Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00253
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello, Fla
Publication Date: April 8, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00253
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text




. ****..........*****i ""....3-DIGIT 326
Special Collections
UniversItY oFla. LiDranes Compp 9
PO Box 117007
Gainesville FL 32611-7007


ONTICELLO


NEWS


141th Year No. 15 Wednesday, April 8, 2009 50 + 46 + 4



County Man Killed In Plane Crash


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
A Jefferson County
man was killed in a
plane crash in Lown-
des County Georgia,
-over the weekend.
Lowndes County
Sheriff Chris Prine re-
ported that Jefferson
County resident,
William C. Howard. 56,


Building

Permits


Go Up In.

March


Building Inspector ',
Wallace "Bubba" Bullock;
sees. building 'hike aif
being temporary

LAZARO ALEMAN
SMonticello News
Senior Staff Writer
Figures released by
the Building Inspection
Department on Thursday,
April 2, show that build-
,7 ing permits went up sig-
nificaintly in March, with
- the city and county issu-
ing a combined 58 per-
v mits, up from the 30
issued during the previ-
ous month.
The valuations of
residential and commer-
cial permits also rose sig-
nificantly, from zero in
both categories in Febru-
ary to $435,849 and $59.500
respectively in March.
The valuation of the cate-
gory labeled 'other per-
mits', (representing
additions, repairs, re-
roofs, etc.) also rose sig-
nificantly, from $350,278
S in February to $586,390 in
March.
f In March 2008, for
comparison, the valua-
tions were $2,016,166 for
residential. $150,594 for
commercial and $283,574
for "other permits".
Can we read any-
thing into the latest fig-
ures?,
Not really, according
to Building Inspector
Wallace "Bubba" Btdl-
lock.
"We've had a little in-
crease this month and
last month in housing
permits," Bullock said
Friday morning. "But I
think it's short term. I
don't really see much,
Please See Building
Permits Page 4A


a. licensed pilot, had
taken off in an experi-
- mental aircraft he had
made himself,. at ap-
proximately 6:15 p.m.,
Saturday evening from
the Lowndes County
Airport. "Aviation
here in Valdosta, told
me that-he had dual fly-
ing classes in a similar
air craft; and this was
his first solo flight in


this particular plane,"
Prine said..-
About 25 minutes
later, Howard con-
tacted the Valdosta Re-
gional Airport's
watchtower twice to re-
" quest an emergency
landing. "He called
back in and said he was
observing smoke in the
cockpit and then prob-
ably five or ten minutes


later he called back in
and told them there
was a fire in the cock-
pit," said Prine. "He
notified the tower-that
he was about five miles.
south of them, headed
north toward them for
an emergency land-
ing."
Prine said that was
the final transmission:
they heard from


Howard. "The control
tower knew his approx-
imate position and then
they saw smoke in the
general area out in the
Woods, so they called
911 to report a possible
crash."
Prine said that the
plane collided with a
tree and exploded upon
impact and Howard
was killed. "When we


I uaiiJ

S6TUJ f1DL^LK
*^ ~lU ;'JuUi \. iyy~u ia


_RFi hal iS ...-,- I omers' w.itioutti nide.t.-"'
o. ' od utty ;Comiis C . County road closures.
S foer ld .an placed in effect F day ad-
Lst J's4" t ,, e-t Q rg m cy meeting fate remaining Monday mbiy -
,AinWs, t ot 'r m ida ftertoon ito, de- : ing. iclude'dtropddelosed
A'' tl:ee. gtye ilea .e ergec .because .K. fi 'extiex
ieced' uirng .roical Ot o ecalse, of the viashouts, .cave' i, elne
'Stri esut& d, daeJagtio'ml im F county posdd pipei water over
a ii"a- h' od'," roads,, bt'alsain expecta- the rqads, ai a the like. '
i4 s i4?d ,.g. as .: ttloi.of .t6 Aucilla Rier "As the days;,weeksb
ribft 1stg iuiAtl4$atfol 'follow weil, at se
cbt- tdrd ci 1 iwing'Sundy Aiid-flood- making .e.rgicy '
ti op. pg iehg expected : .in pairs s. possible .sid
e- ., a -a,, ib...e1 6 ying itar'so-.f the. Radii;- eilitent. avid
;tienr Carl, coir,, ,' ''. Hary'ey'". "'Some ofr fthe.
llerbferI re that', U.. '-" .,.throughout,. the roads, as .With tropical
,thquh i ia ,,l t c cours .tthe heavy- rains. Storm ,Fay, ay not get rer'
ic n s .da i..ab :.-.y Pe Wediesday arid Thursday, paired.." HRe added tht
Io4 fertdcqnted,' rodto, ceWs and deputies norie.of the roads are. "im-
enrd iftic ,,l wevrekeptbusy chinsaws possible" for the. right v-.
4ti9it t0-5 iighoi.it. the' ,,in hnd,.' and removing hicle, buti none of them
; itybf alywliere'frQf 'nyydebri' o4,rees down are suitable: for i-egular,
'sei t, i'ialiif t 'eyen,' .infthe rpidwys. '. small.coipact vehicles,
.minhes & nidomre, ~'thin I-Ellerbee'reported-that v' '1He-hadinstructed his,
twod','ei.d. -; .. '-.. cou ty ,. power outages crewstpdrie a niotor ,
,. Because of the, ex-, were few,.but service ws' : : Please See .Heaby',
Areme 'nount of water '..quickly restored to all cus- Rains PagetSA '.


Library Director
LAZARO ALEMA N the community
Monticello News "I prefer the
Senior Staff Writer zontal meth
Jefferson County's Roldan said of
new library director management s
was on the job Wednes- which rests .on'
day morning, April 1, "round 'table"
and already making more equal and pi
long-term plans for a sional give-and-tal
more viable projection lationship bet'
of the-facility into the director and pe]
community nel, as opposed t<
Serafin Roldan more hierarchica
told the News on authoritarian "v
Thursday that he was cal" model, where
developing a master thority flows str
plan that 'included from the top.
cross training and em- As for the lit
powerment of the in general, Rolda:
staff, as well as out- lives its functic
reach programs into not only to be a pla


h


got to the scene, by look-
ing at the debris,' you
couldn't tell that it was
an aircraft," he added.
The Federal Avia-
tion Agency is continu-
ing the investigation to
determine the cause of
the crash.
An account is open
at FMB for those wish-
ing to contribute to the
family.


City

Officially

Notified

It Will Get

$6 Million

iney is Partfu
rimulus Pack'
LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
The city received offi-
cial word on Friday, April
3, that it has been. ap-
proved for nearly $7 mil-
lion in economic
stimulus money through
the Florida Department
of Environmental Protec-
tion (FDEP).
"We are pleased to in-
form you that $6,790.000""
In construction funding
is now available for your
project as a result of the
American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act,"
Robert E. Hohnden. chief
of the FDEP Bureau of
Water Facilities Funding.
wrote City Manager
Steve Wingate in a letter
dated April 2 that the lat-
ter shared with the News
on Monday
The letter goes on to
inform Wingate that the
money has been moved to
the fundablee portion of
the State Revolving Fund
priority list."
Wingate said the
money not only allows for
completion of the city-
wide sewer-rehabilitation
project. but it further
saves the city between
$500,000 and $781.000 in
interest that it would
have had to pay if it had
had to borrow the money.
The formal an
nouncement of the award
wasn't unexpected, as
consultant engineer
Please See
City Page 4A


Starts Job; Shares Some Ideas
information and in- where to integrate the ing as a baker,
iori- struction in the com- facility more into the zookeeper, garbage col-
od," munity, but also to be a social fabric. lector, mortuary assis-
.his part of the commu- Born in Puerto tant and security
style, nity's social fabric. Rico, where he re- guard.
the Which is the reason ceived much of his Most recently,
r a that he and his wife, higher learning, Roldan and his wife of


'ofes-
ke re-
ween
rson-
o the
l and
verti-
e au-
rictly
brary
n be-
on is
ice of


Dolores, planned to
walk around the court-
house circle and sur-
rounding businesses
this past Saturday
morning, both to get to
know the town and in-
troduce themselves to
the community. He did
not, however, go into
the details of the pro-
Sgrams that he plans to
implement or sponsor
at the library and else-


Roldan enjoys a varied
educational and cos-
mopolitan background
that includes degrees
in anthropology, folk-
loric literature and li-
brary science, and
residences in Bloom-
ington, Indiana;
Chicago, Illinois; and
New York, City, New
York. He has also
worked in many differ-
ent capacities, includ-


37 years resided in cen-
tral Florida, where he
was teaching part-time
at the University of
Florida and at City
College. Prior to teach-
ing, Roldan had been a
reference librarian at
Santa Fe Community
College. He is also a
writer who has penned
numerous articles for
Please See Li-
brary Page 4A


2 Section
Around Jeff. Co. 4-9A
Classifieds _16A
Dining Out Guide 7A

Legal 17A


s, 36 Fages
Money & Finance 10A
Outdoors 13A
Sports 14A-15A


Storm Pictures
Viewpoints


18A
2-3A


Wed
4/8
Mainly sunny. Highs in the mid 60s
and lows in the upper 40s,


Thu 767

Times of sun and clouds. Highs in
the mid 70s and lows in the upper
50s,


F ri
Fri 7/-59


A few thunderstorms possible.


- l- !- - -. -


V--'








2A Monticello News


www.ecbpublishing.com


Wednesday, April 8, 2009


IEWPOINTS


PINIONS


I -- -


Growing Up In The Newspaper Business


I never had to won- the clip art books, proof
de'r what I wanted to do sheet books and border
when I "grew up." I grew tapes.
up doing what I knew I Each year as I grew
wanted to do for the rest older, so did my abilities
of my life the newspa- to do more "important"'
per business, things around the. office.
When you wake up Making pictures in the
' each morning and dread darkroom, .typing sto-
the job that lies ahead of ries, (by the time I
you, then.. it's time to entered the 8th grade and
. change jobs.. When you was put into a typing
wake up each morning class, I was already typ-
and find joy in what lies ing 80 wpm correctly),
ahead of you, then you building ads, pulling
know you have the right tearsheets, stuffing
job for you.' I wake ulp newspapers, addressing
happy each day! newspapers., doing the:
As .children, my newspaper route, mak-
brothers and I, we did ing PIT's, developing
notoreceive an allowance plates, and plating up
at home. We got paid for the press. When I was 19,
working at the newspa- I became the main book-
per business. If we-did- keeper of the business.
n't work, we didn't get I've watched, as .:my
'any money. That's one two children have'grown
lesson that too many up ifi this same busi-
young people 'have ness. learning the same
missed, now a days. 'things I did. It's been a-
We began work at a little different for them;.
young age. At age three, for times have changed.
I' was taught how to We no longer have dark-'
opaque the negatives. rooms (been replaced
SRed pencil, light' table, with computers);, we
and a negative it's just ,don't have PMT
like coloring. Picking up machines and negatives
paperclips, pens, rubber 'and opaquing.' Cheltsie
bahids, and such off the and Brooke have
floor was 'my ,other learned the business
"main" job .(and of "from a more "electronic
course I'm sure a "busy" world" than 'I did, but
job for my parents to the end result is' still the
give me.). ; same.,
By age five to six,. When they .were
(the age of being taught three to five years old,
to read), I was, taught their "job," was picking
how to type on the type- up pens, rubber bands.
setter. I could type. out post' office sack' labels..
'the 'words for the adver- border tape, and such off .
rising, take it into .the ,of the floor. ,They.were
darkroom and develop told'to pick up anything
itI,was also taught how that would cost me
to- proof-read ads. Other "money if I ad to gboto,
jobs included "busy- the store to get -more. I
work" like organizing paid them. a penny for


each item they would
find, and put back in its
proper space. (They too.
have never gotten an
allowance, they earn
paychecks instead.)
As they got a little
older they were taught
the "easy" jobs...... how
to stuff and label news-
papers (not a favorite for
anyone of any age), file
legals and ad orders,
pull tearsheets and type
'stories that were
brought into the paper. -
Now, at the ripe old
ages of 14 and 16, they
have truly .become, an
asset to me, and to our,
businesses. They spend
their Spring/Holiday
Breaks, Teacher
Planning Days, and-
Summer Vacations,
working at the. newspa-
pers. They have learned.
every aspect of the busi-,
ness. .They serve in
every capacity from,
receptionist., typesetter,
circulation (subscrip-
tions), bookkeeping,
selling advertising, and"
photography
They have both
taken their niche in the
business. Cheltsie
enjoys the receptionist,'
typing, and laying put
the newspaper, along
with the photography
,part of covering ball-
games. Bi'ooke enjoys :
the bookkeeping end -
posting the paper, mak-
ing deposits, and paying
bills.
Now I'm just wait-
ing on them to'graduate
high school and college,:
so that I can retire and
they can support me!!!!!
Until then..... I'll see you
around the town.


. Though




S. difference. w'
S.0 ep. * * w ', w'w6 w I & "rw *I w w w w


By: Debbie Snapp.
Monticello News -
Staff wr.i


i- .


10


TEN YEARS AGO
SApril 7, 1999
The County Commission com-
itted inet Thursday to begin the
process that will ultimately result
"in the hiring of a full-time econom-
"ic development person.
H, A concrete fencing and wall
manufacturing company may soon
bocate in the industrial park, just
- each of the jail and fronting US
SHighway 19 South.
Commissioners continue to
express dissatisfaction with the
company that has been paving the
county'ss roads since the $3.6 mil-
lion road paving projects began in
1992. .
TWENTY YEARS AGO
April 5, 1989
At least 100 persons attended a
Rotary Club luncheon at the Opera
]House Friday afternoon where
Governor Bob Martinez demon-
strated an appreciation fot history.
and issued a warning for the future.
A bomb scare at' Artistic
Creations on US 19 South Thursday
iwas likely a prank call, according
to the company's management. But
authorities, did not take the threat
lightly and evacuated the'premises
for about an hour until a thorough
search of the facility showed there
was no bomb.
Phil Maher, director ,of the
Facilities Management Division of
the State Department of General
Service, says the state should know
in about a week whether or niot
Jefferson County will be aifiong the
prospective sites for a state capitol
office complex.
Despite his change in party
affiliation from the Democratic to
the Republication, Party, U.S.
Representative Bill Grant assured a
small gathering of black communi-
,ty leaders at the Missionary Baptist
Church Thursday night that nei-
her his philosophy nor his priori-
ies have changed. Grant told his
iaudience that in the past he. had
voted for civil rights issues and
.would continue to do so in the
.'future.


THIRTY YEARS AGO ;
April 5, 1979
Kim Newman, the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Norman Newman of'
Greenville, was chosen to be Miss ACA.
at Friday night's pageant at AuciUal
Christian Academy
A rabies clinic, sponsored by the
Jefferson County Health Department
will be held at various locations in the
county Saturday.
More than 600 persons attended
the 1979 Tour of Homes which was
sponsored by the Jefferson County!
Historical Association last weekend.
Crime in Jefferson County:
increased last year while the number
of arrests decreased, according to thle
Crime in. Florida report prepared byi
,the Florida Department of Lawi
Enforcement.
FORTY YEARS AGO
April 5, 1969
,Ann. Floyd was installed on#
Saturday night as president of the!
Florida Association .of Future!
Homemakers of America.
Harold Pittman who has been'
assistant manager for about two years|
at the local A&P Grocery assumed the
position as manager on Monday this
week.
Nancy Boyd, daughter of Mr. and!.
Mrs. Fead Boyd of Ashville, is doing
her internship n Deland. *
FIFTY YEARS AGO
'April 5, 1959
Miss Gene Curtis Williams is!
among those on FSU'Dean's List for the;
fall semesteil :
SIXTY YEARS AGO'
April, 1949
The high school glee club is tol
present a concert over a Tallahasseei
radio stat ion. Members of the glee club!
are: :Margaret' Barrett, Hilda Boland,|
Marjorie Boykin, Joanne Mallone,,
Annie Jane Chancy, Lillian Cooksey,
Alice Coulter, Virginia Davis, Maryi
Jane Floyd, Helen Hightowel: Jackiei
House, Rex Hudson, Virginia Jarvisj,
Lois LaVinka, June Mays, Joan's'
SWilliams, Charles Barfield. Pat
Williams, Alberta Large, Benj ie
flodges,- Jimmie Reichert, John
Linton, and Ed Mathis.


Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.

Tourists Praise Hospitality Here


Dear Editor:
- March 23-35 a group.
of 14 from Oak
Hammock and the
University of Florida in
Gainesville came to visit
lovely Monticello and
had a wonderful time.
.Many.thanks to the..
number of citizens who.
arranged and/or partici-
pated in hosting our
visit. The innkeepers at
the Avera-Clarke and
Denham Houses,
Gretchen, and Pat, were
most hospitable ahd' pro-)
vided delicious break-
fasts. '
Dee Counts gave an
excellent historical
overview of the town
and -area. She and


Gr6tchen Avera did a.
-fantastic. job in arrang-
ing activities for us, such
as a tour of Bill
Kirkpatrick's gorgeous-
ly restored home, a. visit
to ,,the" restored Opera
House, a tour of the
courthouse, a program
by the Big Bend Ghost
Trackers, a trip to tour
Bobbie and Fred
Golden's Acre Ranch,
where we enjoyed a
great lunch and some
tasty pastries from
Tupelo's; and also a,
delightful reception at
Dick and Friedel
Bailar's lovely Bavarian
homestead.
Our heartfelt thanks
go to all of these folks


and to the many others
who .participated, such
as Fran Black, who
greeted our group at the
ChamUer of Commerce,
and Jan Rickey who
guided the Opera House
toUr.
Dr. Cynthia
Connolly welcomed us to
the Monticello Vineyard
and Winery for a wine
tasting, and overview of
this horticultural crop.
To these and others, we
could not have had a bet-
ter time. You have a love-
,ly town iif which you
need to continue to have
great pride.
Sincerely,
Pat and Fred Harden
Edria Hindson


Jan Wadsworth


Jan Wadsworth celebrated her 75th
birthday Saturday, Nlarch 28. She
started celebrating early with her many
lady friends, made over the 36 years
she's lived in Monticello. She, and her
husband Virgil, and son came to Jeffer-
son County from St. Petersburg, FL to
work at the Jefferson Couhty Kennel
Club, where- she was employed for 30
years..
She was born in Long Island, NY to Beatrice and Harold
Hoxie, and can trace her ancestry back to the early 1600s from
England. She is still very much involved in the community, as
president of the Woman's Club and 1st vice president of the
Garden Club. Her hobbies include gardening, reading, and
cooking.
She is well known for her zucchini bread making, made
with the freshest of ingredients and butter. She collects, feeds,
watches, and truly enjoys hummingbirds. She is a cancer sur-
vivor... 25 years now.


Publishei/Owner Advertisement is Monday ai 5700
p m. for Wednesday's paper, and
RAY CICHON Wednesday at 5 p.ri. for Fnday's
M an a g in g E d ito r nPap l., 11A fnli P .ct g A
LAZARO ALEMtAN CucuwnooN DEPAurENT
Senior Staff Writer Subscriptorn Rates:
Flonda $45 per year
CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL ADS Out-f-Saite $52 per vedr
Deadline fJo classifieds is Monday tSlhe & loaI taxes incldedlI
at 12.00 p.m. for Wednesday's paper,


ElmDn N GpmE rand Wednesday a 17-00 p.m. r r


Established 1869
A weekly newspaper [USPS 361-620] designed for the express reading pleasures of the people of its
circulation area, be they past, present or future residents.
Published weekly by ECB Publishing, Inc., 180W Washington St. Monticello, FL 32344. Periodicals
postage PAID at the Post Office in Monticello, Florida 32344.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MONTICELLO NEWS, P.O. Box 428, Monticello, FL
32345.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in
the opinion of the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this
newspaper, and to investigate any advertisement submitted.
All photos given to ECB Publishing, Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than
6 months from the date they are dropped off. ECB Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said
deadline.


Motcllo, Flord
32345 B/d~l
850-97-356
[IlITFaxl80-99-377
Illal: l oitiell Ol


- I






Wednesday, April 8, 2009


E POINTS &


PINIONS


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rIMONTIC.LLO NEWS


Monticello News
PO Box 428 180 W 1Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32345
Phone: 850-997-3568
Fax: 850-997-3774
monticellonews@embarqmail.com
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DiD You w


If you spell all the numbers
and try to find letter "A you
will have to count to
thousAnd.


'4 6 people who
S know the "lat.
. est" about what-
'ever, but so
sparsely that the in-
formation is rela-
tively worthless.
Kind of like the one
who hears from a
friend of a friend
whose cousin three
times removed
heard from his sis-
ter-in-law that...."
M ow does one
one's concerns


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with one's elected MV d I I lU Io
official if said .
-elected official has
an unpublished "
phone? And when *-
said elected official
does not return oth-.
erwise received re-
quests for a
conversation?" C


Brmly Stmated
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4A Monticello News


www.ecbpublishing.com


Wednesday, April 8, 2009


COUNTY


Cont. From Page 1


Library Director


Cont. From Page 1


Robert George had given
city officials a heads-up
on the money in March.
Prior to the possibil-
ity of Monticello getting
economic stimulus
money, city officials had
been moving toward
borrowing the money to
complete the long-term
project and paying inter-
est on the loan. That's
.because, by state man-
date, the project must be
completed by June 30,
2012.
It all goes back to
2003, when the FDEP
awarded the city $2.4
million for a sewer reha-
bilitation-and-replace-
ment project under the
. Disadvantaged Small
Community Grant
Program. Two of the
conditions of the fund-
ing were that the city
had to contribute a cer-
tain amount toward the
cost of the project and
that the state money
would be dispersed in
annual installments of
$750,000.
Since 2003, the city
has completed a portion
of the rehabilitation
work. Meanwhile, the
estimated cost of the
project has climbed to
about $6 million; the
Disadvantaged Small
Community Grant,
Program has ceased to
exist (although the
FDEP indicated that it
would honor the com-
mitment); and more
recently, the FEDP
imposed the 2012 dead-
line,-. h a' 'i :
It was the latter deci-


City Manager Steve
Wingate; gets official noti-
fication that city has been
approved for $6.7 million
in economic- stimulus
money.

sion that forced city offi-
cials to consider seeking
a bridge loan to com-
plete the project in one
fell swoop, given that the
$750,000 annual allot-
ments wouldn't'allow for
its timely completion by
the deadline. It was city
officials' thinking that it
could borrow $3 million
or so to complete project
and then repay the loan
with the $750,000 annual
installments and pay the
interest on its own.
Then came the eco-'
nomic downturn and the
promise of federal
money to fund "shovel
ready project", or proj-.
ects that already had the
engineering plans done
and the appropriate per-
mits in hand.
When completed,
the upgrade will 'make
,the, sewer. system more,
'efficient by eliminating


the many inflow-and-
infiltration problems
that currently allow
stormwater runoff to
enter the system and
compromise the plant's
operating capacity.
One- of the earliest-
work of the rehabilita-
tion project entailed
videotaping miles of the
interior' of the sewer
lines, which task served
to identify all the sys-
tem's deficiencies and
gave the engineers the
data to formulate a mas-
ter plan for the repair
and upgrade of the sys-
tem.
On a related topic,
Wingate expressed hope
Monday that stimulus
monies might be avail-
able through Rural
Development for the
construction of a new
sewer treatment plant
on Mamie Scott Road.
The council last month
instructed Wingate to
prepare the necessary
paperwork for the solici-
tation of proposals from
engineering firms for,
the design and construc-
tion 'of a new treatment
plant.
The council's
instruction gave a clear
indication that officials
were leaning toward the
construction of new
facility, rather to the
repair of the existing
one, as they had been
considering previously.
Besides its bowing
walls, the existing treat-
ment plant has several
other structural and
operational problems.


scholarly and other
publications.
Roldan said one of
his first activities on
the job Wednesday was
to meet with the staff
individually to get to
know each and explain
his goals, expectations,
and such. He said he


thought the meetings
had gone well.
Roldan's hiring
was mired in contro-
versy that had nothing
to do with him or his
qualifications per se.
Rather, the controversy
stemmed from the cir-
cumstances surround-


Building Permits


change, neither in dis-
cussion or on the table
for anything in the
future."
A quick perusal of
the March figures
shows that the city
issued 11 permits, and
collected $1,145 in fees
and the county issued
47 permits and collect-
ed $8,996.49 in fees, for
a total of $10,141.49. In
February, the 30 per-
mits that the two gov-
ernment entities
issued resulted in com-
bined fee collections of
$3,524.18. And in' March
2008, for a year-to-year
comparison, the two
issued a combined 40
permits and collected
$15,179.34 in fees.
The overwhelming
majority of the March
permits 42 of the 58 -
were for additions and
repairs to existing
units,; with three being
for new residential
construction and two
for commercial con-
struction. The remain-
ing permits were for


mobile homes and mis-
cellaneous construc-
tiops, such as barns,
sheds, workshops and
pools.
A generally accept-
ed rule of thumb in the
building industry, as
voiced by Bullock, is
that people tend to add
to, and repair, existing
structures during hard
economic times, and
construct new during
good economic times.
The Jefferson
County Planning
Department, mean-
while, issued, 23 per-
mits and collected
$5,901.66 in March,
compared with 11 per-
mits and fee collections
of $4,087 in February.
In March '2008, the
department issued 29
permits and collected
$13,184.98.
Eight of the March
permits were for
mobile' homes, four
were for residential
developments, one was
for a commercial struc-
ture and one was for a


ing the required quali-
fications and the per-
ception among a seg-
ment'of the communi-
ty that the selection
process had been mis-
handled, to the detri-
ment of the local candi-
date vying for the posi-
tion.


ont. From Page 1


major development. "
.The remaining permits -
were mostly for miscel-
laneous items, such as
sheds, workshops, -
pools and septic tanks.
The department I
collected $247.44 for the .
emergency medical -
'impact fee in March,
compared with -
$1,690.11 during the
same month a year ago.
It collected $192.64 for
the fire protection
impact fee, compared
with $1,484.33 during
the same month ta year
ago. The department
collected nothing for
the law enforcement 1
and transportation ]
impact fees in March.
Responding to citi-
zens' demands and the
hard economic times,
the County
Commission on Feb. 26
agreed to cut the emer- -
gency medical and fire .
protection impact fees
by half arid the law-
enforcement and trans-
portation impact fees .
by 100 percent. '


National Public Safety Telecommunicators Week April 12-18


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
National Public
S a -f j ,e t y
Telecommunicators week
it is designed to recognize
'those who serve our com-
munities, in law enforce-
ment and saving lives,
and doing so in a timely
and professional manner.
It takes a unique kind of
individual to be a 911 dis-
patcher, because of the
high degree of .responsi-
bility and stress levels
involved.
Serving in. Jefferson
County, are a total of 14
dispatchers dispatchers,
eight at JCSO; Sgt. Kevin
Huffmaster, Kevin Sears,
Charlsie Boyatt, Naomi
Wolfe, Tommy Smith,
Kasie Murphy, Sylvia
Jones, and Sheila Massey;
and at the Monticello
Police Department, four
full-timers; Debbie
Abbott, Betty Branch,
Paula Pierce, and George
Hook,, and two part-
timers, Vickie Johnson
and Latonya Crumitie.
Each year, the second full
week of April is dedicat-
ed to the men and women
who serve as public safety
Telicommunicators (dis-
patchers).
The official name of
the week when originally
introduced in Congress in,
1991 was "National.Public
S a f e t y
Telicommunicators
Week."
Walking through
what is involved in the
911 daily shifts, the sys-
tem began with the 911
equipment, the brain of
which is a VIPER by
Position, a state-of-the-art
system. This system
determines types of sig-
nals required to alert spe-
cific kinds of' help,
whether firefighters,
EMS personnel, or,
deputies.
The system can route
calls to other agencies on
different frequencies, and


it determines locations of
calls coming in from both
landlines and cell phones.
"We're the hub of the
wheel," said
Communications Sgt.
Kevin Huffmaster.
"Everything goes,
through us. Some can't
handle. the stress,, the
extreme responsibility
and' some we train, stay
for a year and move on to
agencies, like FHP to
make better pay," said
Huffmaster, "It's a high
multitasking job. The job
requires being able to
handle high stress levels
and responsibility, and
not everyone can do it." '
Dispatchers do not
only take the 911 calls.
"We average 700-800 911
calls per month, which
has about doubled since
2001," said Huffmaster.
"Dispatchers have to
answer the calls, deter-
mine what the problem is
and where, prioritize
multiple' calls, and then
route the call accordingly
to either Fire Rescue or
deputies." He' said that in
reaction time and routing,
those calls, the 911 dis-
patcher literally takes the
lives 'of people into
.his/her hands.
"Such as when we get
a call about a distur-
bance, but 'can gain, no
information. We don't
know if we're sending
those deputies into. a
deadly situation or what,"
said Huffmaster.
JCSO dispatchers
also receive a lot of out-
side traffic from Madison
and Leon counties, from
their deputies attempting
to reach that agency and
they route the calls
accordingly Dispatchers
have to know the law
enforcement ten signals
and signals for county
firefighters. They answer
incoming calls to the
Sheriff's Department and
operate as switchboard
operators properly rout-
ing each.


There are four phone
lines at the Sheriff's
Office and the dispatcher
can be on the phone with
two different people, one
phone to each ear and
transmitting over the
radio at the same time.
There are often times,
such as after a 911 call-
hang up, in which the dis-
patcher has to call the
caller back to assure that
everything, is all right.
Not only are the dis-
patchers responsible for
. all incoming calls, they
also handle the entry and
maintaining of all war-
rants, injunctions and
protection orders. They
also handle the entries of
all warrants and forward
them to other state and
federal law enforcement
agencies.
Also, they maintain a
continual computer log,
recording all incoming,
calls, contacts from
deputies, and calls put
out. Each entry must
involve a time of occur-
rence. They are also
responsible for maintain-
ing a log of when war-
.rants are served or can-
celed, at which point,
they are removed from
the active warrants files.
They also maintain a log
of all stolen property.
Not only are. the dis-
patchers handling all of
the incoming calls, radio
signals, computer and
paper work and serving
the public when they
enter the Sheriff's Office,
they also open all securi-
ty doors making proper
visual identifications.
They also handle, 911
calls, which are emotion-
ally distressing to them in
which someone they
know or a family member
is involved, as well as
many non-emergency-
related calls.
"We have gotten 911
calls from people wanting
us to look up telephone
numbers for them. We've
gotten calls from people


in drive-thru's who were
upset about getting the
wrong order or the way
the employee treated
them.
"I heard about a call
in another- county in
which a woman called to
report a rattlesnake in
her closet and she needed
a deputy to remove it.
When he got there, she
didn't want him to shoot
it, she wanted to catch it
while alive and carry it
outside,'" said Huffmaster.
"We also get calls in
.which family and friends
are involved," .said
Huffmaster. "I remember
one night, our dispatcher
was working a traffic
crash and in the process,
she learned that her


daughter was involved.
She had to be able to keep
the logic ahead of the
motherly instinct and do
her job correctly because
she was the only dispatch-
er on shift and we could-
n't get a relief in for her.
It can get personal really
quick. .
"Anyone who says
that they don't get
stressed from time to
time isn't human. It does
get to you, but it takes a
very special person to be
able to handle it and not
take it home, and be'able
to help. people," said
Huffmaster. "There are
a lot of times when we
have to stay on the
phone with a caller to
try to calm him/her


until help arrives on the
scene. We see the best in
people and the worst in
people, callers being
upset, family members
hurt, or their house is
on fire, and some may
even get rude. Most are
emotional to a degree. A
dispatcher has to main-
tain a state of calmness
and a calm voice level at
all times."
Of course, you don't
need National Public
Safety Telicommunica-
tors Week to honor your
public safety dispatch-
ers for excellence! You
can write them a letter,
give them a call or a pat
on the back and say,
"Thank you, for all that
you do."


City


Please visit hftp //wwebpublishingcon to vote on the question of the week!


RON









Wednesday, April 8, 2009


FOUND


www.ecbpublishing.com


EFFERSON


Monticello News 5A


COUNTY


W NNVNlITy


iACA.LN0


April 8 30
New exhibit featuring
Zaid Haynes is now
showing at the Jefferson
Arts Gallery This exhib-
it will be on display
through the entire
month. Jefferson Arts,
Inc. exhibits are free and
open to the public at the
Gallery location 575
West Washington
Street. The Gallery is
open 10 a.m, to 2 p.m.
Wednesday and
Saturday or by appoint-


Elizabeth Hengstebeck, DO
Bood CerifiedFamily
Physician


ment. Jefferson Arts,
Inc. is a non-profit group
with a goal of promoting
art and art education in
the Monticello area of
North Florida and South
Georgia. For more infor-
mation, contact the
Gallery at 997-3311 or
, visit
www.jeffersonartsgaller
ycom
April 9
Monticello Garden Club
Spring General Meeting


UNINSURED??
We have a sliding-fee program for those who
qualify at Tri-County Family Health Care.

850-948-2840


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g Jackson's Drug Store
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Monticello /
a 850-997-3553 I Medication
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180 S. Cherry St., Suite F
Monticello, FL32344
850-997-1400


Are You InNeed Of

Chiropractic Services?

Dr. Michael A. Miller
3116 Capital Circle NE, Ste.2
Tallahassee, FL 32308
., 850-668-4200


12 p.m. Thursday at the
Woman's Club club-
house, on Pearl Street.
Speaker will be Winston
Lee, architect and over-
seer of the downtown
beautification project,
with Monticello
MainStreet, Inc. So as to
complete the program's
'"Easter" theme, partici-
pants are asked to wear
hats with real flowers.
The cost is $10 to cover
the luncheon.
Fundraisers will include
ways and means tables,
and door prizes. Contact
Isabelle de Sercey at 997-
2170 for more informa-
tion. New officers will be
installed at the meeting.

April 9
AA meetings are held 8
p.m. on Thursdays at the
Christ Episcopal Church
Annex, 425 North
Cherry Street. For more
information call 997-2129
or 997-1955.

April 9
The WILD Bookmobile
will be in the area on
Thursday, from 1. to 3
p.m. at the Monticello
Christian Academy, 1590
North Jefferson Street;
and from 3:15 to 4 p.m. at
the Jefferson Arm's
Apartment. Bookmobile
services are' made avail-,
able through a State of
Florida Communities
Caring Grant.
r,- April 9g ir." 7 ,-
The Savvy Senior
monthly outreach pro-
gram Will begin at. noon
Thursday t the
Monticello Opera House..
This free monthly pro-
grain is for seniors who
want to learn more
about creating and
maintaining healthy,
happy, and active
lifestyles. Health screen-'
ings arid exhibitors will
be available; Soft drinks
will be provided, bring a
bag lunch. Make reser-:
vations by calling 523-
7333. Contact Tequila
Hagan, wellness coordi-
nator for Capital Health
Plan Health Promotions
at 523-7491 for more
information.


PERSONAL INJURY &

[ WRONGFUL DEATH



Jon D. Caminez
Board Certified Civil Trial Attorney,

Ii an Brown
Cary A. "Bo" Hardee, III




CAMINEZ, BROWN & HARDEE, P.A.

(850) 997-8181
1307 S. JEFFERSON STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon'
advertisements. Before you decide, ask the lawyer to send you free written information
about their qualifications and experience.


WE TAKE THE
I14TS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


April 9
The Jefferson Soil and
Water Conservation
Board will meet 11:30
a.m. on the .second
Thursday of the month.
in the Jefferson County
Extension Office confer-
ence room, per Dorothy
P. Lewis, secre-
tary/treasurer. This
meeting is open to the
public.
April 9 and 23
Altrusa meets' at noon
on the second Thursday
and, at 6 p.m. on the
fourth Thursday of each
month for a meal and a
meeting. Contact the
Chamber at 99.7-5552 for
more information.

April 10
Monticello Rotary Club
meets every Friday at
noon at the
Mon-ticello/Jefferson
Chamber of Commerce
on, West Washington
Street for lunch and a
meeting. Contact
President James
Muchovej at 980-6509 for
club information.

April 10
The WILD Bookmobile
will be in the area on


Friday at the Lloyd Post
Office, 7 Main Street,
from 3:30 to 4 p.m.; and at
the Lamont Chevron
Fast Track, highway 27,
from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.;
and Union Hill AME
Church, off highway 259
in Wacissa, from 6:00 to
6:30 p.m. Services are
made possible by a State
of Florida Communities
in Caring Grant.
April 11
Codly Pentecostal
Holiness Church will
host an Easter


Celebration Party and
Egg Hunt beginning at
4 p.m. Saturday. There
will be games, fun,
food, slides, and more
for the entire family at
no cost. There will
also be a silent cake
auction being held to
raise funds for the
youth trip to Talent
Quest Competition in
April. For more infor-
mation contact the
church at 997-6774 or
visit the church web-
site at
www.codyphc.org


JAMES MICHAEL BARD


blue scooter, wearing
his yellow retiree fire
helmet.
Mr. Bard is survived
by his wife Betty Bard of
Monticello; one daugh-
ter Sharalyn Marie
(Jeremy) Zampert' of
Denver, CO; son James
Brian (Melissa) Bard of
Largo, FL; father
Samuel (Ann) Bard of
Grantville, GA; two
brothers Shaun
(Nanette) Bard of Santa.
Ann (.dA n-nD i n l 1


, --- :* -iCionfeceraite Vet.rtans iAna, C-A an- iuani eix
,, Camp #746, Navel Ship (Patricia) Bard of
o I\V/ fl nAssociations for the Middleton, CA and
mi USS Coral Sea and USS seven grandchildren
Vammen and Fire Lindsey Nicole Rister,
Fighters Union #754. He Brianna Morgan
6 vas, of, Catholic faith'-,; Zampert, Brenyn AbbyuIi
and "attended ',ther-St~ "Anne Zampert, 'Michele
Iva lee Margaret Catholic Collett, James Curtis
SL Church in Monticello. Bard, Tyler Brian Bard
Many knew Jim as the and Madilyn Claire
Rob re 'guy about town on his Bard.
O S NANCY BOZEMAN

Iva Lee Roberts, BYRD
age 72, died Sunday July 24, 1946 In her professional
home in 1Geenbrier, Sebring, Florida; March life she prospered as a
TN. She was born 29, 2009 Monticello, businesswoman, owning
April 4, 1936 in Florida. and operating at various
nticello,.. FL to Monticello resident times a caladium farm, a
Montelyno, and Samuel Nancy Bozeman Byrd, computer sales and serv-
vely ad Samuel 62, passed gently from ice company and a tow-
She was a home- this life on Sunday ing business.
maker, professional evening, March 29, 2009, Nancy was a very
musician (piano,),and after a long and noble giving person who oper-
a member of the battle against COPD. ating clothing banks,
Ebenezer Baptist Nancy was the 7th child served as a Girl Scout
Church in Greenbrier. and only daughter of leader, took in stray
In addition to'hGreenber Tom and Mamie teenagers and loved
parents, her brother Bozeman of Lake Placid, playing piano for
parennyts Ward and sis- Florida, who were early church. Her acts of love
terms Eva Mayville and settlers in the area. toward strangers are too
Nancy Wagoner pre- She was.married for numerous to mention.
ceded her in death. 35 years to Jerald Byrd, But she was most
Survivors include her originally from proud of her three chil-
husband Kayton A. Montgomery, Alabama. dren and four grandchil-
Roberts; sons Louie Nancy was a member of dren. She is survived by
(Fran) Roberts of Capital Heights Baptist her husband, Jerald of
Myrtle Beach, SC Church in Tallahassee, Monticello, her sons,
Martin (Tiffanie) FL and, although -she Michael Zachary Byrd of
had not been active since Orlando, FL and
Roberts of Smyrna,
A; daughter Jan (Les her illness, she was 'a Jonathan, Pasco Cooper
Williams) Robaug erts of lifelong member of of Lake Placid, daughter
Williams Roberts of Eastern Star. Heather Renee Byrd of
brothers Sammy Ward During a ten-year Tarpon Springs, FL,
of Monticello, ammy Wa residence in Los brothers Norman and
Johnny Ward of Angeles, CA she-worked Tom Bozeman of Lake
Valdosta, GA sister for PBS. Among 'her Placid, and grandchil-
Judy Griffin of many projects she was dren Ezekiel Michael
Valdosta grandchil- an assistant to Dr. Carl Byrd and Amelia Soleil
dren Adam Roberts Sagan, coordinating Byrd of Orlando,
Natalie Roberts, affairs worldwide for the William Cooper of Lake 1
Samuel Roberts, Jaima filming of his television Placid and Cory Palo of
series, Cosmos. Tarpon Springs.
Williams.emorial serve WILLIAM CARY
A memorial serv-
ice was held 10 a.m. HOWARD
2009 dnesday March 18Ebenezer William Cary ers donations may be
Baptist Church in Howard, age 56, died in made to the New Hope ,
Greenbrier with Rev Valdosta, Georgia, Church of God Building
Jack Evans officiath Reving. Saturday April 4,2009. Fund.
Funeral services will Mr. Howard was a ,


100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work Frame Straightening
FREE ESTIMATES INSURANCE WORK WELCOME
1630 E. Jackson St. Thomasville, GA
(located behind Langdale Auto Mall)
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be at 3:00 p.m. Thursday, native (
April 9, 2009, at Beggs Florida a
Funeral Home Naples an
Monticello Chapel, 425 E. before
Dogwood Street, Monticell
Monticello,. Florida. The was self
family will receive electricia
friends after the service and was a
at New Hope Church of horseman
God, 415 E. Palmer Mill Pentecost
Road, Monticello, member o
Florida. In lieu of flow- Church o


)f Ft Myers,
nd had lived in
id.St Petersburg
moving to
lo in 2002. He
employed as a
n, loved flying
in accomplished
n. He was of
:al faith and a
)f the New Hope
f God.'


Now excepting Blue Cross Blue Shield and most other insurances


HEALT


James Michael
Bard, age 64, a retired
Fire Fighter/Paramedic
from the City of Tampa,
FL passed away at his
home in Monticello,
Florida April 1, 2009.
Mr. Bard was a'
native of Montebello,
CA and had lived in
Tampa, FL before mov-
ing to Monticello. He
was a former decorated
Boy Scout Leader; a
member of the Sons of









6A Monticello News


ND


www.ecbpublishing.com


JEFFERSON


Wednesday, April 8, 2009


COUNTY


Local Woman Returns From Mission Trip


: .. ; .-Photo Submitted
,i Te.GrejM tily 6Fit-tbh;Pau Ally, Kevin,and Katy. In 2006, the mis-
sionaty fam lypoved1toQ-jtemala apd began volunteering at Prince of Peace
onme for lrlk. -
.EBBIE SNAPP, Prince- of Peace months of feed as a way
Monticello News,'- Home for, Girls houses for them to have an
taff Writer "' and educates orphaned income and a source of
Ldcal. resident ;girls from the area but protein.
Des ie Harvey traveled there are some 370,000 In ,Antigua, the
toGuatemala City this children and young women bring their col-
past fall withlberlaugh aduttts living on the orful and handmade
ter Susan Hoak.,' streets that never make garments and such for
-.The .mission trip it into an orphanage or the children to sell to
took them to Magdalena home environment, the tourists.
and to the Catalyst Many of this coun- Spanish is the
International .Mission 'try's children are aban- major language in
Center in San Cristobal. dofied atdumpsites and Guatemala with more
.They met with. mis- have b10 known family. than 20 indigenous lan-
-sionaries Paula :and Children as young as -guages. The country is
Fontainq Greene and: three years old are left to slightly smaller than
other Christian organ-: fend for.themselves. the state of Tennessee,
nations whose' vision is "You can't imagine
to -feed the 'hungry .how poor these people '
loathee ,the, naked, and. are. There's ,o running 4
give dtink to the thirsty wateror utilities of any
all in the nAYe of Jesus. kind," she says.
and, to meet the physical "Kids will sell liter-
and spiritual needs of ally everything and any-
the people. thing they can find or
The Greene's min- steal," she adds.
istry provides teams of The missionary
volunteers from United teams help to build
States churches, who chicken coops for the
bring materials to build single mothers with chil-
homes for the poor and dren. filling them with
other projects. 25 to 30 chickens and two

4%!11LW2A AP AV 0 a


" Dentures Partials Relines
" Repairs Extractions
o Same Day Service On Dentures,
Acrylic Partials, Repairs & Extractions
By Appointment No Checks
B William T McFaller III 0DS FAOD
WnN rt.r,:1 intlo,
0 .511l LAb
.i r l'N rr.n Fi Fi H)ra. Si & r, u
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Office Hours: Man-Thur 7:30-4:30
377-6588

Hwy 319 Thomasvllle
111 Miles Nnrih nofiR i&i ASl I Ine an R0nhl 1


Guatemala Missionary Fontaine Greene and a few local orphans shovi
Monticello residents Dessie Harvey and Susan Hoak around the Prince of Peace
Home for Girls in October 2008. "1


with a
more th
The
come s
mission
center
The ce
for 28
ing to
with th
Har
Africa
nessed
the
learned
live v
from a
forest:
saw of


population of people was the poorest
ian 14.3 million, of the poor.
Greene's wel- She feels very much
killed American led to retire to
i teams to their Guatemala to help the
in Guatemala. people in such desper-
nter has room ate need of her love and
volunteers will- care and involvement.
teach and work At this time Harvey
e natives, is offering her time -to
vey grew up in presenting Guatemala
and has wit- DVDs and information
poor firsthand: locally at churches.
natives had businesses, and such.
d to build and Her goal is to raise
,ith resources funds for another mis-
the plains and sionary trip. and for
but' what she the construction of
the Guatemala another orphanage.


"Mimi's House, named
for Paula Greenet-
grandmother." *'
The property will
also be used for a team
house and ministry
center office. It will
become the hub of
operations that will
facilitate the ongoing
work of ministry in
Guatemala for years to
come
Contact her at 850-
284-7102 to schedule aq
informative presenta-
tion.
Love offerings are
welcome.


.. .1.
'Vi..- ' : '. ''
;* * s
i * ; .,* ** *


T"-r-


F..


SPhoto Submitte4
This Guatemalan family of two boys, one girl, and their father live in this 8'X10' cement blockhouse witlj
no source of income. The two sons have clubfeet that volunteer doctors will perform surgery on for no
charge. Dessie Harvey and Susan Hoak, women to right, along with other volunteers visit in Magdalena.

Democrats Plan Supper, Program, April 14
Jefferson Democrats 14 at New t h e remarks:by a local office
are planning a hamburg- Bethel Democratic holder who is a member
er supper and program. A M E Party is of the party For addil
6:30 p.m., Tuesday, April Church on p 1 an ning tional information an4
t h e over the reservations or offers tc
Ashvil recourse of help. with the April 14
*Highway. the year. event, contact Part3
This is. The pro- Chair Gladys Roann
one of sev- gram will 997-5209, or Eleano
eral events :f e a t u r e Hawkins, 997-2863.


20yrs .
S" Combined
id Siding, Inc.Experience
30C 1256821


* New Construction Screen R
*Re-modeling Decks
*Additions Soffit & I
* Replacement Windows Repairs
ui: -i Iladl Eld Fike Eamoan


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Licensed & Insuredl


Mitchell Morgan
(850) 251-6505


Rodney Roberts
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looms


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Wednesday, April 8, 2009






AR OUND


www.ecbpublishing.com






SEFFERSON


Monticello News 7A






COUNTYY


Pery's Southern Rotisserie BBQ
^ *


RAN HUNT
lonticello News
taff 'Writer
. After serving the
community for more
than three years,
theasal and Linda L.
Perry, owners 'and
operator's of Perry's
Southern Rotisserie
3BBQ. continue to
serve residents quali-
ky homemade, finger-
kicking good meals.
e "'We were retired
and wanted to. do
something to get out
into the community
and meet the people,"
,aid.Linda. "We want-
ed to stay busy, but be
flexible with our time,
ind give to those, also
living here, so we
opened the business."
'Theasal's experience
'goes back to college
When he served as a
short order cook in
Atlanta., and he also
Served as a cook in the
ihilitary, .and later
Became a master at
cooking on the grill.
Linda's experience,


comes from a love of
cooking and a love for
her family.
* "If I won't eat
something or feed it to
my family, I will not
serve it to our cus-
tomers,"' she said.
"Back when we had
the tomato scare, we
put up a sign to let
customers knowL that
ours were from our
garden and safe, with
no chemicals, and all
natural, so they could
have a wedge of toma-
to go on their burg-
ers."
Theasal has built a
good rapport with
their meat supplier,
who assures them the
very best quality and
cuts of meat. The pro-
duce comes from their
home garden, : and
when out of season,
Linda is very particu-
lar about the produce
she chooses to serve,
squeezing and testing
for firmness, checking
for soft spots and
bruises, checking and


,* .,. i .^ :,: V.

.. . -.. ... . ..


Monticello New's
Photos By Fran Hunt


W-SOUTHERN
ROTI- Rffa l





OPEN-11.OOAM CLOSED-SUNDOWN
THURSDAY-SATURDAY
*1**


collard greens, baked
beans, Cole slaw, corn
on the cob, macaroni
and cheese, potato
salad, sweet potato
souffle, fries, and
more.
All desserts are
handmade, and
include favorites such
as carrot cake,
German chocolate
cake,. cream cheese
pound cake, old fash-
ion peach cobbler, as a
partial listing.
Serving sizes also
vary from snack,
sandwich and full
meal, which includes
two sides and choice
of meat.
They also offer
catering services, but
ask for a two-week
notice. Hours are
Thursday and Fri-
days, 11 a.m. until
sundown, and
Sunday, noon until
sundown, located on
North Jefferson Street
in front of Fred's.
For further infor-
mation call 445-0334.







www.ecbpublishing.com







PERSONN.


8A Monticello News





AD


Wild Libraries Begin Computer Classes


Wilderness Public
Libraries (WILD) will
begin a series of computer
classes taught by two
experienced trainers:
Deanna Ramsey and
Charles Sawyer. Classes
will be recorded for future
use by library patrons.
This is made possible
by a Library Services ahd
Technology Act (LSTA)
federal grant for 2008-9,,
administered by the State
Library of Florida.
Paul Clark Systems
Librarian for ,WILD has
set up the computer labs
at Jefferson, Franklin,


and Wakulla Public
Libraries to be used for
these classes, which can
house 10-12 people. The
classes are free for the
public. Call the library at
342-0205 to sign up, or
WILD at (850) 997-7400 for
additional information.
Schedules follow:
Tuesday, April n,
2009 6 to 8 p.m. Digital
Photography 1- Instructor
.Charles Sawyer. For begin-
ning-level photographers.
Learn how to see and
capture better photo-
*graphs using your point-
and-shoot digital camera.


Learn how to avoid com-
mon problems in photo-
graphs; perform basic cor-
rections; and prepare pho-
tos for printing, email,
and posting on the web.
For best results, bring
your camera and owner's
manual to class.
Thursday, April 23,
4:30 to 7:30 p.m.-
Microsoft Excel 1-
Instructor Deanna
Ramsey Learn bow to cre-
ate a custom workshdet,
and understand how to be
more proficient using fea-
tures such as: Auto
Correct/Auto Fill, Custom


I


The Jefferson County


Recycling Program accepts


the following items for recycling:


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water
bottles, laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food
cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans. etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc. .

All Cardboard Products.- grocery bag, cereal boxes, food
boxes, laundry detergent oxess, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green),

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center
located at 1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at
any one of the collection sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of
our Landfill and saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How
could you go wrong?,

Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage .

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries
' '
*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigeratdrs, freezers,
washing machines, dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not ac-
cepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil Oilil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool
chemicals, paint, paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers
clearly marked to identify contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will
accept medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be
turned into an employee of the facility and not just dropped off.

Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.

The City of Monticello Offers Curbside pik-up for city resi-
dents for recyclable items on each Wednesday Morning.
For further information on other itmes for disposal in the
City, please call Steve Wingate at 342-0154.

Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations
& hours of opera, for.each individual site.
For further information
please call the Solid Wate.epartment at 342-0184.


List and Keyboard
Shortcuts. Learn basic
formulas and functions.
Prerequisites: Must know
Windows basics including
how to use a mouse.
Thursday, April 30,
6 to 8 p.m.- Digital
Photography 11-
Instructor Charles
Sawyer. For snap-shot pho-
tographers who want to
enhance their techniques.
Learn how different
lenses, lighting, and cam-
era settings affect the
image. Learn how to use
advanced camera features
to capture: and produce
more creative photo-
graphs. Use Photoshop
Elements to perform
image cropping, correc-
tion, and enhancement.
For best results, bring
your camera and owner's
manual to class.
Thursday, May 7,
4:30, to 7:30 p.m.-
Microsoft Word 2007 f-
Instructor, Deanna
Ramsey
In this class you will
learn to create, edit, save
and print documents in
Microsoft Word- Discover
features'such as: Spelling
& Granimar, Auto
C correct /, text ,
Find/Replace, etc:.
Prerequisites: Windows
user and familiarity with
Word.
Tuesday, May 12,,
6:00 to 8:00 p.m.-,
Microsoft PowerPoird
2007-Instructor Charles
Sawyer.
Learn how to get
started creating profes-
sional presentations in
Microsoft Office
PowerPoint 2007. Students
will learn how to choose
and customize a presenta-
,tion theme: insert text, cli-
part, and pictures: work,
work, with Notes, Outline,
Slide Sorter and .other
presentation views; and
prepare to' print presenta-
tioni hand-outs.,
Thursday, May 21,
4:40 Lto 7:30 p.m.-
Microsoft Word 2007 "II-
Instructor Deanna
Ramsey
A continuation of
Microsoft Word 2007.
Learn features that will
prepare you for using this
program in the workplace.
Prerequisites: Windows
user familiar with Word.
Saturday, May 23,


9 to 11 a.m.- Digital
Photography II- Instructor
Charles Sawyer. See
description above.
Saturday, May 23,
11:15 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. -
Digital Photography 1-
Instructor Charles
Sawyer. See description
above.
Tuesday, June 9. 6 to.
8 p.m.- Computer Basics
1- Instructor Charles
Sawyer. Learn basic skills
of personal computing.
Understand the parts
of the computer. Use the
mouse and keyboard. Use
the .. Windows "Start"
menu and key accessories.
Understand the' impor-
tance of data security and
virus protection. By the
end of class; you win cre-
ate and save a WordPad
document and connect
with the Internet. For
beginning computer
users.
Tuesday, June 18,
4:30 to 7:30 p.m-
Windows XP 1- Instructor
Deanna Ramsey
Customize- the Windows
XP features, create, save &
print files, multitask
between programs, dis-
cover time saving tips for
working on the PC.,
Prerequisites: Computer
Newbie: Getting. Started
class and/or familiarity
with Windows basics
including how to use a
mouse.
- Thursday, June 25,
4:30 to 7:30 p.m.-
Windows XP II- Instructor
Deanna Ramsey
A continuation of
Windows XP I. Discover
how to create custom wall-
paper and use Windows
Accessories such as
Calculator, Paint,
WordPad. Learn to copy
and paste between mullti-
ple programs.
Prerequisites: Must know
Windows basics including
how to/use a mouse.,
Saturday, July 11,
9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Computer Basics- II-
Instructor Charles
Sawyer
Learn how to search
for, organize and manage
files 'using Windows
Explorer. Customize your
workspace. Run applica-
tions using Microsoft
Windows. Understand
how to access and use
CD/DVD, flashcard and


Come and have
your precious
child's photo
taken and
published in our
newspaper for
FREEII


, | W -,-.1.. -.-.10 ,"


Prerequisites: Windows
user and familiarity with
Excel.


Wednesday, April 8, 2009






C COUNTY


i:li


USB drives. For interme-
diate computer users.
Saturday, July 11,
11:15 a.m. to .1:15 p.m.-
M i c r o s o f t
PowerPoint/2007-
Instructor Charles
Sawyer.
Learn how to get
started creating profes-
sional presentations in
Microsoft Office Power
Point 2007. Students will
learn how to choose and
customize a presentation
theme; insert text, clipart,
and 'pictures; work with
Notes, Outline, Slide
Sorter and other presenta-
tion views; and prepare to
print. presentation band-
outs.
Thursday, July 16,
4:30 to 7:30 p.m.-
Genealogy Research-
Instructor Deanna
Ramsey
Discover online
genealogy resources and
learn how to use online
databases such as
Ancestry, Heritage Quest..
and RootsWeb.
Prerequisites: Windows
user and familiarity with
using the Internet.
Tuesday, July 21, 6 to
8 p.m.-Introduction to
Windows Vista.
Instructor Charles,
Sawyer.
Learn about the new
features in Windows:
'Vista. Find and use the
Vista Control Panel, per-
form maintenance activi-
,ties, install and uninstall
programs. change admin-
istrative settings, and
acquire optional Windows
and Vista updates. Learn
about the enhanced acces-
sibility options in Vista.
such as .Voice
Recognition. For interme-
diate computer., users
starting out with, Vista or
those converting 'from
Windows XP and earlier
versions of Winidows.
Thursday, July 30,
4:30 to 7:30 p.m.- Family
Tree Maker- This class is
for genealogists who are
using Family Tree Maker
2009' for the first time or
who have used previous
versions of Family Tree
Maker or another geneal-
Sogy software who wish tbo
learn how to use this pro-
gram. Prerequisites: Must
know windows basics
including how to use a
mouse and familiarity
family genealogy
Tuesday, August 4, 6
to.8 p.m.- Windows Vista
for the Web' and E-mai/-
Instructor Charles Sawyer.
Learn how to safely
and securely access the
Intemet/World Wide Web
to find information using
Google Advanced Search;
shop, job-hunt and bank
online; create bookmarks
and set up a free email
account. For new comput-
er.users who already know
how to use the keyboard
and mouse but need some
guidance on using the
Internet. Some previous
computer experience is
required, but Windows
Vista experience is not
necessary.
Tuesday, August 11,
6 to 8 p.m.- Microsoft
Publisher 2007 Instructor
Charles Sawyer.
Learn how to get
started creating profes-
sional business cards,
newsletters, brochures,
flyers and other print pub-
lications using Microsoft:
Publisher 2007. This :
course also touches on
email and Web publica-
tions. For computer users
already familiar with
word processing and Web
browsing.
Thursday, August
13, 4:30 to 7:30 p.m.-
Microsoft Excel 11-
Instructor Deanna
Ramsey
Continue to learn new
features such as Advanced ..
Saving/Printing, More. .
Formulas & Functions.


IrlrrtBlr~b "PhoboSI







( Wednesday, April 8, 2009


www. ecbpublishing. com


Monticello News 9A


EFFERSON


COUNTY


Science Fair At MCA


DEBBIE SNAPP
-9' Monticello News
Staff Writer
M M ont ic e 11 o
-' Christian Academy
will hold its Science
Fair 3 to 5 p.m.
Thursday, April 16 in.
^ the school auditorium,
. 1590 North Jefferson


Street.
The community is
invited to attend and
offer encouragement to
the students participat-
ing.
For more details
contact instructor, and
coordinator 'Mylinda
Lynch at 997-6048.


cwOOver the Shoulder cv


By: Emma Whitmer
Emma is a 5th grader at AucillajChristian Academy.
She enjoys art, softball iand writing


On Tuesday March
24, ex-NFL player Ray
McElroy ; came to
Aucilla Christian
Academy to talk to the
students in grades 5 12
about GQd and his story
of making it to the top.
Ray made us laugh with
quick jokes, expres-
sions, and stories. One
story was when he
played in the AFC
Championship game,
Stealers vs. Colts and


his amazing tackle. To
demonstrate this perfect
tackle, he called on
Philip Watts. Ray
roused the audience
when he lifted 9th grade
Philip into the, air and
over his shoulder. No
hands! Then he posed
for the camera.
Not only did
McElroy show us how to
make the "perfect tack-
le" he also taught us life
lessons fhat will stay


WV JL11 L..S l1Ul t0"' \ .J to r e inJL LI U IL 1'r ln ~ JLU
remember, in the words are born a chooser. So
of Ray McElroy, you are chose the right thing:
not born a winner, you What God would want.


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10A Monticello News


www.ecbpublishing.com


Wednesday, April 8, 2009


MONEY


FINANCE


Foreign Brokerage Sale

Ignites Bidding War

SFighting T Get At .? $ :,
ash. Held By Japanesei H islds


By Michael Curtis
A Special From Greene
Publishing, Inc.
There's been a rising
emphasis during money
dispusions to acknowledge
the impact of global activi-
ties. The effect of foreign
oil is one example. For
those interested in agricul-
ture, competition from
places like Brazil is anoth-
er. But neither is quite as
surprising as the news
coming out of Japan
regarding the proposed
sale of Citigroup's broker-
age .firm, Nikko. Cordial
Securities currently
Japan's third-largest.
American-based finan-
cial services companies
being involved' in overseas
markets isn't new. What is


Japan and a 7,000 salesper-
son army, allowing it to
market securities to one of
the world's biggest sources
of latent wealth, Japanese
households, which are flush
with $15 trillion mostly in
cash. "
The large. 'Japanese
banks, created in the early.
part of this decade through
mergers among banks
weakened by the country's
bad-loan crisis, have been
relatively shielded from the
current financial crisis.
Still, their desire to block
rivals from securing Nikko
Cordial could be limited by
rising bad loans and falling
valuations of their exten-
sive share portfolios, which
caps the amount they can
pay.


new, however, is the reac- Regardless, these num-
tion of ,the three major bers are stagerring when
Japanese .banks to the compared of the numbers
potential purchase, of the coming out of Washington
Citigroup company lately Even the more
Citigroup's planned extreme spending esti-
sale .of Nikko Cordial mates from stimulus dis-
Securities has sparked 'a cussions are in the three-
bidding war among Japan's trillion dollar range, mean-
three big banks, which see ing that fapaanese house-
the retail brokerage opera- holds have five times'that
tion as an important part of massive number in imme-
their growth plans in the diate worldwide buying
country. Such unbridled power.
rivalry is rare in Japan, Vast domestic con-
where.mergers and acquisi- cerns naturally keep the
tions have been traditional- focus at home, although,
ly orchestrated by govern- again,' many continue to
_ment bureaucrats and. recognize the impact of
accepted by bankers as part some foreign commodoties
of, their duty to the coun- like oil. Others have recog-
try's financial stability nized the surge of Chinese
There is simply too ownership if U.S. Treasury
,much at stake for bidders 'bills and bonds. 'Few have
Mitsubishi UFJ Financial .spoken of the Japanese
Group Inc., Sumitomo public as 'ietbltital
MitskiA 'SFinan6ial Group,- investo s mAmerican bu~i-
Inc.,'and MizuhO Financial nesses though. Apparently
Group Inc. The, winnerwill bankers, are realizing it,
get "Nikko Cordial's 109 and they are willing to pay
retail .branches, across big to get more of it.


U.S. Unemployment

Rate Hits 25-Year High
By Michael Curtis other cost-saving survival
A Special From Greene measures that also hit,
Publishing, Inc.. employees, .the report
Unemployment grew showed. Those include
, to 8.5 percent in March, -holding down hours and
the highest in a .quarter- freezing or cuttingpay.
century, as employers axed The average workweek in
663,000 more workers and March dropped to 33.2
pushed the.nation's jobless hours; a record low. And
ranks past 13 million. The nearly a quarter of the
current rate would be even unemployed have been out
higher -15.6 percent if it of work for six months or
included laid-off workers more, the highest propor-
who have given up looking tion since the steep 1981-82'
for new jobs or have had to 'recession.
settle. for part-time work Many who have been
because they can't do any lucky enough to keep their
better. jobs are seeing their pay-
Many near the hum- checks shrink. Average
ber believe that even if the weekly earnings declined
economy show signs of to $614.20 in March from
improvement, businesses. $615.05 in February. If
will cut jobs and'trim fat to earnings keep falling, that
stay lean and. mean. Per would give consumers
broad-based surveys, the another reason to pull
public has shown great back spending, which
hopes for the economic would further weaken the
policies of President economy.
Barack Obama, but those VUnfortunately,
could fade quickly with January's job losses were
more months of layoffs. revised much higher, to
The recession may 741,000 from 655,000, mak-
well end later this year ing them the worst in a
Federal Reserve Chairman single month since 1949. In
Ben Bernanke and. many" March, the number of
private analysts see that unemployed people
possibility but rehiring climbed to 13.2 million.
historically doesn't get The number of people
going until after an eco- forced to work part time
nomic recovery is picking for "economic reasons"
up steam. The jobless rate rose by 423,000 to 9 million.
is therefore expected to Those are 'people who
reach 10 percent by year's would like to work full
end. time but whose hours were
The Labor cut back 6r who were
Department report under- unable to find full-time
scored the recession's toll: work.
a spike in the jobless rate Wall Street and many
from February's 8.1 per- private investors are look-
cent and a net loss of 5.1 ing ahead to an eventual
million jobs since recovery, although ugly
December 2007, almost reminders say Wall Street
two-thirds of them in just might be just as short-
the past five months. sighted now as it was
Economists say an addi- when it.was panicking sev-
tional 2.4 million jobs will eral months ago. So, poten-
disappear through the tial pitfalls.exist, not just
first quarter of next year. for the job ma ket, but also
As the downturn eats in corporate earnings
into companies' sales and reports and outlooks that
profits, they are laying off are just pouri g in for the
workers and resorting to first quarter,


Where Are Taxes Headed?


By Michael Curtis
A Special From Greene
Publishing, Inc.
Changing tax poli-
cies always triggers
political and economic
debates, as well as a
huge degree of risk,
especially given the
country's deep fiscal
hole and competing the-
ories on how best to aid
economic recovery.
Nevertheless, congres-
sional tax-writing com-
mittees are moving
ahead with. a laundry
list of potential tax
changes.
I The. administration
is creating a tax reform
task force charged with
proposing Ways to raise
revenue while not hik-
ing taxes, on families
making less .' than
$250,000.
The group will report
back to the president by
Dec. 4. That end-of-year
deadline provides rea-
son to_ believe that law-
makers will not pass
major tax legislation
until 2010 though, but
the debates and lobby-
ing over content of
that legislation will
begin in earnest this
year.
"If the economy
next year is worse than
it is now, I've got to
believe they're going to
say maybe we ought to:
put off this tax stuff by
another year or so,"
said Ken Kies, manag-
ing director of' the
Federal Policy Group, a
tax lobbyist working on
behalf of' businesses
a id ta'de asodiations'."
-:How much lawmak-
ers ultimately accom-
plish isn't clear yet. But
they are considering
some significant
changes.

Bringing in more rev-
enue from corpora-
tions
One revenue raising
idea is a reform of the
deferral rule for U.S.-
-based multinationals.
Currently, a U.S.-based
company doesn't need
to pay income tax on its
foreign subsidiaries,'
profits unless and until
the money is brotight
back to America. The
provision makes it
more attractive for com-
panies to invest in coun-
tries with lower tax
rates.
The administration
has said .it wants to
make a change but has
yet to propose any
specifics. One idea dis-
cussed by lawmakers is
to eliminate the defer-
ral option so. companies
have to pay tax on their
overseas profits when
earned. Another idea is
to preserve the deferral
option but prohibit
companies that use it
from deducting expens-
es incurred to support
their overseas opera-
tions until they bring
their profits back to U.S.
shores.
Already corpora-
tiops are lining up lob-
byists to shoot down the
idea. Kies, who served
as the head of the Joint
Committee on Taxation
when Republicans con-
trolled Congress, is one
of them.
"This isn't a theory
We've tried this before
and it ended disastrous-
ly," he said.
Kies noted that between
1986 and 2004, U.S.-
based international
shippers were denied


deferral. The number of
U.S.-based shippers
shrank. When Congress


reinstated deferral in
2004, the tax was cited
as a cause of the decline
for the U.S. shipping
industry
In other efforts to
tax U.S. money abroad,
Congress is trying to
crack down on offshore'
tax havens, increasing
enforcement both
against the individuals
who shelter their
money in other coun-
tries and the banks that
help them do so.

Extending tax cuts
President Barack
Obama has proposed
making permanent the
income tax cuts put into
place during the Bush
administration for cou-
ples making less than
$250,000 and for single
filers making less than
$200,000. Senate
Finance Chairman Max
Baucus, D-Mont., has
introduced legislation
that would do just that.
On the other side of
the debate are some tax
experts and federal
deficit hawks that
worry about the effects
tax cut permanency on
the ,country's revenue
and debt levels.
The .Tax Policy Center
estimates extending the
cuts for middle and
lower income families
would reduce revenue
by more than $2 trillion
over 10 years relative to
current law, which
assumes the tax cuts
would expire by 2011.

Reviving the estate
tax"' "
.As things stand
now;. it -would pay off
mightily for heirs if
their relatives, die in
2010 the estate tax is
slated to expire for that
year and that year only.
Come 2011, it's. sched-
uled to revert to its 2001
level, where only the,
first $1 million of an
estate would be exempt
from the tax and the.
taxable portion of the
estate would be taxed at.
rates up to 55 percent.
Obama has called
for the estate tax to be
made permanent .at its
2009 levels adjusted for
inflation going forward.
That would, mean the
first $3.5 million of
one's estate would' be
exempt from estate tax
and taxable portions of
the estate would, be"
taxed at rates no higher
than 45 percent. Baucus
included the provision,
in legislation -he intro-
duced last week.
,Kies expects that
lawmakers may pass a
one-year extension of
the 2009 estate tax
parameters for '2010,
and then include a more
permanent extension in
a broader piece of tax
legislation next year.
The Tax Policy Center
estimates making the
2009 levels permanent
would reduce revenue
*by more than $300 bil-
lion over 10 years.

Curbing health insur-
ance tax breaks
Health reform is
one of the administra-
tion's leading agenda
items that lawmakers
are likely to take up in
earnest this year. But
many legislators favor
paying for Obama's
health reserve fund by
limiting the tax break
that employees receive
when they buy their
health insurance


through work.
Right now the por-
tion of premiums paid


by employers is treated
as tax-free compensa-
tion. And there is no
limit on how much
employers may con-
tribute.
Lawmakers are consid-
.ering capping the
amount that would be
treated as tax-free.

Hiking taxes on car-
ried interest
The president's 2010
budget 'calls for a por-
tion of the profits paid
to managers of hedge
funds and private-equi-
ty funds to be taxed as
ordinary income rather
than- as an investment
gain. In other words, it
would be subject to a
,much higher tax rate
than the 15 percent
long-term capital gains
rate that the managers
have been paying.
The administration
estimated the provision
could raise $24 billion
over 10 years.
But the top tax writers
in the Senate Baucus
and Charles Grassley, R-


Iowa indicated last
week that change might
not be coming in the
near term.

Make permanent the
Making Work Pay
credit
The new tax credit
for middle and low-
income families, worth
up to $400 per worker
($800 per working cou-
ple) is in place for 2009 ,
and 2010. The president
proposed in his budget
to make it permanent,
but as of right now the
idea is not likely to
make it into lawmakers'
budget resolution. That
doesn't mean, however,
it won't make it into
future tax bills. The Tax
Policy Center estimates
making the credit per-
manent would reduce
revenue by $537 billion
over 10 years.
Again, there is,
much debate fueling the
tax fires, which are sure
to grow as the
December deadline
approaches.


How to Invest During
a Recession

Provided by Robert J. Davison
We are now finishing the 16th month of the reces-
sion, which began in December 2007, according to
the National Bureau of Economic Research. Not
only is this a long recession, but it's also a severe
one, marked by painfully high levels of job losses, a
sharply reduced credit flow and a drop in the value
of many investments. Still, despite all the bad news,
there are valid reasons;to believe that brighter days
lie ahead. But you don't have to wait for things~tp
turn around before taking steps to help your own fi-
nancial future.
Here are some actions to consider:

* Don't cut back on your 401(k). During difficult
economic times, it's hard for many people to as-
sume their jobs are safe. But if you are fairly confi-
dent your employment situation is secure, continue
investing in your 401(k) or other employer-spon-
sored retirement plan. The tax advantages of thpse
types of plans not to mention the employer's
match, if one is offered- make them ideal savings
vehicles for retirement. Of course, your plan proba-
bly has taken a hit over the past year, but that's the
case for many investments. If you've chosen a good
mix of investments, your plan should recover at
some point.
* Diversify, diversify, diversify. Generally speaking, it's
not a good idea to tie up more than 5 percent of
your portfolio in'a single investment. Spread your
investment dollars among a wide range of stocks,
bonds, certificates of deposit and other securities.
For a rough idea on how ivell you've diversified, ask
yourself: "If the value of a few of my stocks and
bonds declined and didn't recover, would it be ex-
tremely painful for me financially?" If the answer is
"yes," you probably need more diversification. Of
course, diversification by itself cannot guarantee a
profit or protect against loss, but it can give you
more chances for success and reduce the effects of
volatility on your portfolio.
* Think long term. Your investments may have lost
30 percent to 40 percent of their value from Octo-
ber 2007 to,the present which may seem like a
long time. Yet quality investments often need much
longer periods to show significant growth. So while
it can be painful to endure short-term losses, you
need to develop the discipline to hold your invest-
ments for many years.
* Don't reach for high yields. When the stock market.
is down, many investors turn to bonds that offer
high yields, reasoning that bonds are always safer
than stocks. Don't be fooled into this line of think-
ing; high-yield bonds mean high-risk bonds. If the
issuer defaults, you could lose your principal. Stick
with investment-grade bonds.
* Look for opportunities. Instead of avoiding the fi-
nancial markets, look for good investment opportu-
nities. Because investment prices have fallen so
much, your dollars can now buy more shares. His-
torically, buying shares at lower prices has often led
to higher returns over the long term. If you're re-
ceiving dividends, now is an especially good time
to reinvest them.
You probably can't avoid all the negative effects of
the recession. But by following the above sugges-
tions, you can help avoid getting thrown off track
on your journey toward your financial goals.

Robert J. Davison EdwardJones
Financial Advisor
205 E. Washingtdn Street
Monticello, FL 32344
Bus. 850-997-2572 Fax 866-462-9184
Cell 850-933-3329
robert.davison@edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com

Making Sense of Investing








Wednesday, April 8; 2009


V


tna


www.ecbpublishing.com


Monticello News 11A


Sanu


asm


ALFA HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Samuel Pasco was a
citizen of Jefferson
County who was also a
prominent politician of
the Bourbon Era.
Paco, was born in
London June 28, 1834. He
.immigrated to the
United States with ,his
family when he '12, and
settled in'Charlestown,"
MA. He graduated from
Harvard College in 1858
with a Bachelor Degree
in Arts." He later.
returned to Harvard to
complete 'his Masters
Degree.
Around, the same
time Pasco earned his
bachelor's degree,
Southern planters in
Florida were organizing
the Waukeenah
Academy and had asked
the president of
Harvard to recommend
a principal for the.
school. Pasco was rec-,
ommended fdr the'job
and moved to Florida the'
following :year, to
'become principal of
Waukeenah Academy,
near Monticello, from
.1860-861.
When the Civil War,
erupted,, Pasco enlisted
in .the Confederate
Army as a private in the
Third Florida
Volunteers, along with
15 of his eldest male'stu-
dentswfrom Waulkeenah
Acadnm: '
* uDuring' his enlist-


nient, Pasco's "devotion
to the South", as Carol
Hedman wrote..in her
article "Namesake
Stranger to These
Parts", was recorded in
the war diary written by
Clarence Smith. ;.
In the chapter enti-.
tled 'Private Pasco',
Smith tells that one' of
Pasco's former students
from. Waukeenah, Pvt.
Tom Pettus, was severe-
ly wounded during a bat-.
tlie in July 1863' near
Jackson, Mississippi.
Under the cover of fire,
Pasco' searched through
the wounded, soldiers
trying 'to find Pettus.
Recovering the injured
boy, Pasco returned him
to Confederate- lines.
Pettus died the next day,
but Pasco was commend-
,ed for his efforts by'Gen.
John' Cabell
Breckinridge. Vice-
President of the
Confederac. '
Pasco was wounded
in" Nov.01863, and cap-'
tured at Missionary
Ridge, near
Chattanooga; Tennessee.
He was sent to the Union
camp at Morton, Indiana
where he remained a,
Union prisoner for 14
months, continuously.
ignoring efforts by
Northern friends who
begged him to renounce.
his' pledge to the'
Confederacy and take an
oath of allegiance to the
tUn ion. Pasco .-. was,;
released with several


other prisoners shortly
before the war ended.
He returned to
Florida when the war
ended in 1865 and con-
tinued his occupation as'
the principal of
Waukeenah Academy
from 1865 until 1866. He
was then elected as the
Clerk of Circuit Court of
Jefferson County from
1866-1868. .Pasco was,
, forced to surrender .hli
Clerk of Circuit Court


position with the com-
ing. of the first
Republican governor
during the
. Reconstruction era.
Pasco was soon
admitted to the Florida
Bar in 1868 and joined
the law office of Col.
W.S. Dilworth, his old
regimental commander,
in Monticello.
Ohn Oct. 28, 1869,
Pasco,, arrivedd Jqssi.e
Denham, the grand-


daughter of 'John
Denham. During their
38 year marriage, Pasco
and his wife had two
daughters and three
sons.
In 1872, Pasco was
elected to the state
Democratic Executive
Committee and became
its chairman in 1876. He
served as chairman of
the committee 'for the
next 10 years. During
this time, Pasco led the
Democratic Party to,
state victories in 1876
and 1880. One of his
greatest accomplish-
ments while. he served
as .chairman, was lead-
ing the successful move
to restore home rule in
Florida, re-establishing
county governments,...
Pasco was elected


was elected, to the state
House of Represen-
tatives and was speaker
for the national House
of Representatives
when he was elected to
the U.S. Senate the fol-
lowing year.
In 1889, Pasco was
appointed to the
Isthmian Canal
Commission, the presi-
dential committee
Which laid the ground-
work for the construc-
tion of the Panama
Canal. Pasco supported
U.S. ownership of the
canal and his views on
the situation were
included' in the commis-
sion's recommendation.
The Panama Canal was
completed while Pasco
was still alive, but didn't
open until three years


president of the after his death.
C oin s t it u,t i o n.a 1 Pasco was re-elected
Convention of 1885. in 1893 by state legisla-
which set up Florida's tors for another term in
cabinet form of govern- the U.S..Senate, but the
ment and establish the lawmakers voted him
poll tax. out in 189, because of
In 1886, Pasco ran his efforts twq years
for governor against previous, which led to
Gen Edward A. Perry, the ouster of Florida's
but withdrew, because of state senator, Wilkinson
the respect he had for Call.
his running-mate. Later, Pasco .died at the
as he served as gover- home of one of his
nor, Perry signed a bill daughters in Tampa,
June '2, 1887,: which 'Florida March 3, 1897.
would establish the cur- He was interred in
rent Pasco County, Roseland Cemetery, in
which he named in Monticello beside his
honor of his former wife and a son who were
competitor. killed in the Philippines
.The same year he, during the,,. Spanish-:.
ran for governor. Pasco Americant War.


HINT


*. .;.A ona-
,'- ": ; ... .. .....


.-. ~~',jOO,-:. "A .


'T i **if storj O/ .i


p -
S


ALFA HUNT
Monticello News
* Staff Writer
* 'Though the exact
origin of April Fool's
Day is unknown, sev-
0 eral historians.
believe the tradition
began around 1582 in
France when the
* reform of the calen-
dar under the reign of
Charles IX took place.
* The Gregorian calen-
dar was introduced
that year and New
Year's Day was moved
* from April 1 to
January 1.
In those days,
communication trav-
eled slowly, and many
people did not receive
*word of the change
until several years
later. However, others
who rebelled against
the change, continued
to celebrate New Year
on April'l.
In the French
* community, these peo-
* ple who rebelled were
labeled as "fools" and
were subject to


evolved over time and
the tradition of play-
ing pranks on the first
day of April contin-
ued.
The tradition
eventually spread to
places such as
England and Scotland
in the '18t Century It
was introduced in the
American Colonies by
the English and the
French. Because of
its worldwide spread,
April Fool's Day has,
evolved in its own
way, in each country.
In Scotland, April
Fool's Day is devoted
to pranks involving
the rear end, and the
origin of the infa-
mous "Kick Me" sign
can be traced back to
Scotland.
In England, jokes
are only played on the


morning 'of April 0
Fool's Day. It was con-
sidered to be bad luck
to play ajpke on some- 0
one in the afternoon.
In Rome, the holi-
day is known as theS
Festival of Hilaria
and is celebrated on
March '25. It is also
referred to as "Roman *
Laughing Day".
In Portugal, April
Fool's Day falls on the S
Sunday and Monday
before Lent, a period
of 40 days from Ash
Wednesday to Holy 0
Saturday. During this
celebration, people
have been known to
throw flour at their
friends.
So no matter
where you go in the
world on April 1,
April Fools could be
waiting for you. 0


* ridicule. They were
sent on "fool errands"
and sent invitations
0 to nonexistent parties '
* as well as having
other practical jokes
Splayed on them for
amusement.
S The harassment
0 0 0 00 00 0 0 0 00 00 0 00 0 0


) "










0.0
S ..


* **


I'1~ 'I~I
~~~


Portrait of Hon. Samuel Pasco
of Monticello, Florida.








12A Monticello News


www. ecbpu blishing. com


Wednesday, April 8, 2009


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Wednesday, April 8, 2009


www.ecbpublishing.com


Monticello News 13A


doors


Local Farmers Get Schooled On Crop Management


Kirk Brock
Dozens of local
farmers and agriculture
industry professionals
learned about new inno-
vations in crop manage-
ment at a recent crop
management school
hosted by the Suwannee
River Partnership.
The event was held
at ,,the University of
Florida's Institute of
Food and Agricultural
Sciences (IFAS)
Extension office in
Madison. Those who
attended were offered
continuing education
credits. Lunch was pre-
pared by Dan Buchanan
and Madison County
Farm Bureau.
Staff from. the
Suwannee River Water
Management District
kicked off the school


Wfr










2,..













~>4.
li






, 6.


with a presentation cov-
ering a range of water
issues including water-
use permitting, water-
use monitoring, mini-
mum flows and levels,
and total maximum
daily loads.
Presentations by
Jefferson County farmer
Kirk Brock and
University of Florida
professor David Wright
emphasized, the benefits
of using conservation
tillage systems.
Tim Kelly, owner of
Southeastern Agri-Labs,
provided an overview of
his enterprise and ,its
goal of educating farm-:
ers to be site-specific
when fertilizing..Jarrod
Harris,., with Ag
Technologies, followed
with a presentation
introducing the most
modern equipment
being used to make
farming more efficient.,
The one-day course
concluded with a presen-
tation on pesticide-fertil-
izer irrigation record'
keeping, with an empha-
sis on the importance of
maintaining continuous
and accurate records.
Many participants
also attended a field.
demonstration at
DeWayne Leslie's farm
Madison County where
they were able to see the
equipment they had just
learned about in opera-


Photo Submitted
Area farmers learn
about the newest innova-
trons and techniques in
.crop management while
attending the crop man-
agement school hosted
by the Suwannee River
Partnership.

tion.
The Suwannee River
Partnership is a group
of 63 local, state and fed-
,eral agencies and other
participating members
dedicated to improving
water quality, saving
water and strengthening
agriculture in North
Florida.
For more informa-
tion about, the
.Suwannee River
Partnership, visit
www.suwannee.org.


I
IN



b
C
t
t


a
S

t
s
b

e


FRAN HUNT and could be subject to
MVonticello News serious health prob-
Staff Writer lems like laminitis and,
Over the last hyperinsulinemia as a
[ecade obesity has result. Just like people,
becomee a major health -it appears as though
concernn in horses.. A the culprits are
eam of researchers in overeating and lack of
he Virginia-Maryland exercise.
Regional College of "Obesity in the
Veterinary Medicine past decade. has
mnd the College of become a major health
Agriculture and Life concern in horses,,"
sciences at Virginia said Scott Pleasant,
Tech has determined DVM, MS, and Dipl.
hat horses are facing ACVS, an associate
serious -healt'h risks professor in the
becausee of obesity Department of Large
Of the 300 horses Animal Clinical
examined, 51 percent Sciences. "This is pri-
were determined to be marily because of its
overweightt or.. obese, association with prob-
lems such as insulin
E | E EEinn r! j resistance and lamini-
I II l r! I tis."


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In fact, it was a
spike in pasture-asso-
ciated laminitis cases
'that led Pleasant to
grow curious and seek
the, collaboration of
Thatcher, an interna-
tionally renowned vet-'
erinary nutritionist,
on the innovative
research project. Ray
Geor, MVSc, PhD, Dipl.
ACVIM, the Paul
Mellon distinguished
professor of agricul-
ture in the College of
Agriculture and Life
Sciences,, and the
director of the
M i d d 1 e b u r g
Agricultural Research
and Extension .Center
in Middleburg, VA, an4d
Francios Elvinger
DrMedVet, PhD, Dipl.
ACVPM, an epidemiol-
ogist and associate pro-
fessor in the
Department of Large
Animal; Clinical
Sciences, also worked
on the study.
Funded in part by
the Virginia Horse
Industry board, the
researchers hypothe-
sized that over weight
horses might suffer
from insulin and sugar
imbalances, chronic
inflammation, and
oxidative stress, a mal-
ady that occurs as a
result of changers to
metabolic processes
that alter the delicate
balances between the
destruction and cre-
ation of new cells in
the body.
Other problems
caused by equine obesi-
ty are heat stress,
increased bone, ten-
don, and joint injuries,
and reduced perform-
ance levels.
Until now, only one
other study had looked
at obesity in horses. A
1998 owner-reported
survey of horse owners
conducted by the
USDA's National
Animal Health
Monitoring System
(NAHMS) suggested
that about five percent
of horses were over-
weight.
Based upon the
horses routinely seen
through clinical prac-
tice in the veterinary


,, ,,$


teaching Hospital,
however, the
researchers suspected
the incidence might be
higher. "We thought it
was at a level of at
least 15 percent,", said
Thatcher.
The research team
designed a prospective
study and examined
300 horses from the
114 different farms
chosen randomly from
about 1,000 horses that
have been treated
through the college's
Equine Field Service
Program.
Two independent
body-conditioning
scores (BCS), which
access the amount of
fat cover onthe horses,
were assigned to each
animal. Each horse
was checked for signs
of laminitis and blood
was drawn to assess
glucose and insulin
levels as well as other
hormones, cytokines,
and oxidative biomark-
ers.
While laboratory
and data analysis are
still underway, the
research team has
already made some
alarming discoveries.
Of the horses in
the study, 51 percent
were found to be over-
weight, and 19 percent
were found to be obese.
Eighteen percent of
the overweight horses
and 32 percent of the
obese horses were
hyperinsulemic.
The study result
also suggested that
equine obesity might
result from natural
grazing behavior
instead of the over-
feeding of grains and
other feed, supple-
ments, which defies
conventional thinking
on equine weight mat-
ters. The majority of
horses examined : in
the study were fed pri-
marily pasture and
hay with very little
grain and concentrate.
Instead of over-
feeding of grain and
concentrates, the evi-
dence indicated that
improved forage and
lack of exercise are
the two most common
contributing factors in
equine obesity.
Horses today are
managed much more
differently than their
evolutionary roots,
indicated Pleasant.
"The horse evolved
as a free-roaming graz-
er on sparse pasture
types," he said: "Later
the horse served pri-
marily as a work ani-
mal, serving as a
source of transporta-
tion and draft power.
Today, most horses
serve as companions
and light performance
animals."
The research proj-
ect is ongoing and has
laid the groundwork
for a series of new
studies.


You Could Be A Lucky W


i


- i I I


I II mI' m o w .m ,









14A Monticello News


www.ecbpublishing.com


Wednesday, April 8, 2009


,rts


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Jerry Franklin
Brown, Jr., will serve as
the Jefferson County
Middle High School offen-
sive coordinator and work
with both the offensive
and defensive lines on the
gridiron this season.
Brown will not only
be a plus on the football
field, but also in the class-
roomn. beginning in
August as an ESE teacher.
a field in which he was
recognized as one of the
'50 best in the state for
FCAT improvement in
reading.
He has gained much
experience in his ten
years of coaching. His
career began as a fresh-
man basketball head
coach and junior varsity
football assistant coach
when he also served as
defensive coordinator and
worked with the offensive
line from 1997-1999, at
Rutherford High School
in Panama City, FL. He
also worked in the class-
room as a teacher's aide
for the emotionally handi-
capped.
In 1999. he began at
\Venice High School in
Venice. FL. He worked as
an ESE teacher and a
teacher's aide for the emo-
tionally handicapped
from 1999-2005. He also
served as a JV' head bas-
ketball coach from 1999-
2000: varsity basketball
assistant coach, 2001-2005:
varsity track assistant
coach, 2002-2007: and as
-the assistant varsity foot-
ball coach and offensive
line coach from 1999-2007.
H is team -was-named the
Cla4s 5.A.t l gbhai.pious
* S. *- "


in 2000; He served as the
special: teams coordina-
tor from 2003-2004: and as
the varsity football assis-
tant coach 2006-2007.
From 2007 to the pres-
ent. he has been working
at Booker High School as
an ESE teacher, and
served as varsity football
assistant coach with the
offensive line and special
teams; JV basketball head


him," said
Superintendent Bill
Brumfield. "He will be an
asset to the school. He is a
professional and positive
role model, as well as an
outstanding educator for
out youths."


Tigers To Host

Car Wash

April 25
FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer ..
The recent car wash
hosted by the Jefferson
County Middle High
School varsity -football


coach: and varsity track team was a huge success,
shot put and discus coach. raising $550 to be utilized
Brown obtained his for the .team football
Bachelor's of Arts in camp. Because of its suc-
organizational manage- cess, a second car wash
ment at Goshen College of has been set. ,
Sarasota in 2005: and he is Head Football Coach
presently enrolled and Head Football Coach
working on obtaining his Willie Spears, Jrt said
Master of Science in inte- the players, and coaches
grating technology in the would be on hand
classroom at Walden Saturday, April 25 from
University 11 a.m. un til 1 p.m., in the
Brown is also one for parking lot of the
contributing to the con;- Monticello News for
unity He has worked donations, giving the
with a variety of pro- community and players a
grams including; "In The chance to better get to
Trenches" lineman camp know the team and
and director and coach: coaches..
Extreme Sports Camp as Vehicles will be
a football and basketball washed for donations
coach: YMCA youth bas- and all proceeds will go
ketball: VHS Youth toward the football camp.
Football Camps: Laurel embers of the com-
Civic Association Triple m y .e t
Threat Sports Camp: munity are urged to
Suncoast Humane Society come down and get a top-
"Furry Scurry:" and also notch car wash,.neet thle-
in Special Olyrnpic&.-. ... .T.ie, llBIJRi jth
nwT m 'IT11 er is7)-


Team Of Revell/Spence


Win Glen Arvin Tourney


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
After approximately
10-11 years playing in
the Glen Arvin Country
Club' IDES of March
Golf Tournament, Davis
Revell, of Jefferson
County, is proud to say
that he and.his partner,
Rocky Spence, of
Thomasville,' won the
ove rall tournament.
"For the past three
years, we took the title
in our flight, but we
never won the overall
tournament," said
Revell. "This is the
fourth win for my part-
net: Rocky, and he holds
the course record."
There were approxi-
mately 50-60 teams com-
peting in the three-day
tournament. "We
played 18 holes per day,
and each.day was with a
different scoring for-
mat." Revell added that
he had to play in the
tournament for about
five years 'before he
totally understood the
fort- mats used in the tpur-
na inent.
"At the end of the
first day, we had no
chance of getting in. We
played terrible for two
days and we needed to
have something miracu-
lous happen on the third
day to get in. Those first
two days, we couldn't do
anythirig, we sure
weren't representing
Tiger Woods in any
way."
He .;aid,, that the
golfers was eventfrilly
narrowed down to 20
teams and by Saturday,
1,9 of them had been
filled "We had to get the
best score of the day in
net points,"- he said. Our
team made it. into the,
final 20 and then headed,
into the semifinals,
where we emerged as


Jefferson Journal Photo by Fran Hunt March 27, 2009
Davis Revell shows the Glen Arvin Country Club
IDES of March Golf Tournament first place award, which
had been autographed by all the golfers taking part in
the tournament.


one of the top four
teams and would then
move on to a four-hole
playoff to determine the
winner.
On the final four, we
were losing by one-
stroke," said Revell.
'"And my.partner put me
in a real bad mess. He
put me in a sand trap'
,about 20 feet down from
the green. I wasn't able
to see anything but the.
top of the pin. There
were about 200 specta-.
'tors around the' green
watching and I couldn't
help feeling this was
going to be embarrass-
ing when I take, my
swing and leave the ball
in the trap," said Revell.
"I couldn't see what I
was doing, but took my
swingand I could hear
the enthusiasm, getting


louder and louder, with
all of the ohhing and
ahhhing, and finally
thunderous applause.
When I. got to where I
could see, I had chipped
the ball to within six
inches of the pin," said
Revell. "That was the
best shot I ever made out
of as trap in my life," he
added. "It was quite the
impressive shot, espe-
cially for a sorry golfer
like mte."
"We won b.y one
stroke," said Revell. "It
was real tight and we
were under a lot of pres-
sure."
Revell said that he
usually shoots in the
high 80's and has never
had an even par 72. "I'd
love to do that. It's every
golfers dream," he con-
cluded..


your children love coloring Entries will be judged in three
aster eggs and finding sur- age groups: 2-4, 5-8, and
-ises, then enter them in our 9-13. There will be one win-
aster Coloring Contest. ner from each group. Mail the
very "bunny" will have fun form and your child's entry to
iloring this picture, and the the paper, or drop them off by
winners will enjoy a movie on Friday, April 10. Winners'
s. will be announced in the
paper Friday, April 17.
Monticello News &
Jefferson County Journal
P.O. Box 428 Monticello, FL 32344 /
180 W. Washington St. 850-997-3568


Business

Administration


Accounting


Health Services

Administration

Also offering:

Computers & Technology

Legal Studies*

Criminal Justice

Health Care

Interdisciplinary Studies

Culinary

, Call for a complete list of programs


> Associate, bachelor's and master's" degrees
>- Day, evening and online classes
>- Career placement assistance
>- Financial aid available to those
who qualify
> One class at a time
Admissions hours:
Mon Thurs 9am 8pm,
: Fri 9am 5pm, Sat 9am -1 pm


KEISER
UNIVERSITY
TALLAHASSEE
Call toll free to speak with an
Admissions Counselor


1.888.216.9389


ww .U ce s co -Oni


Jerry Brown Among

New JCMHS Coaches


I' I I


Earn a business degree in:








Wednesday, April 8, 2009


www.ecbpublishing.com


Monticello News 15A


Warriors Meet Gridiron Coach


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News,
Staff Writer
Members of. the
Aucilla Christian
Academy varsity, foot-
ball team had the oppor-
tunity to meet .with the
new gridiron Coach,
Scott Bryan Scharinger,
Friday, March 27. He
spoke of how excited he
was to be at Aucilla, and
for the opportunity to
meet the athletes, with'
whom he shared his phi-
losophy of a winning
football team.
He explained the
basis of his program as
"The 4-F's of the
Warriors Football
Program." -The first of
which, is "Faith." "God
is first. My mission here
is to assist you in reach-
ing your full potential in
life, whether in the
classroom, on the foot-
ball field, or in society
so that you can fulfill.
God's will for your
lives," he said.
"Where you stand in
eternity is the most
important aspect of this
program. We will put
Him first and Glorify
God in all that we do
here. Good or bad, win
or lose, He is first," said
Scharinger.
He said the second F
is "Family". "Family is
important to me, both
yours and mine. I care
about you as individuals
and I will help you in
any way that I possibly
can, on and off the


Scott Bryan Scharinger

field," he said. "Having
said that, this team is, or
will be, a family as well.
A 'Band of Brothers',
players and. coaches
committed to one anoth-
er to accomplish one
goal" .
'He said his recipe,
for success includes
coaches loving the other
coaches; coaches. loving
their players; players
loving the other players;
and players loving their
coaches. "It's all about
relationships. That's
family," said Scharinger.
The third F is
"Football". "I am here
to win and I expect to
win," he said. "We will
'spend every morning in
the weight room, and we
will practice hard and
fast. How you practice
Monday through
Thursday is how you
will play on Friday.
"We will outwork
everyone in the -weight
room, and on the foot-
ball field so we can out-
last our opponents and


win in the fourth quar-
ter. Most games are won
and lost in the fourth
quarter. We will make
that our quarter and we
will finish strong."
The final F is "Fun".
We are going to have fun
with each other in all
that we do," said
Scharinger. "It's too
much work to not have
fun. Remember, we are
family It is family time.
USC Coach Pete
Carroll says it this way,
'having fun is part of the
.deal. There is not reason
why you can't work real-
ly hard and be disci-
plined and not still have
fun. We will practice
hard and practice fast.
And, if it's not fun, then
I need to make a change
in my approach.'
Scharinger added
that if he swayed from
faith, family, football
and fun; then it was time
for him to be gone. "I'm
going to give you my
best, and in turn, I
expect your best," he
said.
- "In searching for a
coach we had three pri-
mary characteristics
that we were looking for
in our new leader," said
ACA Principal Richard
Finlayson.. "First, and
foremost, we were look-
ing for someone who
would be a spiritual
leader that would keep
honoring and serving
Jesus Christ as the pri-
mary focus of our foot-
ball program. We also


wanted someone who
was committed both to
year-round weight
training and to develop-
ing a positive relation-
ship with our support-
ers.
"In hiring Scott
Scharinger, we not only
were able to meet these
needs far better than we
ever could have imag-
ined, but we also were
able to hire a man with
extensive football
knowledge and experi-
ence," said Finlayson.
"We feel extremely
blessed that God has led
Scott to serve our min-
istry with us. We are
truly excited and he will
bd a great edition to our
staff here at Aucilla."
Scharf nger
expressed his excite-
ment about ,his new
position, stating,
"Coaching and teaching
to me is a calling, a mis-
sion, a ministry that
allows me to eternally
affect the lives of young
people, on and off the
football field.
"My coaching phi-
losophy is to impact the
student/athlete academ-
ically, athletically, and
spiritually and to pro-
mote character develop-
ment and encourage
responsibility in order
to create honorable
young men and Godly
American citizens. I
love the fact that God
allows me to use football
to serve Him and to
grow His kingdom."


Tigers Drop Two,

Stand 0-4 On Season


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Tigers baseball
team dropped game. number
three against FAMU, 22-12,
March 19, with what Coach
Alfreddie Hightower
explained as "some
improvement.
"We are still struggling
on defense, however the
offense is starting to show
improvement," he added..
"We finally scored enough
runs but the defense is just
not there yet." The follow-
ing statistics are exactly as
provided.
On the mound, Joey
Dowell pitched the first
three innings, giving up 7
hits, 12 runs, 5 of which
were earned, 4 walks, and
striking out 1 batter. He was
charged with the loss.
Shayne Broxie pitched
the following 2 innings, giv-
ing up 2 hits, 6 runs, 2 of
which were earned, no
walks, aild struck out 1.
Revonte Robinson
wrapped up the effort on the
mound, pitching the final
innings and giving up 1 hit,
4 runs, 1 of which was
earned, walking 2 and strik-
ing out 1.
At the plate, Joseph
Williams had 4 at-bats, 1 hit,
a double; Telvin Norton, 3
at-bats, 2 singles, a walk, 3
runs scored;, Broxie, 3 at-
bats, 1 hit, a dpuble and 1
run; and Nick Parker, 3 at-
bats, 2 walks and 2 runs.
Dembntrey Johnson, 3
at-bats; Gene Noel 1 walk,
and 1 run; Robinson, 3 at-
bats, 1 double, 2 strikeouts
and 1 run; Alphonso
Footman, 0 at-bats, 2 strike-
outs and a walk; Lenorris
Footman, 1 at-bat, 1 single
and 1 run; David Crumitie, .3
at-bats, 2 hits, 1 run, istrike-
out and 1 walk; Richard
Hawkins, 1 at-bat and a


strikeout; Jonathan
Howard, 1 at-bat, 1 hit and a
run; and Treveyon Edwards,
1 at-bat, 1 hit and.a run.
Plagued by the error
bug, the Tigers lost to
Franklin County 16-11,
March 24.
Hightower said players
are starting to shine, despite
* their winless season to this
point. "Senior Joseph
Williams is hitting the ball
very well and seventh grad-
er Revonte Robinson is out-
standing on both offense
and defense. Shayne Broxie
pitched an outstanding
game, But it's almost impos-
sible to comeback from 21
errors," said Hightower.
"We are young and still
shifting players into posi-
tion to maximize their
potential," he added.
On the mound, Broxie
pitched the entire game and
was charged with the loss.
He tossed all six innings,
giving up 7 hits, 16 runs,
only 5 of which were
earned, 3 walks, and struck
out 5 batters.
At the plate, Williams
had 3 at-bats, with a triple, a
homerun, 1 strikeout and 2
walks Robinson, 5 at-bats, 3
hits, 1 run, 2 strikeouts;
Norton, 2 at-bats, 1 hit, 3
runs, 3 walks; Broxie, 3 at-
bats, 1 hit, 2 runs, and 2
walks; Parker, 3 at-bats, no
hits, 1 run, 2 strikeouts and
2 walks.
Lenorris Footman, 3
at-bats, 2 hits, 1 run, 1 dou-
ble, 1 strikeout, and 2
walks; Ladarius Smiley, 4
at-bats, 2 hits, no runs, 2
strikeouts and 1 walk;
Lenorris Footman, 1 at-bat,
1 hit, 1 run; Crumitie, 4 at-
bats, 2 hits, 1 run, 1 strike-
out,, 1 walk; Alphonso
Footman, 1 at-bat and 1
strikeout; and CharQuise
Crumitie, 2 at-bats, 1 hit, 1
Srun anrid 1 walk.


Y.UR Bis CHOIC INA


.LOCAL HOME I





YOJN BU ILDER


A


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Capital Health Plan Proudly Presents



THE
SSaR


SENIOR


A series of lunch and learn programs for older adults
who want to learn more about creating and maintaining
healthy, happy, and active lifestyles.

Join us Thursday, April 16,
at 12:00 p.m.

at the Monticello Opera House
(185 W. Washington Street, Monticello, FL)
Featuring

Join the Trend

with Colon Screening
Presented by: Tara Loucks, ARNP-C
Tara Is the Clinical Director of
the Colon Screening Program
at Capital Health Plan.
Anna Is one of the most
familiar faces In Tallahassee as
the former morning host for
WCTV's "Good Morning Show."

There is no charge; just bring your lunch.
Drinks will be provided.
Please RSVP to 850-523-7333.

Some things get better with age

Capital Health Plan is one of them.

Capital Health
S P L A N
I Il i An Independent Licensee ofthe
V Blue Cross and Blue Shield Assodsation
Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract.
Information will be available on CHP Advantage Plus & CHP Preferred
Advantage. For accommodations of persons with special needs, please
call the numbers below. If you have questions, please call Medicare
Sales Department seven days a week, 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., at
850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY 850-383-3534 or
1-800-955-8771). H5938_2009_0708 014B_033109








16A Monticello News


www.ecbpublishing.com


Wednesday, April 8, 2009


Goat Male, born '11/08, part
"Woods" part "Tennessee
Fainting" friendly. Hiefer-
Limousine, born 6/08, friendly,
$500. 251-1641 or 997-0901.
Leaye message.
2/20,tfn.




3 bd/ Ibth North. Carolina
Mountain Home on one acre
near Asheville reduced
$139,000. Call 997-1582
3/18,tfn,nc
SW on 11/2 ac $80,700
DW on 1 1/4 ac $ 97,000
House on 2.77 AC $227,000
All within 1 mi of 1-10 + 19
. Monticello, call 544-2238
4/1-24, ld.




A few chickens, turkeys, guinea
fowl and peafowl for my yard.
850-464-1165.
2/4,tfn,nc.
Looking to buy used folding
cots and pop-up camper. 'Call
997-0901 msg. or 251-1641.
i 4/1,tfn.


1990 F-350 Flat Bed (Walton)
with hyd. lift gate, PTO. Good
condition. 150,000 miles.
$3,995. Call 850-997-1582. "
2/13, tfn.





BACKHOE SERVICE
Driveways, roads, ditches,
tree and shrub'removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @
997-3116, 933-3458.
7/4fhn,c
MR. STUMP
STUMP GRINDING
509-8530 Quick Responses.
6/22, tfn,c


Fish for stocking your pond
or lake. Coppernose bluegill,
shellcracker, channel catfish,
mosquitofish, grass carp, arid
bass. Call 850-547-2215..
4/8,10,15,17,c.


STOP LEG CRAMPS Locraps
BEFORE THEY STOP YOU. Colet
Calcet's triple calcium formula is
,designed to help stop low calcium leg
cramps. Just ask your pharmacist TnpleCalcium
IlAl. I. l





Unwanted Puppie

or kittens ads,


run twice for



SFREEI.


Call 997.3568.


JEFFERSON PLACE APTS
1468 S. Waukeenah St. Office
300, Monticello. 1 BR ($427) &
2BR ($465). HUD vouchers
.'accepted, subsidy available at
times. 850-997-6964. *TTY711.
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider and
employer.
1/28,tfn,c.
Commercial/ Industrial
Property with state highway
frontage. Corner lots. Fronts
both Harvey Greene Dr. and
Highway 53 South. Enterprise
Zone, Natural gas line, 8 inch
water main, access to city
utilities, fire hydrant, and service
from t6iwo power companies.
Property has easy access to 1-10,
via SR 53 & SR 14. Will build
to suit tenant for short or long
term lease. Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141
S2/11, rtn.


Office Building across street
from Post Office, Courthouse,
and' courthouse Annex. in
Madison (Old' Enterprise
Recorder Office) .111 SE Shelby
St. Madison Newly renovated
back to the 1920's era, Call 973-
4141.


HOMES FOR RENT
www.MbnticelloRealEstate


Full/ Part Time
Great Pay!
Place and collect
Donation Canisters
for a Non-Profit
organization who
helps families who
have children with
Cystic Fibrosis and
other chronic health
,-problems.
'Call
1-800-254-0045.
www'.frfchildreh.org


I.-- -- -


/rtn

;.info


Spacious 2BR, 1 BA w/ sun-
room, Washer/Dryer, -storage,
more. Large yard. Walk to
library, town. 251-0760.


I
I
I


Charming "downtown" his-
toric home. 4BR, 1.5 Bath..
Many nice features. 251-0760;
1/30,tfn,e.


ae I i :.


Children's Dresses...
SSize 3 white long dress, worn as
flower girl dress, satin bodice, lacy
'overlay on. bottom, built in crinoline,

Size 3 white long dress, worn as
flower girl dress, sequin/beadwork
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sequin/beadwdrk/appliques on bot-
tom,.buiilt in crinoline.-.50
Size 4 off white dress, worn as
flower girl dress. lace work around.
bodice, pretty lace work at
bottom, cap sleeves $25
Size 5 purple pageant dress, with
matching socks and hair bow, white
sequin and bead work on
bodice, built i'n crinoline beautiful
dress'- $50
Size 7 red pageant dress, white
applique, sequin and bead work on
bodice .
and bottom, built in
crinoline beautiful dress $65
Size 7 ,white and peach pageant
dress, white ruffles with peach out-
line across chest, sleeves, and
bottom, never worn $35
Size 7-8 off white dress, worn as a
flower girl dress, overlay of lace
over entire dress, probably
knee to calf length $25
Size 8 white, long dress, lace
around neck with decorative bodice
-$25
Size 16 white long pageant gown,
cap sleeves, white sequin work
across entire bodice and sleeves,
buttons around neck with circular
cut-out on back, beautiful gown
- $100
Teen dresses..
Size 7-8 Kelli green gown, lace
overlay $40
Size 8 red gown, sequin/bead
work around bodice $50
Size 14 (child's size 14 but dress is
*for a teen division approximately
13-15) GORGEOUS lime
'green dress, strapless but with
spaghetti straps that cress cross
across the back, sequins spotted
across the entire gown, built in
crinoline absolutely gorgeous. -
$300 (paid over $500 for it)

Call 850-973- 3497
and leave message.


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Washington St. Monticello, or fax resume to 850-997-'3774
.. 3/25,tfn.
Accounting Instructor (full-time) needed at North Florida
Community College. See www.nfcc.edu fbr details!
3/25,27,4/1,3,8,10,c.
Manufacturing- Must be prompt, dependable, and hard working.
Valid D/L, and pass a drug and background check. Apply 7 a.m:-
9 a.m. to: "48 Too Long Keen Road.
4/1,3,8,10, 6.
Part-time Library Aid Jefferson County Government is accept-
ing applications for a part-time library aid at the Public Library.
Job description and applications may be obtained at
www.co.jefferson.fl.us or at the -Jefferson County Courthouse
Rooml10, Monticello, Fl 32344. All applications should be sent to
'450 W. Walnut, Monticello, Fl. 32344. Closing date April 15,
2009.

4/S. I1.I
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College. See www.nfcc.edu for details.

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MONTICELLO NEWS &


Jefferson County Journal


PO Box 428

Monticello, FL 32345
I I I--- m I m mm I- I I I I


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Community-involved people needed.

Work w/international exchange students.
Coordinate with schools, recruit/interview
families, support students/families.
Networking/people skills necessary.

1-800-288-1221.
www.ayusaR.org.


%0 .. '' straight-to you.

A lf'nitic c 11 .VWve ,
Jefferson County Journal

S997-3568


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,Wednesday, April 8, 2009


www.ecbpublishing.com


Monticello News 17A


h 19


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL1
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION

CITIMORTqAGE, INC., CASE NO. 08-339 CA
Plaintiff,
vs.
NICHOLAS S. KOSTIOU; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
NICHOLAS S. KOSTIOU; PATRICIA A. KOSTIOU; THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF PATRICIA A. KOSTIOU; IF LIV-
ING; INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID
DEFENDANTSS, IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED,
THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND
TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFEN-
DANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT
#2; '
Defendants)

NOTICE. OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary
Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the
SCircuit Court of Jefferson Cotinty, Florida, I will sell the property
situate in Jefferson County, Florida, described as:
Beginning at a point 10 'feet East and 210 feet North of the
Northwest cornerF of Lot 1, Block 4, of JEFFERSON
HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION to the Town of Monticello,
Florida, as per map or plat thereof, lin the Public'Records of
Jefferson County, Florida, in Plat Book "B". Page 6: thence
running West along the North boundary of the Baptist
Church Parsonage Lot 100 feet to the Northwest boundary of
said church lot and to the point of beginning of the land here-
in conse3ed, thence running West 130 feet and to the right-of-
way of an improved street, thence running South along the
Easterly right-of-way of said improved street 150 feel to the
North boundary of Seminole A'enue, thence running East
i along the North boundary of Seminole Aenue 130 feet and to
the Southwest' corner of the Baptist Parsonage lot, thence
North along the West boundary of said Baptist Parsonage Lot f
1; 50 feet to the point of beginning of the lands herein conveyed. ;
Sa'e and except therefrom any portion thereof contained in
the righ[-of-w aN of the said streets: and being a portion of the land
"Lcon\e.ed b. deed of record in the Public Records of Jefferson
.i Counrt, Florida, in O.R. Book 7. Page 163. and to whichh reference
is hereby e\pressl directed.
Further subject to a power line easement o\er the
I Southernmost 2.3 feet of abo'e described property as per ease-
ment recorded in O.R. Book 37. Page 325 and O.R. Book 43. Page
.: 513. Public Records of Jefferson Countr, Florida.
.IA/K/ A
290 W. Seminole Aenue
:: Monticello, FL 32344
at public sale. to the highest and best bidder, for cash, At the North
1" Door of the Jefferson CountN Courthouse. Monucello. Florida at S
S11.00 a.m., on April 23. 2009'. .
DATED THIS 24" DAY OF MARCH 2009.
`,. An person claiming aninterest in the surplu, from the sale. if
,. any. her than the property) owner a: of the date ot the h, pendcns, ,
must file a claim within 60 days after the ale \Witness. my hand :
and seal of this court on the 24th da\ of March. 2000 -.i

it CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT ,
By Sherry Sears Deputr Clerk .

THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY
a%% Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
; 9204 King Palm Dne
,'. Tampa. FL 33619-1328
SPhone: 81l3-915-8660 I
;,Atnome\ for Plaintff
In accordance \ith the American with Disabdtines Act of 1990.
".: persons needing a special accommodauon to participate in this.
@ proceeding should contact the ASA Coordinator no later than'
seen i7i da.s prior to the proceedings. If heanng impaired.,
please call i800i 955-8771 ITDDi or 80()l955-8770 i\oicei. \a
i Florida RelaN Sert ice.

4/1.8/09.c



NOTICE
.' ,



The Wilderness Coast Public Libraries' (WILD) Governing
SBoard meeting scheduled for Monday April 13, 2009 at 1:30
p.m. at the Franklin County Public Library in Carrabelle locat-
ed at 311 St. James Street, Carrabelle, Florida has been can-
celled.
For more information,,please call (850) 997-7400.

4/8/09,c.















90 in Monticello, FL. The meeting may be continued as neces-
sary.
Jefferson County Planing Departmet, 445 W. Palmer Mill
Road, Monticello, FL 32344, Telephone 850-342-0223. From

paragraph c: Each board, commission, or agency of this state or




decision made by the board, agency, or commission with
respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, hew
or she will need a record of the proceedings, anda that, for such
I JfesnCut lnigDprmn,45W amrMl
*,RaMnielF 24,Tlpoe803202:Fo
hp lrd Gvrmn nteSnhn aulpg 6
| aarp : ahbad omssoo geyo hssaeo


I'


Mne iN ei sll& I
S Monticello News &
1* 0 t








Jefferson County Jounal
850.997.3568
II I Ifl::l-V-Si SBU"ai "^."


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA

GREEN TREE SERVICING, LLC, CASE NO: 08-459-CA
F/K/A GREEN TREE FINANCIAL SERVICING CORP.
1400 Turbine Drive, Suite, 200,
Rapid City, SD 57703,
Plaintiff,
V.
ROBERT P. WILSON,
JUDY G. DOLLAR, and
CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs
Final Summary Judgment Of Foreclosure entered in the above-
captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Jefferson
County, Florida, described as follows, to wit:
LOT 285 OF RISSMAN'S REPLAT #1 ACCORDING TO
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN PLAT BOOK "B",
PAGE 32, AND TO WHICH REFERENCE IS HEREBY
EXPRESSLY DIRECTED; SAID RISSMAN'S REPLAT #1
BEING A RESUBDIVISION OF LOTS 274 THROUGH 291,
INCLUSIVE, AND LOTS X, Y, Z, AA,,134, 150 AND 151 OF
THE NORTH FLORIDA. PECAN COMPANY SUBDIVI-
SION, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF OF RECORD IN
SAID PUBLIC RECORDS IN PLAT BOOK A AND DEED
BOOK "EE". PAGE 600, TOGETHER WITH THAT CER-
TAIN 1996 FLEETWOOD HOMES, HICKORY HILL
,MOBILE HOME, 66 x 28, VIN # GAFLS35AB10707HH21
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder,' for cash at the
North door of the Jefferson County Courthouse. One Court
Circle. Monticello. Florida 32344. at 11:00 AM (EST), on the
23rd day of April, 2009.


Kirk B. Reams'
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Sherry Sears, Deputy Clerk


Courthouse, Monticello, FL. 32344, at 850-342-0218: 1-800-
9558771 (TDD), or 1-800-955-8770 (voice); via Florida Relay
Service.


4/1,8/09,c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 33-2008-CA-000114
DIVISION:
DLJ MORTGAGE CAPITAL, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
FRED DAIGLE, et al,
Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated March 24, 2009, and entered in Case No. 33-
2008-CA-000114 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial
Circuit in' and for Jefferson County, Florida in which DLJ
Mortgage-Capital, Inc., is the Plaintiff and Fred Daigle, Jennie
W. Daigle, United States of America, are defendants, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on on the north steps of
the Jefferson County Courthouse, One Courthouse Circle,
Monticello, FL 32344, Jefferson County, Florida at 11:00AM on
the 23r day of April, 2009, the following described property as
set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure:. COMMENCE
AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 7, TOWN-
,SHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 4, EAST, JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA, AND RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES, 13 MINUTES,.
21 SECONDS, WEST, ALONG THE SECTION LINE,
2656.76 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE.
EAST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION
7; '
THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES, 51 MINUTES, 43 SEC-
ONDS, WEST, 1321.49 FEET TO'THE NORTHWEST COR-
NER OF SAID EAST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4:
THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES, 24 MINUTES, 24 SEC-
ONDS, EAST, 850.69 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH
89 DEGREES, 38 MINUTES, 52 SECONDS, WEST, 91.99
FEET FOR A POINT OF BEGINNING.
THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CON-
TINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES, 38 MINUTES, 52 SECONDS,
WEST, 764.19 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 13
DEGREES, 32 MINUTES, 56 SECONDS, EAST, 556.22
FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH 06 DEGREES, 52
MINUTES, 57 SECONDS, WEST, 304.69 FEET TO APPOINT;
THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES, 07 MINUTES, 15 SEC-
ONDS, WEST, 443.15 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH
RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF COUNTY ROAD 158-A (FOR-
MERLY STATE ROAD 158), SAID POINT BEING ON A
CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWEST: THENCE RUN
IN A NORTHEASTERLY DIRECTION ALONG SAID
RIGHT OF .WAY LINE AND CURVE, HAVING A RADIUS
OF 2914.93 FEET. THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00
DEGREES, 19 MINUTES, 21 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC
LENGTH OF 16.40 FEET, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING
NORTH 66 DEGREES, 01 MINUTES, 16 SECONDS, EAST,
16.40 FEET TO A POINT;
THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES, 07 MINUTES, 15 SEC-
ONDS, EAST 448.90 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH
06, DEGREES, 52 MINUTES, 57 SECONDS, EAST, 332.23|
FEET TO A POINT; THENCE SOUTH 49 DEGREES, 48
MINUTES, 09 SECONDS, EAST, 803.14 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
SUBJECT TO A 10.00 FOOT WIDE UTILITY EASE-
MENT OVER AND ACROSS THE FRONT, BACK, AND
SIDE LINES THEREOF. ALSO SUBJECT TO AND
TOGETHER WITH A 60.00 WIDE ACCESS, UTILITY AND
DRAINAGE EASEMENT MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH, RANGE 4, EAST, JEF-
FERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN NORTH .00
DEGREES, 13 MINUTES, 21 SECONDS, WEST, 2656.76
FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE EAST
HALF. OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 7;
THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES, 51 MINUTES, 43
SECONDS, WEST, 1321.49 FEET TO -THE NORTHWEST
CORNER OF THE EAST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4
OF SAID SECTION 7; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES, 45
MINUTES, 52 SECONDS, WEST, 709.56 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
THENCE SOUTH 06 DEGREES, 52 MINUTES, 57 SEC-
ONDS, EAST, 329.73 FEET; THENCE SOUTH'80 DEGREES,
01 MINUTES, 51 SECONDS, WEST, 60.09 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 06 DEGREES, 52 MINUTES, 57 SECONDS, WEST,
334.74 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES, 07 MIN-
UTES, 15 SECONDS, WEST, 435.79 FEET TO THE
SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF COUNTY ROAD
158-A, SAID POINT BEING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO
THE NORTHWEST; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT
OF WAY AND CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2914.93 FEET,
THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREE, 17 MIN-
UTES, 28 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC LENGHT OF 65.69
FEET (CHORD OF SAID ARC 'BEING NORTH 65
DEGREES, 51 MINUTES, 30 SECONDS, EAST, 65.69
FEET);
THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY, RUN
SOUTH 00 DEGREES, 07 MINUTES, 15 SECONDS, EAST,
462.41 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
BEING THE SAME PROPERTY THAT IS DESCRIBED
IN THAT CERTAIN WARRANTY DEED AS SHOWN
RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 573 AT PAGE
844, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF JEFFERSON COUN-
TY, FLORIDA. A7K/A 144 FLAMINGO COURT: MONTI-
CELLO, FLORIDA 32344
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the
sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the
Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated in Jefferson County, Florida this 24th day of March, 2009.

Kirk B. Reams
Clerk of ,Circuit Court
Sherry Sears
Deputy Clerk

Albertelli Law Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL
33623 (813) 221-4743 08-05693
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act,
persons needing a special accommodation to participatte in this
proceeding should contact Kirk B. Reams no later than seven (7)
days prior to the proceeding at room 10, Jefferson County


Attorney for plaintiff Timothy D. Padgett, Pa
2878 Remington Green Circle Tallahassee, Fl 32308
850-422-2520


4/1,8/09,c
^ s- -- -


NOTICE

The Jefferson County Planning Commission will review
and 'make at recommendation to the Jefferson County'
Commission regarding a proposed major development site plan
review for a classroom addition at the Aucilla Christian
Academy. The proposed site plan is located at 7803 Aucilla
Road on parcel number 18-1 N-6E-0000-0260-0000. Interested
parties may present their concerns at the Jefferson County
Planning Commission meeting on April 23, 2009 at 7:00 p.m.
in the courtroom,of the Jefferson County Courthouse located at
the intersection of U.S. Highway 19 and U.S. Highway 90 in
Monticello, Florida 32344.
The Jefferson County Commission will review and make a
decision regarding a proposed .major development site plan
review for a classroom addition at the Aucilla Christian
Academy. The proposed site plan. is located at 7803 Aucilla
Road onparcel number 18-1 N-6E-0000-0260-0000. Interested
parties may present their concerns at thq Jefferson County
Commission meeting on May 7, 2009 at 9:00 a.m. in the court-
house annex located at 435 West Walnut Street:in Monticello,
Florida 32344. The meeting may be continued as necessary.
Prior to the meeting interested persons may. contact the
Jefferson County Planming and Building Department at 850-
342-0223 or write, the- Department at 445 West Palmer Mill
Road, Monticello, FL 32344 and provide comments. The devel-'
opment proposal may be reviewed during business hours at the
Department office.
Information concerning the meeting is available at. the
Jefferson County Planning Department, 445 W. Palmer Mill
Road, Monticello, FL. 32344; Telephone 850-342-0223. From
the Florida "Government in the Sunshine Manual", page 36,
paragraph c: Each board, commission, or agency of this stated or
of any political subdivision thereof shall include in the notice of
any meeting or hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing is'
required, of such board,, commission, or agency, conspicuously
on such notice, the advice that, if a person decides to appeal any
decision made by the board, agency, or commission with
respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he
or she will need a record' of the proceedings, and that,, for such
purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings, is made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence updn which, the appeal is to be based.

4/8/09,c


I purpose, he or she may need to ensure that verbatim record of
the proceedings, is made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

S." 4/8/09,c.


i







Wednesday, April 8, 2009


18A Monticello News


HEAY RAINS RESULT II ROAD CLOSURES


Continued From Page


8.80


1 grader making one pass and going around any washouts to at
least give residents one lane through any bad areas. "We're
faced with restoring dirt roads within this county," he said.
"That's going to cost a lot more money than anybody has to
pay, at this time. It's said, and disheartening to see, all of
that hard work that we've done in the last six months, since
5 Tropical Storm Fay. gone in a wave of Mother Nature's
wrath."
County road closures include. Bailey, Casa Bianca. Groover,
Jefferson, Sneads Smokehouse, and West Lake.
Damaged roads include: Barnes (pipes). Brooks (washes
pipes). Cox (pipes), Clark (washes), Clayton (washes), Dills (wash-
es), Fulford (washes). Gilbert (washes), Hokanson (washes), Hopson
(washes), Indian Hills (washes pipes). Lanier (pipes), Limestone
(washes,'pipes). Lloyd Acres (washes). Lukens (washes), Malloy
Landing (washes.. pipes), Oetinger (washes), Old Tung Grove
(washes). Rudolph Lane washess). Smith
& (washes). State Line (washes), Still
(pipes washes), Upper Cody (wash-
es/pipes), Walker Spring (washes. pipes).
and Willie (washes).
Roads closed due to being under water
included; Boston Highway, Cody Church.
Curtis Mill, Lloyd Creek, Malloy Landing,
North Rocky Ford. Pinney Woods. Thompson ,,.
Valley, Turkey Scratch. Watermill. and West :-"-
Pinhook ......


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