
em.w*ma. mn


Prayer Conference with
Rick Shepherd at.
Elizabeth Baptist Church
4124 Bassett Dairy Road Monticell

7:00 pm Friday, May 29
7:00 pm Saturday, May 30
11:00 am Sunday, May 31

Shepherd has served as Director of
the Department of Prayer and
Spiritual Awakening for the Florida
Baptist Convention since 2000.
For information call
850-688-3377
Rev. Dean Spivey, Pastor
Elizabeth Baptist Church


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Spring is a great time to start all
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,. Ewing
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N6O Homes Addihlon Sun Rooms Screen Rooms
Carports Decks I Metal Roolf ,Shingle Roofs
Stale Certified Building Contracror and Roofing Contractor

BENEWING 850-971-5043 ---


S' Burnette ;
Plumbing
& Well Service
(We drill and repairs wells)


850-973-1404
Madison, FL j


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F* KESSLEiN
CONSTRUCTION LLC

850-997-4540
CRC 1329001


Custom
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Additions


New Construction

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Mark Kessler


850-997-4540
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Aaron Box or \ViII G,-i'in
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850-224-0167 631 W. Madison St.*Taahssee


.... For all your
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Broger Real Estate Services, Inc

850-878-5589

=-- Z=-


wens:,7
Propane, Inc.
S"Service With A Smile"
208 W Screven St. Quitman, GA
229-263-5004
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GETTING READY "
TO MOVE OR REPAINT?


COME BY THE
MONTICELLO NEWS OFFICE
AND BUY BUNDLES OF OLD NEWSPAPERS
FOR ONLY $2.00 EACH
180 W. WASHINGTON ST.
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864 NW US 221
Greenville, FL 32331


, Phone. 850-948-7891
Cell: 850-973-7135
Fax: 850-948-2482


email
ieballreams@msn.com


f 'hdr i ~,,lind u lhllhn- m
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Deslqn
Sod or 5eed
Cold flardN Palm~s
Liqht Dzbris Cican Lip
Ti c,- 7.icw raIin.plantitg
0%,vt 3--1 Aic.- In Pioduction
30 'uc,%-ar ,criThits Area
Peacol.K's I .111Inscapiaig
Toll Frvt- I R80f-qPEACOCK


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14A Monticello News


Wednesday, May 27, 2009


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