Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00247
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello, Fla
Publication Date: February 25, 2009
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00247
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text



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Special Collections
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PO Box 117007
Gainesville FL 32611-7007
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I V IONTICELLO
l41th Year No. 9 Wednesday, February 25, QO


Impact Fees Meeting Set
The County Commission will hold a special
meeting 6 p.m. Thursday Feb. 26, in the courthouse.
to consider a reduction of the impact fees.
Commissioners plan to adopt one of two ordir'
nances, both of which propose doing away with the
transportation and law-enforcement impact'fees.
The difference is that oie ordinance would keep
the fire and. ambulance impact fees intact and the
other would reduce the latter by 50 percent. '
Members of the public interested in the issue
should attend the meeting.


Waterfowl Fundraiser

Outperforms Last Year
Event Grosses $26,000, Sees High Attendance,


Monticello News Photo By Laz Aleman, February 20, 2009
Congressman Allen Boyd and wife Cissy, here
talking with RaymondBass (left), of Avalon Plantation,
were among those attending the DU fundraiser on Fri-
day evening.


Monticello News 'noro by Laz Aleman, Feoruary zu, zuu2
Attendees examine the shotguns and other items
that were set for auction later in the evening at the DU
fundraiser on Friday.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
The annual
fundraiser of the Au-
cilla River Chapter of
Duck Unlimited (DU) on
Friday evening, Feb. 20,
confounded expecta-
tions that the event
.might prove diminished
in attendance or pro-
ceeds because of the
economic downturn.
It turns out that 115
people attended the af-
fair at the Willow Pond
Plantation and that the
dinner and associated
auctions grossed
$26,000, a 40 percent in-
crease over last year's


fundraiser.
Nelda Thiel, a DU
committee member, said
Monday that the organi-
zation expected to con-
tribute $21,000 to the
Florida Wetlands Con-
servation Initiative,
once the expenditures
for food and the hall
rental were deducted.
The aim of the Florida
Wetlands Conservation
Initiative is to conserve
wetlands in both the
state and in those parts
of the country that are
breeding grounds for
waterfowl that are im-
portant to Florida.
Please See
Fundraiser Page 4A


Monticello News Photo By Laz Aleman, February 20, 2009
Don and Cindy Lee brought their grandson, Tren-
ton Stuart, 3, to the DU fundraiser on Friday night.


Medical Helicopter Ser


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
Air Methods Corpo-
'ration, a 29-year-old Col-
orado-based company
that is in the business of
providing emergency
air medical transport,
may soon be relocating
its helicopter unit from
Taylor to Jefferson


County
Economic Develop-
ment Director Julie
Conley informed the
County Commission on
Thursday evening, Feb.
19, that Air Methods had
offered to lease an acre
at the industrial park for
a 10-year period at $300
monthly, provided the
county met certain con-


NEWS


editions.
Those conditions, as
Conley enumerated
them: The county must
prepare the site for a
modular building, in-
stall a septic tank, and
build a 40 by 40 feet con-
crete landing pad for the
helicopters.
Conley said the com-
pany would reimburse


county Home
the county over time for
the cost of the improve-
ments, but in the end,
the county would be im-
proving its own prop-
erty
In return, the com-
pany would bring six
full-time employees and
four or five part-time
Please See Medical
Helicopter Page 4A


Single-Vehicle Crash .


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
A Georgia man was un-
injured following a single-
vehicle crash on 1-10 Friday
Feb. 20.
Florida Highway Patrol
reports that 11:15 a.m. Fri-
day, Alexander D. Landy 20,
of Roswell, GA, was driving
a 2002 Ford SUV west in the
inside westbound lane,
when for unknown reasons,
the vehicle drifted across the


roadway and into the me-
dian.
I Landy overcorrected
and the vehicle swerved
back across both westbound
lanes and turned half a turn
clockwise and slid into the
brush where it came to a
rest facing east.
The crash was not alco-
hol-related. Landy was
wearing a seatbelt and unin-
jured. The vehicle sustained
approximately $1,000 dam-
age on the left hand side.


2 Sections. 22 Pages
Around Jeff. Co. 4-9A Legals
Classifieds 12A School
Dining Out Guide 9A Sports
History 8A Viewpoints


13A
16A
10A-11A
2-3A


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2A Monticello News


www.ecbpublishing.com


Wednesday, February 25, 2009


VIEWPOINTS


PINIONS


The Bea y Of A WoLetters to the Editor are typed wordfor word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.
The Beauty Of A Woman Writer Lauds Column About Town In Illinois


A little boy asked his
mother, "Why are you
crying?"
"Because I'm a
woman," she told him.
"I don't understand,"
he said. His Mom just
hugged him and said,
"And you never will."
Later the little boy
asked his father, "Why
does mother seem to,cry
for no reason?"
"All women cry for no
reason," was all his dad
could say.
The little boy grew up
and became a man, still
wondering why women
cry.
Finally he put in a
call to God. When God got
on the phone, he asked,
"God, why do women cry
so easily?"
God said:
"When I made the
woman she had to be spe-
cial.
I made her shoulders
strong enough to carry
the weight of the world,
yet gentle enough to give
comfort
I gave her an inner
strength to endure child-
birth and the rejection
that many times comes
from her children.
I gave her a hardness


that allows her to keep
going.when everyone else
gives up, and take care of
her family through sick-
ness and fatigue with out
complaining.
I gave her the sensi-
tivity to love her children
under any and all cir-
cumstances, even when
her child has hurt her
very badly.
I gave her strength to
carry her husband
through his faults and
fashioned her from his
rib to protect his heart.
I gave her wisdom to
know that a good hus-
band never hurts his
wife, but sometimes tests


her strengths and her
resolve to stand beside
him unfalteringly.
And finally, I gave
her a tear to shed. This is
hers exclusively to use
whenever it is needed."
"You see my son,"
said God, "the beauty of a
woman is not in the
clothes she wears, the fig-
ure that she carries, or
the way she combs her
hair.
The beauty of a
woman must be seen in
her eyes, because that is
the doorway to her heart -
the place where love
resides."


r te-p '3as fI Iume
p


TEN YEARS AGO
February 24, 1999
S Proponents of economic develop-
ment who have been pushing for the
county to hire a full-time person to do
nothing but pursue economic devel-
/ opment got a boost from an unexpect-
i ,|ed quarter last week.
The drawdown of Lake
Miccosukee is scheduled to begin
S Monday. The County Commission
Approved the action Thursday night,
After hearing from a representative
Sof the Department of Environmental
Protection who said the drawdown
was critical to maintain the health of
the lake.
One council member is proposing
i that something along the lines of the
SRoostertown Community Garden be
duplicated in the north part of town.
Monticello police are investigating a
shooting in the Roostertown arealast
;iThursday night that resulted in the
Sounding of a bystander.
A little more than'a year since
STax Collector Frances Walker moved
Sher office to the annex building just
North of the courthouse and already
1 her expanded operation has out-
Sgrown the new location.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
February 22, 1989
: Vowing to continue programs
Sialready implemented and increasing
S activities at the Senior center, incom-
ing director Bobbie Krebs will finish
up as activities director at the
Jefferson Nursing Center February
28 to assume her new role March 1.
S The idea of a resource officer at
S Howard Middle School is back on the
I front burner again. At least, school
officials are trying to bring the issue
to the forefront.
S Discarded trash along county
roads has always been a problem, but
Sthe problem is quickly becoming an
Eyesore to the community, say some
County officials who are trying to fig-
S ure out how best to deal with the
\ problem.
S Putting together a plan to put a
1 911 system into operation in a county
Sfor the first time is no simple matter.
SThe action the County Commission
took last week to implement the basic
enhanced emergency communica-
tion system was the first in a series of
| ,complex steps that must be followed
in order for the system to be opera-
tional by next year.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
February 22, 1979
State Representative Herb
SMorgan, Don Price and James Harold
Thompson came to Monticello
STuesday night to find out what they
Scan do for their Jefferson County
constituents during the 1979 session
Sof the Florida Legislature, and coun-
' ty officials pleaded with them to do


something about skyrocketing work-
men's compensation premiums,.
unfair unemployment compensation :
requirements and the high cost of
protecting the county against law-.
suits.
The Jefferson county Planning
Commission will hold its first public
hearing tonight on a proposed land
use plan and development code
designed to regulate the future'
progress of the county.
An audit report just released by :
the State Department of Education
confirms that the Jefferson County
School District has been keeping
accurate records on transportation
and pupil attendance.
The rabies problem in Jefferson
County is doggone serious. The num-
ber of stray dogs seems to be increas-_
ing. There has been an alarming in
crease in the number of rabies cases:.
in Georgia, and officials here are,
worried that rabid raccoons, may:
have migrated into this area..
FORTY YEARS AGO
February 22, 1969
Folsom's Jewelry, on East
Washington St., was burglarized
sometime Thursday morning and
Thomas Folsom, owner, estimated
$5,000 on an early appraisal.
Lee Kiser and Bobby Plaines
were winners of the Junior-Senior
golf tournament played Sunday at
Jefferson Country Club.
Walter R. Johnson and Stephen'
Oetinger graduated from North
Florida Junior College at the end of
Term 1.
Named in this year's national:
listing of America's most outstand-
ing students is Katherine Langhorne
Kelly, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John
A. Kelly, Jr., of Monticello.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
February 22, 1959
Bids for building the new post
office are to be opened on March 13.
Construction is expected to begin in
April.
Mrs. Jim Cook entertained the
Rook Club. Mrs. John Ward comple-
mented her aunt, Mrs. S.L. Long of'
Atlanta with a coffee and bridge par-
ties were enjoyed at the homes of Mr.
and Mrs. W.W. Scruggs, Mrs.
Desmond Bishop, Mrs. Charles
Anderson and Mrs. Emerson
Ridgeway.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
February 22, 1949
A Woman's Business and
Professional Woman's Club has been
organized with Mrs. R.J. Taylor pres- i
ident.
Students from the first eight
grades of school visited all the
churches and were shown the pipe
organ and given inspirational talks
by the various ministers.


Dear Editor,
This letter is in ref-
erence to the excellent
editorial, by Devvy,
Feb. 6, 2009. thought it
might relate to the issue
of the impact fees cur-
rently being debated in
Jefferson County.
To summarize, the
column features a small
town called Crestwood,
IL. This town of 12,000
has been run by the
same mayor since 1969.
Now, their system of
government would be
ardently opposed by
many government
employees for the sim-
ple reason that their
system would eliminate
some of the exorbitant
agencies presently
bloating government
budgets; from small
towns, all the way up to
the federal level.
The last time I
looked, the federal gov-
ernment was
"Bankrupt," in the
process of creating a
worldwide financial cri-
sis. The fact is that just
about every govern-
ment entity in this
country uses the Feds
as a paradigm. Unless
we all start looking at
better ways for our gov-
ernments to do busi-
ness-like Crestwood
did 40 years ago, and
now operates at a sur-
plus. I do not think it a
reach to conclude the
same- results for all. is
inevitable.


As a business friend-
ly environment, the
town is prospering. In
addition, every year the
government surplus
from property taxes is
returned to the people,
their economy is consis-
tently stimulated. It's
just "free enterprise
101," with a 40-year
track record'of success.
I could be wrong,
but a healthy debate in
Jefferson County, in
context with how we
currently operate just
might be a good thing.
In a time of crisis, it is
also a time of opportuni-
ty for an honest evalua-
tion of the process that
got us where we are,
and how we improve
the process.
Thank You,
Lawrence Beger
Monticello


Got A Cute

Photo?

Send It To Us
And We'll Share
It With Our
Readers

Kids Dogs *
Strange Stuff,
Etc.


Monticello
P.O. Box


News
428


Monticello, FL
32345

"You Can't Be
Without It"


THE JEFFERSON COUNTY
SCHOOL BOARD

Announces a workshop to which the public is invited.
The workshop will be held at the Desmond M. Bishop
Administration Building on
Monday, March 2, 2009 at 6:00 p.m.

The purpose of the workshop is to continue the Designing
of the Strategic Plan. This is the 2nd of three workshops
to bp held on this subject. Everyone is invited
to come and participate.


Neighbor '


Judith Jones

Judith Jones came to Jefferson County 24
y ago from Clewiston, FL. She was a school-
t er, having taught reading, science, and social
s es in the public schools before retiring three
y| ago. She is a graduate of Florida Atlantic
ersity (FAU) in Boca Raton, FL.
"I loved teaching, and I especially love
b ing into my students yet today. I continue to
s em in the supermarket or on the streets. They
k me, and I still remember them," she says.
She is an active member of the Tallahassee Senior Center whe
s s learning to paint in oils, and plays card games like Canasta an
B e. She also takes computer classes, offered free at the Public Li

She sings in her church choir and travels with church member
s nir centers and retirement facilities to entertain the residents and a.
She has a daughter, Cathy Tuten, and three grandchildren.




MONTICELLO



NEWS. .


EMERALD GREENE Publisher/Owner p.m. for Friday's paper. Deadline for Legal
Advertisement is Monday at 5:00 pm. for
lY CIC ON r Wednesday's paper, and Wednesday at 5 p.m. for
RAY UI VHON Friday's paper. ,


Managing Editor
LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer
CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL ADS
Deadline for classified is Monday at 12:00 p.m.
for Wednesday's paper, and Wednesday at 12:00


There will be a '1ff" charge for Affidavits.
CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Subscription Rates:
Florida $45 per year
Out-of-State $52 per year
(State & local taxes included)


AMENDED NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
ON APPLICATIONS FOR CERTICATES OF
APPROPRIATENESS

The City of Monticello Historic Design Review Board will
conduct a public, hearing on applications for certificates of
appropriateness for the following properties located within
the Monticello Historic District:

485 E. Washington Street roof replacement
450 W. Madison Street erection of fence and wall
110 E. Dogwood Street repairs and remodeling

The public hearing will be held on February 26, 2009 at
7:00 p.m. at City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Street, Monticello.
For more information, contact City Hall.


By: Debbie Snapp
Monticello News
Staff Writer

71


6(t


Established 1869
A weekly newspaper [USPS 361-620] designed for the express reading pleasures of the people of its circulation area.
be they past, present or future residents.
Published weekly by ECB Publishing, Inc., 1215 North Jefflrson St. Monticello, FL 32344. Periodicals postage
PAID at the Post Office in Monticello, Florida 32344.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MONTICELLO NEWS. P.O. Box 428, Monticello, FL 32345.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of
the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any
advertisement submitted.
All photos given to ECB Publishing. Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from
the date they are dropped off. ECB Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline.


0=09


P.O. Box 287
1215 North
jefferson Street
Monticello, Florida
32345
850-997-3568
Fax 850-997-3774
EAllail: liloilticellolleNI's
il.coill
c(bellibar(InIaLA








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Wednesday, February 25, 2009


VIEWPOINTS
.. t .


PINIONS


Javonta Hendrez German Hollis Ray Doucette


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Marquis Jarrode
Capers, 19, of Jefferson
County, was picked up
Feb. 16 on a Leon County
warrant on the charges of
false imprisonment and
battery. He was trans-
ported to Tallahassee the


I hate those little
stickers that come on
most fruits you buy at
the grocery store. You
can never quite get all
of it off.
You walk into the
ladies room at the
same time, say hello,
and then your co-
worker (or boss)
continues to talk to
you about work while
going to the bathroom.
It's called a bathroom
"break" for a reason.
Please don't speak to
me while you're
peeing.

Grocery carts with
one bad wheel or any
other non-working
parts
Taking forever to
leave a parking space
while others are
clearly waiting for it
Neighbors'cats that
potty in your veggie
garden!!!
People who don't
listen when you are
talking to them. How
many times have you
said afew sentences to
someone only to have
them suddenly say
"what did you just
say? I wasn't paying
attention."


Re- d es'Pet.Peeves
BifySr.

Go an opnion anddon'
Sen tt s
P.. ox42






o~m usl hweerth
Nes tffrsevs'h
"SD "u3' -Jiu


same day.
Matthew Thomas
O'Donnell, 23, of
Monticello, was arrested
Feb. 16, and charged with
violation of probation on
the charge of throwing a
deadly missile into an
occupied vehicle. Bond
was withheld and he
remained .at the County
Jail, Feb. 23.
Javonta Hendrez
German, 22, of Jefferson
County, was arrested
Feb. 17, and charged with
home invasion robbery
with a firearm. Bond was
set at $25,000 and he bond-
ed out of jail the same
day.
Hollis Ray Doucette,
49, of Jefferson County,
was arrested Feb. 17, and
charged with battery
(domestic) and aggravated
assault with a deadly
weapon. Bond was set at a
total of $6,500, $1,500 for
the battery charge and
$5,000 for the weapon


James Darwin Pease
charge. He bonded out of
jail the next day.
James Darwin Pease
of Broxton, GA, was
arrested Feb. 18, and
charged with lewd or las-
civious conducts for inap-
propriately touching
minors on several occa-
sions. Bond. was set at
$150,000 and he remained
at the County Jail Feb. 23.
Latasha Shadawn
Samuel, 35, of
Thomasville, was arrested
Feb. 22, and charged with
driving under the influ-
ence, and driving while
license was suspended.
Bond was set at a total of
$1,000, $500 for each
charge and she bonded
out of jail the same day.
SDarrell Dewayne
Broxie, 41, of Jefferson
County, was arrested Feb.
21, and charged with fail-
ure to sign citation. Bond
was set at $100 and he
bonded out of jail the
same day.


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Katie
Anderson,
executive
director of
." the Opera
House
explains a
Black
Woman's
exhibit, on
display at
the house,
I in Nov,
1993.


Mt~ondicello News o 3A


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4A Monticello News


FOUND


www.ecbpublishing.com


EFFERSON


Wednesday, February 25, 2009


COUNTY


Medical Helicopter Cont. From Page 1 Fundraiser Cont. From Page 1


employees, which repre-
sented $750,000 in annual
salaries, as well as provid-
ing a valuable service for
citizens.
Conley said Air Meth-
ods was eyeing the parcel
just west of Conway
Trucking Company, on the
south side of Industrial
Park Drive. She said the
company expected to sign
a formal agreement with
the county soon, but was
merely looking for an
agreement in principle at
the moment.
Commissioners were
amenable to the proposal,
seeing it as both' a signifi-
cant step toward economic
development and one that
would provide a critical
service to county resi-
dents.
Until recently, Air
Methods has had its three
helicopters stationed at
Perry, Quincy and the Cap-
ital Regional Medical Cen-
ter in Tallahassee. On Jan.
7, however, it was reported


4 N
that Air Methods was re-
ducing its area fleet from
three to two helicopters
and consolidating the loca-
tions in Leon and Taylor
counties. It was also re-
ported at that time that Air
Methods was considering
moving from its Perry lo-
cation.
Fire Rescue Chief Jim
Billberry, himself once an
emergency helicopter pilot
in south Florida, has re-
portedly been instrumen-
tal in the negotiations with
Air Methods.
The Colorado-based
Air Methods Corporation
operates a fleet of 320 heli-
copters and fixed-wing air-
crafts at 253 bases in 43
states, according to the
company website. The
company bills itself as the
country's largest provider
of air medical emergency
transport services and sys-.
tems, transporting more
than 98,000 patients annu-
Sally
The company report-


Fires, Vandalism


she and her husband
awoke with thick smoke
in the house and immedi-
ately evacuated. She
stated that all heaters
were off and that she had
no idea how the fire could
have started. She also re-
ported that there was no
insurance on the mobile
home. .. .
The State Fire Mar-
shall was on scene at ap-
proximately 3:20 a.m. and
the Red Cross was on
scene at approximately
3:30 a.m. to assist the
homeowners, at which,
time, the scene was se-
cured and no additional
fire hazards found.
'There were no in-
juries reported,' but the
family pets did not make
it out of the home.
In related news, a
number of calls have
come into the News re-
porting that 7th Heaven
Flea Market and Bazaar
took the homeowners to
their place of business
over the weekend and an-
nounced over the inter-
com system that the
couple lost their home
and all the vendors made
donations to the couple.


During the same pe-
riod of time, donations
were also collected for
Natalie Eades, the two
year-old suffering from
leukemia, and undergoing
treatment at Shands.
Sometime during the
weekend of Feb. 7, some-
one stole all four axles off
S:the old military truck con-
verted into a tanker truck
at Lloyd Volunteer Fire
Department. Fire Rescue
Chief Jim Billberry re-
marked: "Anyone who
would intentionally dis-
able a county fire truck at
a volunteer fire station
which responds to the
greatest number of calls
in the county, has no sense
of morality"
Billberry said on
Wednesday that they had
gone to the State Forestry
Department in Lake City
to the bone yard looking
at the old trucks in hopes
of replacing the stolen
axles. He said that they
quickly found several ve-
hicles just like the one
here, but unfortunately
the main reason they
were in the bone yard was
due to broken axles.
Through extensive


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question of the week!


edly provides its services
under the Community
Based Model (CBM) or
Hospital Based Model
(HBM).
As of Dec. 31, 2006, the
CBM model provided its
services in 18 states and
the HBM division provided
services to hospitals in 26
states under operating
agreement with terms
ranging from one to 10
years.
Under both operations,
the company transports
persons who require inten-
sive medical care from the
.scene of an accident or
general care hospitals to
highly skilled trauma cen-
ters or tertiary care cen-
ters. Under the CBM
delivery model, Air Meth-
ods employees provide
medical care to patients en
route, while under the
HBM delivery model, med-
ical care en route is pro-
vided by employees or
contractors of the hospi-
tals.

Count. From Page 1


searching, they were able
to locate four good axles
and returned to the
county and began putting
them on the disabled vehi-
cle. Billberry added that
John Cooksey would prob-
ably finish the installa-
tion by Wednesday
afternoon, again putting
the vehicle back in serv-
ice to the community.
The Jefferson County
Sheriff's Office continues
to investigate the incident
in hopes of soon tracking
down and arresting the
culprit(s). Anyone with
information is asked to
contact the Sheriff's De-
partment at 997-2523.
Feb. 13, at 6:45 p.m., a
call came in to Fire Res-
cue concerning a struc-
ture-fire at the home of
Wilton Boland, located at
12617 Gamble Road in
Wacissa.
SUpon arrival the back
of the home was fully in-
volved. Prior to Fire Res-
cue's arrival on the
scene, a volunteer unit
deployed two attack lines
making an exterior at-
tack. Fire Rescue de-
ployed two attack lines
and made entry through
the front door knocking
the fire down until it was
under control.
The entire back of
the house was a loss. On
scene were 10 Fire Res-
cue personnel, three
Lloyd volunteers, eight
Monticello volunteers
and three Ashville volun-
teers.
James Boland,
brother .to Wilton, re-
ported to the News that
the home, which was
more than 100 years old,
was originally moved
from Leon County at 1-10
to Wacissa in five sec-
tions and then reassem-
bled and Wilton
refurbished the struc-
ture, bringing it back to
its original glory
He said that the fire
damage was limited to
the kitchen and dining
room area with heavy
smoke damage through-
out the home, and that
the State Fire Marshall
reported that the fire had
originated as an electri-
cal problem in one of the


Dave Grabow, DU sen-
ior regional director for
north Florida, explained
that whenever DU dedi-
cates money toward a
project, private and gov-
ernment entities will gen-
erally match the funding 5
to 1, and many, times as
high as 13 to 1. He cited
among the projects that
DU has helped to fund the
St. Marks National
Wildlife Refuge and Hick-
ory Mound impound-
ments, as well as a project
near Chipley and another
on St. Vincent Island.
The affair on Friday
started at 6 p.m. with a so-
cial hour that gave atten-
dees an opportunity to
visit with each other and
get a view of the numer-
ous items that were to be
raffled or live or silent
auctioned later in the
evening as part of the
fundraiser. Arranged on
tables both against the
back wall and an alcove-
like section of the expan-
sive dining room, the
displayed items ranged
from framed waterfowl
prints and turkey feather
collections to hunting
gear and finely tooled
shotguns to rustic out-
doors chairs and silver-
ware sets.
But first came a
hearty meal of grilled
steak, baked potato and
fresh mixed salad,, accom-
panied by two or three
kinds of cake desserts
and followed immediately
by the commencement of
the live auction.
Right off, the bidding
started lively and re-
mained so throughout the
evening, with the auction-
eer's rapid-fire delivery
peppered with many a
comic observation or
aside. Typical of the bid-
ding, a framed print of
waterfowl flying over a
lake'went for $155; a cer-
tificate for a quail hunt
for two at a local planta-
tion went for $500; the
turkey feather collection
went for $450; and a
bronze sculpture of two
running bucks went for
$195.
Throughout the auc-
tion, any time that the
bidding lacked, the auc-
tioneer reminded the au-
dience that the money
was for good cause, which


Monticello News Photo By Laz Aleman, February 20, 2009
Janegale Boyd tries to get her granddaughter, Abigail
Boyd, to smile for the camera at the annual DU fundraiser
on Friday night.


seemed to produce the de-
sired effect. .The event
lasted until about 11 p.m.
A national organiza-
tion with representation
in all 50 states and Canada
and Mexico, the DU stated
mission is to conserve, re-
store and manage wet-
lands and associated
habitats for North Ameri-
can waterfowl. Since its
inception in 1937, the or-
ganization has conserved
nearly 12 million acres of
habitat for waterfowl and
other wetlands-dependent
wildlife throughout North
America.
In Florida, DU has
conserved more than
26,000 acres on both pub-
lic and private lands since
1987.
The organization has
70 chapters in Florida and
a membership of about
14,000. The Aucilla River
Chapter of Ducks Unlim-
ited represents about 200
members, according to
Grabow.


Per the DU website:
"Florida is part of the At-
laintic Flyway, which'pro-
vides an importbrit'wnihter
habitat for migrating wa-
terfowl from the prairies,
Great Lakes and eastern
Canada. The state's
coastal and interior wet-
lands provide important
habitat for a significant
numbers of blue-winged
teal, green-winged teal,
ring-necked ducks, north-
ern pintails and wood
ducks. Florida is also
unique among Atlantic
Flyway states in that its
wetlands and interior
prairies offer habitat to
the native mottled duck."
DU points out that
hunting, fishing and
wildlife activities con-
tribute more than $6 bil-
lion .to the Florida's
economy each year, and
that four million Floridi-
ans, or 25 percent of the
state's population, partic-
ipate in these activities
annually


Everything You Need


Whatever information you're looking for, job listings,
sports highlights, school or local news, the newspaper
has got you covered, Call 850-997-3568 to have all of
this and more delivered to you bi-weekly.


Monticello News t The Jefferson County Journal

1215 North Jefferson Street

850.997.3568


___








Wednesday, February 25, 2009


OONND


www.ecbpublishing.com


J EFFERSON


~T~rXIX~~JIX-~


Monticello News 5A


COUNTY


AtLw0A


Ruby Inez Edwards age
82, passed away at her
home in Monticello,
Thursday, February 19,
2009.
Funeral services were
held Sunday, February 22,
2009 at 2:00 PM. at Beggs
Funeral Home Monticello
Chapel, 485 East Dogwood
Street, in Monticello (850-
997-5612). The family re-
ceived friends Saturday,
February 21, 2009 from 5:00-
7:00 PM at Beggs Funeral
Home Monticello Chapel.
. Mrs. Edwards was a
life long resident of Monti-
cello and a member of
Ebenezer Baptist Church.
She had worked for Talla-
hassee Memorial Hospital
and kept children for many


:Clyde Henry Sauls
began his eternal life on
December 18, 2008 in Or-
land, FL following a
lengthy illness.
He was born in Monti-
cello, FL to Clyde and
Genevieve Sauls on May 1,
1934. Clyde deeply loved
his Jefferson County roots
with his family legacy dat-
ing back to the early
1800's. He graduated from
Jefferson County High
School in Monticello, at-
tended Stetson University
before graduating from
the University of Florida.
Clyde served his country
in the US Army during the
Korean War. His business
career as an Allstate In-
surance Agent spanned 20
years bringing him and
his family to Orlando in
1968. He served his com-
munity on the elected
Edgewood City Council
1996-97. In retirement,
Clyde was extremely ac-
tive and effective serving
as a Mediator and Arbitra-
tor for Florida's 9th Judi-
cial Circuit and the
Florida Supreme Court.
He was also very active in
the Central Florida Stroke
Club and loved to fish,
play golf, New Smyrna
Beach and the mountains
of North Carolina.
A graveside memorial
service will be held Satur-
day at 2:00 P.M., February
28, 2009 at Roseland Ceme-
tery in Monticello,
Florida. In lieu of flowers,
the family has requested
memorials be sent to the
American Heart Associa-
tion, Memorial Tribute, P.


years in Monticello.
She is survived by four
sons; Jerry (Emma)
Branch, Alton (Linda)
Branch and Marvin
(Cricket) Edwards all of
Monticello and Justin
(Niki) Branch of Tallahas-
see; three daughters Lena
Faye (Jimmy) Shiver, and
Mary Jane Branch of Mon-
ticello, Carolyn (Billy) Hor-
ton of Helena, Arkansas;
three sisters Vera Mae
(Harold) Merritt, Willie
Mae Granger and Rena
Walker; 23 grandchildren,
4 great grandchildren and
1 great great grandchild.
She was preceded in
death by her husband Kaye
Edwards and two sons Roy
and Ray Branch.


WALTER CHARLES RAMSEY


Walter Charles Ramsey
age 62 passed away Thurs-
day, February 19, 2009 in
Tallahassee, Florida.
A service of remem-
brance will be Wednesday,,
February 25, 2009 at 2:00
PM at Beggs Funeral Home
Monticello Chapel, 485 E.
Dogwood Street, Monti-.
cello. The family request in
lieu of flowers contribu-
tions may be made to the
Jefferson County Humane
Society, '1250 Mamie Scott
Drive, Monticello, Florida
32344.
Mr. Ramsey was a na-


tive of Michigan City, Indi-
ana and had lived in
Palatka, Florida before
moving to Monticello in
1985. He was a Real Estate
agent and served on the
Rural Development Com-
mission. He was of the
Lutheran faith.
Mr. Ramsey is survived
by his wife Melinda Ram-
sey of Monticello, his
beloved dog BoBo Ramsey;
one brother Dr. Howard
Wayne (Nancy) Ramsey of
Gainesville, Florida; one
sister Bobbie Jean Jones of
Gainesville, Florida.


O. Box 840692, Dallas, TX
75284 or they may be made
on-line at american-
heart.org.
Mr. Sauls is survived
by his wife of 51 years,
Shirley Cox Sauls; Daugh-
ters Lynn S. King (Jay)
of Ashville, NC, Lauri S.
Mayo (David) of Palm City,
FL; Nephew James S.
Sauls (Shannon) of Talla-
hassee; Niece- Cynthia S.
Kynoch of Tallahassee;
four grandchildren; Sis-
ters, Frances S. Jarrett of
Pensacola, FL and
Maryellen M. Higgin-
botham of Mapleton, GA;
Brother-Judge N. Sanders
Sauls of Tallahassee.


Ni -~


WE TAKE THE
DVBAIDS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


RUBY INEZ EDWARDS


Jefferson Arms Apartment.
Bookmobile services are
made available through a
State of Florida Communi-
ties Caring Grant.
FEBRUARY 27
Memorial Missionary Bap-
tist Church Relay For Life
team is holding a Fish Fry to
raise money for the fight
against cancer Friday 11 a.m.
until sold out. The church lo-
cation is on the corner of
Martin Luther King Street
and 2nd Street in Monti-
cello. The cost is $7 per plate
or $5 for a fish sandwich. For
more information contact
Lucretia Brown at 997-4039.
FEBRUARY 27
The WILD Bookmobile will
be in the area on Friday at
the Lloyd Post Office, 7 Main
Street, from 3:30 to 4p.m.; and
at the Lamont Chevron Fast
Track, highway 27, from 4:30
to 5:30 p.m.; and Union Hill
AME Church, off highway
259 in Wacissa, from 6:00 to
6:30 p.m. Services are made
possible by a State of Florida
Communities in Caring
Grant.
FEBRUARY 27
Community Skate Night is
held 6 to 8 p.m. on the last Fri-
day of each month at the
Church of the Nazarene on
'


FCAT JA a N Frf. 28


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Blast off at the FCAT
Jam' 10 a.m. to p. Satur -
day,' Feb .'28, at' the'
SGreenville Madison Learhi :
ing Center, where students
are helped to pass the FCAT.
Parents are encouraged
to bring their children out
for the FCAT Blast. All pub-


lic school students are wel-
comed to attend and partic-
ipate in the day's activities.
There will be live enter-
tainmtent, fee' fod, 'and spe-
cial gUests including FAMU;
athletes. "i
Contact the center at
948-9932 or 508-3699 or just
come to the event at 1376
Southwest Grand Street in
Greenville.


Parent Boosters Meet Thursday
FRAN HUNT come out and become a
Monticello News booster for the track team
Staff Writer and coordinators urge par-
1 The Jefferson County ents of non-track members
Middle High School track to also become boosters.
team will be hosting their Serving the track team
second parent booster this year, as coaches are
meeting; 6 p.m., Thursday, Harry Jacobs, head boy's
Feb. 26 at the old Jefferson coach; Dewayne Jefferson,
County High School adult head girl's coach; and
center.' Linda Wade, assistant
Parents are urged to coach.


100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work Frame Straightening
FREE ESTIMATES INSURANCE WORK WELCOME

1630 E. Jackson St. Thomasville, GA
(located behind Langdale Auto Mall)
229-226-2077


1590 North Jefferson Street.'
This event is free. Bring your
own skates or borrow from
the Roller Club. There is a
small charge for snacks, 997-
3906.
FEBRUARY 27
Monticello Rotary Club
meets every Friday at noon
at the Monticello/Jefferson
Chamber of Commerce on
West Washington Street for
lunch and a meeting. Contact
President James Muchovej at
980-6509 for club information.
FEBRUARY 27 AND 28
USDA Commodities and Sec-
ond Harvest will welcome
volunteers to bag food pack-
ages 6:30 p.m. Friday for dis-
tribution 9-11 a.m. Saturday
at the New Bethel AME
Church, 6496 Ashville High-
way Contact Essie Norton at
997-5683 for information.
FEBRUARY 28
AA meetings are held,8 p.m.
Saturday at the Christ Epis-
copal Church Annex, 425
North Cherry Street. For
more information call 997-
2129 or 997-1955.
FEBRUARY 28


The City of Monticello and
CSAW Inc will host the dedi-
cation of Reginald Jordan
Park, on Pearl Street, 2 p.m.
Saturday Invited speakers
will present a short program.
FEBRUARY 28
Property Appraiser Angela
Gray will be stationed in
front of the Winn Dixie Store
on South Jefferson Street all
day Saturday to collect
homestead and agriculture
exemption cards, and to
offer assistance to those
needing help. For more in-
formation contact her at 997-
3356.
FEBRUARY 28
The regular last-Saturday-of-
the-month meeting of the
Tallahassee Crochet Guild
will be held 10 a.m. 2 p.m. at
the Jefferson Arts Gallery,
575 West Washington Street.
This is a free meeting. Bring
your own projects or work
on some of the Tallahassee
Crochet Guild projects. This
is a crochet and chat gather-
ing. No children please.
http://www.divacrochet.com
for updates.


FEBRUARY 26
Members of the Monticello
Woman's Club will host a
Country Dinner 5 to 7 p.m.
Thursday at the clubhouse,
990 East Pearl Street.
Chicken Pilan and/or
sausage with white acre
peas, sweet potato pouffl6,
fresh greens, macaroni and
cheese, cole slaw, potato
salad, sliced tomatoes, pies
for dessert, and cold tea will
be served or prepared for
take out. $8 adults and $4 chil-
dren under 12.
FEBRUARY 26
AA meetings are held 8 p.m.
on Thursday at the Christ
Episcopal Church Annex, 425
North Cherry Street. For
more information call 997-
2129 or 997-1955.
FEBRUARY 26
Altrusa meets at noon on the
second Thursday and at 6
p.m. on the fourth Thursday
of each month for a meal and
a meeting. Contact the
Chamber at 997-5552 for more
information.
FEBRUARY 26
The WILD Bookmobile will
be in the area on Thursday
from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Monti-
cello Christian Academy
1590 North Jefferson Street;
and from 3:15 to 4 p.m. at the


Tax-free Yield


4.0%
4.5%
5.0%
5.5%
6.0%


4.71%
5.29%
5.88%
6.47%
7.06%


Marginal Tax Rate
15% 25% 28% 33% 35%
Taxable Equivalent Yield
5.33% 5.56% 5.97% 6.15%
6.00% 6.25% 6.72% 6.92%
6.67% 6.94% 7.46% 7.69%
7.33% 7.63% 8.20% 8.46%
8.00% 833% 8.95% 9.23%


(This example does not represent current available rates.)
You may not want to overlook the benefits of tax-free investing.
If you want to free yourself from taxes, remember, you have three
ways to save: municipal bonds, tax-free mutual funds and tax-free
unit investment trusts.

Robert J. Davison EdwardJones
Financial Advisor
205 E. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32344
Bus. 850-997-2572 Fax 866-462-9184
Cell 850-933-3329
robert.davison@edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com
Making Sense of Investing


Free Yourself

From Taxes
Provided by Robert J. Davison
Did You Know?
A person in the highest federal, state and local tax brackets in
New York City loses almost one-half of his investment yield to
taxes (source: IFDS Web site, www.ifds.com).
It's' no secret that taxes can eat up a considerable amount of the
interest you earn on your investments. So how can you keep
more of the interest your investments earn? Tax-free investments
may be a good way to lighten your tax burden while further di-
versifying your portfolio.
Municipal Bonds "
A common approach to tax-free investing is the individual mu-
nicipal bond. These bonds are issued by state or local govern-
ments to build roads, airports and hospitals, among other things.
Interest earned on municipal bonds isn't taxable by the federal
government. Additionally, if you purchase a bond issued by your
municipality or state, it may be free from state and local taxes.
Typically, a minimum investment of $5,000 is required, and your
tax- free interest is paid semiannually. One of the key advantages
of individual municipal bonds is that the interest rates are fixed,
so you always know how much you'll earn.
Tax-free Mutual Funds
If you want to diversify your bond portfolio but you don't want
to buy a legion of individual bonds, you can purchase shares in
a bond mutual fund. These funds normally invest in 30 to 100
municipal bonds, giving you instant diversification. Also, in
most cases, your initial investment can be smaller than $5,000.
In addition, tax-free mutual funds pay you monthly income;
however, the amount of your payment is not fixed.
Tax-free Unit Investment Trusts
Maybe you're interested in the instant diversification of a mu-
tual fund, but you'd rather receive a fixed interest rate. Pur-
chasing shares of a unit investment trust would be an option for
you. With a unit trust, you get a fixed rate of interest and the
added benefit of diversification in seven to 12 tax-free bonds.
Plus, tax-free unit trusts pay investors a monthly check. They do,
however, generally yield less than individual bonds.
It is important to note that tax-free mutual funds and unit trusts
may be subject to the alternative minimum tax as well as state
and local taxes. In addition, the return and principal value of
municipal bonds, mutual funds and unit trusts will fluctuate
based on current market conditions.
Taxable vs. Tax-free
Because of the tax advantages they offer, tax-free investments
often provide significantly more after-tax income than compa-
rable taxable investments paying higher interest rates. The chart
below compares the taxable yields necessary to match the re-
turn on tax-free bonds after payment of federal income tax.


CLYDE HENRY SAUL S


PERSONAL INJURY&

WRONGFUL DEATH



Jon D. Caminez
Board Certified Civil Trial Attorney

Ian Brown
Cary A. "Bo" Hardee, III.




CAMINEZ, BROWN & HARDEE, P.A.

(850) 997-8181
1307 S. JEFFERSON STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon
advertisements. Before you decide, ask the lawyer to send you free written information
about their qualifications and experience.


I








6A Monticello News


FOUND


www.ecbpublishing.com






EFFERSON


Wednesday, February 25, 2009






COUNTYY


e niloraC Sutton Joins Farmers & Merchant's Avaton Plantation sets Rel


Farmers & Merchants
Bank announced today
Caroline Sutton has
joined the bank as it's in
house appraiser.
Prior to joining FMB,
Sutton was employed as a
staff appraiser with
Florida's Department of
Community Affairs,
where she was responsi-
ble for developing, ad-
ministering, and
coordinating appraisals
and appraisal reviews on
all projects receiving
grant funding. She has
been a certified appraiser
in the State of Florida
since 1986 and is an Asso-
ciate Member of the Ap-
praisal Institute.
Farmers & Merchants
Bank, organized in 1906,


slaw, dessert
a soft drink.
here will be
rtainment, a
p fire, and door
es.
'or additional
rmation, or
ets, contact
a or Perry
inger at 508-
, or 997-8714.
Mail address is
cil1 a 90,210
l.com


6 And


Going Strong


is one of the oldest and
strongest financial in-
stitutions in
Florida. Head-
quartered in
Monticello,
Florida, FMB
offers a full
range of
ban k ing
products and
services, and
operates six
branch of-
fices in Talla-
hassee, plus
individual of-
fices in Monti-
cello, Madison
and Greenville,
Florida, and
Thomasville, GA.


Bank As Assistant Vice President


The Avalon cole
Plantation Relay for and
Life Team will hold T
a Southern Style ente
Fish Fry, 5:30 p.m, cam
Friday, March 13, at prizi
the Beau Turner I
Youth Center, on US info]
Hwy 19 South in ticket
Capps. Dana
Donation is $10 Last
per ticket, and the 2174
menu includes: E
fresh bass fillets, a u
grits, French fries, @ao


Rotary 21
FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Monticello Rotary
Club, which clearly demon-
strates that great things
often come in small pack-
ages, celebrates 26 years of
service to the community
this month.
The local Club was
founded in February of
1983, sponsored by the Ro-
tary Clubs of Tallahassee
Capital, Tallahassee North-
side and Tallahassee. Col.
"Pete" Ballas, local club
"godfather", "Nap" Ellis
and Wilson Carraway were
instrumental in the found-
ing of the club.
Of the 20 founding
members, three, Mike Sims,
first president, Bill Dou-
glas, first secretary, and
Ron Cichon are still active.
The Monticello Rotary
Club builds handicap
ramps for the needy, has
constructed a bridge over
a stream on the nature
trail behind the Jefferson
Elementary School, and
actively helps the needy
during the holidays.
The club is "hands on"
and a high percentage
(more than 80 percent) par-
ticipates in most projects.
Other projects have in-
cluded a deck for the
Eagle's Nest Scout Hut,
and scholarships for stu-
dents in the vocational
areas.
In 2008, four scholar-
ships were presented to
area students to help them
with their studies. Local
members also work to-
ward the international
fight to eradicate polio,
and this year, the Monti-


S~. .


Certificate Classes

Begin March17

"1 love working with children so
it'sgoing to be very rewarding to
work with children in my career."
Jennifer Bohannan
\TCC Ear, COldhoodEduxaion Graduae
North Florida Community College
WWW.NFCC.EDU


the Rotary Foundation;
The Rotary Foundation
then uses these funds to
promote world under-
standing and on such proj-
ects as the eradication of
polio from all areas of the
world.
SInternationally, the
club has been active in
many projects and has
sponsored Dr. Wesley
Scoles in medical missions
to Guatemala, last year to
the Amazon, and this year,
a return to the Amazon.
Also, the club has
sponsored a Rotary Am-
bassadorial Scholar from
Japan. In 2005, and spon-
sored the Rotary Centen-
nial Group Study
Exchange Team Leader, Dr.
James Muchovej, who took
a group of three profes-
sionals from to Santa Cata-
rina, Brazil for five weeks.
Rotary International
was founded by Paul Har-
ris and three business as-
sociates in Chicago. They
were looking for a way to
provide service to the com-
munity using acquain-
tance as an opportunity for
service. Since then Rotary
has expanded to almost
every country.
Today, Rotary is the
only service organization
to have a seat at the UN,
and sponsors the world's
largest privately funded
international scholarship
program to major univer-
sities as well as a program
in .World Peace and Con-
flict Resolution at select
universities worldwide.
Rotary also sponsors
other exchange programs
to help in world under-
standing.
This years' Board in-
cludes, President James
Muchovej; President
Elect, Mal Jopling; Secre-
tary John Lilly; and
Treasurer Lisa McGinley.


Caroline Sutton


If you've dreamed of
becoming a certified pre-
school teacher, NFCC's
Early Childhood Education
program can make it possi-
ble for you to be in the'
classroom in less than one
year. New classes begin
March 17 and will be held
Tuesday and Thursdays
from 6 to 10 p.m. at the
NFCC Career and Techni-
cal Education Center (Bldg.
13) in Madison, FL. Those
interested in joining the
program should apply now
and begin the admissions
process,
The program combines
classroom'' instruction and
field work" experience to
prepare students for satis-
fying careers in childcare.
Graduates may become
childcare workers, teacher
aides, preschool teachers
or childcare development


specialists in public, pre-K
II I41YTi 'i I aor private day care pro-
grams.


A


llT Poi





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TRI-COUNTY FAMILY HEALTH CARE
193 NW US 221 *Greenville, FL 32331
Mon., Wed., Fri. 8am-5pm; Tues. 1 Oam-5pm; Thurs. 1Oam-7pm
North Florida Medical Centers, Inc.

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A-' C' C counseling


Are You In Need Of

Chiropractic Services?


Dr. Michael A. Miller


180 S. Cherry St., Suite D
Monticello, FL 32344
QRn n'7 14An


3116 Capital Circle NE, Ste.2
Tallahassee, FL 32308
on //TO AAfIr\


t4UU


S77/-eing Blu e CosslSen o U-0oo-4
Now excepting Blue Cross Blue Shield and most other insurances


The Early Childhood
Education program has
four learning sections
which, when completed,
lead to a vocational /tech-
nical education certificate.
The certificate satisfies re-
quirements for the Florida
Department of Education's
Early Childhood Profes-
sional Certificate (ECPC)
with a preschool specializa-
tion. Program graduates
are certified to be a lead
teacher in a public or pri-
vate preschool class in
Florida. Certificate credits
may also be applied toward
an Associate, in Applied
Science degree at NFCC.
To enter the program,
individuals must be at least
18, have a high school
diploma or GED, complete
NFCC admissions, pass the
Test of Adult Basic Educa-
tion (TABE), and have a
background check before
entering the program. Fi-
nancial aid may be avail-
able to qualified students.
For more information,
contact D.J. Waller in the
NFCC Career and Techni-
cal Education Center at
973-1629 or email
WallerD@nfcc.edu. Infor-
mation is also available at
www.nfcc.edu [search:
early childhood education].


cello Rotary will be work-
ing with the group study
exchange of young profes-
sionals.
The Monticello Rotary
Club has had a place in
helping celebrate the local
"Watermelon Festival" as
it holds a barbecue on the
Friday that begins the
weekend celebration. This
year's barbecue will be
held Friday, June 19, 2009
from 5 p.m. until 8 p.m., at
the Opera House. This
meal has been served to as
many as a thousand people
in the three-hourperiod.
The Monticello Rotary
Club is small by most stan-
dards with about 25 mem-
bers, however, it is a strong
and well-knit club. The
membership includes
many influential people
who are united in the ideal
of "service to the commu-
nity". Meetings are held
Friday at noon at the
Chamber of Commerce.
Contributions to the
Rotary Foundation are of
great importance to club
members. The club cur-
rently has 11 active, Paul
Harris Fellows: Bill Beaty,
Jack Brinson, Ron Cichon,
Mary Frances Gramling,
Roy Mediate, James Mu-
chovej, Randy Pierson,
Mike Sims, Don Taylor, Bill
Douglas, Chuck Sarkisian,
and non-Rotarian John
Muchovej.
Paul Harris fellows are
individuals who have con-
tributed significantly to


NFCC Early Childhood Education

Program Begins March 17


Homestead Exemption &
Agricultural
Classification Renewals
Due Mon. March 2nd

Property owners are encouraged to update, sign
and return these renewal cards to the Property
Appraiser's Office at 480 W. Walnut Street
(behind the old historic High School on West 90).

For the first time, there is an after-hours drop box
available at the office and on Sat., February 28th
the office will be staged at Winn Dixie from 9AM
until 4PM to accept renewal cards or assist owners
with new applications.

Your Property Appraiser will ask the County
Commission to adopt an ordinance allowing for
Automatic Homestead renewal
to begin in 2010.

For more info, call 997-3356
or visit jeffersonpa.net.


Angela Gray
Property Appraiser


I II II


i OM 9 -A II I l


OJU-p


r







Wednesday, February 25, 2009


FOUND


EFFERSON


COUNTY


Stage Company Sets Auditions
For Spring Production


RAY CICHON
Monticello News
Managing Editor
The Opera House Stage
Company will hold open au-
ditions for its coming sea-
son, 3 p.m. Sunday, March 1,
and 7 p.m. Monday, March 2,
at the Opera House.
The next production is
an interactive dinner the-
atre murder mystery,
"Killing Mr. Withers." It's a
/ comedic take off on Alfred
Hitchcock, and is set in a
run down desert diner from
the movie "The Postman Al-
ways Rings Twice."
The cast includes: Re-
becca, a tour bus guide, who
gets her bus lost, and ends
up at the Last Chance Pump
and Grill, in Death Valley,
NV.
Kurt, the ill tempered
and menacing owner/chef
of the Last Chance.
Veronica, Kurt's sexy,


young wife.
Jack, the
mechanic/waiter/drifter,
and Veronica's lover.
Natasha and Boris,
Eastern European assas-
sins and spies.
Mr. Withers, a crooked
bank president others are
trying to kill, but he just
won't die.
Deputy Weaver, same
actor as Rebecca.
Auditions will be a
"cold read," meaning a
script will be provided to
read. However, those who
have a comedic or dramatic
monologue prepared, may
bring it along, to deliver.
These roles will be cast
and rehearsals will begin in
early March. Performances
will be the first three week-
ends in May
For additional informa-
tion, contact the Opera
House at 997-4242.


0} C on8ta6i ^UBsb 3akide cf0ftoiette CQk )
Twynette and Alphonzo Reed of Mon-
Larico Dixion of Talla- ticello, FL. and has a
hassee, FL, Donald special aunt Dorothy
Gillyard of Tallahas- Wise also of Monti-
: see, and Oscar and cello. She attended
Debbie Clark of Rickards High School
Thomasville, GA an- in Tallahassee.
nounce the marriage The marriage cele-
of their daughter An- bration was held at 3
tionette Clark of Talla- p.m. Saturday, Febru-
hassee to Rontavis ary 21, 2009 at the East
Bush of Gretna, FL. Spring Primitive Bap-
Rontavis is the son tist Church located at
of Shavet Davis and 7964 Buck Lake Road in
S, Anthony Bush of Tallahassee.
Quincy, FL. He is a The reception fol-
graduate of TCLI lowed in the church
Catholic School in annex building.
9P Quincy Family and friends
Antionette is the were invited to witness
."/ s. goddaughter of Minnie the exchange of rings
Mae Reed and and vows.
8 o
v ', 2


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8A Monticello News


p/


www.ecbpublishing.com


Wednesday, February 25, .2009


wullUUM


ALFA HUNT
Monticello News
$taff Writer
The Timucua natives,
usually referred to as
Timucua Speakers today
t1ecause they all spoke di-
alects of the same lan-
4uage, lived in the
northeastern part of that
State, but some migrated
to the eastern part of
Leon County
SOthers crossed the
state line and settled in
Georgia. These Indians
were living in Florida
when the French and
Spanish first made con-.
tact in the late 1400's and
1500's. The culture and
people of the Timucua
tribes died out soon after-
ward and barely left any
imprint on recorded his-
tory, but because they
lived here before our an-
cestors, they deserve to
be remembered.
Timucuas who lived
in the panhandle, closer
to where present-day Tal-
lahassee stands and well
as in the southern por-
tion of Georgia, had rich
soil to grow crops. These
bands of Timucuas re-
lied more heavily on cul-
tivation, than the:
Timucuas who lived nearI
Jacksonville. The soil
there was mostly com-
prised of sand which is
not particularly good for
crops. Historical records
which were left report
that eastern Timucuas
Sid grow crops, but they
relied more on wild
plants as well as shell-
fish.
I Politically, the vari-
dus bands of Timucua
t ibes never united; al-
lfances between them
wouldd rise and fall
throughout their history,
But none endured.
;: When .the French
tade contact in 1564, the
ree head chiefs of the
Timucua bands were Sat-
4riwa, chief of the east
pnd north lands of the
t. Johns, Outina, chief
f lands west and south
of the St. Johns, and
Iotano, chief of the
Inds west and 'north-
*est of Outina. These
tree chiefs were at war
with one another most of
the time.
SThe French reported
the odd fashion of battle
these warriors used.
'hey did not fight to take
each other's land and the
battle was declared over
when one or two men
were killed. It almost
seems as though battles
were fought for mere en-
joyment instead of pos-
session. The French said
that lands were never
taken and after the battle
everyone would go home
peacefully.
The name "Timucua"
is believed to have come
from a misunderstand-
i~g on the Frenchman
Laudonniere's part. The
head chief Saturiwa
gave Laudonniere's a sil-
yer ingot, and the chief
ras asked where he got
the silver.


Picture drawn by Jacques le Moyne giving an idea of what
the layout was for a typical Timucua village.


Sat-
uriwa
then
pointed to
the south-
west and
said with
" g:rea t
anger"
that he
had cap-
tured it
from the
Thimag-
ona. This
word is
generally
believed
to have
meant
"terrible
enemy",
rather
than a
specific
group of
people. It
is as-
s u m e d
that he
was refer-
ring to
the head
chief Out-
ina, who
was his
greatest
enemy.
The
French
m i s un-
derstood
the mean-
ing of the
silver as
well as
the mean-
ing of the
word
"Thimag-
ona". The
w o r d
wordeventu-
eventu-


Picture drawn by Jacques le Moyne showing the chief Satourio
his wife taking a walk with their servants.


. A picture drawn over 400 years ago by French explorer, JacqL
Moyne, displaying the ritual of Black Drink which would prep w
for battle.


ally evolved from Tho-
mogona to Thimogoa to
Timogoa and finally to
Timucua which had
come from the Spanish
pronunciation. The Indi-
ans never referred to
themselves as Timucua.
A typical Timucua
village would consist of
anywhere from 50 to 300
individuals; but the Eu-
ropean reports varied
widely. The homes were
made by pounding the


thick ends of a small tree
trunks into the ground,
forming a circular shape.
The top of the trunks
were probably bent and
tied together.
Grapevines, thin pines,
or such were woven over
and under the poles, en-
circling the home. This
weaving technique made
a strong wall and roof,
which did not need nails,
and needed little tying or
reinforcement.


Palm fronds were
woven over and under
the floors and ceiling
which created a water-
proof thatch all the way
around the hut. A short
door was left on one side
and a smoke hole was
built in the roof.
Benches lined the
inner walls of the Timu-
cua home. These were
used for sleeping and
often had animal furs
lining them for cushion-


ing. A small
smudge fire
burning of
1 Idried corn cobs
would be left
underneath the
benches, -, :at
night to 'make
smoke which
would keep the
bugs away.
Areas were set
aside for cook-
ing and for
storage. Most
activities were
done outside
the home,
mainly due to
the fact that
these homes
averaged only
na and 25 feet in diam-
eter and would
house an ex-
tended family.
Outside, there
was plenty of
workspace for
housework.
When many of
the homes
came together,
they formed a
s village.
Store-
S houses may
: have been pres-
; ent in villages.
The largest and
grandest build-
ing in a Timu-
cua village
would have
been the Coun-
cil House
which could
seat all of the
jes le villagers. The
warriors "black drink
ceremony", a
ritual that war-
riors would
partake in before head-
ing out to war, was held
within the Council
House along with meet-
ings, community cele-
bration, and dances.
There is some evi-
dence that the Timucuas
also had summer houses
in the forests, but these
were mostly used for the
chief and important
families. These homes
were larger and carried
a breeze.


The Timucua bands
had a variety of food
gathering techniques
which included fishing,
hunting, gathering, and
planting. In the Jack-
sonville area, oysters
were a large component
of the Timucua diet. In
northeast Florida, but
more so in western
Florida and southern
Georgia, they planted
corn, pumpkins, squash,
gourds (which were used
for containers), beans,
sunflowers, pigweed,
and few other things.
They gathered blue-
berries, blackberries,
muscadine grapes, cher-
ries, peas, plums, per-
simmons, peppergrass
seeds, cattail roots,
acorns, hickory nuts,
onion clover, yaupon
holly leaves for the black
drink, and medicinal
plants like willow bark
for aspirin.
Animals which were
hunted included deer,
bear, raccoon, gray
Squirrel, fox squirrel,
rabbits mink fox, dol-
phin, and just about any
other thing they could
get their hands on.
Their fields were de-
fended from a variety of
thieves. Gourds were
hung on nearby trees to
provide homes for pur-
ple martins. These birds
ate the insects which fed
off the Timucua crops.
Small children made ex-
cellent rabbit and bird
chasers.
The last group of
thieves were rival Timu-
cua groups. The elderly
members of the tribe
were often stationed as
guards on these fields, so
they could raise the alert
if they spotted a raid.,
Even though it
proved to be dangerous
and sometimes fatal
task, it allowed the older,
less productive members
of society to play an im-
portant role in the sur-
vival of the village.
Their way of life con-
tinued until the Spanish
and French arrived.
Over the next few cen-
turies, the numbers
dwindled. Smallpox and
plague would some-
times wipe out half a
village. French and
Spanish soldiers would
often kill Timucua peo-
ple in raids, and Eng-
lish would capture
villagers to serve them
as slaves in the Caroli-
nas.
As missions were
being established,
Timucua children were
being taught to read,
write, Spanish culture,
and new rules. They
would soon begin tak-
ing up the Spanish way
of life and abandon
their own. Because of
this, the Timucua cul-
ture was lost.
The last known
Timucua descendant
died in Cuba in 1767,
and with him, the
Timucua way of life
passed into history.


IT7 AA A








Wednesday, February 25, 2009






ROUND


www. ecbpublishing. com


EFFERSON


Monticello News 9A


COUNTY


WwaM'la Cd Ta t Had


Couyq Diwmet


DEBBIE
SNAPP '
Monticello
News
Staff Writer
Mem- m
bers of' the
Monticello
Woman's
Club (MWC)
will host a
Co u.ntry .
Dinner, 5 to
7 p.m. Thursday Feb. 26 at
the clubhouse, 990 East
Pearl Street.
Members are selling
tickets now for the meal of
Chicken Pileau and/or
sausage with white acre
peas, sweet potato souffle,
fresh greens, macaroni
and cheese, cole slaw,-po-
tato salad and sliced toma-
toes. There will be a
variety of pies for dessert,
and cold tea.
The cost is $8 for
adults and $4 for children
under 12.
Take out or dine in
meals will be available.
SFunds raised from this
dinner event will be used
for local scholarships,
local charities, and for the
upkeep and maintenance
of the clubhouse.


In related
news, the
-tM W C
-e members
will host
the Relay
for Life
Cancer
Survivors
Dinner 6
.... p.m. Tues-
day, April
14. They will serve roasted
or fried chicken, and
pulled pork with a variety
of side dish items at the
Monticello Opera House.
A Spaghetti Dinner
fundraiser is in the plan-
ning stages for the near fu-
ture, a date will be
determined soon.
The Monticello
Woman's Club meets at
noon on the first Tuesday,
of every month in the
clubhouse for lunch and a
meeting.
Their next meeting
will be March 3.
Contact Fundraising
Chairman Ethel Strick-
land at 997-3382 or Club
President Jan Wadsworth
at 997-4440 for ticket infor-
mation or more informa-
tion about the club.


ARC Presents Midyear Report


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
StaffWriter
The Association for Re-
tarded Citizens (ARC) is an
agency dedicated to provid-
ing assistance and instruc-
tion to adults with
developmental disabilities.
Its ultimate goal is to
help these adults acquire, en-
hance, or maintain skills
and/or abilities that enable
them to live and care for
themselves as independently
as possible.
At the local ARC, con-
sumers receive supervised
instruction on reading, writ-
ing, calculator skills, check
writing skills, filling out
time sheets for work, rudi-
mentary cleaning skills,
budgeting skills, and the
like.
Most of the consumers-
earn money each month for
assisting with the cleaning
and upkeep of the center.
Four consumers partici-
pate in janitorial work at the
county's rest areas, and con-
tinue to earn high ratings for
the work they do at those lo-
cations.
In addition to this, the
center has been privileged to
have received visits and in-.
struction from Heidi
Copeland, who, until the end
of December, was the
county's Family and Con-
sumer Sciences Extension
Agent. She provided instruc-
tion in cooking and arts and
crafts activities. Her
monthly visits are missed,
and the consumers and staff
wish 'her success with her
new job.
In addition to these vis-
its, they receive monthly vis-
its and instruction from
Anne Robinson and Chastity
McCarthy from the local Jef-
ferison County Health De-
partfientf(JCHD.) The JCHD
has revealed the dangers and
consequences of smoking,
inhaling second-hand
smoke, and poor dietary
habits. Also, they have been
shown how diet, exercise,


ARC consumers enjoy activities throughout the year. From left to right standing,
Lilla Anderson, Sheri Edwards, and Scott Raeside. Seated, Derrick Sneed, Shirley
Williams, Rebecca Wilson, Barbara Moore, Olivia Sneed, Michael Pitts, standing, Tina
Tucker, and Karen Lane.


and weight control con-
tribute to a longer, healthier,
happier life. Many of the con-
sumers had their body mass
index calculated and blood
pressure measured. In addi-
tion to this each was issued a
pedometer, so they could
begin to tabulate the number
of steps they take hi exercise
,activities.
The consumers look for-
ward to visits like the before
mentioned.
During their weekly vis-
its to the local public library,
some of the consumers have
enjoyed the story reading
skills of Kitty Brooks. She in-
troduced them to authors
and stories and types of
books of all varieties. They
are deeply grateful to her for
her thoughtful, insightful,
well-prepared presentations.
And look forward with an-
ticipation to what she'll be
sharing with them in the fu-
ture.
They have enjoyed field
trips to numerous locations


this year. In September they
visited the Mary Brogan Mu-
seum in Tallahassee. They
saw exhibits featuring pic-
tures and testimony from
people who have claimed to
have seen UFO's and/or who
have claimed to have had
close contact with extrater-
restrial beings. They saw
artwork featuring items of
all kinds, overlaid in gold.
In October they visited
the Governor's Mansion and
learned much about its ini-
tial construction, features,
additions, and history.
In November they went
to the Challenger Learning
Center to see the IMAX The-
ater presentation of an ani-
mated live action movie
detailing what life may have
been like for a dinosaur era
creature whose remains
were discovered in the west-
ern United States. They also
enjoyed a presentation in the
planetarium about the solar
system, the galaxy, and the
universe in general, focus-


ing on the composition of
planets and stars and paths
of comets and meteors that
are visible here on earth.
In January the con-
sumers traveled to
Thomasville, GA. where
they went to, and spent time
at, the public library before
enjoying a lunch at Ryan's
Steakhouse..
During the month of
February, they will enjoy,
and benefit from, the visits of
local artist and residence,
Alice Cappa. All in atten-
dance will be engaged in pro-
ducing finished artwork
reflecting personal interests,
tastes, ambitions, and the
like. The hope is that at least
in some small way Alice's
creativity, inventiveness,
and artistic abilities will rub
off.
The consumers have
much to look forward to in
the coming months, as they
also look forward to sharing
their activities with the read-
ers of the Monticello News.


YOU LOVE A REAL BREAKFAST
AS MUCH AS WE DO.


* i


1~
1,
n ~ (1R.









10A Monticello News


www.ecbpublishing.com


Wednesday, February 25, 2009


PORTS


Sandbaggers

Classic March 9

FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Slots are still available
for golfers to take part in
the Annual Rotary Sand-
baggers Golf Classic, set
for Monday, March 9 at the
Country Club, with tee
time at 1 p.m.
Golfers are asked to be
present at 12:30 p.m. for
check in.
The tournament will be
a shotgun start with a best
ball format for the four-per-
son teams competing.
The entry fee is $50 per
person, $200 per team and
includes 18 holes of golf, a
golf cart, the Rotary's fa-
mous ten-ounce rib-eye
steak dinner with all of the
trimmingsT and door
prizes.
Hole sponsorships are
also still available for $150
and sponsors will have
their name placed on a par-
ticular hole of the course.
rophies will be awarded
for Last Place, Low Gross,
and Low Net. For further
information contact any
Rotarian or James Mu-
chovej at 997-6508..


ACA JV

Softball Roster
FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Aucilla Christian acad-
emy reports the roster for the
junior varsity softball team.
Coaching the young Lady War-
riors this year is Mary Beth
Bishop.
Junior varsity ILady War-
riors are: Keli Dollar, Vicki
Perry, Sunnie Sorensen,
Shelby Witmer, Brooke Kins-
ley, Michaela Metcalfe, Whit-
ney McKnight, Hadley Revell,
Pamela Watt, Victoria Brock,
Kayla Fulford, Caitlyn Hol-
land, Autumn. Lamb, and
Marisa Thomas.

Warriors JV

Baseball Roster
FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy reports its roster for the
junior varsity baseball team.
Coaching the young Warriors
this year is Daryl Adams.
The young Warriors in-
clude: Levi Cobb, Tres
Copeland, Cole Davis, Russell
Fraleigh, Bradley Holm, Bran-
don Holm, Hunter Home,
Tyler Jackson, Jared Jackson,
Capas Kinsey, Ben Sadler,
Hans Sorensen, Matt Tuten,
and Philip Watts.


JV Warriors


Drop Season


Opener
FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Aucilla' Christian
Academy baseball team
dropped the season opener
against Perry Middle (Tay-
lor County), 10-0, Feb. 19. in
a five-inning game called
due to the ten-run rule.
"Taylor is a really good
team and I guess we started
off as a bunch of nerves,
just coming out of basket-
ball season," said ,Coach
Daryl Adams. He added
that the young Warriors al-
lowed six runs in the first
innings, five of which were
unearned and they com-
mitted three errors, but
began cutting back on the
errors to commit a total of
five throughout the entire
game.
"Taylor is a high-qual-
ity team, they are good,"
said Adams.' "We're good
too, but you can't take any-
thing away from them.
Aucilla collected four
hits during. the game.
Phillip Watt -went two for
two; Russell Fraleigh, one
for three; and Ben Sadler,
one for two.
On the mound, Hans
Sorensen served as the
Warriors pitcher, giving up
three earned runs, five un-
earned runs, five hits,
striking out one, and.walk-
ing four.


Monticello News photo by Emerald Greene February 13, 2009
The ACA Middle School Girls? Basketball awards were presented recently to three outstanding
players. Pictured left to right: Pamela Watt, Most Steals; Brooke Kinsley, Most Points Scored; and
Brooke Kinsey, Leadership award.

ACA MIDDLE SCHOOL BASKETBALL AWARDS


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy honored its top athletes
on the boys' and girls" mid-
dle school teams, Friday,
Feb. 13.
On the girls' team,
Brooke Kinsley was
awarded a plaque for high-
est score with 75 points;
Pamela Watt was recog-
nized for the most steals.
with 64; and Brooke Kinsey
was presented with the lead-


ership award.
For the young Warriors,
Coach Mac Finlayson pre-
sented Jared Jackson with
the Defensive Player of the
Year award. "Jared is one
mean rebounder. If he got
his hands on the ball, he
usually came down with it.
He has very strong hands,"
said Finlayson.
Hans Sorensen was
named the Offensive Player
of the year. "Hans started
learning about game driv-
ing rather than long-range


shots and he began creating
shots for others when he
would cut through with a
drive and pass to another
player," said Finlayson.
Jay Finlayson was
named as the team MVP for
the young Warriors. "Jay
could come through when
he was needed on the floor,
because of his ability to play
under control and when it
was.needed, he could move
quickly or he could slow
down under the press," said
Coach Finlayson.


Monticello News photo by Emerald Greene February 13, 2009
The ACA Middle School Boys' Basketball awards were presented recently to three out-
standing players. Pictured left to right: ; Jay Finlayson, MVP; Hans Sorensen, Offensive Player
award, and Jared Jackson, Defensive Player Award


Li 1 WAR6OR1S .1-ON SEASON
Ln~~~~l nn lU n 1-1 Ul i(ij


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The roster has been de-
termined for the Aucilla
Christian Academy varsity
softball team, and in the
first two games of the sea-
son, the Lady. Warriors won
the first game against
North Florida Christian,
12-2. and lost the second
against Godby, 12-10.
Lady Warriors are;
Erin Kelly, Kalyn Owens,
Mallory Plaines, Michaela
Roccanti, Olivia Sorensen,
Kayla Haire, Brooke Stew-,
art, Katlyn Watts, Taryn
Copeland, Kaitlin Jackson,
Lisa Kisamore, Sarah
Sorensen, Brooke Kinsey,
and Ashley Schofill.
In the game against
North Florida Christian,
Feb. 10, Olivia Sorensen


had 3 at-bats, three runs,
one double, one walk, one
strikeout, one single and
two stolen bases.
Brooke Kinsey had 4 at-
bats with 3 runs, 2 singles,
1 walk, 1 put-out, 3 RBI;
Sunnie Sorensen, 3 at-bats,
3 runs, 1 single, 1 double
and 1 strikeout; Erin Kelly,
4 at-bats, 2 runs, 2 hits, 3
RBI, Itriple, 1 steal, 1 single
and 2 put-outs; and
Michaela Roccanti 3 at-
bats, 1 hit, 2 RBI, 2 strike-
outs, 1 put-out, 1 sacrifice.
Taryn Copeland, 4 at-
bats, 1 run, 1 hit, 2 RBI, 1
walk, 1 steal, 1 strikeout, 1
put-out, 1 error; Ashley
Schofill, 4 at-bats, 1 strike-
out, 3 put-outs; Brooke
Stewart, 2 at-bats, 1 strike-
out and 1 put-out; Sarah
Sorensen had 2 at-bats, 1
strikeout and 1 single; Lisa


Kisamore had 3 at-bats
with 3 put-outs; and Kayla
Haire had 1 at-bat with 1
strikeout.
On the mound,
Copeland pitched all seven
innings striking out seven,
and giving up three hits
and two earned runs.
Aucilla fell to Godby
Feb. 12. "Our defense did
really well. We had a few er-
rors right out of the gate,
and if not for that, we prob-
ably would have beaten
them," said Coach Edwin
Kinsey.
Olivia Sorensen had 4
at-bats, 1 run, 1 hit, 1 RBI, 1
walk, 3 strikeouts; Brooke
Kinsey, 3 at-bats, two runs,
1 walk, 1 error. 2 put-outs;
Owens, 3 at-bats, 1 run, 2
hits, 1 walk, 1 strikeout, 2
stolen bases; Kelly, 4 at-
bats, 1 single, 1 walk, 1
strikeout, 1 fly-out, 2 runs.
Roccanti had 4 at-bats, 2
walks, 1 single, 1 strikeout,
1 RBI, 1 run; Copeland, 4 at-
bats, 1 error, 2 put-outs, 1
strikeout, 1 RBI, 1 run;
Schofill, 4 at-bats, 1 hit-by-
pitch, 1 walk, 1 triple, 1 put-
out and 1 run; Stewart, 1
at-bat with 1 strikeout.
Sunnie Sorensen had 3
at-bats with 2 strikeouts, 1
put-out; Kisamore, 1 at-bat
with 1 strikeout; Pamela
Watt, 3 at-bats, 1 single, 1
walk, 1 putout,1 run.
On the mound,
Copeland pitched the first
four innings, striking out 1
and giving up 22 hits and 8
runs; and Schofill pitched
the final three innings
striking out 2 and giving up
8 hits and 4 runs.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC
MEETING

THE DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OF JEFFERSON .
COUNTY ANNOUNCES A SERIES OF WORKSHOPS
TO WHICH THE PUBLIC IS INVITED TIE PURPOSE
OF THE WORKSHOPS WILL BE:

DESIGNING STRATEGIC PLAN.

DATE: Feb'ruary 2, 2009; March 2, 2009 and
April 6, 2009
TIME:' 6:00 p.m. (all Workshops at this Time)
PLACE: 1490 W. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32344

SUBJECT: Designing Strategic Plan


Attention
Jefferson County Residents

Are you 55+, unemployed

and having
difficulty finding a job?

If you qualify, Experience Works has
Certified Nurse Assistant (CNA), and
Home Health Aide (HHA) job
opportunities funded at no cost to you.

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Wednesday, February 25, 2009


www.ecbpublishing.com


Monticello News 11A


PORTS


Mary Beth Bishop


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
County native Mary Beth
Bishop has come full-circle and
returned home to' both her
hometown and her alma mater,
Aucilla Christian Academy
where she now serves as the
coach for the JV softball team
and a physical education
teacher.
Bishop carries with her
both knowledge and love of the
game. She attended Aucilla
Christian Academy from
kindergarten through 12th
grade, graduating in 2002. "It's
been a lot of fun getting in-
volved again with not only the
softball program but the EE.
classes as well," said Bishop.
'Although I'm still adjusting to
being a faculty member now. I
thoroughly enjoyed playing
sports at Aucilla Christian I
played softball and basketball
for six years, and spent two
years with the cross-country
team.
"Sdftball was the sport I
liked the most and I pitched
five years for the varsity team,"
said Bishop. "We had several
talented athletes at that time
and regularly won district ti-
tles, and it's exciting for me to
see how much the program has
continued growing and now
competes at a statewide level."
Following graduation,


Bishop attended the University
of Florida for three years,
where she graduated with a
Bachelor of Science degree in
Journalism and Communica-
tions. She worked as a sports
copy editor and designer for
the Tallahassee Democrat after
college, and then spent a year
covering Big Bend prep sports'
for the paper. Bishop returned
to Monticello in December
after spending 15 months in
Hawaii, where she also covered
sports for The Maui News.
Addressing taking over for
former coach Frank Brown,
Bishop stated, "I definitely
have big shoes to fill coming in
after coach Frank Brown. He
took Aucilla Christian's JV
softball program to the highest
level its ever been," she said.
"You can tell the returning
players have had excellent
coaching in the past; they're
disciplined, fundamentally
sound and hard workers. Hav-
ing players of that caliber is
making my first season an
easy transition.
"Coach Brown also did a
tremendous amount of work
with the JV softball field and
facilities, and we've continued
using several of his practice
techniques and criteria, in
hopes of continuing the suc-
cess he had with the Lady
Warriors," she added.
Bishop said that though


Aucilla lost a few players at
the start of the season for
various reasons, that they
were however, fortunate to
have several returning
players and starters, as
well as some new faces
among ACA 7th graders.
The JVs have 13 girls
total and, since they have
players with different lev-
els of experience, they're
primarily focusing on fun-
damentals "We're also
working on developing new
pitchers to help our starter,
eighth.grader Pamela Watt,
who's doing a fantastic
job," she said. "My father
is assisting me with the
team, and the parents of
the players have been
tremendous as well, will-
ing to help in whatever
ways they can. The .girls
are stepping up to every
challenge we give them and
work very well together.
They've been very patient
with me as I continue set-
tling into my new position.
SShe is the daughter of
Benny and Liz Bishop. of
Monticello, and she has
two younger brothers,
Glen, who recently fin-
ished college at Abraham
Baldwin Agricultural Col-
lege, and Matt, a senior at
ACA and playing baseball
for Coach Ray Hughes.


Lady Tigers Drop


First Tvwo ames


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Jefferson County Mid-
dle/High School reports
the roster for the varsity
softball team, and Coach
Howard Marx provided
highlights for the first
two games of the season.
The Lady Tigers con-
sist of a very young team
this year, with only two
seniors returning to the
bench.
Players include Sen-
iors Malika Norton,
Kierra Powell; ninth
grader Emily Howell;
eighth graders Janiese
Banks, Jana Barber,
Alyssa Lewis, Megan Mc-
Clellan, Makayla Norton,
Michelle Watson; and
seventh graders Justice
Barrington, Taylor
Clemons, Courtney
Grayson, and Allaura
Pierce.
In the season, opener
held Feb. 17 against
Rickards, the Lady
Tigers fell 15-8. Marx
said the Lady Tigers held
their heads up and didn't
quit. "They are a very,
very young team, playing
a varsity schedule," he
said. "We'll get them
though, if ngt this year
in a year or two."
He added that the
girls were down by ten


runs in the second in-
ning, but managed to
tighten the score. The
new statistics girl was
just learning to keep the
book, so Marx provided
the game highlights.
Jana Baker and Megan
McClellan each ripped a
triple.
On Feb. 19, the Lady
Tigers were trounced for
a 27-1 loss in the game
called due to the ten-run
rule in five innings.
"We hung tough for
three innings and just
fell apart in the fourth,"



Hair

Stylist
15 years experien,


Jessi


said Marx. "We were
able to make a couple of
double plays, but a lot of
walks and errors got us.
"Inexperience reared
its ugly head on the Lady
Tigers that day. But they
didn't quit. They kept
trying and didn't play like
a little puppy tucking its
tail and running. They
played like Lady Tigers,
bared their claws and
stuck to it."
Serving the Lady
Tigers as assistant coach
this year is Hattie Jor-
dan.
fl


ce


Howe


Now in Monticello at the Hairstyle Villa
Located in the Montivilla Subdivision
Tuesday and Wednesdays

Color Cuts Foils

850-973-7421
call for appointment


Brooke Kinsley
lays down a
perfect bunt:in
the ACA JV
girls season
opener against
Perry Middle.
Aucilla won
the game 21-5.


ACA JV Girls Split First Two


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Academy JV softball team
conquered the season opener
Thursday, Feb. 19 against
Perry Middle, 21-5 in the four-
inning game.
Sunnie Sorensen'went 3
for 5 with 3 runs scored, 2 RBI,
1 double and a home run;
Whitney McKnight, 4 for 5
with 1 run scored and 3 RBI;
and Pamela Watt, 3 for 4 with
4 runs scored, and 2 RBI.
Michaela Metcalfe went 3
for 5 with 5 runs scored, 4 RBI,
and 1 triple; Hadley Revell, 2
for 4 with 3 runs scored, 4 RBI,
and 1 walk; Brooke Kinsley, 2
for 5 with 1 run and 2 strike-
outs; Keli Dollar, 2 for 3 with 2
runs, 2 RBI, and 1 walk; Au-
tumn Lamb,1 for 1 with 1 run;
Marisa Thomas,1 for 3 with 1
RBI, and 2 strikeouts; and
Kayla Fulford, 0 for 2 with 1
walk, and 2 strikeouts.
On the mound, Watt also
struck out 5 and walked 7.
Friday, Feb. 20, the JV
Lady Warriors lost a 13-12
squeaker to Lafayette County
Sorensen went 3 for 4 with
4 runs, 1 double, and 1 walk;
Watt, 3 for 5 with 2 runs
scored, 1 RBI, and 1 double;
Metcalfe, 1 for 4 with 3 runs
scored, 2 RBI, 1 double, and 1
walk; Revell, 2 for 5, with 1 run
scored, and 2 RBI; Dollar,.1 for
3 with 2 runs, 1 triple, and 2
walks; McKnight, 1 for 3 with
1 RBI, ,nd 2 walks; Kinsley, 1
for 6 with 1 run scored; and
Thomas, l'for 2, with 1 strike-
out.
On the mound, Watt
pitched a complete game with
2 strikeouts and 4 walks.
"I believe our team can
compete with everyone on
our schedule," said Coach
Mary Beth Bishop. "We've
put up 33 runs in our first two
games and will work on being


more aggressive on defense
as well. The girls know if
they give us their best at all
times, we'll never be disap-
pointed, and they continue to
push themselves and get
better each day.


"We have great leader-
ship from our captains, Sun-
nie Sorensen and Keli
Dollar, and they in turn del-
egate responsibilities to the
younger girls," she con-
cluded.


* .. .. '.*.

A *I


"Join me and become

a member of a CHP

Medicare Advantage Plan."


Capital Health
Capitml.-. ..


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r L A N


An ndep.M.MLknrmaftdw
SkiCu Cfand Eu.Slu ldAnodaton


Plan to attend a SEMINAR to LEARNMOR

about CHP Advantage Plus a i:

CHP Preferred Advata.a;,

Call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512
to RSVP or for more information.

(TTY/TDD: 850-383-3534 or 1-800-955-8771)
8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week
or visit us at: www.capitalhealth.com/medicare
.. .

Seminars will be held at the .
Capital Health Plan Health Cen trletated t
1491 Governor's Square Blvd. At 10:00 amn. a on:

Friday, February 27 Friday, March 13
Tuesday, March 10 Friday, March 27



Some things get better with age.

Capital Health Plan is one of them.
Paid Endorsement Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract.
For accommodations of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call the
numbers above. A sales representative will be present with information and
applications. Benefits may change on January 1,2010.
H5938_2009_1008 043_101908


First 'Birthday Photosl



.., .





Come and have
your precious,
ehlld's photo
Taken and
published in our
newspaper for
FREEr!

FIRST BIRTHDAYS
* What: Betsy Barfield Photography takes the 'Je t:
ferson JourtiaPHappy First Birthday photos.
* Where: Betsy Barfield Photography Studio, 387
de Sercey Road, Monticello, FL 850.933.4055
www.betsyphoto.com
* When: First Monday of each month 5:00 7:00.
prm,Third Wednesday of each month 10:00 am .
-No&o -;,;.
* Prices Free first birthday baby photo for publica-
tion: additlio0b kages are available for purchase,
* Details: Call ietsy Barfield 850.933.4055 for
information and directions.
* Publication: Photos will be published on the last
Friday of each month in the effersortFCounty Jour- '
nal- -
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12A Monticello News


Ia Services


PIG female, 350 lbs. A
Call 997-3459

PIGS- Born 01-01-09.
Call 997-0901 or 251-1


Asking $150. BACKHOE SERVICE
12/10,tfn,nc. Driveways, roads, ditches, tree and
shrub removal, burn piles. Contact
$35.00 each. Gary Tuten @ 997-3116, 933-'
641. 3458. 7/4tfi,c


117/09, n/c.


FIREWOOD
Call 342-1411
1/30-2/25,pd.
TELEVISIONS Magnovox 12",
$25. OBO 997-0901, 251-1641.
1/30,tfn.
Bantam chicks and adults $2.00
each. Call 997-1582 or 933-0823.
2/25,27,nc.




A few chickens, turkeys, guinea fowl
and peafowl for my yard. 850-464-
1165.
2/4,tfn,nc.


Funeral
The Memorial Missionary Baptist
Church is having a Fish Fry to raise
money for Relay for Life on Friday,
2/27/09. The starting time is 11:00
a.m. until they are sold out. The
church is located on the corner of
Martin Luther King St. and 2nd
Street in Monticello. The cost is
$7.00 per plate or $5.00 for a fish
sandwich. For more information
you may contact Lucretia Brown at
997-4039. Fish is "brain food" y'all
and you know it's gonna be REAL
GOOD!
2/25,27,nc.


MR. STUMP
STUMP GRINDING
509-8530 Quick Responses.
6/22, tfn,c
House/Office Cleaning Reliable
service, competitive rates, free esti-
mates, references available upon re-
quest. Give us a call and ask about
our specials and schedule your free
estimate. 997-1125 or 212-0115.
Leave message.
2/18,20,25,27,c.







3 bd/ Ibth North Carolina
Mountain Home on 1 acre near
Ashville special $140,000. Call
997-1582 7/2,tfn,nc


I For Sale]


2br/ 1 bth $350.00. w $300 dep. No
pets, lease required. 284-7102.
2/18,20,25,27,pd.
Pr -


I
I
I,


www.ecbpublishing.com


1999 Chevrolet 4x4. 17" Wheels,
whtte color. 150,000 miles. Has cap
on bed. Recent front alignment and
rotation. Asking $6500.00. 251-1641
or 997-0901. Leave message.
11/14,tfn,nc.
1990 F-350 Flat Bed (Walton) with
hyd. lift gate, PTO. Good condition.
150,000 miles. $3,995. Call 850-
997-1582.
2/13, n/c.


JEFFERSON PLACE APTS
1468 S. Waukeenah St. Office 300,
Monticello. 1 BR ($427) & 2BR
($465). HUD vouchers accepted, sub-
sidy available at times. 850-997-6964.
2 BR Handicap unit open. Subsidy
Available. TTY711 Equal housing
opportunity. This institution is an
equal opportunity provider and em-
ployer.
1/28,tfn,c.
Commercial/ Industrial
Property with state highway
frontage. Corner lots. Fronts
both Harvey Greene Dr. and
Highway 53 South. Enterprise
Zone, Naural gas line, 8 inch
water main, access to city
utilities, fire hydrant, and service
frorr two power companies.
Property has easy access to 1-10,
via SR 53 & SR 14. Will' build
to suit tenant or short or long
term lease. Call Tommy Greene
850-973-4141
2/11, rtn.
Office Building across street from
Post Office, Courthouse, and court-
house Annex. in Madison (Old Enter-
prise Recorder Office)
111 SE Shelby St. Madison Newly
renovated back to the 1920's era, Call
S973-4141.
rtn
For rent/lease. 1500 sq.ft. Com-
mericial Building downtown 380
N. Cherry, Monticello. 850-997-
5705.
2/6,11,13,18,20,25,27,c.
2 br/lba MOBILE HOME on Lonnie
Rd. $400 month 300-deposit. Call
352-359-2647.
2/13,18,20,25,27,pd, cc.


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LI. I I I I I I I I 11 11 1 m


Wednesday, February 25, 2009



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LEGALS


Monticello News 13A


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN \N D FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION

DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST
COMIPANI'. AS TRUSTEE FOR LONG BEACH
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-3,
Pl.iiniiit.

CASE NO.: 33-2009-CA-000003
DIVISION;
ERIC CAMPAILLA, et al, Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:

ERIC CAMPAILLA
L AST KNOWN ADDRESS: 1802 MAPLELEAF BOULEVARD
OLDSMAR, FL 34677

CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN

ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH H. UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED IN-
DI IDLIAL DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN

CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN

'YOLU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the
following property in JEFFERSON County, Florida:
COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING
THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF U.
S. HIGH.\\AY 90 WITH THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF HICK-
ORY STREET AND RUN NORTH, ALONG THE EAST RIGHT OF
\\A L INE OF HICKORY STREET A DISTANCE OF 605.74 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE NORTH, ALONG
SAI D RIGHT T OF WAY LINE, 378.46 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID
RIGHT OF WAY LINE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 14
SECONDS EAST 259.62 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 11
SINLTTE S 59 SECONDS WEST 11.26 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DE-
GREES 12 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 347.89 FEET, THENCE
SOUTH 00 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 87.14-
FEET TO A POINT IN THE APPROXIMATE CENTER OF A 30
FOOT WIDE DRAINAGE EASEMENT, THENCE RUN ALONG
SAID EASEMENT AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 61 DEGREES 07 MIN-
LiTES 07 SECONDS WEST 37.19 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 82 DE-
GREES 31 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 27.55 FEET, THENCE
NORTH 46 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 36.43
FEET. THENCE SOUTH 79 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 56 SECONDS
\EST 16 66 FRET, THENCE NORTH 79 DEGREES 42 MINUTES
44 SECONDS WEST 70.78 FEET, THENCE NORTH 36 DEGREES
51 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST 26.46 FEET, THENCE NORTH
54 DEGREES 10 MINUTES


37 SECONDS \ EST 12.-S4 FEET TO THE POINT )F BEGINNING.
LESS AND EXCEPT:
COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 90 WITH THE EAST
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF HICKORY STREET AND RUN NORTH
760.74 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CON-
TINUE NORTH 30.00 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH 89
DEGREES 49 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 258.93 FEET TO A
POINT, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 14 SEC-
ONDS WEST 30.00 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 89 DE-
GREES 49 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST258.83 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
LESS AND EXCEPT:
COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTH
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 90 WITH THE EAST
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF HICKORY STREET AND RUN
NORTH 605.74 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING,
THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE
NORTH 155.00 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH 89 DE-|
GREES 49 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 258.83 FEET TO A
POINT, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 14 SEC-
ONDS WEST 135.69 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 000
DEGREES 19 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 87.14 FEET TOR
A POINT, THENCE NORTH SIDEGREES 07 MINUTES 07|
SECONDS WEST 37.19 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH
82 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 27.55 FEET
TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH 46 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 15
SECONDS WEST 36.43 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH
79 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 76.66 FEET-
TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH 79 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 44
SECONDS WEST 70.78 FEET TO POINT, THENCE NORTH 36
DEGREES 51 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST 26.46 FEET TO
A POINT, THENCE NORTH 54 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 371
SECONDS WEST 12.84 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-1
NING.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publica-
tion, if any, on Florida Default Law Group, P.L., Plaintiffs attor-
ney, whose address is 9119 Corporate Lake Drive, Suite 300,
Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court-either
before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 17 day of
February, 2009.
Kirk B. Reams
Clerk of Court
By: Debbie Matthews
As Deputy Clerk


Florida Default Law Group, P.L.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
MOSS-WAMU-CONV-R-csilversto-F08112266


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14A Monticello News



ids Incorprated L


Wednesday, February 25, 2009




n utCuUh

Photo Submitted
Kids Incorporated held a ribbon cutting ceremony,
Tuesday, February 17, using children's handprints on
paper for the ribbon. Included at this special occasion are
Bart Gunter, Kids Inc board chairman, Pam Davis, execu-
tive director, former board member Lucile Day, Dr. Ann
Levy, board member, Congressman Allen Boyd, Florida
House Representative for District 10 Leonard Bembry,
and Florida House Representative Michelle Rehwinkel
Vasilinda.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Kids Incorporated
took over the Dick
Howser Center in Sept.
2003, when the Dick
Howser program closed.
The agency had pre-
viously contracted with
them to serve the Early
'Head Start children and
rather than stopping
services, it chose to step
up and take over the pro-
gramn and converted it
over time to an Early
Head Start program pro-
viding comprehensive


services to children
from six weeks of age to
three years old, their
families and pregnant
women.
Comprehensive serv'-
ices include: high qual-
ity early learning
services with a "one
adult to four children"
ratio and a maximum of
"eight children to two
teachers" in each class-
room, along with a foster
grandparent. Each fam-
ily must complete a fam-
ily profile and develop a
list of goals for the year
and a family advocate at
the' center will help the
family members access
services to help them
meet their goals.
A health and disabil-
ity coordinator will
work with the children
and families to ensure
that each child has a
medical home. Health


nation process that ex-
panded the kitchen.
added a parent resource
room, enclosed the class-
rooms, and added an ad-
ditional classroom and
baby room.
Then the playground
was renovated; the chil-
dren refer to it as "the
park." The park is the
nicest playground of the
five Early Head Start
centers operates. A new
roof has also been
added.
Over the past three
years, close to $300,000
has been spent making
the necessary improve-
ments in the center mak-
ing the staff proud of
the facility.
The children are
thriving and the families
are doing well. And,
there is currently a wait-
ing list for families
wanting to access the


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~ JOHN DtEuRIE


PATHWAYS


Look for our special

Church Section in every

Wednesday's

Monticello News


~1'


IVINTICELLO NEWS
SCall 997-3568 today to start home

delivery at your doorstep tomorrow!


Photo Submitted
Kids Incorporated took over the Dick Howser Center in Monticello in September
2003.


screens are done yearly,
and children needing ad-
ditional services are re-
ferred for those services,
others are done on site.
These are just the
highlights of what Kids
Incorporated provides.
32 children and their
families are served at
the Jefferson County
Early Head Start.
Upon enrollment,
most family members
are at or below the fed-
eral poverty level. Ten
percent of the children
served in the entire pro-
gram, including Jeffer-
son, Madison, and Leon
counties, have special
needs.
Early Head Start re-'
cently received a grant
to renovate the center in
order to convert the pre-
kindergarten facility
into a facility for infants
and toddlers.
Once Kids Incorpo-
rated purchased the
building from Dick
Howser, it began a reno-


services.
This is a United Way
certified agency --and
United Way funding was
received for this center.
The Early Head Start
grant requires the rais-
ing of 20 percent of the
grant locally, among the
three counties served.
This means $49,202.48
needs to be raised each
and every month. No
small task in the best of
times!
Part of that funding
can come through volun-
teers, allowable in-kind
donations of goods and
services, as well as fi-
nancial grants and dona-
tions.
The center is located
at 395 East Washington
Street in Monticello. The
area director is Ramona
Fritzen. The lead
teacher is Willette Jones,
and the family advocate
is Melissa Morgan.
Chad Arnold is the
health and disability co-
ordinator for the center.


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