Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00227
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello, Fla
Publication Date: October 8, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00227
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text



Special Collections ALL FOR ADC 320 .,..
University of Fla Libraries
PO Box 17007 4 Ik
Gaies.ville FL 32611-7007
i..l... Ii 11 i ... ...


I-.S"


NONTICELLO


140th Year No. 41 Wednesday, October 8, 2008 50 460 + 4


Repairs for


Matt Bishop and Savannah Reams were crowned
ACA's 2008 Homecoming King and Queen.
See Pages 14A-15A for full Homecoming coverage.


Storm Damage Aggravates


Longstanding Road Issue


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer.
A tropical storm
Fay-related road issue
that has been percolat-
ing for several weeks
now reached an unsatis-
factory conclusion from
the point of view of the
concerned citizens
when the County Com-
mission refused their re-
quest on Thursday
night, Oct. 2.
The issue has'a long
history and concerns a
small private road in a
subdivision just west of
the industrial park on
US 19 South. As related
by Nita Howard, chief
spokesperson for group,
the problem had its ori-
gins in the county's de-
velopment of the
industrial park property
and the closing of the
park's roads to the sub-
division residents, in
combination with the
county's installation of
a retention pond and
drainage system uphill
of the subdivision's pri-


vae-'road.
Howard and a few
others of the residents
argued that the closure
of the two industrial
park roads, long used by
the residents as a way to
access US 19, limited
their egress to the sub-
division's one private
road. The closing of the
industrial park's roads
not only posed an incon-
venience for the subdi-
vision's residents, who
had to travel a longer
way now to access US 19,
but it meant that emer-
gency vehicles also had
to travel the longer dis-
tance to access the sub-
division in an
emergency situation,
she said.
Compounding the
problem, stormwater
runoff from the indus-
trial park property and
overflow from the reten-
tion pond and a pipe
that the county installed
under their road for the
drainage of the runoff
had caused havoc to the
road during Fay's pas-


sage, she said.
Howard's request
was twofold: The first
part was that the county
remove the barrier that
it had put up to block
the subdivision's resi-
dents from gaining ac-
cess to US '19 South
across the industrial
park via Industrial Park
Road. The second part
was that the county fix
the damage that the
county's drainage pipe
caused the private road.
"I'm not asking for
anything unreason-
able," Howard said. "I'm
asking you to do what is
necessary and reason-
able. It's the right and
legal thing to do. I'm
asking for you to take
something that was
done wrong in the past
and fix it."
Howard first made
her appeal to the County
Commission on Sept. 18,
at which time commis-
sioners offered to have
the county repair the
Please See
Road Issue Page 4A


Attorney To Advise County


Officials On Potential Suit


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
County Attorney
Buck Bird has been re-
viewing the potential
lawsuit to the county
over the rejected quar-
ter horse racetrack and
is expected to advise the
County Commission on
how to proceed on the
issue in the coming
weeks.
"We're in the
process of reviewing the
complaint and will come
back and make a recom-
mendation on how to
proceed with legal rep-
resentation," Bird told
commissioners on Sept.
18, adding that he had al-
ready involved Attorney
Scott Shirley in the dis-
cussions.
An expert on zoning
and land-use matters,
Shirley has long acted as
the Jefferson Planning
Commission's attorney
and has advised and rep-
resented the county on
various land-use issues.
Ironically, it was


County Attorney Buck
Bird; expected to
advise commission on
the potential racetrack
suit.
Shirley's advice to the
commission during the
public hearing on the
racetrack that the
county had no choice
but to approve the proj-
ect and that it risked po-
tential litigation if it
rejected the proposal,
which the commission
ultimately did on Jan.
17, 2008.
Bird has already ad-
vised commissioners
that neither he nor At-
torney Paula Sparkman


hav e expertise to de-
fend the county in the
potential lawsuit.
'County officials be-
came aware of the po-
tential lawsuit onr Aug.
29 via a Notice of Intent
mailed to them by the
law firm of Hopping
Green & Sams. The sev-
eral pages of correspon-
dence, mailed on behalf
* of a property owner
who stood to benefit
handsomely from the
racetrack developer's
purchase of a 15.3-acre
tract near Lloyd, ex-
pressed the desire that
matter could be resolved
amicably The complaint
specifically seeks
$1,116,900 in damages
for Jamaro, Inc., owner
of a 15.3-acre property
on the northeast corner
of 1-10 and SR-59 near
Lloyd.
The complaint ar-
gues that Jamaro en-
tered into a real-estate
purchase agreement
with Equestrian Land
Please See
Attorney Page 4A


Chief Explains Department's Fire Safety Inspection Policy


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
The Jefferson
County Fire Depart-
ment will continue to
conduct fire safety in-
spections of commercial
public buildings where
required by law or at the
request of the particu-
lar property owner, but
not on a wholesale or au-
tomatic basis.
This appears to be


the gist of the county's
fire safety inspections
policy, as explained by
Fire Rescue Chief Jim
Billherry to the County
Commission and fur-
ther clarified by com-
missioners on Thursday
night, Oct. 2. Fire safety
inspections are intended
to .eliminate hazards
that may contribute to
the risk of fires in busi-
nesses.
Billberry's presenta-


tion to the board came at
the request of Commis-
sioner Gene Hall, who
asked at the last com-
mission meeting to have
the chief inform the
board about the county's
fire inspection policy It
has been Hall's argu-
ment in the past that the
county should pursue
fire inspections both as
a public service and a
means of generating
revenues.


Billberry related
that upon taking over as
chief here, he had re-
viewed the fire safety in-
spections policy and
determined to continue
the practice of conduct-
ing the inspections
where required by state
licensing rules, such as
is the case for schools,
daycare facilities and
nursing homes. As a
former business owner
himself, Billberry said


he was appreciative of
the fact that business
people sometimes could-
n't keep UP with all the
rule changes and that
the last thing such indi-
viduals needed was to
have a public official
with a bad attitude
heavy handedly enforc-
ing those rules.
Regrettably, the de-
partment had had just
Please See
Chief Page 4A


Renee McCord fire
inspector for the
Jefferson County Fire
Rescue Department.


2 Sections, 30 Pages
ACAHomecoming 14A-15A Legals
Around Jeff. Co. 4-9A National
Classifieds 16A Sports
Home Improvement 11A Spiritual
Football Contest 13A Viewpoi]


17A


4-H Week 10A
12A
Pathways B Sect.
nts 2-3A


Wed 8265
10)8 765
Showers, maybe a rumble of thun-
der,


Thu 84/58
10/9
Showers, maybe a rumb
der.


Fri 85/62
1sibilit 10/10
)le of thun- Mix of sun and clouds. Highs in the
mid 80s and lows in the low 60s.


x


-- ,,


__ --


I


M^t. c







2A Monticello News


Wednesday, October 8, 2008


VIEWPOINTS E


PINIONS


Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.


Reader Questions Alleged



Actions Of Football Coach

:Dear Editor: love or concern for these children what-
I would like to take this opportunity so-ever. I, by no means, am saying to
:to express my feelings/opinion about treat these boys like cheerleaders, how-
:football coaches who should not be ever, in order to be a coach of a high
:coaching. I understand, and was told, school sport, one is expected to at least
'that in order to have my letter printed I LIKE children. It is quite obvious that
could not cross the line of libel, and I this particular coach does not like chil-
will keep this in mind while writing dren at all.
:this letter. A few weeks ago he was unable to
I will call no names, but there is a participate in the second half of a foot-
:local high school football coach who ball game. The boys were down (in the
:seems to be able to do nothing more score) -but then began to make a
:than constantly belittle "his boys" and remarkable come-back. They fought
cuss them out. hard and played like a team. One foot-
I've been told that several people ball player made the remark, "That's
:have complained to the administration, because we didn't have someone on the
:but to no avail. Are football coaches in sidelines cussing us out and telling us
:such high demand that nothing can be how awful we were. We actually had
done about the mouth on one particular encouragement on the sideline, from
man? Or is the administration afraid to our remaining coaches."
stand up and actually be in charge? Is So I have to ask again, "Where is the
,the administration only teaching administration in all of this?" Do you
;Christian ethics in the hallways, but actually have to "hear it with your own
saying that the football field is a differ- ears?" (As one has said she was told
ent walk of life?. after her complaint to administration.)
I totally understand that football is Football coaches HAVE to be tough.
!a different "walk" of life. I understand You need tough boys on that field, I
what conversations can be like on those know that. However, there is a HUGE
sidelines. I KNOW what is said to foot- difference between being tough and
ball boys and generally have no com- being hateful. There is a HUGE differ-
plaints and/or problems with that. ence between having a coach that the
My problem lies with the CON- boys respect, and having a coach that
STANT put-downs (no congratulatory the boys hate and despise.
Remarkss, CONTANT insults (no "pick- Name withheld upon request,
me-up" remarks), and the show of NO but on file at this newspaper.

Citizen Writes Tag Due

Notification Not Required


Dear Editor:
I have owned a truck registered in
Jefferson County since 2001. I dutifully
pay the pay the tag fees each year when I
get the white notice form our local tax col-
lector. A tag must be renewed the first
,day of your birth month.
This year my poor old truck got a tick-
et for an out of date tag. FHP Trooper
Jones was absolutely correct; the tag was
way out of date. I dutifully went to the tax
collector's office and purchased the tag
sticker the same day. My husband paid
the ticket.
I discovered that after years of get-
ting notices, my poor old truck had been
dropped off the date base of the Cass Date
and Mailing Company. Our new tax col-
lector contracts with the Cass Company
to send out the notices to renew both
your tags and drivers licenses.


I called the Cass Company and they
had no explanation and sadly for me they
would offer no way to get my truck back
in their computer.
While talking to both DOT and our
tax collector, I discovered that the
notices you et in the mail are only a
"courtesy" paid for by Jefferson County,
but not required by law. These County
courtesies are apparently .fickly.
Sometimes you get the courtesy and
sometimes you don't.
So be sure to go to the tax collectors
office on the first day of your birth
month. If you forget, or if the Cass
Company fails, to send yo a notice that
you paid for with your tax money, the
"courtesy" will cost you $87.
Be careful out there.
Merry Ann Frisby
Monticello


ctep3a r[ FT7'i
\fsfS^ ^ "*____ ^rr______________^________


TEN YEARS AGO
October 7. 1998
Democratic nominees for the
County Commission District 4 seat
'and the School Board 5 seat are
Felix "Skeet" Joyner and Charles
Boland respectively.
The logging operation that was
saucing the water to be muddied at
the head of the Aucilla'River has
taken steps to mitigate the problem.
The fourth annual consolidated
community effort to provide food
and clothing for the less fortunate at
Christmastime is now under way.
District School Nurse Gladys
Roann alerts parents that it is not
too soon to be on the look out for
head lice to make their appearance
in school children.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
October 5, 1988
Repeated problems with "wild,
uncontrollable juveniles," most of
whom are repeat offenders, have
kept city police running to the point
that they are getting fed up with it.
Police Chief Nelson Blount has
decided to take the problem to the
State Attorney.
On a recent trip to Jacksonville,
City Councilwoman Johann
Murdaugh discovered a possible
new source for low-interest commer-
Sacial and residential loans. The loans
I|are available through HUD's
Community Planning and
Development Division.
Two fourth quarter touchdowns
; saved the Aucilla Christian
Academy Warriors from their fourth
consecutive loss as the Warriors
edged Branford 21-20 Friday during
Sthe last minutes of play. The


Emerald Greene, Publisher


J/I.r


Children Learn What They Live


When I was a child on
through my teenage years,,
a scroll hung in my bed-
room (on my closet door)
with a nice saying on it. I
used to lie in bed and read
that scroll many a night as
I fell asleep. The older I'
got, the more I understood
what it meant.
I have thought of that
scroll, and what those
words meant,, for many
years. I have yet to buy me
the same saying, to hang
in my daughters' rooms,
but have every intention
of doing so.


GOT.


N^^mws?^^


C.44LL


If a child lives with criticism,
He learns to condemn.
If a child lives with hostility,
He learns to fight.
If a child lives with ridicule,
He learns to be shy.
If a child lives with jealousy,
He learns to feel guilty.
If a child lives with tolerance,
He learns to be patient.
If a child lives with encouragement,
He learns to appreciate.
If a child lives with praise,
He learns to appreciate.
If a child lives with fairness,
He learns justice.
If a child lives with security,
He learns to have faith.
If a child lives with approval,
He learns to like himself.
If a child lives with acceptance and friendship,
He learns to find life in the world.

Until then..... I'll see you around the town.


MONTICELLO


NEWs.


Warriors improved their record to 1-
3.
The Jefferson Tigers have j
retained their undefeated record
after tying Bainbridge 7-7 on Friday.'
The Tigers are presently 3-0-1.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
October 5, 1978
The City Council unanimously:
accepted a bare bones#budget ofi
$690,071.29 after Councilman Marvini
Bishop, head of the budget commit-_
tee presented a detailed study of the,
findings of the budget committee.
"Peace and quiet" are the main
attractions of farm life for Emily:
Walker, the wife of T. Butler Walker.
The couple was recently named'
Jefferson County Outstanding Farm:
Family and will be guests of honor
at many North Florida Fairi
Activities.
Parents of the Jefferson County:
High School students will have an|
opportunity to meet their children's
teachers and tour the classrooms!
today at the annual Open House.
The Great American Circus, a:
big under-canvas circus is coming to:
the Recreation Park under the spon-i
sorship of the Jefferson County:
Recreation department on October&
26. Shows will be at 6 and 8 p.m.
Opening of the new TG&Y store
in Jefferson Square is planned for I
February 15, according to a company'i
spokesman.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
October 5, 1958
Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Frishmuth-,
visited last week in St. Petersburg.
Mrs. W. E. Leisy has returned
home from a month's visit in
Colorado and California.


EMERALD GREENE Publisher/Owner A erel-e '.. pAk.pe D,'ahn tr Legp. for
RAY CICHON i Ver. p,per and ejrneid 'a, 5 p m for
A F,'i., paper
Managing Edilr i, i ,1'I." ,i iq,,, .Atd.mit
LAZARO ALEMw4N CmfRt Ut loVDEP.R TRMENT
Senior Staff' Win-r iuhrnpipuon Rale
CL.4.SSfim .wD LEG.A AD5 I hind l45 p r year
Deadline for CI3lsfied, is Mondy at 12 00 p n ulj.:,1-Slal .52 per 'vel
for Wedneday's paper and WVedrnedadj at 12 o.i Iji & I.'cal l '. mincludedi


.1ItoI%
- -rros


Established 1869
A weekly newspaper [USPS 361-620] designed for the express reading pleasures of the people of its circulation area,
be they past, present or future residents.
Published weekly by ECB Publishing, Inc., 1215 North Jefferson St. Monticello, FL 32344. Periodicals postage
PAID at the Post Office in Monticello, Florida 32344.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MONTICELLO NEWS, P.O. Box 428, Monticello, FL 32345.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of
the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any
advertisement submitted.
All photos given to ECB Publishing, Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from
the date they are dropped off. ECB Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline.


_I


P.O. Box,
1215 Nor h
Jefferson Street
Monticello, Florida
32345
850-997-3568
Fax 850-997-3774
Eitlail: nionticellonews
@entbarqmail.coni -A


It







Wednesday, October 8, 2008


VIEWPOINTS &


In the Friday, Oct. 3,
issue of the Jefferson
Journal, the reporter
erred on the story on the
candidates' forum,
headlined "Last Forum
Focuses on 2 County, 2
School Races".
Reference the
District 4 School Board
race, the reporter wrote
that candidate
Marianne Arbulu
charged that the current
School Board exceeded
the budget "by $571,000
this year and by
$400,000-plus last
year..." The amounts
were correct, but .the fis-
cal years were wrong.
Arbigu .... act ally
charged that the c&trien't
School Board "ekcee'ded
the budget by $571,000 in
the 2006-07 fiscal year
and by $422,000 in the
2007-08 fiscal year."
The Journal regrets
the error.


PINIONS


By Debbie Sn:
Monticello New
Staff Writer


eeet Yo


Neighbor


Dorothy Lewis


Dorothy Lewis is many things, but "laid back" is not one of them. She is
an active member of the Central Baptist Church in Aucilla,
and serves on the Jefferson Soil and Water Conserva-
tion Board.
.Through her SHARE affiliation she helps area
families better meet their monthly food costs by paying


less money for more product.
She's a member of the County Farm Bureau, with
a soft spot for raising funds for the American Kidney
Foundation.
Lewis moved to the area from Virginia in 1964.
She has two sons, one here in Jefferson County, and the
other as close as Madison County.


IL .~


"In my spare time," she chuckles, "I enjoy my
S grandchildren, who are now quite grown." "Ijust enjop
staying active. My involvement keeps me busy.. .keeps me from being bored."
She hopes never to sl6w down. She is one of the most active, willing, and
gracious volunteers in all of Jefferson County, and does all this at the proud
age of 82!
She has made many a friend, in high places and in low places, and treats
them all the same, with dignity, love, and respect.


Fu

BfelySatd_ 112,13 ,14 mm 5


Do people ever
wonder where all the
beer cans, plastic
bags, and styrofoam
cups that were in the
back of their pick-up
trucks went? They are
all on the side of the
road now!
You can always tell
locals from out-of-
town visitors by the
way they drive around
the courthouse! The
Yield signs are there
for a reason!
* When did it get to be
cheaper to buy a case
of beer as apposeed to
one single weekend
movie ticket?And who
thought this was a
good idea?!
Don't whine and
complain, JUST
STING! and all your
troubles will melt
away....


THEME: FIRST DATES

ACROSS
1. Vietnam's neighbor
5. Special Wednesday
for Christians
8. Surrender
12. Wet nurse
13. Guns aren't much
use without it
14. Voids or vacancies
15. It has minimal dis-
tortion
16. Often used in hunt-
ing
17. Not the same ones
18. *When love is
rarely found
21. Rubbish
22. Famous T-Rex
23. Hee-hawed, as in
donkey
26. Luge rider
30. Tote, as in suitcase
31. Nullify
34. __ of thumb
35. '*You probably
want it portrayed


favorably on a first
date
37. DNA transmitter
38. Thrown ahead of
band
39. Very bright star
40. *Followed by a
movie?
42. Has April 15th as
deadline
43. *Typical date prep
45. Jennifer's role on
"Friends"
47. One who loves
attention
48. White tree
50. *Four on the town
52. Approximately
54. Julia's Academy
Award-winning role
55. Sudden attack
59. These lips sink
ships
60. Trampled
61. A duckling that
became a swan
62. Feeble
63. *Date night?
64. Tree trunk under
bark


DOWN


1. Between sol and ti
2. Friend in Paris
3. Goon
4. Evasive
5. Collect
6. *He played dating
coach in "Hitch"
7. *Have the for
someone
8. Official chair of bish-
op
9. Genuine
10. Date asked of
expecting women
11. Van Gogh cut one
off
13. Wear away
14. *Offers lots of
advice for dating
women
19. "Flashdance" Cara
20. Small island
23. *Unknown date
24. Through the
grapevine?
25. American aloe
26. Baseball great
Musial
27. Found in
Netherlands
28. *Unwelcome out-
come for parents of
those dating?
29. Relating to kidneys
32. "Get a __1"
33. Conservative politi-
cal commentator
Coulter
36. Provider of gas in
cities before natural
gas
38. Husk
40. and Dumber"
41. Found on a "to do"
list
44. Popular preparation
of mushrooms
46. A winged child
48. Known for his
"yogi-isms"
49. Dostoevsky's "The
50. Usually accompa-
nied by gloom
51. Make a Deal"
52. or nothing"
53. Type of constrictor
56. In the past
57. Sick
58. Used for coloring


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DI-DYouKIivw,,9I


Spiral staircases in medieval castles are
running clockwise. This is because all knights
used to be right-handed. When the intruding
army would climb the stairs they would not be
able to use their right hand which was holding
the sword because of the difficulties in
climbing the stairs.
Left-handed knights would have had no
troubles except left-handed people could, never
become knights because it was assumed that
they were descendants of the devil.


!


Monticello News *' 3A


uH I I I II W U








4A Monticello News


Wednesday, October 8, 2008


FOUND


JEFFERSON


COUNTY


Costs


Emergency Management
Agency) gives a commit-
ment of exactly how much
it will reimburse the county
for the work.
"I say we cap it at
$310,000," Joyner said. "And
once we get word from
FEMA, we need to know
how long it will be before
we get the money I want the
commitment from FEMA
before we proceed with the
work. I don't want us to get
six months or a year down
the road and find that some-
one dropped the ball and
the county is in debt for a
million. I don't want us to
get stuck with the cost be-
cause FEMA won't pay."
As it was, the county
was already paying interest
on the $310,000, Joyner said.
County Coordinator
Roy Schleicher offered that
FEMA personnel have been
working hand-in-hand with
county personnel to assess
the storm-caused damage
here and have offered as-
surances, to the degree they
were able, that the county
would get reimbursed for
the work. In fact, FEMA
personnel were scheduled
to spend the week of Oct. 6-
10 here calculating the cost
of repairs to the 80-or-so
damaged roads, Schleicher
said. He expected that it
would be two to three weeks
before FEMA had the calcu-
lations completed, he said.
As for getting FEMA to
commit upfront to spending
so much per road, that was
extremely doubtful, Schle-
icher said. The best that the
county could do, he said,
was to authorize repairs to
the exact amount that
FEMA calculated it would
take to accomplish the
work. Once those funds
were expended, the county
could approach FEMA and
seek additional funding if
it was determined that
more work was needed on a
particular project, he said.
"I don't know that we
can ask FEMA for a guar-
antee upfront," Schleicher
said.
He mentioned that
FEMA had already cau-
tioned that the. county
should not run up the engi-
neering costs on the repair
plans for the roads until the
federal agency itself could


assess the situation, as
FEMA might not pay for
every aspect of the repairs.
In light of the warning, the
county was reexamining its
contract with the engineer,
Schleicher said.
A question also exists
whether the state will
waive the 12-1/2 percent of
the repair cost that is as-
sign to each local entity in
such restoration work. The
way it works, FEMA will re-
imburse 75 percent of the
repair cost, the state will re-
imburse 12-12 percent, and
the local entity is responsi-
ble for the last 12 1/. Jeffer-
son County officials have
asked that the state waive
the local 12-%2 percent
match, as this county is for-
mally designated a fiscally
constraint county But with
Florida itself in fiscal con-
straint because of the gen-
eral economic downtown,
it's up in the air right now
whether the state will grant
the waiver.
Joyner kept returning
to the issue of the FEMA re-
imbursements. If FEMA in-
dicated that it would give so
much for the repair of a
particular road, then he
didn't want the county to
spend one cent more than
what FEMA indicated,
Joyner said. His concern,
he said, was that contrac-
tors had a tendency to bid a
certain price for a job and
then kept upping the price
by change orders.
"I want to make sure
that Jefferson County does-
n't get stuck with $250,000 at
the end," Joyner said.
"We're already paying in-
terest on the $310,000."
Speaking of the
$310,000 money that the
county spent upfront in the
immediate wake of Fay
with the nod of the FEMA
,people Joyner asked
Road Department Superin-
tendent David Harvey if
that money hadn't accom-
plished its purpose of mak-
ing the damaged roads
passable?
"It depends what your
definition of passable is,"
Harvey responded.
Harvey himself had
another matter he wanted
to discuss, a sinkhole that
he detected alongside
Lake Road in' the after-


Chief


Cont. From Page 1


math of Fay and that has
the potential to collapse a
section of the road. He
said the sinkhole already
had forced the closing of
one lane of the road.
"It's already gulped
down a few thousand
yards of dirt," Harvey
said. "It's still feeding on
the surface, but at a
slower rate."
He asked for authori-
zation to pay a contractor
$17,872 to do a geological
study of the sinkhole. It
could be that solid rock ex-
isted under the road or,
that it was a void ready to
collapse, Harvey said. He
explained that the study
would determine the ex-
tent of any void under-
neath the road and also
indicate the steps that
needed to be taken to rem-
edy the problem.
Joyner wondered if
FEMA would cover the
cost of the study and the
subsequent repair.
'"Here's my concern,"
Joyner said. "Where is the
$17,872 going to come
from?"
Commissioner J. N.
"Junior" Tuten granted
that the concern was legit-
imate. But he asked what
choice the county had,
other than to repair the
road?
"We don't have any
choice but to spend the
money whether FEMA
helps us or not," Tuten
said. "This is an emer-
gency. We need to commit
the money and move for-
ward and hope that we can
work this out with FEMA
later."
The commission ulti-
mately approved the ex-
penditure.
Harvey also proposed
a "quick fix" should the
county have to close the
road, an -action that he
said "would disrupt the
lives of a lot of people" in
the area. That quick fix
was to build a temporary
one-lane detour around
the sinkhole area during
any repairs, rather than
forcing residents to take a
longer distance detour
using other county roads.
The commission took
the recommendation
under advisement.


Cont. From Page 1


Hoffman Promoted To




FMB Branch Manager


Farmers & Merchants
Bank is please to announce
Janene A. Hoffman's pro-
motion to Assistant Branch
Manager at the West Ten-
nessee Street Office. Hoff-
man.. has been in the
banking industry for over
17 years in Havana and Tal-
lahassee.
A .Tallahassee native
and West Tennessee's team
leader for the American
Heart Association Heart
Walk fundraiser, She has
also been involved with the
American Cancer Society
Relay for Life in Havana,
and the Toys for Havana


Kids project for over 10
years.
About Farmers &
Merchants Bank
Farmers & Merchants
Bank, founded in 1907, is
one of the oldest and
strongest financial institu-
tions in Florida. Headquar-
tered in Monticello,
Florida, FMB offers a full
range of banking products
and services, and operates
5 branch offices in Talla-
hassee, plus individual of-
fices in Monticello,
Madison and Greenville,
Florida, and Thomasville,
Georgia.


Young Eagle Will Fly


DEBBIESNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The EAA Chapter 1427
will offer the third annual
Young Eagle flying event
8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday,
Oct. 11 at the Jefferson
Landing Airpark on
Ashville Highway, east of
town.
This fun event if free
with airplane rides for stu-
dents ages 8 to 17, with
parental permission.
The event is weather
permitting of course!
Contact Scott Sutor at
342-1700 for more informa-
tion.

Attorney

Holdings, LLC, for
the stated purchase price
of $100,000 per acre on
the 15.3 acres, contin-
gent on the county ap-
proving the racetrack. It
further argues that the
developer complied with
all the applicable zoning
and land-use regulations
and that the commission
rejected the project for
personal and political
reasons.
The complaint also
alleges ex-parte commu-

Road Issue


nications on the part of
at least two commission-.
ers. Ex-parte communi-
cations are oral or
written, off-the-record
oral or written commu-
nications made to or by a
decision makers without
notice to all the involved
parties and that are di-
rected to the merits or
outcome of on-the-
record proceedings. Gen-
erally, ex-parte rules
prohibit commissioners
from engaging in infor-


Cont.-From Page 1

mal communications
with parties that could
influence how an issue is
decided.
In summary, the com-
plaint alleges that the
commissioners' decision
to deny the project
caused Jamaro's prop-
erty to be down valued
"a staggering' 73 per-
cent", or from $100,000
an acre to $27,000 per
acre, representing a total
loss of $1,116,900 on the
15.3 acres.


Cont. From Page 1


such an individual con-
ducting the inspections
previously, Billberry said.
But he added that the situ-
ation had now been reme-
died and Renee McCord
was the new fire inspector.
He described McCord as
college educated and sensi-
tive to the issues.
Billberry said it was
his philosophy that fire in-
spections should serve two
purposes. The first was
that they ensure safety for
those members of the pub-
lic who frequented a par-
ticular establishment. The
second was that they point
out potential liabilities
that the business owner
might not even be aware
of, thus helping the latter
mitigate the problem.
"Our philosophy as a
fire inspector is not to
come in with badges and
say we're going to shut you
down," Billberry said.
He cited the example
of two plantation man-
agers who had approached
his department with trepi-
dation about discussing
fire protection plans for
their respective organiza-
tions. These were individ-


uals who had not been fans
of the department, Bill-
berry said. But after a sat-
isfactory meeting with
Fire Rescue that had re-
* sulted in the formulation
of viable fire protection
plans, the two plantations
had made donations to the
Ashville Volunteer. Fire
Department, Billberry
said.
"We're doing our job,"
Billberry said. "I just want
to make sure that ,what
we're doing is in compli-
ance with what you want.
We've been doing the
mandatory inspections
and not the private ones,
unless we get a request."
Billberry added a
caveat. He pointed out that
effective Oct. 1, the state
now requires fire depart-
ments to investigate re-
ported violations. Meaning
that if some person or
agency reported a viola-
tion to his department, he
was bound to act on it. Oth-
erwise, the department
would risk liability should
a tragedy occurred be-
cause of the violation.
Commissioners in-
structed Billberry to con-


tinue a commonsense ap-
proach to the conduct of
fire inspections. Meaning
that by all means the de-
partment should continue
to conduct fire inspections
in cases where state li-
censing laws required it or
where a private individual
requested the inspection.
Likewise, if a violation
was reported, the depart-
ment should inspect the fa-
cility But by no means
should the department ex-
pand the fire inspections
beyond that point, the
commissioners enipha-
sized.
Bill Brown, a citizen in
the audience, confessed
being a little confused by
the commissioners' stand.
It had always been his un-
derstanding, Brown said,
that state law required the
inspection of all public
buildings to ensure that
members of the public
were protected from po-
tential fires. Was he wrong
in his understanding?
Brown asked.
The commission never
really responded to the
question.


pipe-caused damage,
have the county's engi-
neer inspect the reten-
tion pond for problems,
and research the resi-
dents' claim that the In-
dustrial Park Road had
served as a public road
since at least the mid
1970s.
County Coordinator
Roy Schleicher reported
on Thursday night that
engineer Frank Darabi
had inspected the reten-
tion pond and deter-
mined that it had not
overflowed, although
runoff from the indus-
trial park had made a
mess of the private road.
"The engineer says
the retention pond and
drainage system per-
formed adequately,"
Schleicher said. "But
stormwater runoff from
the property did flow
downhill and across the
road."
Howard disagreed.
The retention pond had
too overflowed and she
had the photographs to
prove it, she maintained.
"If you can take their


word for it," she said in
reference to Darabi and
Schleicher's representa-
tions, "you can take my
word for it. I'm profes-
sionally asking for your
help."
County officials also
disputed the public's
right to use of the road,
arguing that no records
had been found to sub-
stantiate the residents'
assertion that it had
served as a county road
for decades before its
closing.
Dick Bailar, an in-
volved citizen and strong
proponent of economic
development, argued
against the commission
granting the residents'
request for the opening
of Industrial Park Road,
which action he said
would destroy the viabil-
ity of the commercial fa-
cility. Rather, if the
money allowed, the
county should put up a
10-foot high cyclone fence
to buffer and protect the
facility, he said.
"Putting a public ac-
cess road through the in-


dustrial park is the worst
thing that you can do for
the park," Bailar said.
Commissioner Jerry
Sutphin, in whose dis-
trict the subdivision is lo-
cated, championed the
residents' cause.
"These people were
there before the indus-
trial park," Sutphin said.
"The industrial park was
not an industrial park
when they built their
houses back there. These
people have the right to
travel through the indus-
trial park to Drifton."
Sutphin's motion to
open the road, which
Commissioner Gene Hall
supported, failed to pass
3-2, at which point sev-
eral of the residents left
the room upset.
"There's no sympathy
here," Howard voiced as
part of the group walked
out of the meeting.
"It's a tough job,
folks," Commission
Chairman Felix "Skeet"
Joyner voiced to the re-
maining audience. "But
somebody has got to do
it."







Wednesday, October 8, 2008


Monticello News 5A


OUND


EFFERSON


COUNTY


IA^0A0


James "Jim" Emmett
Baker, age 71, President
and Manager of
Fairchild Florida Con-
struction Company died
Thursday, October 2, 2008
in Tallahassee, Florida.
Funeral services
were held Monday, Octo-
ber 6, 2008 at 10:00 am in
the First Baptist Church
in Monticello. Interment
followed at Oakfield
Cemetery. Visitation was
Saturday, October 4, 2008
from 6-8 pm at the fu-
neral home, and the fam-
ily received friends at
Jim's home following the
service at the cemetery.
Jim was born in Hop-
kinsville Kentucky on
October 31, 1937 to Henry
Bryant Baker and Mil-
dred Morrison Baker. He
was a former resident of
Prattville, Alabama be-
fore moving to Monti-
cello in 1985. Jim
received his Civil Engi-


neer Degree from the
University' of Kentucky
and was a great fan. Jim
had the largest single col-
lection of knives in the
Southeast. He was a
member of Masonic
Lodge #5 F&AM in Mon-
ticello. Past board mem-
ber of Florida
Transportation Builders
Association, and Past
President of Southern
Bridge Inc.
Jim is survived by
two daughters: Beck
Baker Harp of Monti-
cello and Jamie Baker
(Greg) Blackwell of
Thomasville, GA; two
brothers: Henry (Mary
Frances) Baker of Berea,
KY and Crump W. (Alta
Burnette) Baker of
Louisville, KY; three
grandchildren: James
Thomas "TJ" Harp,
James Baker Blackwell
and Anna Catherine
Blackwell.


VICTORIA MARY JAKOMAS
KARNOUPAK1S


Victoria Mary Jako-
mas Karnoupakis was
born to John and Kather-
ine Jakomas.on November
10, 1915 in Saberton, WV,
raised in McKeesport, PA,
and lived in Weirton, WV
after her- marriage to
George Karnoupakis in
1937. Then in 1998 Vicky
moved to Monticello, FL to
be near her daughter, Di-
anne Westbrook.
Vicky's time on earth
at the age of 92 ended Fri-
day, October 3, 2008 at Jef-
ferson Nursing Center,
Monticello, where she
resided for the'last 4 1/2
years of her physical life.
Beggs Funeral Home
of Monticello will be han-
dling arrangements.
Graveside services will he
held in Boynton Beach, FL
at a later date. Vicky was
raised in the Orthodox
faith and participated in
many activities of her
church, the All Saints
Greek Orthodox Church in
Weirton, WV. She loved
and enjoyed baking Greek
pastries for her church and
family events, and was a
member of the Philopto-
chos So ciety. She was a
homemaker, devoted and
loving Mother of her chil-
dren, and family members.
She leaves behind her
son, Nestor Karnoupakis
(Gail) of Maryville, TN,


and her daughter Dianne
Westbrook (Buddy) of
Monticello, FL. In addition
to her children, Mrs.
Karnoupakis leaves 3
grandchildren, and 2 great-
grandchildren all of
Maryville, TN. She has one
remaining brother 'Tedd
Jakomas (Andrea) of New
Smyrna Beach, FL, and a
host of nieces and
nephews. Her husband,
George, her parents, and
three brothers Gus, An-
drew and Pete Jakomas of
McKeesport, PA preceded
her in death.
In lieu of flowers the
family of Mrs.
Karnoupakis request that
donations be made to ei-
ther the Jefferson Nursing
Center, 1780 N. Jefferson
St., Monticello, FL 32344,
Big Bend Hospice, 205 N.
Mtilberry St., Monticello,
FL 32344, the All Saints
Greek Orthodox Church at
P 0. Box 128CS, Weirton,
WV 26062, or your favorite
charity
Special thanks are
given to Dr. John MacKay,
Big Bend Hospice, and es-
pecially the staff of Jeffer-
son Nursing Center, and
her caregivers whose love
and caring greatly sup-
ported Ms. Vicky and her
family during her final
days. We will miss her
singing.


JAMES BAKER


C /


rRcsarssa;


October 8
Monticello Kiwanis
Club meets every Wednes-
day at noon at the Jeffer-
son Country Club on
Boston Highway for lunch
and a meeting. Contact
President Rob Mazur at
907-5138 for club informa-
tion.
October 8
Mignonette Garden
Circle meets at noon on the
second Wednesday of the
month for a meeting and
program. Contact Chair-
man Jan Wadsworth at 997-
4440 for meeting location
and for more information.
October 9
Founder's Garden Cir-
cle meets at noon on the
second Thursday of the
month. Contact Chairman
Suzanne Peary at 997-4043
for meeting location and
for more information.
October 9
Workforce Mobile Ca-
reer Lab is stationed across
from the street from First
Baptist Church, Monticello
9 a.m.- 4 p.m. on the second
Thursday of each month.
Services include job
search, resume assistance,
assessments, and labor
market information. For
more information, contact
Employment Connection
Director Cheryl Rehberg at
673-7688, or volunteers Paul
Kovary at 997-2313, or Mike
Reichman at 997-5100, or
SW Ellis at 567-3800 or 866-
367-4758.
October 9
Altrusa meets at noon
on the second Thursday
and at 6 p.m. on the fourth
Thursday of each month
for a meal and a meeting.
Contact the Chamber at
997-5552 for more informa-
tion.
October 9
AA meetings are held 8
p.m. on Thursdays at the
Christ Episcopal Church
Annex, 425 North Cherry
Street. For more informa-
tion call 997-2129 or 997-
1955.
October 10
Fresh Mullet Fish Fry
at Waukeenah United
Methodist Church 5 to 8
p.m. The cost is $10 for
adults and $4 for children.
The meal will include
cheese grits, cole slaw,
baked beans, a beverage,
and a homemade dessert.
Eat in or carry out. 997-
2171 for more information.
October 10
Monticello Rotary Club
meets every Friday at noon
at the Monticello/Jefferson
Chamber of Commerce on


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0 -
i SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11TH ... |
O OPEN ALL DAY, 7 a.m. -5 p.m.,0
TO CELEBRATE OUR 0 1
1ST YEAR ANNIVERSARY .... 0
>Join us for a fun "MINI-MARKET" I
from o10 a.m. 3 p.m. with
New Leaf Market, White Oak
0 Pastures, Full Circle Farm, 0
0 )Karen Knox, Damayan Garden 9 Q ')
Project, Golden Acres Ranch, ^ /
Sweet Grass Dairy, Sparkman's
Dairy and more!
The Jefferson County Humane
Society will be here with adoptable
Animals and information too.
Come join the fun and meet your U
farmers, ranchers and dairies!

Tupelo's Bakery & Cafe
The area's only almost totally
organic/natural bakery and cafe. ".
220 West Washington St.
Monticello, FL


850-997-2127
A4, f


------7


I


West Washington Street for
lunch and a meeting. Con-
tact President James Mu-
chovej at 980-6509 for club
information.
October 11
AA meetings are held 8
p.m. Saturday at the-Christ
Episcopal Church Annex,
425 North Cherry Street.
For more information, call
997-2129 or 997-1955.
October 11
Young Eagle flying
event 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sat-
urday at Jefferson Landing
Airpark on Ashville High-
way, weather permitting.
Free airplane rides for stu-
dents ages 8 to 17 with
parental permission. The
EAA Chapter 1427 spon-
sors this third annual
event. Contact Scott Sutor
at 342-1700 for more infor-
mation.
October 11
The Scarlet O'Hatters
of Monticello meet. 11:30
. a.m. on the second Satur-
day for a Halloween lunch
and meeting at the Cham-
ber. Contact Mary Connell
at 997-2772 for more infor-
mation.
October 13
AA Women's Meetings
are held 6:45 p.m. Monday;
AA and Al-Anon meetings
are held 8 p.m. Christ Epis-
copal Church Annex, 425
North Cherry Street. For
more information call 997-
2129 or 997-1955.
October 13
Boy Scout Troop 803
meets 7 p.m. every Monday
at the Eagles Nest on South
Water Street. For informa-
tion, contact Scout Leader
Paul Wittig at 997-1727 or
997-3169.
October 13
Girl Scouts meet 4 p.m.
on Monday at the St.
Phillips Boys and Girls
Club. For more informa-
tion contact Club Director
Sabrina Williams at 997-
4226.
October 13
VFW Ladies Auxiliary
Post 251 meets 6:30 p.m. on
the first Monday of each
month at Memorial MB
Church. Contact Mary
Madison at 210-7090 for
more information.
October 13
Masonic Lodge #5
meets 7:30 p.m. on the sec-
ond and fourth Monday at
the Hiram Masonic Lodge,
235 Olive Street in Monti-
cello. Contact Roy Faglie at
933-2938 for more informa-
tion.
October 14
AA classes are held
every Tuesday evening 8


A


,


9)ca ES31S


p.m. for those seeking help.
Located at 1599 Springhol-
low Road in the Harvest
Center. Contact Marvin
Graham at 212-7669 for
more information.
October 14
Aucilla Christian
Academy will host its
weekly Tuesday fish fry at
6:30 p.m. throughout the
football season just outside
the football field. The cost
is $7 per meal with all pro-
ceeds to benefit the ACA
Football Boosters. Call
Tonya Roberts at 997-3597
for more information.
October 14
The Jefferson County
Democrat Party meets 7
p.m. on the second Tuesday
of each month at the Pub-
lic Library Contact
Eleanor Hawkins at 997-
2863 for more information.
October 14
American Legion Post
49 and Ladies Auxiliary
will meet 7 p.m. on the sec-
ond .Tuesday of each
month for a business meet-
ing at the Otto Walker Post
on South Water Street.
Contact President Fred
Shofner at 997-3234 for
more information.
October 14
Monticello/Jefferson
County Chamber of Com-
merce's general meeting is
held at noon on the second
Tuesday of each month
and includes lunch. Con-
tact Director Mary Frances
Gramling at 997-5552, or
monticellojeffersonfl.com
October 16
Monticello Garden
Club General Meeting will
meet 11:30 a.m. Thursday
at the Christ Episcopal
Church annex. Speaker
Linda Van Beck will pres-
ent the program on "plant-'
ing bulbs now for showers
of spring flowers." She will
have bulbs for sale. Each"
Circle is responsible for a
Ways and Means table and
for cleanup. Members with
a covered dish $5, no cov-
ered dish $10. Contact Pres-
ident Jan Wadsworth at
997-4440 for more informa-
tion.


cost of the dinner is a $5 ,
donation, with all proceeds
benefiting the Jefferson
Senior Center.
October 16
Craft fun night will be
held 5:30 to 10 p.m. Thurs-
day at First United
Methodist Church, Monti-
cello. Come enjoy the fel-
lowship with other
crafters. Call the church at
997-5545 for more informa-
tion.
October 17 and 18
Southern Music Rising,
presents Louisiana-style
cooking classes featuring
Janice "Boo" Macomber,
hosted by Carrie Ann & Co.
at the Mays House, 544-,
2427. There will be three
identical sessions: 2-4 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 17; 9-11 a.m.
Saturday, Oct. 18; and 1-3
p.m. Saturday, Oct. 18. Each
session is limited to 20 par-
ticipants. The menu will -
include Shrimp Etouffe,
Cajun Crab Casserole, and
Bananas Foster. The- ses-,
sions are $60 each. For
more information contact
Barry.kelly@coldwell-
banker.com or 997-5516, or
d.voglegesang@att.net
October 18
1984 JCHS Class Re-
union Meeting will be held
3:30 p.m. Saturday, at Pizza
Hut. Contact Carolyn
Hamilton at 284-4306 or de-
onjala72@yahoo.com for
more information.
October 18
Jefferson Nursing Cen-
ter will hold its annualFalll
Festival, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. ,
Saturday, at 1780 North Jef-,-
ferson Street. Vendors are
asked to respond now for
set-up and area locations.
Apply to JNC hosts Mae
Kyler, social services direc-
tor; Voncell Thomas, activ-
ity director; or Marcie ,
Preacher, risk manager at
997-2313 or 997-0287 for
more information. The fes-
tival will offer good food,
games, music, prizes, and -,
loads of fun for all ages.







6A Monticello News


Wednesday, October 8, 2008


FOUND


EFFERSON


COUNTY


Only God-


Stay In Your Places

DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News ."
Staff Writer
Evangelist Betty
Dean-Hightowver
Ministry will
present "Only
God Stay In
Your Places" 5
p.m. Sunday. '
Oct.12 at the
C a p i to 1 a
Church of God P
in Prophecy
The public
is invited, and
there is no ad-
mission fee.
You won't
want to miss
these fun filled
and exciting
episodes. Yet. seri-
ous and inspirational -
trues, in a heartwarm-
ing, heart touching per-
formance of "In The Word."
For more information contact CCGP at 997-
4235, located at 25550 Capitola Road in Tallahassee,
S _Keep your ears tuned for the upcoming "Trust
And Obey II."




What Does the Rescue Plan
Mean to Indiviual Investors?

Provided by Robert J. Davison

If you've watched the news from Wall Street and Washington the
past few days, you've seen a hefty amount of drama. But in the
end, what will it mean to you?

Lawmakers have agreed on a $700 billion plan, called the Emer-
gency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, to revive the credit
markets and restore the flow of credit to the U.S. economy. The
legislation will, among other provisions, give' the Treasury De-
partment the ability to purchase up to $700 billion in mortgage-
backed securities and other troubled assets from banks and
financial firms, though some of this spending authority will be
subject to Congressional approval.

This rescue package has both supporters and detractors. Its pro-
ponents claim that, you, as a taxpayer, will ultimately reap rewards
when the Treasury eventually sells the currently distressed assets
for a profit. However, while no one can say for sure when, or if,
this will happen, it does seem likely that the bailout .could have
some real benefits for you as an investor.

Why? Because one of the most important goals of the bailout is
to help "unclog" the credit markets and put more cash back into
our financial system. The subprime mortgage crisis has sucked an
enormous amount of liquidity from our markets; without this liq-
uidity, banks have become unwilling, or unable, to extend credit
to'consumers and businesses. When businesses can't get credit,
they can't expand their operations and that makes it hard for
them to make a profit.

As an investor, of course, you are looking for profitable companies
in which to invest. So, to the extent that an infusion of liquidity
may help the fortunes of many businesses, you now may face a
brighter investment horizon.

Furthermore, the bailout may calm the financial markets and
calmer financial markets are more conducive to long-term in-
vesting. As an investor, you may find it hard to stick to your
strategy when you see the stock market show giant gains one day,
followed by huge losses the next.

Nonetheless, as you look ahead, don't be surprised if some volatil-
ity continues, although it will hopefully be less extreme than what
we've seen.
Fortunately, you can take effective action against market fluctua-
tions, whatever their size, by diversifying your investments. Talk
to your financial advisor about how to diversify your portfolio in
a way that's appropriate for your risk tolerance and time horizon.
Be aware, however, that diversification, by itself, cannot guaran-
tee a profit or protect against a loss.

Also, keep looking for quality investments. During market down-
turns, even quality stocks can lose value. But these same stocks
often recover quickly when the market turns around. Look for-
good, solid companies whose products are competitive and whose
management has enunciated a strategy for future growth.

Here's the bottom line: The government's rescue plan may well
help investors. But by following proven strategies, such as diver-
sifying your holdings and investing for quality, you can build a
portfolio that can navigate even the choppiest financial waters -
without having to bail yourself out.

Robert J. Davison EdwardJones
Financial Advisor
205 E. Washington Street -
Monticello, FL 32344 .S


Sr. Center Hosts POW/MIA Ceremony


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer I
The Ladies Auxiliary
Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 251 conducted their sec-
ond annual POW/MIA re.
membrance ceremony at the
Jefferson Senior Center, 10:15
a.m., Friday, Sept. 19.
The program was called-
"Save a Place For the Missing
Man." Auxiliary President
Mary Madison remarked that
the symbols and ritual were
used to remember loved ones
left behind or those unac-
counted for. "With this cere
mony, we honor our nation's-
unaccounted prisoners of
war and missing in action
(POW/MIA)" stated Madison.
She explained that the
third Friday of September is
National pow/mia Recogni-
tion Day set aside .by Con-
gress to remember those who
went to battle and never came
home.
Madison, who served as
moderator for the ceremony,
called attention to the raised
table at the front of the room
and explained to the audi-
ence that the purpose of the
ceremonial ritual was to
honor all missing/captured
comrades-in-arms.
On the table was dis-
played six place cards repre-
senting six empty place
settings for those Americans
still missing from either the
Army, Navy, Marine Corps,
Air Force, Coast Guard, or
Civilians. A baseball cap was
displayed on the table, which
represented the spotlight on
the individual soldier.
The ceremony began
with Chaplin-Minister
Shirley Washington offering
a remembrance prayer, fol-
lowed by Pledge of Alle-
giance and song, God Bless
America."
Madison then asked par-
ticipants for the meaning of
each item placed: on the
"Missing Man" table. Those
participants included Madi-
son, and Auxiliary mem-


Monticello ewsaota y ran "un, eptem er 9, 2008
Ladies Auxiliary Post 251 members participating during the POW/MIA ceremony
hosted at the Senior Center, included, left to right; Shirley Washington, Willie Ann Dickey,
Dorothy Benjamin, Ollie King, E. Marie Gallon, and Mary Madison, and granddaughter
Madison Kelley.


bers/sisters: Shirley Wash-
ington, Willie Ann Dickey,
new member Dorothy- Ben-
jamin, Ollie King, E. Marie
Gallon, and American legion
Post 49 Ladies Auxiliary
President Sheila Slik.
Items and their mean-
ings are: The roundness of
the table represents our ever-
lasting concern for the miss-
ing. The whiteness of the
tablecloth symbolizes the pu-
rity of the motives of those
who answered the call of
duty. The single red rose in a
vase is a reminder of the
lives of each of the missing
and the loved ones who keep
the faith, still waiting for an
answer.
The red, white and blue
ribbons tied around the vase
shows our continued deter-
mination to account for the
missing. The lemon slice on
the bread plate is to remind
us of the bitter fate of those
captured and missing in a
foreign land. A pinch of salt
recalls the tears endured by
those missing and their fami-
lies who seek answers. An in-
verted glass symbolizes their
(POWs/MIAs) inability to
share in today's toast. The


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Bible represents the strength
gained through faith to sus-
tain those lost from our coun-
try, which was founded as
'One nation under God.' The
single, empty chair before a
single place setting, stands
empty to express their ab-
serice. The solitary candle
(which was lit) burns to rep-
resent the 'upward reach of
their unconquerable spirit'."
Posted on the front of the
podium next to the table was
the numbers of those still un-
accounted for prisoners of
war and missing in action:
WW I, 3,350; WW II, 78,750;
Korean War, 8,215; Cold War,
124; and Southeast Asia,
2,005.
Madison expressed that
"Each element of the ritual
,calls upon witnesses to re-
member. Each symbol ex-
presses both our grief and
our hope. This Missing Man
table' and honors ceremony
ends with a toast; to the cap-
tured, to the missing, and
most of all, to the success of
the efforts to account for
them all. Salute!


At the conclusion of the
ceremony, VFW Commander
Byron Barnhart gave thanks
and remarks.
Among guests present
during the ceremony were:
County Sheriff David Hobbs;
-Monticello Police Depart-
ment Chief Fred Mosley,
Mayor Gerrold Austin, An-
gela Gray, Jefferson Senior
Citizen Director Bobbie.
KIrebs, Past American Legion
Post 49 President Ron Slik,
Supervisor of Elections
Marty Bishop, County 4-H Co-
ordinator John Lilly; and Tax
Collector Lois Hunter.
Center clients present in-
cluded; Jean Watson, Cora
Henry, Chriss Robinson, Al-
fredia Thompson, Melvin
Brown, Freddie Williams,
Maggie Alexander, Reed
Richard, Chris Robertson,
Susie Morris, Marie Handley,
Beulah Farmer,-Ocie Neely, -
Betty Conner, Horace Neely,
and the youngest attendee,
five month-old little Miss
Madison Kelley, granddaugh-
ter of Mary and Sam Madi-
son.


Monticello News Photo By Fran Hunt, September 19, 2008
The poster displayed on the front of the podium during
the POW/MIA ceremony gave an account of those still un-
accounted for.


Monticello Newis Photo By Fran Hunt, September 19, 2008
The "Missing Man" table displayed many items, each
with significance to the POW/MIAs and their families, their
feelings, hopes, love and devotion.


SNew Hope Church of God
V Oct. 11th, Fish Fry: the cost is $6.00 per person.
Time: 5pm- 7pm in the fellowship hall.
Everyone is welcome to attend.
For more information please call
Sthel church office at 977-1119.
** 5I EI Palmhner Mill Rd. -Monticello
-1 UI''II see you there!
T 1. W.4


Bus. 850-997-2572 Fax 866-462-9184 ,
Cell 850-933-3329 .
robert.davison@edwardjones.com -
www.edwardjones.com
Making Sense of Investing 4


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oJV-J







Wednesday, October 8, 2008


Monticello News 7A


FOUND


EFFERSON


COUNTY


S- Jefferson Arts Inc. October Exhibit


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Jefferson Arts, Inc. will host a new-exhibit
opening Saturday, Oct. 11, featuring artwork
created by the students of Monticello New
Life..
Monticello New Life is a juvenile deten-
tion center for adolescent females.
The show encompasses works created
through an Art Therapy Program that was
started nine months ago by Dr. Paul Knoll, di-
rector of Monticello New Life and Sylvan
Fluharty, an Art Therapy student at FSU.
Participation in the program enhances
treatment and rehabilitation by helping the
ladies express their feelings, thoughts and
memories to the outside world.
The artwork that will be displayed
throughout the month of October reveals


some of the difficulties the ladies have expe-
rienced in their past and current lives, their
abilities to overcome their circumstances, and
expressions of their dreams.
The opening reception of this emotional
exhibit will be held 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct.
11.
The exhibit is free and open to the public,
and will be on display Oct. 11 to 31 in the
Gallery, located at 575 West Washington
Street.
The Gallery is open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Wednesday and Saturdays, or by appoint-
ment by calling 997-3311.
Jefferson Arts, Inc. is a non-profit group
with a goal of promoting art and art education
in the Monticello area of North Florida and
South Georgia.
For more information visit www.jeffer-
sonartsgallery.com


Monticello News Photo By Debbie Snapp, October 4, 2008.
Jefferson County Refuge House Director Dessie Harvey and Task Force Member An-
gela Gray were busy Saturday preparing doors for display during October's Domestic Vi-
olence Awareness Month. Helping with the cleaning is Isabella Gray.

October Is National Domestic

Violence Awareness Month


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
In recognition of Na-
tional Domestic Violence
Awareness Month the Jef-
ferson County Refuge
House Task Force will host
the annual Domestic Vio-
lence Awareness Program
5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Thurs-
day, Oct. 9 across from the
Courthouse, at the south-
east lot of the former
Downtown Foodstore.
The community is wel-
comed and encouraged to
join in honor and support
of survivors of domestic
violence.
Featured speaker will
be Aimee Mallini from Tal-
lahassee followed by a pres-
entation of a "Collection of
Doors Art Work" painted
by survivors of domestic
violence.
These doors will be dis-
played in various locations
in the city throughout the
month of October.
Food and refreshments
will be provided. Admis-
sion is free.
Refuge House is a do-
mestic violence and rape
crisis center that serves


Jefferson County and seven
surrounding counties.
With two emergency shel-
ters and outreach offices in
each county served.
A tradition for more
than a decade, National Vi-
olence Awareness Month is
observed for the purpose of
celebrating
survivors of
domestic vi-
olence, hon-
oring the
victims who
lost their
lives to do- -
mestic vio-
1 e n c e ;
raising
awareness
in the com- *
m u n i t y .
about vio-
lence in the
home and
providing
strength, in
numbers, to
eliminate
domestic vi-
olence. Monticello News Ph
T h e Jefferson C
U n i t e d Dessie Harvey
States Con- Gray show one o
gress first be on display be
passed Do- tablishments ar
passed Do-


mestic Violence Awareness
Month legislation in 1989
and has continued to draw
attention to efforts to end
violence in homes ever
since.
Contact Dessie Harvey
at 342-3518 for more infor-
mation.


ot0o By ueBDle anapp, uctouer 4, zuuo.
County Refuge House Director
and Task Force Member Angela
of the five, hand painted doors to
beginning Thursday, Oct. 9 in es-
ound town.


Jesad,

P [Zeuse


T JecycLe




The Jefferson County


Recvclina Proaram accents


the following items for recycling:


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All Cardboard Products grocery bag, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located
at 1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the
collection sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our
Landfill and saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go
wrong?

Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing
machines, dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle
Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals,
paint, paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to
identify contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept
medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an
employee of the facility and not just dropped off.

Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.

The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Steve Wingate at 342-0154.

Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


PERSONAL INJURY & ]

C WRONGFUL DEATH 9



Jon D. Caminez
Board Certified Civil Trial Attorney

Ian Brown
Cary A. "Bo" Hardee, III



CAMINEZ, BROWN & HARDEE, P.A.

(850) 997-8181
1307 S. JEFFERSON STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
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about their quaKliications and experience.








8A* Monticello News


Wednesday, October 8, 2008


OUND


EFFERSON


COUNTY


Jefferson Tiger Welcomes All


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Twelve years after being
donated to the then Jefferson
County High School, the
.Jefferson Tiger, affectionate-
ly known as "King Frederick"
has been auspiciously located
in the main building at
Jefferson County Middle
High School, where all that
pass by can be greeted by his
stately stance.
King Frederick's story
began back in 1996, when
Anita Furrow, then TAPP
(Teenage Pregnancy
Program) teacher, who had.
for years been dedicated to
Jefferson High and active in
FHA and all athletics, donat-
ed the Tiger to the school.
"I have always been
devoted and dedicated to
Jefferson, and in 1996, both of
my parents (William
Fredrick Luscomb and
Beatrice Casalini Luscomb)
passed away," said Furrow.
"I was in the mall and went
inside of a gift shop and I saw
this beautiful bronze life-
sized statue of a Tiger, so I
bought it and donated it to the
school in memory of my par-
ents.
Furrow recalled that
there was no ceremony
upon the dedication and
afterward, "King
Fredrick" was
placed in the old
Jefferson' County
High School /
library, on Water
Street. Over the
years, whenever
there was a spe-
cial occasion at
the high school
auditorium, "King
Fredrick" was
moved to the stage
for the event, and then
returned to the libra r\
When the new school,
on David Street, was built
about five years ago, "King
Fredrick" developed a case of


wanderlust, and was report-
ed to have been placed in the
athletic director's office, and
later "into the new school
library.
This year, a more proper
and fitting location was
found and Frederick was
moved to the lobby of the
main building where he
greets all who crosses his
path. '
Furrow reported that she
is very pleased with the new
location, which seems to say
"Welcome Jefferson, the
home of Tiger Pride."
"I'm glad that the kids
will be able to enjoy it," said
Furrow. "Not only does King
Fredrick honor my parents,
but also my children, my
grandchildren, and those yet
to come."
Even after retiring in
1999 after 31 years at the
school, and returning briefly
during the 2001-2002 school
year as the library techni-
cian, she still remains a true
Tiger fan. ."I bleed orange
and blue, as far as I'm con-
cerned, there is nothing
else," she concluded.

Monticello News photo by Fran Hunt,
September 11, 2008
This Jefferson County
High School Tiger,
Donated in 1996
Sby Anita
: Furrow in
Memory of
her par-
years kept
watch in
the old
Jefferson
Library on
Street. He
then trav-
eled around
the school and
now has a per-
manent home in
the main building of
the new school greeting
visitors as they arrive through
the door, "Welcome to Tiger
Country."'


IAnnual Jake


Friday Evening

Saturday


Octo

Super

Aladisc

Entrn

- Hors d'oel

- Bring Your


Portion of Proce(

American Cance

Paid by Madison County Tourist and Devel


*ra .a t


Presentations to Honorees Susie Stewart and Rosa Frazier. Left to right, Alberta Barnhart, Dr. Carolyn Brooks,
Honoree Susie. Stewart seated, honoree Mrs. Frazier, and Mary Madison.


Midwife Recognition


Well-Attended


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Approximately 60 fam-
ily members, midwife-
delivered individuals and
friends were in atten-
dance at the recognition of
15 known Jefferson
County midwives,
Sunday, Sept. 21 at Union
Bethel AME Church. '
Veteran of Foreign
Wars Post. 251 and ladies
Auxiliary hosted the
memorial event honoring
two of Jefferson County's
known living midwives,
sister Susie Stewart and
mother Rosa Frazier.
Another 13 others
were also recognized for
their valuable services
rendered. They included:
Feebie Bradley, Rachael
Collins, Maggie Connell,
Rosa Gilley, Charlotte
Henry, Alberta Sneed
Jackson, Juanita
Jefferson, Georgia Ann
Lockett, Nellie "Lilla"
Massey, Mary Scott, Mary
Etta Sneed, Lula Reed,
and Rachael White.
Past VFW
Commander/ Brother Ned
Hill, Jr., and Brother
Eddie Gallon, Jr., opened
the program with devo-
tion. Audience selections
included; "Won't it be
Grand"; "This Little Light
of Mine"; "God Has
Smiled on Me"; "What a
Friend We Have in Jesus";
"Amazing Grace"; and
"God is Good All the


Sullivan


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ivre Finger Foods
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Time."
The program contin-:
ued with the welcome by
Sister Edna Henry; the
occasion by LAVFW
President/Sister Mary
Madison; and the scrip-
ture by Minister Louise
Wallace.
The message was
given by Minister Dr.
Carolyn Brooks, past pres-
ident LAVFW Post 12054,
Quincy. The honorary
messenger began by
revealing she too was mid-
wife-delivered by her mid-
wife grandmother.
Next, she gave an
extensive introduction of
the history of "mid-
wifery". She explained
that from reference, the
word, "midwife" comes'
from old English and
means "with woman" and
is found in Hindu records
in Greek and Roman man-
uscripts. It was stated
that midwives have
helped women deliver
babies since the beginning
of history approximately
4,000 years ago.
She emphasized that
the services of midwifery
and an honorable, profes-
sional service that was
prevalent in 'the col-
ored/negro/black/black
American/African
American race in the past,
due to the fact that little to
no doctor services were
available to them.
Therefore the practice has
passed ,down from genera-
tion to generation.
Minister Brooks then
gave Biblical reference of
the early use of midwifery
from the book of Exodus
chapter, one, verses 15-21,
which tells of the king of
Egypt's instruction to the
Hebrew midwives
Shiphrah and Puah to kill
all male babies when they
helped the Hebrew women
deliver.
This was to stop mas-
sive reproduction in
Egypt. 'Dr. Brooks fol-
lowed with three points to
King Pharoh's instruc-
tions for the Hebrew
women and the actions of
the Hebrew midwives.
Number one, Fear God
as the midwives did in
verse 17; number two;
pray to God and He will
sustain and guide you as
in verses 20-21. Dr. Brooks
exemplified that the two
honorees and the others
have to have had the char-
acter of the two Biblical
midwives, to have been
able to remain dedicated
and humble to their pro-
fession in those crucial


periods of time.
Mrs. Stewart's daugh-
ter, Margaret, spoke on
behalf of her mother. She
remarked that her mother
had cared for and nur-
tured her before and after
the delivery of eight of her
13 children. She
explained that the love,
and support of her mid-
wife mother was the true
nature of obligation to her
profession, not just to her,
but tQ every mother and
baby(ies) she attended and
delivered.
Positive responses of
"Amen's and "Yes's erupt-
ed 'from the audience,
along with other affirma-
tive replies. One of
Margaret's sons was pres-
ent to honor his grand-
mother, Susie.
Frazier expounded
beautifully about her
short-term experiences as
a midwife in the late 1920s'
and how she truly enjoyed
helping the young moth-
ers during their delivery.
She reminisced that many
times she had to walk for
miles or ride on the horse
and wagon to get to the
laboring mother.
She also remembered
how, many time, she
stayed several days, wait-
ing and nurturing the
mother until the baby was
born, because she never
wanted to lose a baby or
mother in childbirth.
Sh'e thanked God that
she had never lost either,
however, one baby did die
several weeks later from
uncontrollable circum-
stances. She also told that
there was very little finan-
cial compensation ($2-$5),
but most of the time, she


would be paid in eggs,
chickens, or whatever else
the family could afford.
She quickly empha-
sized, "I love what I did
and I thank God, I was
able to do it." Frazier
noted that she served as a
midwife for a short while
in the 1930's, but because
of the hard times and
steady work, which
monopolized her time, she
could no longer deliver
babies, much to her
regret.
. The two honorees
were presented with spe-
cially made certificates by
Past Commander John
Nelson and bouquets' of
roses from Commander
Barnhart. Frazier is a
faith member and
guardian in the ladies
auxiliary.
Photo sessions of Mrs.
Stewart and 15 members
of her fami-
ly/friends/deliveries, was
taken; then Frazier and
her special guests, of the
special presentations, and
of all the midwife-deliv-
ered attendees, 18 in total.
Among those midwife
delivered, were Nelson
Madison, Dr. Brooks, Hill
and wife Carolyn, treasur-
er Barnhart and her twin
sisters, Gwendolyn
Reshard and Geraldine
Hill, Gallon, daughter
Stewart, Wilson, Nellie
Randall, and several oth-
ers.
Final remarks from
commanders Nelson and
Barnhart ended the pro-
gram with the benediction
by Minister Brooks.
Refreshments of
assorted cookies, cake and
punch were served.


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Wednesday, October 8, 2008


Monticello News 9A


Sur lo1
..4 .





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10A Monticello News


Wednesday, October 8, 2008


October 5 11


County 4-Hers Involved In Variety Of Activities


Paper Clovers-


On Sale Now!

National 4-H Council is '-
thrilled to announce that ,.'.; ,^;' k
we have again partnered , .
with Southern States .
Cooperative retail stores ...
to run the "4-H Paper -
Clover" campaign, an : -'.,
exciting consumer-driven ., ,
fund-raising promotion t ...
where consumers
purchase a paper clover at
the register for $1. Some of you may have
participated in the small-scale pilot campaign we
did last year. Given what was learned, a few
changes have been made: a consultant was hired to
redesign the promotional materials and we're doing
it again this year!
Southern States. has told us that stores in
Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Georgia. Kentucky,
Maryland, North Carolina. South Carolina.
Virginia, and West Virginia will be participating
(list of participating locations can be found by
visiting www.4-hbrandnetwork.org). Below are the
details of this year's promotion. Hope to see you at a
participating Southern States Store!
The Promotion What is it and What is
Different from Last Year's Pilot?
From Sunday, October 5 to Sunday. October 19.
Southern States Cooperative will be selling paper
clovers to their customers for $1 at the register at
select Southern States locations. Fifty cents from
'each $1 donation will go to the local 4-H program
and the remainder will go to National 4-H Council
to underwrite the
prom otion.a. :, .: . .- .: .
If a --.:- .
participating .
Southern States
store is in your .
area and you would .,
like to promote the
program, visit
www.4-
hbrandnetwork.org I .
for sample posters,
ads and other
resources to use inSU PPLY INC.
your promotions. If 4
you have, any.
questions, feel free
to contact Anarosa
Garcia at agarciand - .-
fom'hcouncil.edu .




AND FARM SUPPLY; INC.


.,. Seed Feed Fertilizer (Bag & Bulk)
Spreader Service
Fencing Materials* Farm chemicalss
.*) ~Veterinarian Supplies
Waukeenah Hwy., (Just South of US 27)

997-4460

roudly Supporting 4-H


Buy Direct From Manufacturer
Several Profiles to Choose From
Over 20 Colors in Stock with 40 Year Warranties
Call for Brochures & Installation Guides
Toll Free
1-888-393-0335
www.gulfcoastsupply.com

Proudly Supporting 4-H


RAY CICHON
Monticello News
Managing Editor
Country 4-H Coordinator John Lilly has organized
local 4-H activities for 21 years. He notes that he
Jefferson County 4-H aspires to be the leading yotth
development program that creates positive change n
youth, families and communities. There are 701 cut-
rent members, in a total of five county 4-H Clubs.
Some of the clubs have more than one chapter
with its own leader. One of the Ag Adventures Clubs
is led by Jeffery and Alacia Cone, of Greenville. Their
contact number is (850) 948-3173.
The second Ag Adventures Club is led by Mark
Demott. He can be reached at 997-5746 (home), or 997-
2072 (work). Both these clubs are dedicated to learn-
ing about agriculture.
Jefferson County 4-Hers will participate ia the
first Ag Adventure Day at the North Florida
Research Center, Oct. 10. The program is designed to
teach fourth to sixth grade students about agricul-
ture through in class and hands on. learning.
The Ag Adventures Program is designed to help
students understand the link between food growing
in a field, and what they see in a grocery store.
The Explorer's Club is led by Tammy Bowing.
She can be contacted at 997-8624 (Home) or 997-.665
(Work). This club is devoted to community service.
The Hamster's Club is led by Russell and Carrie
White. It is a club consisting of Ham Ralio
Operators. They can be reached at 997-3985.
There are five Hickory Hill Clubs, which aie
devoted to community service. Leaders of these
clubs are: Ruth Ann Scurry, 997-3102, (home), (850
410-3613 (work);
Endia Thomas, 997-0167; Kathy Campbell, 997-
5994; Lillie M. Gardner, 997-2856; Elsie Young, Box
364, Monticello, FL, 32345.
There are three Working Soldiers Clubs, which
are dedicated to community service. Their leaders
are: Dwanda Skipworth, 997-5362 (home), (850) 342-
0140 (work); Ann Reddick, 997-2176 (home), (850) 644-
3463 (work); Brenda Farmer, 997-6572, or (850) 245-0542.
To enroll in the Jefferson County 4-H fill out an
enrollment form at the 4-H Office, 275 North Mulberry
Street. The 4-H year runs from October through
September with National 4-H Week celebrated the
first week of October. Members are re-enrolled then,
with club activities generally following the school
year.
In addition to the above mentioned 4-H Clubs
other 4-H activities include: Ecology Field Day, Home
School Clubs, Day Camps, Summer Day Camps, and
Wildlife Camp.
County 4-Hers also participate in the Fashion
Revue, 4-H Council, 4-H Newsletter, computer lab,
County Demonstration Day, 4-H Congress, 4-H
Legislature, Club Booths, Talent Contest, District
Events Day, and District II 4-H Blitz Rally.
County 4-Hers will exhibit at the North Florida
Fair, running through Nov. 6-16.
Entries will include bake goods, drawing, crafts,
scrapbook pages, pillows, clothing, construction, pic-
tures, posters, and the like, with 16 members exhibit-
ing.
Exhibitors are: Abigail Hildreth and Jordan
Hildreth, Clover Buds: Anna Bowling and Abby
Starling, Intermediate Division; Marta Vargas,
Junior Divison; Gabe Starling, Michael Starling,
Senior Division; Lea Vargas, Junior Division;
Alexandra Brookins, Intermediate Division;
Katherine Brookins, Junior Divisions, Olivia
Brookins, Junior Divisions.
Alternates in the. Junior Division are:
Christopher Jones, Temarek Whtie and Terrance
White, dance team.
Alternates in the Intermediate Division are
Talitha Hanks who will sing "The Power of His
Love."
Alternates in the Senior Division are Dancing
"Crunk Soldiers:" Jakeia Morris, Kashonda Morris,
and Kassandra Simpkins.
Coordinator John Lilly relates that more are
expected to participate, with the deadline, Oct. 15.
Amanda Cone and Allison Cone will exhibit in the
Jr. Beef Division.
An Explorer Club Booth will be manned by local
4-Hers, and Consumer Choice Judging Teams are in
the process of organizing.



The 4-H' EmMblem


- ..
4. +.gw 'MI Ro wE ..
,-^^^:;&i4
^ .^ ; lo.1 L'


The special meaning of the
4-H emblem is:
HEAD think, plan,
reason;
HEART- be kind, true,
sympathetic;
HANDS to be useful,
helpful, skillful;
HEALTH to enjoy
life, efficiency in work and
play.


4-H symbols express the spirit of 4-H. The emblem is the
four leaf clover of green, with a white H on each leaf.
The leaves of the clover represent the whole self: Head,
Heart, Hands and Health.


Mr. John G. Lilly, Sr.
Jefferson County 4-H Coordinator
4-H is the largest youth organization in the world
with a membership exceeding seven million youth. 4-H
is active in all 50 US states and more that 80 countries
around the world.
YOU ARE INVITED. . .to join a 4-H club or to
enroll as a Home Study member. Club members
participate in 1-2 club meetings each month and in
county 4-H activities. To join a club, just contact the
leader of the club you are interested in. A club
directory is available from the 4-H Office.
HOW TO ENROLL IN 4-H
You'll need to fill out an enrollment form at the 4-H
at the Extension Office or with your club. The 4-H year
runs from October through September with the
National 4-H Week the first week of October. Members
are re-enrolled then, with club activities generally
following the school year.
When you join the Jefferson County 4-H, you'll get a
4H Membership Handbook. It contains important
iHformation for you. It will help you to understand how
you can be a part of the many learning opportunities 4-
H offers.


f 4-H Pled

I pledge... "
2 AD to clearer thie
ART to greater l"
-NDS to larger servi
HIEALTH to better livi
my club, my common
yAcountry and my wo


SJefferson County
Health Department

1255 W. Washington St.
Monticello, FL
342-0170

Head, Heart, Hands
& HEALTH

"We support 4-H Programs"


PRESSURE CLEANING /
SOFT WASHING
www.danburch.us
Since 1977 Free Estimates

850-997-4100
Mention this ad and get
10% Discount on this Ad ONLY
"We proudly support our 4-H Programs"







Wednesday, October 8, 2008


Monticello News 11A


;;: ;' *n- ^ 7-2(12; o ;' N < '*'"*' .
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12A* Monticello News


Wednesday, October 8, 2008


PORTS


FAMU High Retires



Madison Jersey Number '


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
SStaff Writer
Jefferson County native,
New York Giants cornerback
(29), Superbowl XLII champion
Sam Madison, Jr., was honored
last week when his high school
alma mater, FAMU High, re-
tired his school football jersey
number (22) during the half-
time festivities.
Because of the Giants'
bye-week, Madison flew into
Jacksonville Friday (Sept. 26)
and drove to Tallahassee to at-


Aucilla Christian


Lw-I
OFFENSE
Trent Roberts
10 pass
completions of
25 attempts for
120 yards
&1TD


DEFENSE
Casey Anderson


tend the fourth annual Sam
Madison Classic.
The Rattlers' football team
stepped up and delivered an
All-Pro worthy performance,
trouncing Cottondale 46-0 in
the District 1-1B campaign. By
the time Madison's number
was retired at halftime, the
game was well in hand.
Madison has been a proud
supporter of FAMU DRS Baby
Rattler athletics for many
years. He was featured at half-
time with a recognition cere-
mony, at which time, he and


.,football Contest

^fL. iniirher


Bert Banks, right, was the Monticello News Foot-
ball Contest Winner for week four, earning him two Wild
Adventure passes to the theme park in Valdosta, GA.
.Advertising Executive Jon Fisher is happy for Banks
as he presents the winning tickets.


his family members were rec-
ognized by George Stanley,
president of the Baby Rattler
quarterback club.
Madison was presented with a
football, autographed by the
entire team, and a bouquet of
red roses were presented to his
mother, Mary
The main attraction came
with the retirement of Madi-
son's high school jersey (#22)
by Dr. Ronald Holmes, super-
intendent of FAMU DRS.
Madison thanked the
school for the honors and
thanked the supporting crowd
for coming out to the event.
Next, came a photo session and
an interview with the WCTV
news sports videographer.
Present with Madison on
Sthe field, were his parents,
Mary and Sam Madison. Sr.:,
sister. Teresa and nieces
Jaedaria and Madison, and.
nephew, XaCarri: additional
family members in the crowd
were his aunt Debra Gail,
cousins Sharece, Nehru II. lit-
tle Nehru. and Nigeria friomn
Tamnpa, cousins Reynoldo and
Hue Ellen McQuay: also ex-
tended family members Car.
olyn Junious. a long-time
family friend. Ernestine John-
son and a host of Jeffersoni.
ans, friends and fans.
FAMU Head Football
Coach Ira Reynolds said that
having Madison in the stands
served as an encouraging
boost to his players. "His
(Madison's presence makes
them think success is attain-
able." Reynolds said. "When
there is someone that went to
your high school, and did all
thie things that he needed to do
and made it, it makes it a little
more attainable to the young
guys."


bp


Morris Petroleum,

A o. Inc.
AL^


Jefferson County H.S.

Coach Rodell
Thomas was not
available to reveal
the offensive and
defensive players of
the week


11 tackles


wj~ff.


735 E. Washington St. / P.O. Box 495
Monticello, Florida 32345


(850) 997-2222
Fax (850) 997-8719
morrispetroleum@embarqmail.com


Fuels
Lubricants


24 Hour Fueling
Tanks & Pumps


More than 65 years of quality products and service
to Jefferson and surrounding counties


Photo Submitted
Sam Madison, Jr., was honored Friday, Sept. 26 by FAMU High when they retired his
high school football jersey number (22) and presented him with a football autographed
by the entire team. Left to right, front, Jaedaria and XaCarri Kelley, back, left to right,
Teresa and Madison Kelley, Mary Madison, Sam Madison, Jr., Sam Madison, Sr., FAMU
DRS Superintendent Dr. Ronald Holmes, FAMU President of the Quarterback Club
Charles Stanley, and FAMU Athletic Director and Head Football Coach Ira Reynolds.
Photo Submitted




,,. Sam Madi-
'son, Jr.,
poses with
Baby Rattler
,,cheerleaders
during the
halftime cer-
'", emony retir-
ing his old
football jer-
sey number
Friday night,
.Sept. 26.


14 Of 15 ACA Runners Beat Personal Records


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
ACA Cross Country
Runners surpassed 14 of 15
personal records, Saturday
at the Westover Invitational,
including six of seven Lady
Warriors, five of five War-
riors, and the three team
managers who ran during
the race.
"All of the boys ran their
fastest times in the past six
years, and two of them beat
the fastest boy's time of
Hans Sorensen, of 20:33,"
said Coach Dan Nennstiel.
"I'd be surprised if any of
the times go down this year.
They ran phenomenally and
will be hard to top. I'm really
encouraged by the fact that
we've improved a lot to be
where we want to be, but
we've' got to take one more
step forward and keep work-
ing hard."
The teams will not race
this weekend, but enjoy a
day at St. George Island,
where they will practice and


they will also be practicing
hard the following week.
Running for the Lady
Warriors were Anna Fin-
layson, finishing 64th and set-
ting a personal record with
21:47, an average of 7:02 per
mile; Michaela Roccanti fin-
ished 65th setting a personal
record with 21:50, an average
of 7:00 per mile; and Eliza-
beth Riley finished 98th with
22:58, setting a personal
record and averaging 7:19
per mile.
Caroline Mueller fin-
ished 148th, setting s personal
record with 25:51, an average
of 8:18 per mile; Angela Mc-
Cune finished 153rd with
26:14, an average of 8:1o per
mile; Chelsea Snodgrass fin-
ished 17th, setting a personal
record with 27:34, an average
of 8:37 per mile; and Hanndh
Haselden finished 194th, set-
ting s personal record with
32:17, an average of 9:55 per
mile.
Running for the War-
riors. Russell Fraleigh fin-
ished 32nd setting a personal


record with 20:29, an average
of 6:10 per mile; Jay Fin-
layson finished 39th setting a
personal record of 20:50, an
, average of 6:42 per mile;
Ricky Finlayson set a per-
sonal record with 22:27, fin-
ishing 82nd with an average
of 6:43 per mile.
Jay Dickey finished 100t
setting a personal record
with 23:12, an average of 7:10
per mile; and Kent Jones fin-
ished 118th, setting a personal
record with 24:16, an average
of 7:19 per mile.
Running for the War-
riors team managers, Gatlin
Nennstiel finished 29th,set-
ting a personal record of
20:16, an average of 6:38 per
mile; Ian Haselden finished
86th, setting a personal
record with 22:41, an average
of 7:19 per mile; and Sam
Hogg finished 147th, setting a
personal record with 25:38,
an average of 8:05 per mile.
The next competition
will be the Panhandle Cham-
pionship, Oct. 25 in Mari-
anna.


ACA Big Bend Leaders


Matt Bishop Casey Anderson


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Several athletes at Au-
cilla Christian Academy
were named to the list of Big
Bend Leaders last week in
football, on the offensive side
of the field.
In rushing, Matt Bishop
stands at number one with


92 rushes for a total of 832
yards, and nine touchdowns.
In passing, Trent
Roberts stands at number
nine with 27 pass comple-
tions of 67 attempts, with
four pass interceptions
thrown, a total of 367 yards,
and six touchdowns.
In receiving, Casey An-
derson stands at #10 with 14


Trent Roberts


pass receptions for a total of
193 yards, and two touch-
downs; and Brandon Dun-
bar stands at #15 with eight
pass receptions for 1345
yards, and three touch-
downs.
In pass interceptions,
Anderson stands tied at
number three with seven
other players, with two.


HIGH SCHOOL PLAYERS OF THE WEEK


^rtlince 19

MORRIS"q


; wqmmmw .r


4m" limm"Rop-mor---tw--o MMMI--M--- -, WIN-


.-






Wednesday, October 8, 2008


Monticello News 13A


SBA


If your teams


.. . .


l:


Steve Walker
Realty, LLC
250 S. Jefferson St.
M onticello


Jefferson Health Dept
(Tobacco FNee I
Jefferson /LlAI

342-0170
Florida Department or Health Tobacco
SrIPrevention Program


ratkton'r
]Drug &tort


997-3553


. Georgia Tech s. Gardner-Webbi
Caminez,Brown & Hardee, P.A.


co u e the big Winneri

IT'S EASY! Just pick the %winners of this
\\ week's games featured in each ad and send us your -. .. -
entry! *


Each week, the entry with the most correct
picks (and the closest to the game score in the tie
breaker) will win a $20.00 check from Monticello
News or 2 tickets to Wild Adventures Theme Park.
The Second Place and the Third Place winners will
receive 2 movie passes each from Monticello News.


Official Football Mania Rules
* One entry per person. All entries must be on an official entry
blank. No photocopies accepted.
* Entries must be completely filled out, legible and dropped
off at Monticello News, 1215 N. Jefferson St., Monticello, no
later than 5 pm on Friday or mailed to P.O. Box 428, Monti-
cello, Florida 32345; postmarked by Friday.
* Judges decisions are final.
* Winners will be announced each Wednesday in the Monti-
cello News..
* Employees of the newspaper and their family members are
not eligible for the Football Mania contest.
* Must be ten (10) years old, or older to play.
* In the Vanderbilt vs. Mississippi, write down what you
think the final score will be. This will be used to break a tie,
if needed.

This Week's Winner

l. Riley Jones

2. Susan Page

3. Matt Replogle ,
"Prizes tbe picked up at

S 1215, i Jefferson St.
u M0ntici- Florida 32344
*---------------- ------------------*-

Official Entry Form
Name:
Address:
City:__
State: ZIP:____
Phone:
II


Fill
I.
12-


in the name of the team you think will win.


I .
I I
I I
14 I




I
18. I
- - - - - - -
I I
I. I
I I
I ------------------------------------


Lc--------------------------i----------------------------j


r 6. Miami vs. UCF
Morrow Insurance Agency
380 S. Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL
(850) 997-3912

futo.-Oners insurance A)
I--^'^ Life Home Car BuSihess fl/ I


SORRENSON TIRE CENTER
From Wheelbarrow to 18-Wheeler
We've got your tires!


1300 N Jefferson St.
Monticello. FL


M ONTICELLO NEWS
&
3Jefferson Journal


Bird Leinback & Sparkman
Attorneys at Law
165 E Dowood St. ontIedo, FL


997-3503


-fe J "I.t, EHEVROLET
329-226-3901 206 Moultie Rood
Thomasville. GA


i


-L~l~l b LI I I L I I 1LI


Ilrra~unr~8laslm~slulaagpaq~ IPICL C1 ~C -I -- L II 1- II~ I


^ftfW.,






Wednesday, October 8, 2008


14A* Monticello News


Homecoming 2008


l__i__ _ _ -


SSALE BEGINS

Monday, September 29

S10:00 a.m.
Everything After 62 years in
60% or business, the W.B. Dunn Co.
more off is closing due to the illness
store of owner, Eugenia Dunn.

l FINAL DAYS

Ai of the


inventory All pictures,
MUST be sold! lamps &

All sales are final. accessories
75% off
Cash, Money Orders and
Cashiers Checks will be accepted.


W B. Dunn Furniture
1242 N. Jeferson St.Monticell
^BHHH850-997-2013
Storehour 10am- 4 Cloed Sat. & Sun.


Warriors Lose


Tough Game


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
After the Warriors
were badly shaken in the
first quarter, losing -the
team's strongest running
back due to severe injury,
Aucilla suffered a 32-16 loss
during the 2008 Homecom-
ing game, Friday evening
against Randolph.
Early in the first quar-
ter, running back Matt
Bishop (last week's number
one slot in rushing, with 92
rushes for a total of 832
yards, and nine touch-
downs) received a severe
concussion due to a helmet-
to-helmet collision.
Witnesses reported that
paramedics had to perform
CPR on the senior and sta-
bilize his breathing before
he could be transported for
treatment, via Life-flight.
Witnesses stated that
Aucilla cheerleaders were
in tears and the varsity
Warriors were clearly
shaken at their friend and
teammate's injury
Coach Joe Striplin re-
ported Monday morning
that Bishop was released
from the hospital Tuesday,
however, in order to avoid
another blow, he will be out
of playing football for the
next six weeks, which boils
down to the. remainder of
the season.
Striplin named quar-
terback Trent Roberts as
the offensive player of the
week, he had ten completed
passes out of 25 attempts
for a total of 120 yards and
one touchdown.
Casey Anderson was
named the defensive player
of the week with 11 tackles.
Brandon Dunbar had
one reception for a touch-
down; and Zack Waters
had a two-point conversion


and ten carries for a total
of 88 yards. Phillip Watts
had a rushing touchdown
and a two-point conver-


sion.
The Warriors take on
FAMU, 7:30 p.m., Friday,
here.


Monticello News Photo Emerald Greene October 3, 2008
Luke Witmer makes a solo tackle against Randolph during
Friday night's Homecoming game.


Monticello News Photo Emerald Greene October 3, 2008
Wilson Lewis goes airborne for a successful pass reception
during the Homecoming game against Randolph Friday night.


Monticello News Photo Emerald Greene October 3, 2008
Aucilla coaches and football players join in prayer for injured Warrior Matt Bishop,
who was being prepped for Life-Flight transport to the hospital.







Wednesday, October 8, 2008


Ing


Monticello News 15A


Freshmen Representatives:
Dakota Allen and Shelby Witmer


Senior Representatives:
Luke Witmer and Jodie Bradford


Sophomore Representatives:
Marcus Roberts and Caroline Mueller


Senior Representatives:
Stephen Dollar and Savannah Reams
Savannah was later crowned
Homecoming Queen


Junior Representatives:
Jacob Pitts and Tiffany Brasington


Senior Representatives:
Matt Bishop and Miranda Wider,
Miranda's father Burt Wider, escorted his
daughter during halftime ceremonies, due to
Matt Bishop's injuries. Matt was later crowned
Homecoming King


School Spirit Was In High GearAt ACA Homecoming


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The majority of War-
riors illustrated their school
spirit last week during the
annual Homecoming festivi-
ties, which concluded with
the seniors winning the
Spirit Award and Matt
Bishop, and Savannah
Reams being named as the
Homecoming King and
Queen.
ACA began celebrating
its annual Spirit Week ac-
tivities, Nov. 29 through Oct.
3, and capping off the week,
with the Annual Homecom-
ing game against the Ran-
dolph-Southern Patriots,
which the Warriors unfor-
tunately 6 lost 23-16 after
losing running back Matt
Bishop to a severe injury
The points for each
event were added all week
and the class with the most
points won the "Spirit
Award. The Senior Class,
and the seventh grade was
announced as winners at
the Pep Rally Friday
Festivities began Mon-
day, with many pajama-clad
students in attendance,
sporting their favorite
nighttime wear and acces-
sories.
Tuesday was "Camo
Day; Wednesday was "Class
Theme Day", Thursday, was
"Rat Day" and this years'
Rats illustrated many fic-
tional characters including
Papa Smurf and five Smur-
fettes, Peter Pan characters
including Peter Pan, Dr.
Hook. Tinkerbelle, and Mr.
Schmeed, a host of Willie
Wanka's Umpa Lumpas, Mr.


Clean, and creative clowns.
On Thursday, the Pow-
der Puff football game took
place. The games were held
on a 35-minute schedule and
the freshmen played against
the seniors, the seniors win-
ning 16-0; the sophomores
played against the juniors,
the sophomores winning 6-
0.
The winners of each
contest moved on to the
championship game, which
resulted in the sophomores
downing the seniors, 8-0.
Overall, sophomores came
in first place, seniors, sec-
ond, and the freshmen and
juniors tied for third place.
The football Warriors
served as coaches for the
event.
Friday was Homecom-
ing Day, which began with a
plethora of activities, with
grades nine through twelve
finishing their floats on
campus. In the parade, the
senior float, featured the
slogan "Cannonball the Pa-
triots", and had two large

CongratuCations
9CA graduates

Monticello
Hairlines
"Professional Hair Care For
The Entire Family"

Debra Ussery
285 E. Washington St.
Monticello, FL

850-997-8302


replica cannons on the float.
As is tradition, some sen-
iors marched in front of the
float using borrowed band
instruments making a "joy-
ful noise".
The juniors float slogan
was "Pound the Patriots"
and featured a costumed
Uncle Sam being pounded
by students with fake ham-
mers. The sophomores'
float featured the slogan
"Plow the Patriots" and all
students wore green John
Deere t-shirts, complete
with yellow John Deere
tractor emblem and the float
being pulled by a John
Deere tractor.
The freshmen slogan
was "The Patriots are Com-
ing, But the Warriors were
Here First"; the float fea-
tured a large Patriots hel-
met with a Warrior's spear


through it.
The. Fellowship of
Christian Athletes Field
Day, which featured a col-
lection of individual and
group games with various
grades competing in such
games as Dodge Ball, Ulti-
mate Frisbee, Tug of War,
Wheel of Fortune, and the
ever-popular Eating Con-
test.
Seniors took first in the
competition, sophomores
took second place and the
freshmen and juniors tied
for third.
The annual Scavenger
Hunt, which-is always fun,
resulted in the seniors tak-
ing first place, sophomores
took second place, juniors
took third, and freshmen
finished fourth. Students
stuffed their backpacks
with household and school


2182 S. Jefferson St.
Monticello

BUYERS OF PINE POLES, SAWTIMBER
AND PULPWOOD


Work: 997-2436
Fox: 997-5162


Joy Walton

Ben Walton


Congratulations CA graduates


items, everything from
golf tees, to business cards,
to newspapers, to old tests
and report cards, foreign
money and cooking uten-
sils, a hub cap, even garden
hoses, a pink slip with Mr.
Harvin's signature on it,
and pair of men's boxer's
which was not being worn
at the time of the contest.
Following the Scav-
enger Hunt, the annual Pep
Rally, took place. Winners
of individual contests held
throughout the week were
named, as well as the win-
ners of the "Spirit Award",
and the Court was recog-
nized.


Many alumni attended
the Tailgate Party prior to
the Homecoming game and
at half-timer, Matt Bishop
and Savannah Reams were
named the Homecoming
King and Queen.
Class representatives
included ninth grade,
Shelby Witmer and Dakota
Allen; tenth grade, Carolirie
Mueller and Marcus
Roberts; eleventh grade,
Tiffany Brasington and
Jacob Pitts, and twelfth
grade, Jodie. Bradford, Sa-
vannah Reams, Miranda
Wider, Matt Bishop,
Stephen Dollar, and Luke
Witmer.


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16A Monticello News


Wednesday, October 8, 2008


IFrR tI


Apartments for Vent at
Pond. 1 BR/1BA.
Call 997-5007.

PRIME Downtown OFFI
Cherry Street Commo
750 Sq. Ft. $540. Mo
500 Sq. Ft. $460. Mon
Call Katrina Walton/Coldwe
Kelly & Kelly Properties at
8;
Downtown Monticello -
Newly Renovated 2/1 Fu
and unfurnished apartme
term or long term. Wit]
Laundry & Parking. Als
office spaces for re
Call 850-284-7685
7/


AutomotivLt


Coopers Lay-A-Way now for Christmas.
50cc SCOOTERS and 4 WHEEL-
ERS "JUST SCOOTERS"
7/2,tfn,c. RT 221 NORTH, GREENVILLE,
ASK FOR BOB 850-242-9342 or
CE Space 850-948-2788.
ons. 5/23,tfn,c.
nth. F- 350 1990 Ford truck, flat bed,
nth. Dual wheel w/ removable side rails.
11 Banker/ Good Farm Truck in Good Condi-
510-9512 tion. $ 4,200, call 997-1582.
31,tfn,c 8/29, tfn, nc.
Spacious 89' F-150 Ford Green Pickup
irnished Runs fine, power locks and win-
nts short dows, new paint job. $1,800.
:h A/C, Call 727-415-4428 ask for Hunter.


so have
nt.
5.
23, tfn, c.


New 1BR Mobiles,- furnished and
.unfurnished. Adult Park, No pets.
$600-$650 a month includes elec-
tric. Deposit Required. 850-997-
1638. No calls before 9 am or after 9
pm.


7/30,tfa,c.


JEFFERSON PLACE APTS
1468 S. Waukeenah St. Office 300,
Monticello. 1 BR ($417). & 2BR
($455). HUD vouchers accepted,
subsidy available at times. 850-997-
6964. Handicap units open. TTY711
Equal housing opportunity.
8/6,tfn,c.

870 Sq Ft Office/Retail space on
busy N. Jefferson St. $500 A
month includes utilities. Call 997-
3666.
8/8,tfn,c.
2BR, 11/2 Bath-$ 300 a month, $
300 deposit for information call
850-342-1144 between 8 a.m. -
7 p.m.

10/8,10, 15, 17, pd.

EXTRA special homes for rent!
www.MonticelloRealEstate.info.
10/8,10,c.





North Carolina Mountain Home
on 1 acre near Blue Ridge Mtns.
Special $150,000. Call 997-1582
7/2,tfn,nc




* II tff 1


TWO single Craftmati
massager, like new. $900
call 997-1658.


c Beds w/
for both
9/17 tfn,c.


Mobile Home 2000 Single 14 x 56
new carpet vinyl,. central air/heat
must be moved. $12,5001 Call 997-
1204/ 294-5831.
9/24-10/17,pd.
Non-Astringent Japanese Persim-
mons $ 1.25 per Ib, 12 Lb. Mini-
mum. Call 509 8745.
10/8,10,pd.
Tim

9! VA RalII.



850-997-4340
www.TimPeary.com
Selling Real Estate Since 1972
Experience can help!
One Are CClark Rd $25.001
New Listing 5 acres on Nash Road
wooded $8,500 per acre
Waukeenah 14 acres, $.x0Ni
Great Buv! 1 bedroom 1 bath home on
4+ acres screened front porch, covered
deck in back $89,500
Spacious near US 27 3.2 an. polx 2
outbuilding 2 a$3~25Xij
In Town Treasure 2 bedroom 1 bath
beautiful floors $129,900
Thompson Valley Rd 2 home 7.33 ac.
mostlJ ,eared $175,000
Huge Price Reduction from
$165,000 3/2 mobile home 1.56 ac, big
bam, green hse $85,000
Murmuring Creek 5 2 rac. sepac
Link %69Z :0)
Priced to Sell! 5 hillside acres inAucilla
Shores $50,000
Mixed Use Property 12acres
4 houses/ac allowed $.36.(%V ji
Ve Preyty 5 lovely acres on paved road
$15,500 peracre
eall 4/3.5 aJ nIree/ 2car garage/ pool/
gethile. hop ritureI/ 10) pcan

Prime Commercial Property ear
Pizza Hut 6.5 acs $650,000'
Waukeenah Highway 2790 ac
pasture, fenced, pond $545,00U
Timberland 156 ac some pines divided
by Hwy $2,000/ac
RENTALS AVAILABLE


9/17/tfn,nc.
2002 Honda Odyssey mini
Van;very good condition; 85,000 mi.
My price $7,750 (blue book value
$8,415; new list price $26,255) 997-
8803.
10/3,8,10,pd.
5th Wheel- '91 Coachman. Asking
$ 5,000 obo, good condition. Call
850-322-7928.
10/8,10,pd.


Scripture, Tradition and Reason
are the foundations of the
Episcopal faith. Christ Episcopal
Church, three blocks N of the
courthouse. Sunday services at
8:30 and 11:00 a.m. Call 997-
4116.
10/8,c.





JACKSON'S DRUG STORE -
Have you been taken off your hor-
mone replacement? See our new
menopausal products. 997-3553
5/12,tfn,c

BACKHOE SERVICE:
Driveways, roads, ditches, tree and
shrub removal, .burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116, 933-
3458. 7/41fn,c
MR. STUMP
STUMP GRINDING
509-8530 Quick Responses.
6/22, tfc
I BUILD SHEDS, DECKS
Exterior Carpentry work
Call Bob 850-242-9342.
Sheds as low as $650.00.
8/6,tfn,c.
PRESSURE CLEANING/
SOFT WASHING:
Homes, Businesses, Sidewalks,
Driveways, Decks, Lic./Ins. Since
1977. Free estimates 997-4100, or
www.danburch.us
8/27, tfn,c.





Hardwood, you cut and haul. 997-
2288..
9/26,10/1,3,8, nc.







RV, Boat, 95 Pickup, yard equip,
Furniture, linen clothes, appliances,
mattress, angels, collectables, lamps,
glassware, X-mas items,
knicks/knacks. Everything must go!
Many more items on sale.
707 Casa Bianca, Monticello. Call
545-2716, 8 a.m.- 3 p.m. Sat. and
Sun. 10/11-10/12.
10/08,10,pd.


Saturday, 8 a.m. 1 p.m. linton
Place, off Old Lloyd Road (158A) 3
miles south of Hwy. 90. Lots of
woman's clothing, hardware items,
household misc.
10/8,10,pd.


Front desk cashier- must have experience and high school diploma. Apply
in person to Capitol City Travel Center, 1-10/59 Intersection, between 2-4.
pm.
9/26,10/1,3,8,c.
Maintenance Director- Basic knowledge of air conditioning, electrical, car-
pentry/painting skills and Life Safety in a skilled nursing facility. Maintain
records for inspection review. Experience preferred; will train the right can-
didate. Benefits include health, dental and life insurance, and 401K. Fax re-
sume or name and telephone number to 850-973-2667 attention
Administrator. 10/1 thru 31, c.
RISK MANAGER/STAFF DEVELOPMENT- Responsible for the im-
plementation and oversight of the facility's risk management and quality as-
surance program along with Staff Education. MUST be an RN; experience
preferred. Benefits include health, dental, and life insurance; 401K. Fax re-
sume to Administrator, Madison Nursing Center at 850-973-2667 or call 850-
973-4880.
10/1,3,8,10, c.

Now hiring first shift waitress, must be mature, friendly, fast moving, with
experience. Apply in person at Big Bend Restaurant in Capitol City Travel
Center, corner of 1-10/59, or call Al Clements at 997-1202.
10/8,10,15,17,6.



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MONTICELLO NEWS &

Jefferson County Journal

PO Box 428
Monticello, FL 32345
L ----------- m -------------


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Wednesday, October 8, 2008


Monticello News 17A


GALS


STATEWbIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR
MONDAY 10/6/2008
THROUGH 10/12/2008
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NOTICE OF MEETING OF CITIZENS' COMMITTEE TO STUDY
DESIGN REGULATIONS IN THE COURTHOUSE SQUARE
AREA

A Citizens' Committee appointed by the Monticello City Council
will meet on Monday, October 13th at 6:00 p.m. to continue consider-
ation of current and proposed design regulations in the Courthouse
Square area of Downtown Monticello. The Meeting will take place at
City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Street.

10/08/08, c.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL- CR-
CUIT IN AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA


CASE NO.


ROBERT M.ERVIN,
08-216-CA
Plaintiff,


VS.
BARRY WYCHE SR., et al.,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS GIVEN that under an amended final judgment of
foreclosure dated October 2, 2008, in Case No. 08-216-CA of the Cir-
cuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Jefferson County,
Florida, in which ROBERT M. ERVIN is Plaintiff and BARRY
WYCHE SR., ALICE GERMON, DEMETRIA POPE, JEROME
POPE, WILBUR MURRAY and FRANCES SYKES are Defendants,
I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the north door of
the Jefferson County Courthouse in Jefferson County, Florida, at 11:00
A.M. on October 24, 2008, the followingdescribed property set forth
in the amended Final Order, Judgment or Decree of Foreclosure:
(FROM OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 239 PAGE 145): Situate
in the Town of Monticello, Florida, and particularly described as
being a part of Lot Numbered Twenty-four of Dilworth's Addi-
tion to the Town of Monticello, Florida and being described as be-
ginning at the Southeast corner of Lot No. 24 and running North
along the West boundary of a lane 100.0 feet, thence West along
the South boundary of lands of B.H. Faglie 80.0 feet, thence South
along the East boundary of lands of William Igle 100.0 feet, thence
East along the North boundary of First Street (as extended) 80.0
feet to the point of beginning. The land thereby conveyed being a
portion of the land conveyed by deed of record in the public
records of Jefferson County, Florida, in Deed Book "DDD", page
300, and to which reference is hereby expressly directed.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if
any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens
must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated October 6, 2008
Kirk Reams Clerk of Circuit Court

By Deborah Matthews
Deputy Clerk' -
10/8,15/08,c.



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 08-56-PR
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOHN LAWRENCE STEPHENS,
Deceased.

NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate of JOHN LAWRENCE
STEPHENS, deceased, File Number 08-56-PR is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Jefferson County, Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 1 Courthouse Circle, Monticello, Florida 32344. The name
and address of the personal representative and of the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this notice is served who have objections
that challenge the validity of the will, the qualifications of the per-
sonal representative, venue, or jurisdiction of this Court are required
to file their objections with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is
served within three months after the date of the first publication of
this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or
demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this Notice is October 1, 2008.


Attorney For Personal Representative:
T. Buckingham Bird, Esq.
STEPHENS
P. 0. Box 247
Monticello, FL 32345
32344 850-997-3503
FL Bar ID #0006176


DEBRA RUTH

669 Barnes Road
Monticello, Florida


10/01,08/08,c.


Tn'r.r'r
i~'.j 1


Pursuant to section 83.801 FL statute, the entire contents of the fol-
lowing storage spaces, consisting of miscellaneous household items,
will be confiscated and sold on a later date. All tenants listed below
have the right to pay all amounts due plus accrued late fees up until Oc-
tober 20, 2008. Unit 5-unknown, Unit 7-James Mack, Unit 52 Noanne
Gwynn, Unit 35 Kecia Hawkins, unit 66 Angel Scott.

10,8,15/08, c.


C Capital Health
P' L A N


November 15 through December 31 is the Annual
Enrollment Period for Medicare beneficiaries interested in
joining the Capital Health Plan Medicare program.
If you live in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, or Jefferson County
and have Medicare Part A and Part B, please call;
1-877-247-6512 (850-523-7441) or TTY 1-800-955-8771
(850-383-3534), 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., seven days a week to sign
up for a meeting to learn more'about the Capital Health Plan
Medicare program. A sales representative will be present at
each meeting. You also can speak to a sales representative
or obtain information at the Capital Health Plan
Administrative Offices, 1545 Raymond Diehl Boulevard,
Tallahassee, FL 32308, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday
through Friday.
Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare
contract. For accommodations of persons with disabilities,
please call one of the numbers-above.
H5938_2008_0807_004_080807


ONE DAY ONLY

OCTOBER 8TH


POST WIRE


2 1/2" TO 3" 6 1/2'
3" TO 3 1/2" 6 1/2'
5" TO 6" 8'
S1047 RB FIELD FENCE 330'
W8' RED GATE
-'i- 10' RED GATE
S12'RED GATE
1 6'RED GATE
; --.6 1/2" STEEL POST

4 HUNTING

"M ACORN RAGE 5.5#
.r, 15'2 MAN LADDER STAND
6L' MAN DBLX CLIMBING S
t^ BBK15' BIG MAN LADDER

SSEED

GULF ANNUAL RYE GRASS
S, ALL DEER PLOT MIXES






4 CALL FOR DELIVERY RATES AND
SPECIALS. WE WILL HAVE V\ENDE
PFIZER ANIMALL HEALTH AND SOUTH1
r -^ i- -i- - -- -- -- -- --- --
',. Bring in this coupon ai
.." ~20 lb. LP Gas Cylinde

...- 99


$245
$295
$795

$16995
$5295
$5995
$6595
$7995
$499


. 999

STA ND $ 495
Wt




50# $2295
$100 OFI -






) OTHER ONE DAY
RS ON H.4ND FROM
HERN STATES FEED. (

nd receive a

.r Refill for ,


A V


I


-~--I rl--e r


%a~







18A* Monticello News


Matter Named FirE


Wednesday, October 8, 2008



v olunter Of Yea


p I.


Schleicher then recog-
nized the evenings VIPs in-
cluding Emergency
Management Director Carol
Ellerbee and her husband,
Dale, County Commissioner
Gene Hall, and County Com-
-missioner Felix "Skeet"
Joyner and invited guests to
the buffet tables.
Guests enjoyed a spec-
tacular meal of fresh garden
salad with homemade vini-
.garette dressing, warm yeast
rolls, sliced turkey breast,
homemade mashed potatoes
and gravy, saut6ed yellow
squash, zucchini, green
beans and mushrooms,
whipped sweet potatoes, iced
tea and a wide variety of
desserts.
As guests continued en-
joying their meals, presenta-
tions were made. Billberry
recognized his wife, Lori, for
her support in his firefight-
ing endeavors and in the
transition to JCFR Fire
Chief, the move from Miami
and holding down the home
fort as Billberry built a Jef-
ferson County home, and he
presented her with a bou-
quet of roses.
Billberry recognized the
banquet committee for plan-
ning the meal for the
evening: they included
Denise Tosado, Michelle
Staffieri, Judy Turner, and
Krista Story. Firefighter
Holly Smith was recognized
for having a birthday and
presented with a brownie
with burning candle to blow
out.
Billberry recognized Dr.
Wesley Scoles. who served
for a number of years as the
medical director.for the de-
partment, and Firefighter
Mark Matthews was recog-
nized for his service and ex-
cellence in filling in as Fire
Rescue Chief and accepting
the honorary plaque in his
absence was his wife. Deb-
bie.
AssistingBillberry with
pronitions -'re, Skeet
Jovner and Geti6fill. ,.ro-
motions included Lt-)e eir
Walker promoted to Captain;
Emergency. Service Coordi-
nator Jim fen prompted to
-Lt.: Fire Prevention Bureau.
Coordinator Rene McCord


A


Jf


Commissioners Skeet Joyner, left, and Gene Hall, right,
pin the Captains emblem on promoted Lt. Dexter Walker.

promoted to Lt.; and Lt. Ron
Motter promoted to Captain.
Billberry then presented
the awards for Volunteer and
Firefighter of the Year: he
said the Volunteer of the
Year was held by the area vol-
unteer fire departments, and
they quickly came to the
tmaniunous decision of John
Cooksev as the winner. As
Cooks accepted h is plaque.
he was greeted with a stand-
ing ovation.
Billbertry then named Commissioners Skeet
Ron otter as the FirefighterJoyner, font and Gene Hall,
of the Yeari commenting on yner,feont and Gene Hall,
his bravery and quick think back, pin the Lt. emblem on
ing during the Hazmat situa. Emergency Services Coor,
tion involving a truck full of dinator Jim Iten.
chemicals used to make gun-
powder catching fire in the the highest points, named
heartof Monticello. Hecom- the overall winner of the
mented ona Motter's bravery game,. Wacissa downed
and how his quick thinking Monticello; Lloyd downed
kept Monticello from becomn- Ashville, and Fire rescue
ing a "smoking hole in the beat the county adminLstra-
ground". tors. 'Fire rescue i.vas
He added that after that named theWinners."q the
particular incident, it wasn't game. ,.
common knowledge that two Billberry. conIfcluded the
of those trailers each day. evening saying how.proud
filled with 41.000 pounds of he was of.all-of the volun-
chemicals used to make gun teer' departments,and all
powder; travels through the they had ..accomplished.
heart of Monticello. "'The Ll6yd and Ashville
The evening concluded fire departments have re-
with a game of Firefighter cruited some new.pbople.
Feud. similar to the televi- and in the neat future, we
sion show. Family Feud. will havea2427-4MS service
Many interesting questions addedin LloY;,-.
were asked from. five-mem- We- de d on.
ber teams representing the coufity fiefeigtrs,.'
different local stations.. Billberry "If not for theii,
- Three rounds --were he county would be itt n.
liladed, the team earifi.g, an Y ti6uble,' -


A monthly outreach program for seniors who want to learn more about
creating and maintaining healthy, happy, and active lifestyles.


Come out and join our group, meet new friends,.


There is no charge; just bring your lunch. Drinks will be provided.
Please RSVP to 850-523-7333.


Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare
contract. If you have questions, please call
Member Services seven days a week, 8:00 a.m. to
8:00 p.m., at 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512
(TTY/TTD 850-383-3534 or 1-800-955-8771).


*OCTOBER IS I


TOOL BOX OR BEDLINER

GIVEN WITH PURCHASE

OF ANY PICKUP TRUCK!


Downtown Valdosta
A A ASAAA AA AAAAA A4


ILL ,- ,-




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