Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00225
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello, Fla
Publication Date: September 24, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00225
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text





"--... .ALL FOR ADC 320
Special Collecbons
Unvers loT FFla Libranes 15
PO Box 117007
Gamnesville FL 32611-7007
I ". ", hl.h.....Ih...ll..l .,l. ,h,,ll,,h,, hl hi


1ONTICELLO


140th Year No. 39 Wednesday, September 24, 2008


Readers'

Pet Peeves

Briefly

Stated
See Page 3A

Fay Increases
Water Levels
Across District
LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
The latest hydro-
logic conditions report
from the Suwannee
River Water Manage-
ment District (SRWMD)
reveals just how exten-
sive and dramatic was
the drenching that trop-
ical storm Fay gave the
northern part of
Florida in the latter part
of August.
The SRWMD report
indicates that the aver-
age rainfall across the
district for August was
13.77 inches, the highest
August average since
1932. Indeed, the long-
term monthly average
Please See
Water Levels Page 4A

Community Response

Saves Animals

At Shelter
FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Because of the criti-
cal circumstances at the
Jefferson County; Hu-
mane Society shelter,
concerning the lack of
funds, an overabun-
dance of animals, a plea
for help went out to the
community in hopes of
saving animals at the
shelter from euthana-
sia.
As of noon, Friday,
Sept. 20, and the over-
whelming support from
the community, many
were found homes and
the survival of all ani-
mals was ensured.
"The Jefferson
County Humane Society
wishes to thank every-
one so much," said
Board member Mar-
garet McMurray. "The
outpouring of assis-
tance that we so desper-
ately needed has given
us all, the Board of Di-
rectors, the staff, the
members and volun-
teers, a reason to smile
again.
She said that the at-
tention the Society re-
ceived as a response
from the ad in the Mon-
ticello News was incred-
ibly widespread. "We
were contacted by the
Tallahassee Democrat,
channels 6, 49 and 27
Please See
Shelter Page4AA


Candidate Challenges Results of Election


of Democrat candidate
Hines Boyd in the Aug.
26 primary election.
Voters will remem-
ber that Boyd received
340 in that election and
Miller 310 votes. A third
Democratic- candidate,
Annie Ransom-Reddick,
received 79 votes.
In a complaint filed


in Circuit Court on Sept.
15, Miller is contesting
the results of the elec-
tion. The complaint
takes aim at Election Su-
pervisor Marty Bishop
* and the Jefferson
County Canvassing,
Board, consisting of'
Bishop, Judge Bobby
Plaines and County


Commission Chairman
Felix "Skeet" Joyner.
The complaint al-
leges that Bishop and
his office failed to com-
*ply with the provisions
of law that require that
the election official.
make and keep an accu-
Please See
Election Page 4A


District Schools

Ready Anti-

Bullying Policy
Despite the popular-
ity and usefulness of the
Internet, it also has its
pitfalls. Websites such as
Myspace and Facebook
are a good way for friends
to keep in touch on the In-
ternet, but they are not
without their liabilities.
There have been nu-
merous stories' in the
media of predators, play-
ing up to young people
* and lying about their
ages, and arranging to
meet them.
Currently authori-
ties relate that young peo-
Sple who just want to
engage in chat of interest
tb young people, have en-
countered others online
who are cruel and hateful
for no reason, in what is
known as cyber-bullying.
Exacerbating the sit-
uation is that this cyber-
bullying is carrying over
into the schools on a face
to face level. It is easy
enough to shut down a
computerlor change web-
sites if one is harassed
online, but when this oc-
curs in person, it be-
comes a different story
To counter this situa-
tion, schools across the
state are educating stu-
dents on cyber safety
Attorney General
Bill McCollum an-
nounced a partnership,
Wednesday Sept. 17, that
allows school resource of-
ficers to teach students in
middle and high schools
how to stay safe online.
In addition, by De-
cember all schools in
Florida will have an anti-
bullying ordinance in
place.
At Jefferson County
School District Title I Di-
rectolr Gloria Heath, is in
the process of writing the
anti-bullying policy for
the county public schools.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff- Writer
Sometimes, an elec-
tion doesn't settle the
issue. That appears to be


the case in the District 3
County Commission
race, where unsuccess-
ful Democratic candi-
date C. P. Miller is
challenging the winning


BAN IMPOSED ON DUCK


BLINDS IN MICCOSUKEE


Monticello News Photo By Laz Aleman, February 2, 2008
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission rule banning permanent blinds on state sovereign.
lands is not popular with duck hunters.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello Netws
. Senior Staff Writer
Duck hunters, are
not so much surprised&
as dismayed by the deci'-


City
LAZARO AI
Monticello N
Senior Staff


sion of the Florida Fish.
and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission (FWC)
to ban permanent duck
blinds on Lake Miccosu-
*"kee and three other area


lakes.
That decision came
Wednesday, Sept. 18,
when the FWC Govern-
ing Board approved a
staff-recommended rule


that prohibits anyone
from hunting in or near
a permanent duck blind
on Lake Miccousukee in
Please See
Ban Page 4A


Cracks Down On Stray, Loose Animals
Monticello
LEMAN largely dependent on the N~I e ,3 nPr .'.,
ews amount of pressure U Alno n
Writer brought to bear by citi- 2008


Monticello officials
are alerting residents
that the. city is imposing
a 'no tolerance" policy
relative to free roaming
dogs and cats, effective
immediately.
Long recognized as a
problem, city officials'
pursuit of a solution has
ebbed and flowed,


zehs at any one
Please See
Animals Page 4 A

Packs of stray dogs
reportedly plaque different
areas of the city, overturning
trashcans, disturbing the
nocturnal quiet, and in some
instances, threatening pedestrians.


Lunch Recognizes Folks

Involved in.Fay Response


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
County and private
sector personnel, who
participated in the
emergency service oper-
ations during and im-
mediately following
tropical storm Fay's
passage here on Aug. 22-
23 were treated to an ap-
preciation luncheon


Friday afternoon, com-
pliments of a local citi-
zen who prefers to
remain anonymous.
Commissioner
SDanny Monroe also had
a part in the prepara-
tion and coordination of
the event.
The citizen who
chose to remain anony-
Please See
Lunch Page 4A


Folks involved
in emergency
service efforts
here during
tropical storm
Fay in late
August got
treated to a
hearty lunch
at the Beau
Turner Youth
Conservation
Center on
Friday after-
noon,
compliments
of a citizen
who desires to
remain
anonymous.


2 Sections, 28 Pages
Around Jeff. Co. 4-8A NationalDogWeek 16-17A
Classifieds 13A Outdoors 19A
Dixie Plantation 9A School/Sports 10-12A
Football Contest 12A Spiritual Pathways B Sect.
Legals 13-15A Viewpoints 2-3A
(


Wed
Wed 83/60
Abundant sunshine. Highs in the
low 80s and lows in the low 60s.


Thu 79/60 ,
9125
Partly cloudy. Highs in the upper
70s and lows in the low 60s.


Fri
9/26


80163


Times of sun and clouds. Highs in
the low 80s and lows in the low
60s.


!, A.: %M..'


Complaint Takes Aim
At Canvassing Board


50460t+ 40


I, H


I I


1
ti









2A Monticello News


Wednesday, September 24, 2008


VIEWPOINTS &


PINIONS


Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.

Family Requests Victim's Photo Not Be Reprinted


Dear Editor,
The family of the late Tyrone C. Macon
requests that his picture not be used in the
paper again. He is still alive. His life has ended
and he is no longer a part of this earth. He has
gone home to be with the Father who art in
Heaven.
Please respect the family which is still
which is still grieving. We don't want a
reminder of Tyronne's past, and when he died


God wiped all his sins away, from this earth.
Let them stay dead, but alive in Christ,
and rest in peace. Tyronne's life was taken for
the wrong reason,which was not drugs, but
rather for money he received from a lawsuit.
When he was killed, he was also robbed.
We are seeking justice for the suspects, in
the name of Jesus.
Rosena Signleton
Family Minister


Reader Questions Accuracy

Of Race Track Information


Dear Editor:
I was very surprised to open the
Wednesday Sept 17" issue of the Monticello
News and find on page 3A what appeared to be
an OpEd (Opinion/Editor) piece criticizing the
County Commissioners for the decision in.
January on the Jefferson County Race Track
issue.
The piece included bad photos of a thor-
oughbred horse on a race track with a reprint
of an article by Dave Hodges from the
Tallahassee Democrat. The first part of the sec-
tion was in a larger font to attract attention
and made references to information that was
not accurate
The tone of the piece was very sarcastic
and I was surprised that such an Opinion piece
would have been written by the staff of the
Monticello News.
Imagine my surprise to find that what
appeared to be an opinion piece was actually a
Paid advertisement.
There was no mention anywhere on that
page that this was a paid advertisement. There
was also no mention that the article from the
Democrat had been reprinted by permission.
Nor was there any mention if the author of
the reprinted article was compensated. These
are things that should have been done to alert
the public.
I was also surprised that the staff of the
Monticello News did not pick up on the inaccu-
racies and do a follow up story.
I am writing this letter to let the general,
public know that this was not an editorial
opinion piece by the Monticello News staff and
to provide some other insights.
The article made mention of 58 new jobs
that the race track, would3have provided.,Thisi
was a claim that was not based on all the facts.
Currently there' are about 30 employees work-
ing at the Triple Creek Nursery.
These people would have lost their jobs.
Had the race track and the card room been
allowed to open in Jefferson County, the JC


' TEN YEARS AGO
September 23, 1998
Despite the proposed tax hikes,
-the County Commission's public
hearing on the tentative budget and
village rate on Thursday night was
' :rather tame.
Congressman Allen Boyd will
appear on "Florida's Watch on
Washington," 10 p.m. Thursday on.
WFSU TV.
A committee will soon be
formed to draw up an animal con-
trol ordinance for countywide,
implementation.
The tenth annual Trade Fair
opens at the Opera House 4 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. Thursday, under the chair-
manship of Eleanor Hawkins.
The Department of
Transportation is asking feedback
from the city on the proposed elimi-
nation of on-street parking on US
Highway 19 South.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
I September 21, 1988
: The current court-ordered
investigation into alleged election
irregularities was not the first
probe in this first primary election.
I And you only have to look back as
far 1980 to find the next latest one.
County Commissioner accepted
lids at last Wednesday's regular
meeting for pest control and LP gas
for all county offices.
I' In general, Jefferson County
farmers and their crops were
stressed but "not like they were in
the Med-west," says Jefferson
County Extension Director Larry
Halsey. Still, the agriculture picture
is not a totally favorable one.
The setting of preliminaries for
: negotiations between the firefight-
ers' union and the City Council; that
basically was the topic of discussion
last Thursday when the Joint
City/County Fire Committee met to
discuss the impending firemen's
A union contract.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
September 21, 1978
An art display in the Board
loom of the school administration
building will someday be, incorpo-
rated into a mural to grace the wall
of pthe Jefferson High School
Auditorium.
Work is nearing completion of


Kennel Club would have been forced to close
(another 30 plus jobs). As a result, there would
have been a net loss of jobs in the county
The article mentioned the county lost a
$3.5 million sewer system at that intersection.
Again, not all the facts were mentioned. Had
one been at the Planning Commission and
County Commission Meetings, one would have
learned that the sewer system would have
been built only if they could not get a connec-
tion on the current sewer system that is cur-
rently available across the Interstate intersec-
tion.
The article failed to mention that the pro-
posed race track in Jefferson County did not
want to build stables, nor did they want to con-
nect to the current Jefferson County
Community Water system.
It fails to mention that the principals
involved with the race track are registered in
Florida as lobbyists for the Big Gambling
industry, It also does not.address the flooding
problem. The wetlands on that property under
contract were under substantial amounts of
water after Tropical Storm Fay.
The article finally complains about the
economic loss to the county. However, where,
are the quarter horses that would race at the
new proposed race track be coming from?
If this is such a successful venture that
will have a viable race track for quarter hors-
es (and not just be a front for a card room,.
"alternative adult entertainment" and eventu-
ally Vegas style slots as was proposed for
Jefferson County), then the quarter horses will
need to come from surrounding communities.
If you believe in the race track, then build
stables and training facilities in ,Jefferson
County for the -hundreds" of horse? that will
need .to.gotere. This -ill bring many more
jobs in the. county over the long rIm.,

David Hall
Lloyd


the new addition to the Jefferson
Square Shopping center. John,
O'Conner of Hall Properties IiL,
Jacksonville developers of the,
Center, said that completion is
scheduled for late September and-, ,
the grand opening of the new TG&Y
store will take place on November 1.
The Sunbelt Agricultural
Exposition, which will be held in
Moultrie, Georgia, on October 10
through 12, will feature over 300 j
major exhibitions at the outdoor
agricultural demonstration show.
Watermelon Queen Jennifer
Yaun made an appearance in
Panama City Beach to help publi- I
cize the completion and commis-|
sioning of the Treasure Ship on
Saturday.
Council Luther Pickels of
Monticello was among the 417 stu-
dents at Florida State University
who were named to the Dean's List
for the summer quarter.
FORTY YEARS AGO
September 21, 1968
The Jefferson County Tigers |
played host to three fine football j
teams last Friday night in their first
football jamboree.
Jack Youngblood, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Kay Youngblood of Monticello,
who was All-Big Bend Lineman of
the Year in 1966 while playing with
the Monticello Tigers and distin- i
guished himself as a freshman play-
er at the university of Florida last
year, is expected to see plenty of
action with the 1968 Gator squad
largely on kick-offs and field goals.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
September 21, 1958
Charlie Walker, 14, won the
highest honors in the 4-H Dairy i i
Show last Saturday. Marjorie
Thompson led in fitting and condi-
tioning and John Aligood submitted
the best record book. -
SIXTY YEARS AGO
September 21, 1948
The children of Mr. and Mrs. `
Joseph Raiford Hughes entertained"
"at home" Sunday afternoon in
honor of their, golden wedding
anniversary.
Mr. and Mrs. T.B. McDoniald,
have returned from spending, tfheid-
summer at their cottage at Lake
Junaluska, N.C.


My two daughters
LOVED to watch "The
Lion King" movie. In
this movie is the song
"The Circle of Life." It
explains how we are all
a part of this great cir-
cle and we depend upon
each other for every-
thing, whether we know
it or not.
It's true. We live, we
die. Our bodies go back
into the ground and
help the vegetation,
which nourishes the
plants that animals eat.
Big animals eat smaller
animals (humans eat
animals.)
Even the "bad" ani-
mals have a purpose.
Snakes eat mice and
rodents that we don't
Want around. Spiders
eat bugs and flies that
we also don't want
around.
So I have to ask,
"Exactly what purpose
does a Lovebug have?"


I've thought long
and hard and I just can't
seem to find a place in
the Circle Of Life for a
Lovebug.
While writing this
column I actually
looked up a few web-
sites on Lovebugs.
EVERY website spoke
of what nuisances they
are. Some things men-
tioned were the facts
that they can clog up
radiators, can eat the
paint off the cars,
obscure vision to a driv-
er, soil clothing by sit-
ting on them, and they
are also a considerable
nuisance to fresh paint.
So I ask again,
"Exactly what purpose
does a Lovebug have?"
And, "How do they fit
into our circle of life?"
I only found ONE.
website that actually
gave a 'half reason' that
they might be good to
our ecosystem........


"For most of the
year, lovebugs are bene-
ficial in that the larvae
(maggots) live in grassy
areas and feed on dead
vegetation within the
thatch. This results in
not only the eventual
release of nutrients back
into the soil, but also
decreases excessive
thatch which can be
detrimental to grass
growth. and serve as a
protective cover for seri-
ous grass pests."
I don't think I want
to accept that. All I
know is that they are
driving me crazy.
The good news is
that the fall Lovebug
season is August and
September. That
means...... lovebug sea-
son is almost over. We
have survived another
epidemic overload.
Until next sea-
son..... see you around
the town.


'K


"The Circle Of Life"


'MONTICELLO


NEWS


EJIIERALD GREENE Publisher/Owliner pm 'Fnjit ,,t 5.0R~ 1) pe m frLea
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N1l niging Edaor Tr i: ilt~rI' ,II '1(`i" 1-i' AtIidji1t
LA4zARo ALErIIW CIRCIULTnnN OfP4PNAIENT
Senior Su.ff Writer SuichripuinriRiks
CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL -Ams Fiindj J.45 per yeair
Dedlire fo'r clacsifieds is Nlonda% .t 12 CH) p m (Uur 'idiS2~$ per %.Ear
for Wedr~esdv., spdper. arid Wednesda)y aiI 12 60 Isurir& I')ciJLd wx Incldtddl


Established 1869
A weekly newspaper [USPS 361-620] designed for the express reading pleasures of the people of its circulation area,
be they past, present or future residents.
Published weekly by ECB Publishing, Inc., 1215 North Jefferson St. Monticello, FL 32344. Periodicals postage
PAID at the Post Office in Monticello, Florida 32344.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MONTICELLO NEWS, P.O. Box 428, Monticello, FL 32345.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of
the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners, of this newspaper, and to investigate any
advertisement submitted.
All photos given to ECB Publishing, Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from
the date they are dropped off. ECB Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline.


During Toddler Time at the library, in Aug. 1993, children enjoyed a Teddy Bear
Tea Party. From left: Raymond Milcarsky, Steven Jadaszewski, and Thea Delaney.


P.O. Box 428
t215 North
Jefferson Street
Monticello, Florida
32345
850-997-3568
Fax 850-997-3774
Email: monticellonews
@enil)arqma







Wednesday, September 24, 2008


Monticello News 3A


VIEWPOINTS &


PINIONS


Other than fruit,
honey is the only (- \\
natural food that is -. _--
made without ..... ...
destroying any kind of >
life! What about milk, :l
you say? A cow has to
eat grass to produce
milk and grass is ---.
living! . -


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Frances Ann Johnson,
21, of 420 E. 2n1' Way, Aucilla
Shores, was arrested, Sept.
9, and charged with battery
(domestic). Bond was set at
$250 and she bonded out of
jail the same day.
Gary Roy Alday, 38, of
420 E. 2nd Way, Aucilla
Shores was arrested, Sept.
9, and charged with viola-
tion of probation on the
charge of aggravated bat-
tery with great bodily
harm, a Leon County
charge. Bond was withheld
and he was picked up by
Leon County from the jail
Sept. 15.
Arrie Ledington, 52, of
4000 B. Brewster,
Tallahassee, was arrested,
Sept, 10, and charged with
carrying a concealed
weapon, driving while
license suspended and
attaching tag not .assigned.
Bond was set at $500 and he
remained in jail Tuesday
afternoon,-Sept. 16.,
Lance Nealy, 27, of 1425
E. Clark Ave., Apt. G was
arrested, Sept. 10, and
charged with contempt of
court, child support. Bond




Readers' Pet Peeve's
Briefly Stated
It really disturbed me that
the Monticello News
reported more on Aucilla
Christian Academy sports
than on the Jefferson
County High School sports
until I called them and
found out that the coaches
will not turn in the
statistics, stories, rosters,
etc. when the reporter calls
them. Now I'm really
disturbed at the JCMHS.
How can these coaches not
find 10 minutes to talk to a
reporter at the newspaper so
that our boys and girls can
have some glory? This is
un-acceptable. Something
should be done about this,
within the school.
*. This is a great country!
In Spiritual Pathways you
can have a discussion on
,Taoism, Christianity and
Native American equinox
blessings all in the same
issue.! I didn 't know that I
didn't have freedom of
choice of exercise though...
Oh welt, it's still a great
country.

Employees who don't
have information their
position requires, such as
"In which aisle will Ifind
the sugar?"
Divers who don't use
,directional lights, or who
turn them on to make a
turn and leave them on
after the turn, so others
don't know where they will
turn, if anywhere.

Itao piionddo'

P.. ox42
Mniell, L: 235
Orsndu a mala


was set at $500 and he bond-
ed out the same day.
Robert Baker, Jr., 45, of
2452 Golf Course Rd.,
Perry, was arrested, Sept.
11, and charged with &rit
of attachment for child sup-
port totaling $1,500. He was
ordered to pay the $1,500 in
child support or spend 60
days in the County Jail. He
remained in jail Tuesday
afternoon, Sept. 15.
Daniel Shane Cruce, 24,
of 370 Al Suber Dr., Perry,
"was sentenced in court
Sept. 11 to 45 days in the
County Jail on the charges
of reckless driving and.
driving while license sus-
pended.
Geneva Morris, 44, of
346 Thomas Rd. was sen-
tenced in court Sept. 12 to
serve 66 days in the County
Jail with credit for 36 days,
giving her 30 days in jail on
the. charts of driving
while license suspended
(habitual),- driving- under
the influence, driving
while license suspended,
and refusal td take-a 'DUI
test.
Tammy Terrell
Williams, 40, of 895
Flatwoods Rd. was arrest-
ed, Sept. 15 and charged


Y


with battery (domestic).
Bond was set at $1,000 and
she bonded out of jail the
same day.
Hollie Herndon, 43, of
1400 N. Jefferson St. was
arrested, Sept. 15, alnd
charged with violation of
probation for charges of
criminal mischief. She
was released on her own
recognizance the same
day.
Heather Lee Compton,
32, of 5160 Jim Lee Rd.,
Perry, was arrested, and
charged with failure to
appear on the charge of
driving, while license sus-
pended, three counts of
passing worthless, bank
checks, possession of a
firearm by a convicted
felon, and fraud for grand
theft of a firearm by a con-
victed felon. Bond was set
at $1,500 and she bonded
out of jail the same day.
Matthew Dewayne
Scott, 22 of 7 Waukeenah.
Cemetery Rd., was arrest-I
'ed on charges. of writ of'
attachmnent-and ordered to
pay $750 for no support or
spend 90 days in the
County Jail. He remained
at the jail Tuesday after-
noon, Sept. 15.


By Debbie Snapp
Monticello News/ Staff Writer




Meet Your



Neighbor




Mark Raciappa

Mark Raciappa is a licensed business coach with Action COACH.
and a member of the MNonticello Ki % anis Club.
He joined the Monticello Club in 1980 and was
elected president in 1988.
"It is very gratifying to ha\e lunch with my fel-
low Kiwanians on Wednesday afternoons at the Jef-
ferson Country Club." he remarks.
Action COACH is the %world's #1 Business
Coaching Team.
As a coach he couples his education and experi-
ence with a proven system to help small to medium-
sized business owners articulate their goals, believe
that they can achieve them. develop a balanced plan. and hold them ac-
countable for their own results.
"To differentiate oursel\ es from consultants w ho ad\ ise a business
owner 'what they SHOULD do.'" \e ask the client "What do )ou WANT
to do?' and then mentor them through the process, filling in the gaps in
their learning and helping them transform their business into a commer-
cial. profitable enterprise that \works without them," he says.
His goals are to educate and inspire business owners to impro\ e
their businesses and their lives.
By establishing his coaching practice and reaching out to the busi-
ness community through seminars, workshops, and mentoring, he as-
pires to build a reputation of credibility and success.
His plan is to acquire a larger office with afirst-class training room
and hire at least three Team members.
He graduated from Florida State University with a degree in Busi-
ness Management and, prior to becoming a Business Coach in 2006.
worked for 33 \ears in the supermarket industry, the last 13 of those as
Owner/M[anager of an independent supermarket with 30 employees.
He has been married to Linda for 26 years and has a daughter who
is 4 junior in college and pursuing a degree in Elementary Education.
They are currently supervised b\ a boxer/mutt miLx that.entertains
and delights them on a regular basis.
In his spare time, he follows FSU sports and classic car collecting
and restoration.
He has been a part of Monticello since 1976.


architect
73. Food sign
74. Nows and ___


THEME: MOVIE
VILLAINS
ACROSS
1. Result of pots collid-
ing
6. Ostrich-like bird
9. *Where Captain Hook
or Barbossa toss ene-
mies
13. What one should do
with debts
14. Part of URL
15. Exclude
16. Antonym of afar
17. *Spacey in "Seven"
18. Wall or pedestal sup-
port
19. *He carried a grudge
-in "Cape Fear"
21. *Antagonist nurse in
"One Flew Over the
Cuckoo's Nest"
23. Parent volunteer
organization
24. *Could be used to
describe Joker in "The
Dark Knight"
25. Fake tooth
28. .Gaelic


30. *Cannibalistic doctor
35. Seed cover
37. High rocky hills
39. Join companies, e.g.
40. "The Kinks" hit
41. Soup up
43. A foolhardy chal-
lenge
44. Type of address
46. Wedding cake layer
47. Eyeballed
48. *Chigurh in "No
Country for Old Men"
50. Happy face
52. Eye infection
53. Famously extinct
55. Goes with "aah"
57. *Freddy's surname
61. *Puppy snatcher
65. It helps to have this
when watching horror
movies
66. None found in neat
drink
68. Ox of southeast Asia
69. With great enthusi-
asm
, 70. Car's ID
71. Chambers connected
to other chambers
72. Famous English


DOWN
1. Pack to capacity
2. Russian river in
Siberia
3. Mt. Everest's relation-
ship to Earth
4. Civil rights organiza-
tion
5. What rockers often do
on stage
6. Whirlpool
S7. Bovine sound
8. Wombs
9. Eastern
10. Their lifestyles are
often chronicled
11. Not active
12. Turned to the right,
as in horse
15. An attitude of admi-
ration
20. *Lured by dark side
22. the King's Men"
24. Hitchcock classic
25. Noted in Old-
Testament for his strong
faith when entering
Canaan
26. Smell of baking
bread, e.g.
27. "For Whom the Bell
Tolls" protagonist
29. Worn by coal miner
31. Surrender
32. Not to be thrown
away at cafeteria, pl.
33. White heron
34. Reedlike
36. Put down.
38. Wooer
42. Earlier
45. *Latest Joker
49. Barkeeper on "The
Simpsons"
51. Found in a Baby
Ruth
54. Tee off
56. *First name of 45
57. "If you only !"
58. End of line
59. Push for something
60. -steven"
61. Penny
62. Ancient Greeks' .harp
63. Past participle of
"lie"
64. Regrettably
67. *Bourne's pursuer


Sudobu

The objective of the game is to fill all the blank squares
in a game with the correct numbers.
There are three very simple constraints to follow.


in a 9DV .9 Oua S oul aame:
Every row of 9 numbers must include all digits 1 through 9 in any
order. Every column of 9 numbers must include all digits 1
through.9 in any order. Every 3 by 3 subsection of the 9 by 9
square
must include all digits 1 through 9.

5 2 1

6 2

1 4 6 7
^- -^ -M- -- -^- -
3 2 8 6

6 4 9 8

8 9 1 3

4 9 7 8


1 4
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5 9
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4A Monticello News


Wednesday, September 24, 2008


FOUND


EFFERSON


COUNTY


Lunch


Cont. From Page 1 Election


Cont. From Page 1


mous asked that the lunch's spon-
sorship be attributed to the A-Min-
ing Group, an' affiliate of the
Anderson-Columbia Company,
Inc., based in Lake City, FL. The A-
Mining Group operates a quarry
off US 98 in Taylor County that it
kept opened in the aftermath of
the storm to provide aggregate
materials for the emergency re-
pairs of roads in the region.
The anonymous citizen said
he simply wanted to recognize the
men and women who had put
themselves on the line during and
after the storm by conducting res-
cue mission and doing the neces-
sary post-storm repair work to
return the area to normalcy. He
said the lunch was simply his way.
of showing his appreciation.
Helping with the outdoors
cookout, which was held at the
Beau Turner Youth Conservation
Center on US 19 South and which
served about 200 people, were

Shelter


and WFSU radio," said McMur-
ray. "Someone had heard about
us and sent an email out to hun-
dreds of animals lovers, and
since then, the shelter has re-
ceived so many calls since last
Wednesday, that it has been dif-
ficult for the staff to get their
jobs done as they are answering
every call they can.",
She added that people were
not just calling the shelter.
"They are coming and adopting,
fostering and donating money
and supplies," reported McMur-
ray
As of noon Friday, the dog
population, which had been at'
35 the previous week, was down
to 18, and the cat population was
down from 65 to 20. "We have re-
ceived calls from as far away as
Valdosta promising to come
adopt and donate," said McMur-
ray. ",Some have adopted multi-
ple animals after coming to the
shelter.
"We can barely express our
gratitude to this community for
coming together for us in the
difficult time," added McMur-
ray., "Our three staff members
who are losing their jobs, are
thrilled that these animals are
finally finding homes, and, have
not thought about their own fu-
tures after this week. Their pri-
ority has always been the
welfare of the animals, and it
still is."
"We hope our situation will
remind everyone that they need
to support local charitable or-
ganizations which receive no
funding other then donations,"
said McMurray "And please,
don't wait for another crisis.
Even one dollar a week can
make a big difference, and if
'you get your co-workers and
friends to match your one dollar
a week, just imagine what could

Ban


Jefferson County and lakes Ia-
monia, Carr and Jackson in
Leon County.
The rule, which takes effect
for the coming waterfowl hunt-
ing season, states that no one
may hunt ducks, geese, mer-
gansers or coots "within 30
yards of a permanent blind or
anything that violates Florida
Statutes prohibiting unautho-
rized construction on .state
lands". The rule defines a per-
manent blind as anything that
provides shelter, cover or con-
cealment for a hunter; it does not
include any rooted vegetation.
The rule also does not include
temporary blinds that are used
only while the hunter is present
and dismantled and removed
upon the latter's departure from
the scene.
The FWC maintains that
the ban is necessary because of
continuing conflicts between in-
dividuals who build the blinds.
and claim ownership of sover-
eign state lands and others who
hunt or fish in proximity of the
blinds. The FWC points out that
construction of blinds in sover-
eign waters without a permit is
a violation of state law.
The FWC staff's decision to
recommend the rule change fol-
lowed a June 3 public hearing in
Tallahassee that sought citizens
and stakeholders' input on the
proposed ban. Commissioner
Felix "Skeet" Joyner, himself
once, an avid duck hunter, at-
tended the hearing. Joyner said
subsequently that he understood
why the FWC was proposing the
ban, given that hunters con-
structed the blinds of every con-
ceivable material, including
boards, plywood and even pipes


Monroe and Commission Chair-
man Felix "Skeet" Joyner. Com-
missioner Jerry Sutphin was also
present, as were County Coordi-
nator Roy Schleicher, Road Super-
intendent David Harvey, Sheriff
David Hobbs, Emergency Manage-
ment Director Carol Ellerbe, Fire
Rescue Chief Jim Billberry and
Property Appraiser David Ward.
Honorees at the luncheon in-
cluded the staffs and other repre-
sentatives of the county's
Emergency Management, Fire
Rescue Department, Health De-
partment, Road Department, Sher-
iff's Office, Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion, Progress Energy and Tri-
County Cooperative Electric and,
the A-Minding Group.
Following a brief prayer and
introductory remarks, Joyner of-
fered words of praise to the.many
participants for their hard work
and dedication during and after


the storm. He also praised the pri-
vate citizen and the A-Mining
Group for taking tlie initiative to
sponsor the event.
The city, meanwhile, also
honored its employees for their
efforts during Fay at a recent
luncheon. Councilwomen Idella
Scott and Linda Butler were
largely responsible for the latter
effort.
Recognized at that city's
event were employees Jim Mili-
cic, Greg Seabrooks, Ricco
Watkins, Raymond Clark, Ron
Brumbley, Derrick Jennings,
Roger Black and Simon Williams.
"These employees worked
long hours in bad weather condi-
tions and I am very thankful for
their efforts," City Manager Steve
'Wingate said. "We have received
a lot of comments from the public
praising our employees for the
great job that they did during the
storm."


Cont. From Page 1


be done."
As part of the public outcry
last week, Society President
Caroline Carswell explained
that due to the continually grow-
ing population of the county
and the ever growing population
of unwanted animals in the
community, and that growing
number trickling down to the
shelter, the Board of Directors
had opted to downsize the shel-
ter by a large number of ani-
mals in order to continue
providing the much needed
service to the community.
The shelter has, at times,
housed as many as 120+ ani-
mals, and due to the limited
community support received,
the board of directors has deter-
mined that they must reduce the
shelter staff from four to one
employee, which affects the
quality of care able to be pro-
vided for housed animals. That
means the shelter population
must be reduced to approxi-
mately 20 animals, cutting the
,available resources down .by an
average of 100 animals; which in
turn, comes to question of the
best possible method to down-
size that population.
"We have always been a no-
kill shelter and the only time we
have ever resorted to euthanasia
of animals, was either if they
were vicious or being so incred-
ibly ill, there was no way to pre-
vent imminent death," said
Carswell. "
She said to be able to prop-
erly care for the animals, which
sometimes have numbered well
over one hundred, the yearly
budget would be approximately
$100,000. But, however, the- aver-
age financial'support from the
community is about $5.6,000.
"And that leaves a pretty large
gap in the service we should be


providing to a community of
this size, which is a service that
the number of people who re-
side in the community require.
"We are not closing and will
not consider closing as an op-
tion," said Carswell. "Our
Board is fully dedicated to keep-
ing the shelter open and run-
ning and not operating in any
where near substandard condi-
tions."
She explained, that "Plan-
A"' involves having a new, up-
dated facility which.can provide
the proper care needed for the
animals, and at the same time,
take care of those establish-
ments which provide services to
the shelter, including veterinary
bills, food providers, and em-
ployees working at the shelter.
"In order to achieve Plan-A,
we have to go to Plan-B," said
Carswell. "We have to downsize
and operate under the donations
we receive. The shelter has to be
run like a business, and through
hosting additional fundraisers
and gaining much needed finan-
,eialasupport; .we will grow- to
care for as many animals as we
. are financially able to do."
Call the shelter to make an
appointment to come meet and
fall in love with a pet that needs
a home and will repay you with
the devotion only a pet can
give, or you can go to the web-
site at jchs.us, to get more in-
formation on those animals.
Call 850-342-0244 and leave a
message. Someone will return
your call as soon as possible.
', "We hope that in the near
Future we will be able to start
increasing our staff and ani-
mal population, but that de-
pends on you, the citizens of
Jefferson County, to support
your shelter," concluded Car-
swell.


rate list of all persons voting in
each precinct and that such lists
be certified to the canvassing
board. The complaint further al-
leges that the canvassing board
failed to accurately compare the
number of persons who voted
in District 3 with the number of
ballots counted and the total
vote count certified to the state,
as required by law.
The complaint notes that of
the 15 voting precincts that par-
ticipated in the Aug. 26 primary
election, two are located in Dis-
trict 3 and that the canvassing
board certified to the state that
a total of 729 votes were cast in
District 3, with 310 going, to
Miller and 340 to Boyd.
"Upon reason and belief,
plaintiff asserts that a discrep-
ancy exists between the true
votes accepted in County Com-
mission District 3 by defendant
Bishop and his assistants, and
the number of votes certified by
the canvassing board to the
state of Florida," the complaint
alleges. "Plaintiff asserts that


the ballots of a number of elec-
tors who actually voted in the
District 3 precincts, or who
should have been allowed to
vote in the District 3 precincts,
were not accurately tabulated in
the total count of votes cast in
County Commission District 3."
"Plaintiff asserts that the
result of this discrepancy was a
reduction in the votes can-
vassed on his behalf. Plaintiff
asserts that the result of this
discrepancy, and the reduction
in the votes canvassed on his be-
half was a critical factor in the
outcome of the election, and in-
deed changed the true outcome
' of the election."
In summary, the complaint
alleges that a number of the 153
absentee ballots cast in the Dis-
trict 3 race were not.properly
executed and so should not
have been accepted. The com-
plaint states that the canvass-
ing board's acceptance and
tabulation of the alleged defec-
tive absentee ballots affected
the outcome of the election.


Water Levels


for August is 7.41 inches. In Jef-
ferson and Madison counties,
the rainfall ranged from 14 to 18
inches and is estimated to have
gone as high as 20 inches or
more in some parts of Jefferson
County
Overall, the district went
from an annual rainfall deficit
of 4.2 inches during the last 12
months to a surplus of 3.31, an
improvement of 7.5 inches -
the first annual rainfall surplus
since March 2006. The district's
24-month deficit also improved,
from 22.2 inches in July to 13.4
in August. All told, the district
has received 58.02 inches of
rainfall ,during the last 12
months. Historically, the dis-
*trict's 12-month average is 54.71
inches.
.,The district reports rainfall
recordings in excess of the one-
percent (100-year) 24-hour and
72-hour storms af the Wacissa
Tower, Lamont and Sneads Lake
in Jefferson County Meanwhile,
the Aucilla River at Lamont
crested at three feet above flood
stage, considered to be minor
flooding. The district also re-
ports that between 12 and 20
inches of rain fell in the Aucilla
fasin during August.
The county specific statis-
tics show that'Jefferson County
a


received 17.55 inches in August,.
compared with 7.48 inches in
August 2007 and the August av-
erage of 6.46 inches. Jefferson
County has received 57.39
inches during the last 12
months.
Neighboring Madison,
County, meanwhile, received
14.94 inches in August, com-
pared with 7.85 inches in Au-
gust 2007 and the August,
average of 6.13 inches. Madison
County has received 60.23
inches during the last 12
months.
Other statistics show that
groundwater levels rose by an
average of 0.7 feet since July, as
measured at 93 monitoring
wells: Most of tfte measurb-
ments, however, were taken
prior to tropicalstorm Fay ,
"Levels from wells mdni-
tored after Fay showed modest
increases in the northern coun-
ties, and significant increases
in Levy County," the district re-
port, notes. "Recharge of the
Floridian Aquifer can be nearly
instantaneous in wells near the
rivers, or can take months in
areas of low recharge rates,
such as western Madison and
Jefferson counties, where the
highest rainfall was. seen. The
district will continue to moni-


SAMERICAN HEART '
ASSOCIATION A 1
MEMORIALS & TRIBUTES 1111 1


1-800-AHA-USA1


Cont. From Page 1


and sunken chain-link fences in
some instances.
"It's an environmental and
a safety hazard to boaters,"'
Joyner acknowledged.
But he thought that the
FWC was going too far in ban-
ning even blinds constructed of
biodegradable materials. At
Joyner's and Commissioner
Danny Monroe's urging, the Jef-
ferson County Commission
wrote the FWC a letter request-
ing that biodegradable blinds be
permitted on the lakes.
Judging from the FWC's
final ruling, however, the com-
mission's request apparently
made little impression.
Mark Wirick, owner of
Edenfield Hardware Store, has
been duck hunting on Lake Mic-
cosukee 32 of his 44 years. He
was one of the many hunters
who attended the June 3 public
hearing in Tallahassee. His reac-
tion to the ruling was not unex-
pected. .
"I'm not surprised that the
FWC approved the ruling,"
Wirick said Friday. "I'm sur-
prised that they approved it
against public opinion."
His take on the June 3 hear-
ing was that the majority of peo-
ple who attended the meeting
expressed opposition to the pro-
posed ban and only a few sup-
ported it.
Wirick conceded that he has
had confrontations or territorial
disputes with other hunters in
the past. But these disputes were
minimal and occurred prior to
the opening of the season and
generally involved the place-
ment of the blinds, he said.
"I think it's going to make it
worse," Wirick said of the po-


tential for confrontations under
the new rule. "I think confronta-
tions are going to be an everyday
thing now."
What's more, the perma-
nent blinds ensured adequate
spacing between hunters and so
promoted safety, he said. Now
hunters were going to set
portable blinds in the dark with-
out really knowing who else
might be setting up another
portable blind in close proximity,
he said.
"There's no way to enforce
the blinds being apart now," he
said.
County resident Richard
Bevis likewise has been hunting
on Lake Miccosukee since he
was "old enough to drive", but
unlike Wirick, he has never had
a confrontation or witnessed
one. The FWC ruling dismayed
him on two counts.
The first has to do with his-
tory
"Permanent blinds are just
an old, old tradition that's more
than 100 years," Bevis said. "It's
a sad day It's the end of an era
and a tradition."
The second has to with a
perceived arbitrariness of the
decision.
"I would question where is
the data that the FWC did not
'make public and that they based
this decision on," Bevis said.
"How many confrontations, how
many conflicts have they docu-
mented? It seems like this is a
personal burr under somebody's
saddle. There is no data that I
know of. You can't make a deci-
sion that affects so many people
without facts. We were never
presented with the facts. I think
there will be more confronta-


tions now"
Joey Collins, of Collins
Pecans in Thomasville, GA, is
another lifetime duck hunter
who attended the FWC public
hearing on June 3 and consid-
pred it "a waste of time".
"The FWC said that the re-
sults of the meeting would have
a great bearing on the decision,"
Collins said. "There were 52
comments saying that the ban
would not solve the problem.
Three people said that the ban
would help. Why did they waste
our time if they weren't going to
listen? I think the FWC rammed
this down our throats."
Collins also argued that the
ban would not solve the problem
of confrontations, which he did-
n't view as that great of a prob-
lem to begin with. He himself
had had only one confrontation
and witnessed zero confronta-
tions between others during a
lifetime of hunting on Lake Mic-
cosukee, he said.
"This won't change a
thing," Collins said of the rule.
What's more, given' that
only boats of 10 horsepower and
less are permitted on these
lakes, the ban would create a
safety issue, he said.
'Ten horsepower boats are
not stable," Collins said. "These
boats are not safe to jump up and
shoot from."
As for the assertion that the
blinds present a navigational
hazard to boaters, what about
the piers that extend far out into
rivers and lakes all across the
state? Collins asked.
"I don't care what's in a
lake, if you don't run a boat
properly, it's a navigational haz-
ard," he said.


time. But now it seems that of-:
ficials are resolved to address
the problem once and for all,
the result of a combination of
factors that include a new ad-
ministration, renewed out-
cries from citizens and a
recognition that the problem
is growing.
In recent months, the
city's acting animal control of-
ficer has been picking up stray
animals when and as his regu-
lar job duties allows. But the
city is now planning to send
two of its employees to a week-
long animal control certifica-
tion class in the coming
month. Once certified, these
employees will be able to issue
citations, which should
ratchet enforcement of the
city's animal control ordi-
nance.
In light of the stepped-up


SFamily Re

997-1
Announces: N
"Thursday, Friday, Saturd

In addition to
".', store hours 6:30 art

.I Daily Specials
S Femturnng REAL HOME CoolkinQ
Breakfast
SAngurs teak- &
r Hamburgers


The complaints asks that
the court hold a hearing to deny
Boyd the election's winning and
assign that winning to Miller,
or as an alternative, that a new
election be required for the Dis-
trict 3 County Commission
seat.
Boyd said Monday that he
didn't think the complaint had
merit.
"The suit alleges no wrong-
doing by any candidate," Boyd
said. "It is a complaint about
election procedures. Since it
was filed, I've asked a lot of
questions. So far, I have not
been able to identify a single in-
cident that could be a legiti-
mate cause for the complaint,
and the plaintiff has given us
none. I am confident that the
Supervisor of Elections, his
staff, and the canvassing board
did their job well. Most likely,
the case will be quickly dis-
missed. I'm continuing to cam-
paign as hard as ever and am
looking forward to the election
in November.



Cont. From Page 1


tor groundwater levels and will
assess the situation as data be-
come available."'
Other highlights of the re-
port:
The 12-month Standard-
ized Precipitation Index, which
is based on long-term precipita-
tion patterns that impact
streams and groundwater, indi-
cates near-normal conditions
throughout the district.
None of the district's
river basins are experiencing
hydrologic drought or below-
normal condition's, as charac-
terized by the US Geological
Survey, which is based on a
seven-day average stream flow.
The long-range outlooks
from the National Weather
Service Climate Prediction Cen-
ter show an increased probabil-
ity of above-normal
precipitation for Florida
through October.
Even so, the SRWMD con-
tinues its Phase 1 Water Storage
Advisory which encourages vol-
untary reductions in water use.
The district compiles the
hydrologic conditions report
using water resource data col-
lected from radar-derived rain-
fall estimates, groundwater and
surfacewater levels, and river
flows, among other variables.



Count. From Page 1

enforcement, City Manager
Steve Wingate is urging dog
and cat owners to buy the city
required pet license. He notes
-that the yearly license fees are
$5 and less, but ensure the re-
turn of a family pets should it
become lost or stolen, pro-
vided the animal is wearing
the tag.
"Many of these animals
(that the city is picking up)
may be someone's pet,"
Wingate said Monday. "But
without the proper identifica-
tion, they can't be returned to
their owner".
Wingate reminds resi-
dents that pets must be kept
under restraint and not al-
lowed to roam or cause a nui-
sance He further reminds
residents that animals must
wear their license tags at all
times.


.staurant

202
rOW OPEN
ay 4:30 pm 9:00

our regular
n- 2:00 pm daily

Weekend Specials.


at Capil


- W1







Wednesday, September 24, 2008






AROUND


Monticello News 5A


EFFERSON


TlUNNLJNIIY LAL0NDAFg


SEPTEMBER 25
Altrusa meets at 6 p.m.
on the fourth Thursday and
at noon on the second Thurs-
day of each month for a
meal and a meeting. Contact
the Chamber at 997-5552 for
more information.
SEPTEMBER 25
AA meetings are held 8
p.m. on Thursdays at the


Christ Episcopal Church
Annex, 425 North Cherry
Street. For more informa-
tion call 997-2129 or 997-1955.
SEPTEMBER 25
The Jefferson County
Seminole Club will meet
Thursday at Christ Episco-
pal Church Gerry Hall due
to increased attendance.
Speaker for this meeting will


FRANK MARRONE


Frank Joseph Marrone,
age 83, passed away Thurs-
day, September 18, 2008 at
his home surrounded by
his loving family.
He was a native of
Wichata, KS and former
resident of Pittsburg, KS
living in Leon Co. and sur-
rounding areas for the past
50 years.
Funeral services were
held at Beggs Funeral
Home Apalachee Chapel
Saturday September 20,
2008, at 11:00 a.m. with in-
terment at Beth Page Ceme-
tery. The family received
friends 10:00 a.m., 1 hour
prior to services. In Lieu of


flowers the family requests
you please make donations
to Big Bend Hospice 1723-1
Mahan Center Blvd Talla-
hassee FL 32308-5428.
He survived by his wife,
Joe Anna Marrone of
Wacissa; two sons, Richard
and David Marrone of
Pittsburg, KS; stepson,
Park Brittle and Phyllis of
Lloyd, FL; step daughter,
Diane Cheek and Allan of
Mount Dora, FL; 2 grand-
children, 6 step grandchil-
dren and 6 step
great-grandchildren.
He was preceded in
death by a son, Mickey Mar-
rone.


FCC Administrative


be the new Athletic Director,
Randy Spetman, from
Florida State University For
more information contact
Sharon Morris at 997-2572.
SEPTEMBER 26
Monticello Rotary Club
meets every Friday at noon
at the Monticello/Jefferson
Chamber of Commerce on
West Washington Street for
lunch and a meeting. Con-
tact President James Mu-
chovej at 980-6509 for club
information.
SEPTEMBER 26-27
The Opera House Stage
Company will present Nice
People Dancing To Good
Country Music Friday and
Saturday evening. Call for
information and reserva-
tions to 997-4242.
SEPTEMBER 26 30
Jefferson Arts, Inc. an-
nounces a new exhibit on
display through the month,
featuring renowned artist,
donalee pond-Koenig. Her
artwork is based on the fun-
damentals of drawing. She
is working on organic forms
of nature, with the use of
color, form and textures. The
exhibit is free and open to
the public at the Gallery 575
West Washington
Street. The Gallery is open
Wednesday and Saturdays


Iss8 stant


Program Offers Business Training


Program helping local
stfldents reach their career
goals
North Florida Commu-
nity College instructor
Enid Kozlowski is helping
prepare area students for
careers in business. With
nine students currently en-
rolled in NFCC's Adminis-
trative Assistant Program,
Kozlowski is confident that
the skills being taught in
this career and technology
based program will help
students succeed on the
job.
"The nine students that
are currently in the pro-
gram come from all walks
of life and abilities, but
everyone works together
toward the common goal of
obtaining an administra-
tive position at the end of
the year," said Kozlowski.
"NFCC has an opportunity
to change the future of
these students and help
them to become a produc-
tive office assistant."
Vandella "Van" John-
son of Monticello is one of
the nine students in
NFCC's Administrative As-


sistant Program. This is
her firsfsemester'at'NFCC;
she began classes in Au-
gust.
"I enrolled in the pro-
gram to improve my skills
and to get an office job,"
said Johnson. "It's a nice
college."
Johnson, and her stu-
dent peers are learning
about business systems, of-
fice technology, business
software, digital design,
keyboarding, employabil-
ity skills, filing, business
math and English, commu-
nication and computer
concepts. Some of the stu-
dents in the class are up-
dating current skills in
order to get a better job,
others are gaining skills to
start a new career and
some plan to continue their
education once they com-
plete the program.
"The definition of the
'administrative assistant'
is constantly changing, but
the one thing that remains
constant is that employers
are looking for employees
who are competent and de-
pendable," said Kozlowski.


"No longer is the' adminis-
trative assistant expected
just to. answer phones, ,but,
he/she needs to be organ-
ized, computer' savvy, de-
pendable, and able to
communicate well in the
business world."
Students completing
the program have the op-
tion to transfer into
NFCC's Associate in Sci-
ence in Business Adminis-
tration and Management
program if they want to
earn an A.S. degree or can
choose from different
tracks in the vocational
certificate program Ad-
ministrative Assistant,
Legal Administrative As-
sistant or Customer Assis-
tance Technology NFCC
also offers its Associate in
Arts degree with a busi-
ness emphasis for students
planning to continue into a
bachelor's degree pro-
gram. Kozlowski encour-
ages those interested in
pursuing careers in busi-
ness to take a look at the
training and educational
opportunities offered at
NFCC.


from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. or by
appointment. Jefferson
Arts, Inc. is a non-profit
group with a goal of promot-
ing art and art education in
the Monticello area of North
Florida and South Geor-
gia. For more information,
contact the Gallery at 997-
3311 or visit our website at
www.jeffersonartsgalleryco
m
SEPTEMBER 26
Fresh Mullet Fish Fry at
Waukeenah United
Methodist Church 5 to 8 p.m.
The cost is $10 adults and $4
children, and will include
cheese grits, cole slaw,
baked beans, a beverage,
and a homemade dessert.
Eat in or carry out.
SEPTEMBER 26
Family Skate Night is
held 7 p.m. on the last Friday
of each month at the Church
of the Nazarene on 1590
North Jefferson Street. This
event is free, as are the
skates if needed. There is a
small charge for snacks.
SEPTEMBER 26
Big Bend Hospice is
hosting its Fourth Annual
Bereavement Conference,
"Grief: A Journey to Hope"
8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on at-the
Tallahassee Community Col-
lege Center for Economic
and Workforce Development.
This conference is de-
signed to provide useful in-
formation and practical
strategies for professionals
to use in assisting clients
through the grief process.
The cost of the conference is
$69 with special rates for stu-
dents, or four or more from
the same agency 6.5 Contin-
uing Education Units win be
offered. Late registration
after Sep. 12 will add $10 to
each category Contact Lisa
Baggett at 878-5310, X433 to
register or for more infor-
matibn.
SEPTEMBER 26 27
USDA Commodities and
Second Harvest will wel-
come volunteers to bag food


packages 6:30 p.m. Friday for
distribution 9-11 a.m. Satur-
day at the New Bethel AME
Church, 6496 Ashville High-
way Contact Essie Norton at
997-5683 for information.
SEPTEMBER 27
AA meetings are held 8
p.m. Saturday at the Christ
Episcopal Church Annex,
425 North Cherry Street. For
more information, call 997-
2129 or 997-1955.
SEPTEMBER 27
The regular last-Satur-
day-of-the-month meeting of
the Tallahassee Crochet
Guild will be held 10 a.m. 2
p.m. at the Jefferson Arts
Gallery 575 West Washing-
ton Street. This is a free
meeting. Bring your own
projects or work on some of
the Tallahassee Crochet
Guild projects. No children
please. http://www.divacro-
chet.com for updates.
SEPTEMBER 27
Jefferson SHARE vol-
unteers will be stationed at
the Church of the
Nazarene, 1590 North Jef-
ferson Street from 8 to 9:30
a.m. Saturday with the
monthly food delivery or-
ders. Turn in registration
copy when picking up or-
ders. Cash donations will be
accepted for the cost of fuel
for the volunteers. Contact
Martha Creel at 445-9061 for
more information.
SEPTEMBER 27 28
Alpacas Pure &.Simple
Farm will host an Open
House during National Al-
paca Days from 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. Saturday and Sunday


at 1833 Dills Road; follow the
signs on highway 19 for di-
rection.
SEPTEMBER 29
Martin Luther King
Community Center meets 7
p.m. on the last Monday of
each month at the MLK
Center. Contact Charles
Parrish at 997-3760 for more
information.
SEPTEMBER 29
AA Women's Meetings
are held 6:45 p.m. Monday;
AA and Al-Anon meetings
are held 8 p.m. Christ Epis-
copal Church Annex, 425
North Cherry Street. For
more information call 997-
2129 or 997-1955.
SEPTEMBER 29
Boy Scout Troop 803
meets 7 p.m. every Monday
at the Eagles Nest on South
Water Street. For informa-
tion, contact Scout Leader
Paul Wittig at 997-1727 or
997-3169.
SEPTEMBER 29
Girl Scoutsmeet 4 to 5
p.m. on Mondays at the St.
Phillips Boys and Girls
Club. For more information
contact Club Director Sab-
rina Williams at 997-4226.


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6A Monticello News


Wednesday, September 24, 2008


OUND


EFFERSON


COUNTY


Calvary

Bluegrass At

Lamont UMC
DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Lamont United
Methodist Chiu-ch will host
Calvary Bluegrass 7 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 27 at 73
Depot Road in Lamont.
Refreshments will be
served in the dining hall
immediately after the mu-
sical extravaganza.
For more information
about this monthly -event,
or about service dates and
times contact Rev. Ralph
Wrightstone, pastor, at 997-
2527.

Fish Fry At

Waukeenah

UMC
DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
A Fresh Mullet Fish
Fry will be held at Wau-
keenah United Methodist
Church 5 to 8 p.m. on Fri-
day, September 26 and on
Friday, Oct. 10.
This annual fish fry ex-
travaganza will cost $10 for
adults and $4 for children.
Eat in or carry out.
The meal will also in-
clude cheese grits, cole
slaw. baked beans, a bever-
age. and a homemade
dessert.
Come enjoy some great
od, great fun, and great
ellowship.
r, Waukeenah UMC is lo-
cated at 81 Methodist
Church Road.
Contact Rev. Ralph
Wrightstone, pastor, at 997-
2527 for more information.


Dinner For Democratic Candidates


On November Ballot Planned


The Jefferson Demo-
cratic Party is hosting a
dinner featuring Demo-
cratic candidates who
will be on the ballot Nov.
4, with the event planned
6 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 2, at
the Monticello Opera
House.
Admission is free
with a non-perishable do-
nation for the. Second
Harvest Food Bank. Spe-


cial music with a DJ is on
tap.
Theme for the evening
is Octoberfest with a
menu consisting of sauer-
kraut, bratwurst, potato
salad, beverage and
dessert.
Following on the heels
of the dinner will be a
"Get Out and Vote" drive
10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Oct.25, at
the County Government-


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Jazz Ensembles in the
United States, is a dynamic
band of top professional
musicians. The band has
appeared at Carnegie Hall,
Disney, World's ,EPCOT
Center, Ruth Eckerd Hall
and Jacksonville's Metro-
politan Park and per-
formed with-- Dizzy
Gillespie, Buddy DeFranco,
Diane Schuur, Ernie Watts,
the Manhattan Transfer,
and many more.
The Sept. 30 show at
NFCC will include such fa-
vorites as Take The "A:'
Train, It Had to Be You,
Someone to Watch Over
Me, In The Mood, Rockin'
In Rhythm, April In Paris,
Moondance, Summertime,
Georgia and other songs
from world renown artists
like Duke Ellington,
George and Ira Gershwin,
Fats Waller, Rodgers. and
Hammerstein, and Van
Morrison.
Leading the band is
Musical Director Chris
Creswell. He earned his
bachelor's degree in music


Center parking lot. This
activity will feature re-
freshments, children's
events, music,' and door
prizes.
This will be the first
Saturday of early voting,
and Party Chair Eleanor
Hawkins says partici-
pants will be encouraged
to visit the nearby Elec-
tions Office and cast their
ballots.


RIwvvr


at the University ot Nortlh
Florida and a Master of
Music in Trombone Per-
formance at the Manhattan
School of Music in New.
York City. Joining him on
stage will be award win-
ning vocalist Lisa Kelly,
who is well-known for her
rich, smooth tone and
swinging delivery of lyric.
Kelly is a four time Down-
beat-"Jazz Vocal Soloist"
award winner. Crewell,
Kelly and the St. Johns
River City Band are sure to
deliver a wonderful night
of entertainment at NFCC.
The band's mission is
to keep jazz and other


Jefferson cursing Center

Plans Fall estival


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Jefferson
Nursing Center i
will hold its an- .
nual Fall Festi-
val 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Saturday, .
Oct. 18, at 1780
North Jefferson Street.
This Health Fair and
Fall Festival is a well-at-
tended event so vendors are
asked to respond now for
set-up and area locations.


City I


American music alive
through performance and
education. So in addition to
the 7 p.m. Artist Series per-
formance, members of the
group will host educational
workshops with the Madi-
son County High School
Jazz Band and music stu-
dents at NFCC on Sept. 30.
The performance and
workshops are sponsored
in part by the State of
Florida, Department of
State, Division of Cultural
Affairs, the Florida Arts
Council, and the National
Endowment for the Arts.
Tickets are on sale now
for the St. Johns River City
Band performance and sea-
son passes for the season
are still available. Individ-
ual tickets are $12 for
adults and $6 for NFCC stu-
dents (with ID) and chil-


Contact Jefferson
Nursing hosts Mae
Kyler, social serv-
ices director;!
V oVoncell
Thomas, activ-
ity director; or
M a r c i e.
Preacher, risk
manager, at 997-2313
or 997-0287 for more in-
formation and to reserve,
space.
The festival will offer
good food, games, music,
prizes, and fun for all ages.


4FCC
dren ages 12 and under;
season passes are $45 for
open seating sections and
include the Sept. 30 St.
Johns River City Band per-
formance plus five more,
entertaining shows.
Contact the NFCC Of-
fice of College Advance-
ment for information at
(850) 973-1653, email Artist-
Series@nfcc.edu or visit
www.nfcc.edu (keyword
Artist Series).






North Florida Community College
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Wednesday, September 24, 2008


OUND


EFFERSON


Monticello News 7A






COUNTY


JCMHS 9-11 Observance Well Attended


Monticello Police Chief
Fred Mosley, spoke of those
giving their lives on 9-11
and being proud to be on
the front lines serving to
protect the public safety.
FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Jefferson JROTC
held its seventh annual 9-11
observance, Sept. 11, at Jef-
ferson County Middle/High
School, which was well at-
tended by community mem-
bers and local dignitaries.
The program began with
the JROTC Color Guard post-
ing the Colors and the Pledge
of Alliance, led by Cadet CSM
Randy Lewis,. followed by
Keyonna Scott singing the
National.Anthem, under the
half-mast flag.
The observance contin-
ued with the invocation of-
fered by Shannon McDonald.;
Cadet Kassandra Simp-
kins, extended the welcome
:and recalled that 2,985 people
died in the 9-11 attacks, in-
cluding; 19 terrorists, and
2'966 victims. All but 13 peo-
ple died on that day. The re-
t~aining 131ater died of their

One' person has died
since the attacks, of lung can-
cer, suspected to have been
caused by all the debris from
the Twin Towers. There were
266 people on the four planes:
American Airlines Flight
Ili (crashed into the WTC): 92
(including five terrorists);
United Airlines Flight 175
(crashed into the WTC): 65
(including five terrorists);
American Airlines Flight 77
(crashed into the Pentagon:
64 (including five terrorists);
United Flight 93 (downed in
Shanksville, PA): 45 (includ-
ing four terrorists).
There were 2,595 people
in the World Trade Center
and near it, including: 343
NYFD firefighters and para-
medics; 23 NYPD police offi-
cers; 37 Port Authority police
officers; 1,402 people in Tower
1; 614 people in Tower 2; 658
people at one company, Can-
tor Fitzgerald; 1,762 New York
residents; 674 New Jersey res-
idents; 1 NYFD firefighter
killed by a man jumping off
the top floors of the twin tow-
ers; There were 125 civilians
ind military personnel at the
Pentagon.


Firefighter/EMT Rene JCMHS Principal Geral-
McCord spoke of how 9-11 dine Wildgoose spoke of 9-
brought the local depart- 11 being a privilege for
ment and the country as a citizens to come together
whole, closer together and and remember the sacri-
of changes made in the de- fices made on 9-11.
apartment to better combat
and prepare for any kind of
terrorist activity or attack.


FAMU ROTC Major
Williams quoted, "That
which does not kill us,
makes us stronger."
Simpkins. then intro-
duced guest speakers, all of
whom spoke heartfelt words,
about bravery, duty and coun-
try.
The first guest speaker
was Police Chief Fred Mosley,
who began noting that 9-11
was a sad but proud day, re-
flecting the pride of Ameri-
can citizens and those who
serve daily with a dedication
to duty and public safety.
"Those law enforcement
officers, firefighters 'and
EMTs don't consider their
own safety above others.
They are always up to the call
for help and proud to be there.
I am proud to be on those
front lines. There have been
times I thought I might not re-
turn home to my family, but I
did my job and what had to be
done. And the dedication
comes from the feeling of
being the shepherd looking
over the safety of the flock."
Firefighter/EMT Rene
McCord spoke in the absence
of Fire Rescue Chief Jim Bill-.
berry She spoke of how the
attacks of 9-11 affected those
at the local department and
those directly involved with
it. "The tragedy of 9-11
brought our department
closer as a team and unit,"
said McCod. 'And we are a
naturally close-knit group.
Our hearts go out to those
who lost their lives on 9-11
and their families and 9-11 did


Dr. Sonia McNelis
spoke of coming to the US
with her family, being here.
for 9-11 and seeing the re-
suits of how it brought the
country closer together.


do
st

ti
Ii
w
s(

Je
p
Si
B


serve to make changes in our n
department." s
She spoke of how em- s]
ployees are now required to U
take classes on terrorism, w
what to do in various situa- ii
tionis and under different cir- w
cumstances, additional safety re
precautions to be taken while c
on calls and absolutely not w
taking deliveries of packages b
at the department which are co
not expected or are from h
sources not known by staff, to d
keeping areas of the depart- t(
ment. locked down and away c
from public access, and the, a
like: "As an element of 9-11, ro
we are all reminded why we A
do our jobs," she said.
Major Williams of the s]
FAMU ROTC reminded atten- le
dees that the USA is not only G
at war overseas, but also here P
at home. "I had the opportu-
nity to be in Washington DC
when I heard about the first
plane hitting the twin' towers
and how I thought it was an
accident, but when the second
plane hit the second tower, I
realized that our country was
being attacked."
He said that the annual
observance of 9-11 was to re-
member those who lost their
lives that day and that their
lives were not lost in vain.
"The attacks were meant to
drive us apart as a country,
but it had the opposite effect.
It brought us together, much
like the saying, that which


oes not kill us makes uts
tronset."
He stressed not forget-
nig those who served and
lade the ultimate sacrifice
ith their lives in order to
serve. .
Dr. Sonia McNelis of the
efferson County Health De-
artment spoke in the ab-
ence of Director Kim
arnhill who was in Califor-
ia at the time of the local ob-
ervance. She told of how
he brought her family to the
JSA, the best country in the
Norld and.shortly after com-
ng here, the country under-
rent the attacks of 9-11. "I
member the looks on my
children's faces as if they
rere thinking why did you
ring us to such an awful
country? But when they saw
ow those attacks.meant to
ivide us brought us closer
together, my children saw a
country come closer together
nd unite in the war on ter-
orism. I am proud tobe an
kmerican citizen," she said.
Following the guest
speakers, a moment of si-
ence was led by Johntue
illey and Taps on the trum-
et by Cadet Harold Ingram.


Principal. Geraldine
Wildkoose remarked on how
it was a privilege to honor
those who lost-their lives on
9-11. She thanked those at.
tended, invited them to visit
the school at any time and
dismissed the group.
Attendees included mem-
ber'; of the Jefferson County
Sheriffs Office. Monticello
,Police Department. Jefferson
County Fire Rescue. County
Commissioners. City Council
member-s. School Board mem-
bers. and School Superin-
tendent Phil Barker.:

Cadet Harold Ingram
played Taps prior to the
close of the ceremony.


S- -
Music Lessons For All Ages
Piano, Voice, Organ, and Cello

Sissi' Kilpatrick .
usic / degrtc .o'i' FS. School Teaacher
" -Id t~Lu 'c(h '/.a ,' iHiii il

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Wednesday, September 24, 2008


Monticello News 8A


OUND


EFFERSON


COUNTY


'lice people fanela' Continues t Opera 0 a ffouse I


RAY CICHON
Monticello News
Managing Editor
Opening night, Friday,
of the Opera House Stage
Company's fall production
of "Nice People Dancing to
Good Country Music drew
an appreciative audience,
which enjoyed the Texas
style dinner before the
show, catered by Carrie
Ann & Co.
The show. continues
Friday and Saturday, Sept.
26, 27, with dinner at 7 p.m.
and the show at 8 p.m.
Despite the title, this play
is not a musical, though
snatches of country songs
are woven throughout. It is
a comedy, which draws on
the redneck stereotype for
its humor, yet also con-
tains accurate observa-
tions of life, and romance,
that go beyond mere come-
dy.
With a cast of only five
characters, as opposed to
the larger casts seen at the
House more frequently, it
falls to these characters to
bring the play to life,
which they do with perfec-
tion.
In addition to the well
chosen cast, under the
direction of Colin Rolfe


and Jack Williams, the set
designers and all those
behind the scenes, help
add authenticity.
Audiences will find
tables containing a six
pack of Lone Star Beer,
placed on oversized red
bandanas, as the center-
pieces. Sold only in Texas,
the beer was purchased by
Opera House Director Jan
Rickey and her husband
Kent, when they passed
through Texas while on
vacation, recently.
Perhaps most notable,
set wise, is the "real" truck
that serves as a major
prop. Williams relates that
the authentic truck body
was created in
Thomasville in a manner
that allowed it to be hauled
up the stairs to the theatre
and assembled on stage.
The play opens with
Rich Clifford, as Jim
Stools, working on his
truck, which doesn't seem
to want to start. Dressed in
redneck style, Clifford
even has the obligatory
barbed wire tattoos (fake)
around both biceps and
around one wrist.
As he works on the
truck, he never misses a
chance to curse it, and give,


it a good whack with what-
ever tool he has handy.
When the tfuck threatens
to go up in smoke, after the
abuse it suffered, it is for-
tunate a fire extinguisher
is handy.
Jon Taylor, as Roy
Manual, observes, as
Clifford works on his
truck. He is an honest, if
simple fellow, from the
bar. He wants Clifford to
introduce him to Kuder,
and doesn't care if she is or
was a- nun or not. Clifford
tries to explain, to Taylor
what love does to a man,
but his words fall on deaf
ears.
Taylor was seen most
recently at the Opera
House in "Alibis" as
Detective Solvedd. He has
performed in some 11 local
productions and has the
ability to adapt to whatev-
er the role demands.
In his first' production
with the Opera House
Stage Company, Andrew
Ashburn, plays Jason/Jay
Bob, 15 year old nephew of
Eve (Eva June) Wilfong.
Ashburn has studied
the violin and danced with
the Pas de Vie Ballet
Troupe, in Tallahassee. No
doubt his studies will
carry him far on stage,
should he choose that
path.
In.a role very different
from her usual glamorous
parts, Mellissa Kuder, as
Catherine Empanger is


Don't Get Rattled by Wall

Street's Bumpy Road

Provided by Robert J. Davison

In the investment world, these are no ordinary times. Consider
the following:
* On Sept. 15, The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell more than
500 points the biggest point drop since the September 2001
terrorist attacks. Following this decline, the market was down
about 23 percent from its all-time high last October.
* Facing big lossestwo big names on Wall Street- Merrill Lynch
and Lehman Brothers took drastic steps to rescue their respec-
tive businesses, with Merrill Lynch selling itself, to Bank of Amer-
ica and Lehman Brothers filing for bankruptcy protection.
* The U.S. government has bailed out investment bank Bear
'Stearns, mortgage finance giants, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac,
and American International Group (AIG).
What's behind this slew of bad news? Several factors are involved,
but a key culprit is the subprime mortgage crisis, which resulted in
enormous losses suffered by financial institutions.
Of course, we've seen large market declines before, but what's hap-
pened to these major players in the investment world is something
new for most of us. And yet, you shouldn't confuse the problems
of certain financial services providers with the viability of our fi-
nancial markets as a whole. We still have the most powerful and
resilient economy in recorded history, and investment opportuni-
ties, still abound.
Nonetheless, as an individual investor, you'll find it hard to ig-
nore the recent market turmoil. How should you respond to this
level of volatility?
Basically, you-have these weapons at your disposal:
*.Patience It's usually not a good idea to let short-term mar-
ket movements dictate your long-term investment strategy. If the
current market decline led you to take a "time out" from invest-
ing, you might feel better for a few weeks or months, but you
wouldn't be helping yourself achieve your long term financial ob-
jectives. In the past, the market has fallen sharply after a variety
of events wars, assassinations, terrorist attacks, 'natural disas-
ters, corporate scandals and so on only to regain its footing and
move on to new highs. And since the biggest gains can occur in
the early stages of a market turnaround, you could miss out on the
possibility for considerable growth if you're sitting on the invest-
ment sidelines.
* Diversification If a market downturn primarily affects just
one type of asset, such as domestic stocks, and your portfolio is
dominated by that asset, you could take a big hit. But if you
broaden your holdings to include international stocks, bonds,
Treasury securities, certificates of deposit (CDs) and other invest-
ments, you can potentially reduce the effects of market volatility.
(Keep in mind that diversification, by itself, cannot guarantee a
profit or protect against a loss.)
* Quality During market downturns, even quality stocks can
lose value. But these same stocks have the potential to recover
when the market turns around. Look for good, solid companies
whose products are competitive and whose management has epun-
ciated a strategy for future growth.
The last few months have been difficult ones for investors, and
we may still have some rough roads ahead. But by showing pa-
tience, diversifying your holdings and buying quality investments,
you can continue to make progress toward your long-term goals -
in markets that are good, bad or indifferent.

Robert J. Davison EdwardJones
Financial Advisor
205 E. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32344
Bus. 850-997-2572 Fax 866-462-9184
Cell 850-933-3329
robert.davison@edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com

Making Sense of Investing


Mail to Monticello News
P.O. Box 428 Monticello. FL 32344

r ,, rn,. .:


hilarious as a novice nun
who was asked to leave
the convent. It seems she
suffers from a curious
compulsion to yell obscen-
ities at the wrong
moment, and at times to
even barks like a dog. She
spontaneously gives the
audience a sampling of
her "affliction."
After leaving the con-
vent, she returns home
and her aunt Lisa
Reasoner as Eve (Eva
June) Wilfong, who feels
obligated to give her niece
the benefit of her experi-
ence with men, before
allowing her to venture
back into the mad modern
country world.
What follows is not
just comic, but well
observed, romantic, and
affecting as well. Reasoner
wears an outfit that allows
her to highlight her lower
back with a fake tattoo,
which adds authenticity
to her character.
It is difficult to recall a
role Reasoner has not
undertaken in the Opera
House Stage Company.
Whatever the role, she
gives her all, which makes
her a favorite of' audi-
ences.
In conclusion, kudos
to all on stage and behind
the scenes. This is a play
suitable for all, which per-
haps says more by what it
does not say, and provides
food for thought.


Reoli-ier tc'r 'our-rhance to
*inl 2.. 10~L'T
Wil d J.'erji~jre.S Theme Parh
Oin-7 %,ririer ,v'ill 0.5rawn4!

DeaoIn's Ix r rTr-,, is 10-15 Noon.


WE TAKE THE
1D)'TS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


Monticello News Ploto By ueobie anapp, August zL, zuu2 .
Monticello Kiwanis President Rob Mazur, right, welcomes
Retired FMB President Gary Wright, left, to speak to the mem-
bership about banking in today's concerned economic envi-
ronment. Wright proud himself on being "the bankers
banker."

Banking In Today's


Economic Environment


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Gary Wright spoke to fel-
low Kiwanians about banking
in today's economic environ-
ment at the Aug. 27 meeting
held at the Jefferson County
Country Club. '
He. retired from the
Farmers and Merchants Bank
last year, but not from bank-
ing, He actually considers
himself "the bankers
banker."
Wright has retained an
appointment by the American
Bankers Association on its
Membership Council as State
Representative for Florida.
He tells that he enjoys
this position because he has a
lot of banker friends through-
out the state and the appoint-
ment provides a pleasant way
to stay in touch with the
industry and be helpful too.
The ABA was founded in
1875 and is based in
Washington, D.C. It is dedi-
cated to enhancing the finan-
cial role of America's banks
to provide the most efficient
and safest financial services
to you the public.
It's different from the
other national bank trade
associations. The ICBA, or
Independent 'Community
Bankers Association, in that
the ABA represents banks of
all sizes from Wall Street to
Main Street.
The broad membership
base adds strength that helps
the association on issues of
national importance for
financial institutions and
their customers. ABA is con-
sistently ranked as one of the.
most effective lobbying
organizations in Washington
and referred to as America's
Premier National Trade
Association for FDIC Insured
Banks.
Wright's ABA responsi-
bilities are to serve as an
ambassador for the associa-
tion in the state, keep mem-
ber banks (202.1 aware of the
value of membership, and
invite non member banks (75)
and new (de noeo) banks to
become members.
He has an office estab.
lished in the "old library"
downtown. It provides a place
for him to be available to vis-


iting bankers and other
industry related folks that
'drop in. It has the resources
he needs; computer, phone,
security files, storage and a
place to put his "I love me"
stuff. He even has a special
place for his hero, General
Lee. His wife Anna likes it
too because he's out of her
hair, but she can still keep
track of him.
He has electronic access
to the major industry periodi-
cals' that help him to keep
abreast of the financial serv-
ices industry news and track
individual bank performance.
He tries to anticipate which
banks in Florida may need
personal attention from the
ABA and he makes sure that
they get it.
Now do remember.... he
is retired!
"Yes, there are chal-
lenges in today's market
economy," he says, "and yes
more banks may fail but you
need to know that your
money is still safe in the
bank...And here's why he
adds; because customer's
deposits are protected. ,
Congress created the
Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation in 1933 to restore
public confidence in the
nation's banking system and
75 years since, not a penny
has been lost in an insured
bank.
In this time of market tur-
moil, it is worthwhile remem-
bering that only commercial
banks, thrifts and savings
banks carry FDIC insurance.
Look for the FDIC sticker or
symbol.
For more information
call him at 997-5705 on
lgwright39@embarqmail.com.
*We live in the greatest
nation on earth and
America's Banks are the
source of stability and growth,
in our economy.
Your deposits provide liq-
uidity so that banks can make
loans to grow our economy.
Support them w ith your busi-.
ness. They are still the safest
place for your money. You
can Bank on It!!
Before his presentation.
Wright did mention that he
had a gallon of information he
had to cram in a quart
jar...and he was so right.


I MJ ___if

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FREE ESTIMATES INSURANCE WORK WELCOME

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(located behind Langdale Auto Mall)
229-226-2077








Wednesday, September 24, 2008


Monticello News 9A


14, 008 F



a Sun" Show


tRb


Midnight Sun holds.
the distinction as the
first stallion to win the
World Grand Champi-
onship title in Shel-
byville, Tennessee
during the Celebration
in 1945 and again in
1946. Continuing the
'bloodline of his sire,
Wilson's Allen and dam,
.Ramsey's Rena, Mid-
'night Sun's offspring
and succeeding genera-
Stions continue to donti-

Antique


Show

A 044': Sale
:,L4J 'Le.yorself be trans-
ported in time to the 1940's
adql be immersed in the ar-
chitecture and life style of
.ihe f"Old South"A' The man-
sion at Dixie Plantation
'"Its designed by the fore-
most classical architect of
ie twentieth century, John
Russell Pope. Mt: Pope
.,s6 designed, the Jeffer-
son Memorial, the Na-
:iional Archives and The
National Gallery of Art,
all Washington, D.C. land-
i notarks. The plantation
jbeom has over 14,000
:square feet on the ground
- and second floor Servants'
quarters on the third floor
SMid a large basement com-
.pf'.te this hidden,.gem of
4.he south..'The facade is
,ifrmed in'.double height
, iTid columns in the clas-
.i,;Neoclassical architec-
tistal style.
S Upon entering the
doors at the mansion, the
t hme: tour begins with
.high points of interest as
tlYle Guft Room, ,fte Li-
':r6y, 'the Screened Porch,
.ei Loggia, the Living
Room, the Blue Room, the
Trophy Room, the Ladies'
-qPakror, the Dining Room,
ithe .Kitchen, numerous
d Efrooms and the' ser-
-v ts. quarters. All rooms
.iare decorated. with an'
etttes-for sale by various
s:qgality dealers. History
. ffs and antique lovers
-may also enjoy thie lunch-
&eoH with musical overture
i ewtllas the Gala Dinner
'."Dane ..'.hcdler the


nate the walking horse
industry.
The colt foaled June
8, 1940 gave little indi-
cation that this. "ugly
duckling" would be-
come a great champion.
John A. Hendrixson
purchased the black colt
and named him Joe
Lewis Wilson. Charles
Brantley bought half
* interest in the black
.stallion during a visit to
the Hendrixson Farm.


Winston Wiser's first as-
sessment was that Joe
Lewis was too big, awk-
ward and too black.
However, Wiser took the
colt and developed him
from the ugly duckling
to the beautiful black
swan that attracted the
attention of Henry
Davis.
Henry Davis's as-
sessment of Midnight
Sun resulted in Wirt
and Alex Harlin pur-


Ilh ilor\ 4of Ihth lBrouks Counry NIllus-ca, and
Cultural (t'vnter and Spons;rshiip of the
Midnight Sun Charity Hlors Shoi and
IFestival

FciuinleiJ ill 14')3 1dii: Bl1,oLks C',unty Mu,1eulil
A: (';:lnir,til l-ntr i slft'-suppw.rt'ng IC; li.I
nrori .rolt ..,r;:rjini ion to 'rmicd i, create ea Ie o's.,10-
r;' fer h?.,Ni.riial Irti'lactl.. ,Sind asI.L l 'iprO idC v ari-
'ty ot :j'lui;tl c ll-m.:-, ir rhe cOLiiMini.it. In 21 ( l4
thle BOA.utl J I. t i D t .i[ I', II[,hl.1- tl i' L'J-L l -,l.l ] [i :Llt .l i
- l't ,fis rl. ..r.- (A nI r-n,.''lj r funl ;ali'.in i i: ri'., It',
, l ; I..L. Il'Ih .., t:ie "M dltdiiiLit Sun" t l(i, y -I ._,l i.
,"iov n, .n 1 _-9tli'..il .:2 beCLnIJ .I t 1t't hIr:Le i: i-',:
trr.,t V'uorld it -'i'., ( Ti' fll-,, .ieie,-sce Wa' kinl~ iH:: r.:
:'Mid fi S ui". Di.iie Piaintu.cilo. Jca-ei.J ,us.
*-.o0 ,1; l. o r I ;'. : '. o ( S &'; I- t_ ;Li l Ir]h tt',ii l 'i it 1 1 :-.
[ I.1i i P]l.milh.li'O l n:l l, ilelh, it I: i si l tIL- .itni:'iL
a ". ,:,- I c [ ,t -. i'-,v I:, 2 Il .0v,'a hI:.iwi ;: '.d tk.,.-
To:.r-:se:..', ,,'i. :t,.:. [ I.,Ai'-. S:-,: i l it. ll-. 1 .L-
"'13cs N ".'- t" in thre nrt- i.p 1 Sinj.:i; rt-'.; ti l-(;
the lidnlighi SuJin'i" shlow' hat. cluinjued t L, ..'.3'..
v ii :Lr.iiner, .:iiind l hibi'.:.-, lor, n .i :, th.." :'i .t,

I n .. 1-C.'1 01eu
I l | i: i 1 '* ,'i; !;-, i."' l, ; I ._ '.:- t.

*'. h. lh Ir..:l .u ,':. 1..L' l thl! ^''.i ; i. L u,'l ',"
iand f: .lit sii,, t,'u.'.i\n.A iiItLc Show Hiut'c and '.,.U'.;
S mi-l : s L.)lfllfl,1 land iii .ii [s [i i'<;f Sr'i"'h.l Mll -ijL! :;" rJ

(. ultLrs i nt ,, ith i prirti-,n a prf-Lc 14 : go:ii., ii'
lthe Di',i,. [lii ltiOu n [ki i .. 'trd I It" usIte .


chasing the black stal-
lion in 1944 and giving
him a new name. Mid-
night Sun.
History records the
electricity that filled the
air during the 1945-46
Celebrations with Fred
Walker as Midnight
Sun's trainer and rider.
The standard for the
Celebration Champi-
onship was now in
place.
The Harlinsdale


Farm sold Midnight Sun
to Mrs. Eleanor Liv-
ingston and her daugh-
ter Geraldine in 1957.
The Livingstons stipu-
lated that Midnight Sun
remain at Harlinsdale
Farm until his death.
The stallion was buried
at Harlinsdale when he
died in 1965.
Geraldine Liv-
ingston commissioned a
life size statue of Mid-
night Sun and presented


,,lidni ht Sun
rcn lncs, ,\.. i. Horion
World Championt


/945


1946


,M idr Iit. TorI h( ld- (hI dpi iiL:0 itiin as
thl til i ir,.i jiii fi 'i t i t1\div W\urld .rifnd
(. 'ul iiit h il. in sil a h ',li i lT rdli '.uii,
duriltl' n t-t ( LIL lII.a l ,ill II I l4q L i .l .1'2J ill
in I '[ i ('in1it inL i lttN 1 'h,, lI ni.t i'. tf' h-
%rls IFi d.Mj,1? JiJ '/'r,':mr 1111 t in. I m',,rn '.-"

S',.'itiltW 1 Lt r. i l l i i..![iln li l 4.ti (i4 u lli in Ili
!th' ti' iLkni t Iliit '- iinidt i:
ir'i l i,, i[titr 1 i ct,',l i ,.t r ld ( Rli 1 l r
|r.,htii i irtp r .'.r' ,! idllhil *S rn ,in
I97. \ f(ir I1 dc:'th of 'idnimhtn huti in
I16.M I Iraliinn is IIih.5 1 iI llilluII il[jI ,IU i
.1 li t Qi.? '. irc it \liLjl :ll lt[ Jlun Li,' pi'-
innlttl ii iti t 'c ilr thi, [in hi.tr IbirlhI.i iii
1 .72. i ihr 4.rii, .j iJ jiiiil Itrjuin bs ri.,'-
intil h''init ,ii i !i,t U.'lliurttruiiri s, niit 1 L.11'

>it t Ii I LiiiwL L IL, \\ ..ilti' i ii' t L' l 1it CL r LI
i%'ll .1'i, j'r t. L- t1 h I tXItL ri'. i \ ,ins, id' r,


Illi tT 1. tk illit l I d 1 h.i T 1,uril.ili, ll
l 'ir hllLi, .I < ,l i h I ll[n t il.t 1 .li Dl til,
mrn.i'riiti.tiii ; h .ri. c .i h i ri r l) h lihldr l
,l i ,Jf iL'ii .*%r,,! '. tl. i !i iili ',lnt \\ :dilkini.
IIarb hili 1 0'. .JL Li i t.l-t t li"'


it to her mother on her
birthday in 1972. Mid-
night Sun stood at Dixie
Plantation as a magnifi-
cent work of -art to per-
petuate his place in
Tennessee Walking
Horse history as the
greatest sire until July,
2003. He is now on loan
to the Tennessee Walk-
ing Horse-Breeders and
Exhibitors. Association
and stands in their Me-
morial Garden.


AY a, 2-yr


1.i J1 I l I'lt i

4- -.C.t f V - -. "




A C lrta Evtr foudy Spoxnsrd by ,the
Brrs County Mursum & Cahiraei Cea
and de Tmstees omf D De PhanuLw
BmobO CNUmy Mawcum

3 1 !,; i N. C4uppera- Sh
-...i*.' ,Quinan, GA 3...3
-9)263000


CEi-r.,*-tion Dixie P,iar.ta.i on is


ocated of' Cour ty


P'. : 1-i- (to *-.': ..- lI) N,:-: enast of M,:.i it i!e II: 7L.
F r.::- 0 i. r- a -, A ik-a -w ,v 221 Sr L J 1 tr:
iniErsi.: ~ron of Cr:'iri:vy .Rd 1 16.; 'a As-h.:vli'e). htrn
V'; e:: t. .-an1 I r p .: o 8 i mI e s I c .-
r'/sd.:l ri- : S-.-'E H' ~rm .r c 5: I-o', :-id F-e s : .'ia Sigscs







1 OA Monticello News


Wednesday, September 24, 2008


SCHOOL & "PORTS


Vladimir Faustine

Earns BS Degree


Vladimir Faustin, of Monticello,
received his bachelor of science degree
from Kansas State University in its
summer graduation program. .
More than 440 students received
degrees from the University, with more
than 280 bachelor degrees, some 140


masters degrees, and 27 doctoral
degrees were awarded.
Summer 2008 graduates have the
option of participating in K-States's
May 2008 commencement ceremony, or
the Dec. 2008 commencement cere-
monies.


4

"1
~fl


Matt Bishop


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Aucilla Christian,
Academy varsity football
team clobbered Rocky
Bayou Christian, 34-7,
Friday, Sept. 12, to climb to
a 1-1 season.
Quarterback Trent
Roberts completed six of 11
passes for 100 yards and
two touchdowns. Casey
Anderson had six recep-
tions for 100 yards and two
touchdowns.
Matt Bishop was
named-the offensive player
of the week. He had 25 rush-
es for 209 yards and three
touchdowns.
On the defensive side of
the field, Luke Witmer had


ISA


Luke Witmer
eiglit tackles,, Koal Swann
was named defensive play-
er of the week. He had
seven tackles, and
Anderson had one inter-


.bp Morris Petroleum,

:o Inc.
, A.:


WARRIORS \




Koal Swann
ception.
The Warriors will
square off against St.
Francis at 7:30 p.m., Friday,
there in Gainesville.


bp


ji z


HIGH SCHOOL PLAYERS OF THE WEEK


Aucilla Christian


Matt Bishop


34 carries for
273 yards, 5
touchdowns
(unofficial
school records)


DEFENSE
Casey Anderson


Jefferson County H.S.


Coach Rodell
Thomas would not
name offensive and
defensive players of
the week


7 tackles


lince 19390



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ACA Runs Well In


Cougar Challenge


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Aucilla Christian
Academy cross country
teams ran well in the offi-
cial season-opening
Cougar Challenge
Monday, Sept. 15.
"We did really well,"
said Coach Dan Nennstiel.
"It wasn't a really fast
course, but I was very
impressed with the kids
performance. It shows
they were listening by
starting slower and finish-
ing faster.
They ran a very smart
race. We're not in great-,
shape yet, but it is still
early in the season. The
boys didn't finish at the
top, but I'm pleased with
their times. We don't have
a year-round running pro-
gram at Aucilla. We gener-
ally start practices when
school starts and we work
on improvements as the
season progresses.,
"Right now, I'm. not
worried about where we
place," said Nennstiel.
"It's not where.we place at
the beginning of. the sea-
son, but at the end of the
season. We will have
made a lot of improve-
ments by then."
I He added that though
two of the girls did not run
for the Lady Warriors dur-


Monticello News
Staff Writer
Sunday's games
between the New York
Giants and Cleveland
Browns got off to a slow
start for the Giants, who
went one, two, three, on
the first possession and
had to punt the ball to
Cleveland.
The Giants suddenly
jelled and came together.
as a unit, both offensive-
ly- and defensively. In
an eight-minute, 28-sec-
ond span in the first
quarter, Hixon scored
three touchdowns to help
propel the Giants to a 37-
34 defeat of the Cleveland
Browns in Giants
Stadium in a game featur-
ing several big and unusu-
al plays. The Giants led by
27 points in the first half.
"That was a game.in
which many, many things
happened," coach T6m
Coughlin said. "It w.as
kind of a bizarre game.
There were some things
that happened in the first
'half that you don't see
normally. Like a player
scoring three touchdowns
in the first 15 minutes.
Hixon, who has been the
first-team split end since
the beginning of training
camp because of Plaxico
Burress' ankle injury.
caught touchdown passes
of 11 and 24 yards from Eli
Manning, then completed
his memorable evening
with an 82-yard return of
a free kick following a
safety."
But the game turned
on the first play of the
Giants' second series.
when cornerback Eric
Wright made contact with
receiver Sinorice Moss
when the ball was in the
air, drawing a 53-yard
pass interference penalty.
That moved the Giants all
the way to the Browns' 26-
yard line. A six-yard run
by Jacobs and Manning's
nine-yard scramble gave
the Giants a first down at
the 11. Manning threw to


"If Right now, I'm
-I not worried
about where we
place," said
Nennstiel. "It's not
where we place at
the beginning of the
season, but at the
end of the season.
We will have made a
lot of improvements
by then."
-Coach Dan Nennstiel

ing the invitational, how-
ever, two of the girls did
finish in the top 15 run-
ners from 7-8 teams.
Nennstiel said the teams
usually stick around after
the races to seewhere they


- the right back corner of
the end zone, where
Hixon had a step on
Wright. He caught the
pass and got his feet down
for his first touchdown.














increased their lead to -16-
3 on another unusual
play. Cleveland's Dave
Zastudil. tried to unt
from his end zone, butthe
ball caromed. off Browns.
running back Travis
Thomas, who was trying
to block Drougins. The



of bounds for a safety.
But the early onslaught
wasn't finished. Syndric
Steptoe's 90-yard kickoff
return gave the Browns a
first down at the Giants'
nine-yard line as tile first
quarter ended. But on the
second play after the
teams switched sides,
Derek Anderson attempt-
ed a handoff to Jamal
Lewis, who never gained
possession. The ball fell to
the ground, where Butler
fell on It, picked himself
up an d Brd 9 yards
ahead of thscoreld for the
tochown justhat increased
the g nt' lead to rolled ou0-3.
Plenty of time
reainedow afrt' tie Giants

Clovoeland nade thle most
of It, closing to within 30-
17 at halftime, to within
six points early in the


came in as a team, but it
began raining very heavi-
ly so Aucilla departed
before they could find out
where they stood in the
finish.
Running for the Lady
Warriors, Michaela
Roccanti finished 9th with
24:30; Anna Finlayson,
13th with 24:59; Elizabeth
Riley, 25:52; Angela
McCune, 30:47; and
Hannah Haselden, 43:53.
Running for the
Warriors, Sean Snowden,
88th, 23:56; Jay Finlayson,
93rd, 24:18; Russell
Fraleigh, 92nd, 24:11;
Ricky Finlayson, 102nd,
25:03; Carson Nennstiel,
120th; 28:18; Jay Dickey,
128th, 30:29; Kent Jones,
130th, 30:37;
Running unofficially
for the Warriors as team
managers because they
are too young to be on the
team, were, Gatlin
Nennstiel, 4th grade, fin-
ished 95th with 24:23; fifth
grader IanHaselden fin-
ished 119th with 28:17;
fifth grader Sam Hogg
finished 127t" with 29:47;
and Dilyn Stowers, sec-
ond grade, finished 140th
with 34:12.
The next race is the
Lincoln Invitational,
Saturday, Sept. 20, there;
and FSU Invitational,
Saturday, Sept. 27, there.


third quarter -and three
points in the fourth.
The Browns mim-
icked the Giants by scor-
ing twice within 1;26 late
in the second quarter.
Steptoe, a Giants nemesis
all night, took a lateral
and scored on a seven-
yard touchdown run
around right end to
make it 30-10. On the
SGiants' first play on the
next possession not
includingg Michael
atthews' holding
penalty Anthony
right was hit -by
Adams as he threw. to
raphonso Thorpe. The
all was intercepted by
Wright, who returned it
15 yards for a touchdown,
cutting the Giants' half-
time lead to 13 points.
Cleveland retained its
momentum early in the
third quarter, scoring in
just 2:13 on yet another
wacky play. On second-
and-three from the
Giants' 44, Brady Quinn
threw deep down the
right sideline for Steptoe.
Cornerback Kevin
Dockery was right next to
him and picked off the
pass at the 10 briefly.,
Dockery couldn't secure
the ball; Steptoe-batted it
out of his hands, caught it
at the five and stepped
into the end zone. The
Giants' once big lead had
shrunk to 30-24.
But back they came, pro-
pelled by another big play
Ware's 59-yard kickoff
return to the Browns' 41-
yard line. That set up a 10-
play touchdown drive
that included 16 rushing
yards by Bradshaw. the
last a fourth-down dive
over the pile into the end
zone that increased the
Giants' lead to 37-24.
Cornerback Sam
Madison, Jr., was listed
as not playing in the game
due to a sports hernia.
The Giants are slated
to face off against the
Cincinnati Bengals, 1
p.m., Sunday, Sept. 21,
aired on CBS.


,K .' Week 2


7 -


I







Wednesday, September 24, 2008


Monticello News 11A


PORTS


mM ACA Cross Country


.t. Rosters, Schedule
. ..t t .&


Monticello News Photo by Cheltsie Kinsley September 18, 2008
ACA JV Warrior, Tyler Jackson, catches a pass thrown during last week's game
against Brookwood. Jackson finished the game with five tackles and one touchdown.


JV Warriors Climb To 3-0 Season


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Aucilla JV War-
riors hosted Brookwood
Thursday Sept. 18. and
chalked up an impressive
42-8 victory.
Coach Derrick Burrus
provided the wrap up of
the game; Brookwood was
first to score putting eight
points on the board and
Aucilla answered, scoring
in their first drive tying
the game at eight.
The rest of the first
half saw both teams fight
hard without scoring.
"After making some
'adjustments during half-
time.the Aucilla Warriors
rallied to take control of
the game including line-
backer Bradley Holm re-
covering three fumbles,
one for a 45 yd touchdown,
and Holm led the defense
with 12 tackles," reported
Burrus. "Jarrod Turner
had eight tackles; Jared
Jackson had seven tackles
and one fumble recovery;
Nick Roberts and Hans
Sorenson each had six
tackles; and Tyldr Jackson
had five tackles."
Offensively, Holm
rushed for 39 yards and
one touchdown; Sorenson


Monticello News Photo by Cheltsie Kinsley September 18, 2008
ACA JV Warrior Quarterback, Hans Sorenson, keeps
the ball and runs for extra yardage. The JV Warriors now
stand 3-0 In the season.


rushed for a touchdown
and threw touchdown
passes to Holm, Jared
Jackson, and Tyler Jack-
son; Cody Ledford kicked
two extra points; Jay
Dickey recovered a fumble
in the end zone scoring
two points.
"It was a hard fought
and well earned victory.


Hats off to the Brookwood
Warriors for a good
game," said Burrus. "We
will be back to practice
Monday preparing to face
Maclay on their field 6
p.m., Thursday September
25."


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
ACA Cross Country
Coach Dan Nennstiel has
released the rosters and
schedule for the 2008 boy's
and girl's cross country
teams.
In its second year as an
official team with at least
five runners, there are
seven Warriors ,on this
year's team. These include
eighth graders Jay Dickey
and Jay Finlayson, sixth
graders Ricky Finlayson
and Carson Nennstiel,
ninth grader Russell
Fraleigh, tenth grader Kent
Jones, and twelfth grader
Sean Snowden.
Running for the Lady
Warriors are tenth graders
Anna Finlayson Jessica
Hagan, and Elizabeth Riley,
eighth grader Hannah
Haselden, twelfth graders
Angela McCune, Michaela
Roccanti, and Olivia
Sorensen, and ninth grader
Chelsea Snodgrass.
The times for this year's
meets will be announced
and competition began

Got A Cute Photo?

Send It To Us
And We'll Share It
With Our Readers

Kids Dogs
Strange Stuff, Etc.


Monticello News
P.O. Box 428
Monticello, FL 32345

"You Can't Be.
Without It"


when Aucilla takes on the
Cougar Challengers, in Tal-
lahassee, Monday Sept. 15;
the Lincoln Invitational in
Tallahassee, Saturday Sept.
20; and the FSU Invitational
in Tallahassee, Saturday
Sept. 27.
The Westover Invita-
tional in Albany GA, Satur-


day October 4; a mandatory
practice on the beach at St.
George Island, Saturday
Oct. 11, the Panhandle
Championship in Mariana,
Saturday Oct. 25; the City
Championships in Tallahas-
see, Friday Oct. 31; district
November 3-11; regional
Nov 15;.and state Nov. 22.


Attention Youth Ministers -
we invite you to a God honoring event:
man of God / woman of God
VINTr T ETRIEAT 08-09
january 2-4


SPEAKERS M W RELATE TO STIJDETS SPECIAL SESSIONS DESIGNED FOR YOUR GUYS & GELS
AMAZING WORSP LEADERS WITH A M FART TO SEE YOUR SumE1 S D DEEP i TIR FAITH
When: January 2-4, 2009 Friday Sunday Where: Georgia Baptist Conference Center
Norman park, GA http://normanpark.gabaptist.org Cost: $120 early bird registration,
$50 non-refundable deposit Per person due November 1", $140 late registration with $50 non
refundable deposit Per person due November 221d, Final balance is due upon arrival
SImportant: All checks made payable to: Stand and Shout Ministries P.0, Box 180338,
Tallahassee, FL 32318-0028 Please.send church letter head with your contact information.
For More Information Visit Us at* www.standandshoutcom or call Ty Greene at 850-545-3118


Jefferson Varsity Football Roster


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
With the season
opener in gridiron action
set against FAMU, 7:30
p.m., Friday, Sept. 8, here,
Head Football Coach
Rodell Thomas, released
the roster for the 2008 sea-
son.
There are 33 Tigers on
the team this year, they in-
clude; Terrel Oliver (1),
wide- receiver/safety;
Kendrick Huggins (2), run-
ning back; Alphonso Foot-
man (4), quarterback;
Garrett Roberts (5), wide
receiver/center back;
Arenz Ammons (6), offen-
sive line back/tight end;
Telvin Norton (7), offen-
sive line back/running
back; Curtis Hightower (9),
wide receiver/safety; and
Shelderrick Duhart (10);
wide receiver/center back.
Also, David Crumitie
(11), wide receiver/center
back; Kelvin Mutch (12),
wide receiver; Tray John-
son (13), line back/tight
end; Antonio Robinson
(14), offensive line
back/wide receiver; Devon
Winston (15), position un-
determined; Chris Mays
(20), wide receiver; Keyron


Bellamy (21), full
back/line back; Joseph
Williams (24), line
back/running back; and
Dondray Hopkins (26),
wide receiver/center
back.
Also, Jarvis Allen (32),
safety; Johnny Gallon (33),
line back/full back; An-
thony McDaniel (33), line
back; Kyle Zelker (34), line
back; Leroy Montgomery
(50), offensive lineman;
Shayne Broxie (51), offen-
sive line/defensive line;
Kendell Grant (52), offen-
sive line/defensive line;
Destin Philpot (54), offen-
sive line/defensive line;
and Breyon Crumity (55),
line back/offensive line-
man.
Also, Brandon Whit-
field (56), offensive
line/defensive line back;
Marquis Brown (63), de-
fensive lineman; Denzel
Whitfield (72), offensive
lineman; Nick Parker (78),
offensive lineman;
Roshaundrick Jones (81),
wide receiver; and Andy
Barakat (no jersey num-
ber assigned), offensive
line/defensive line; and
Kevin Wade (no jersey as-
signed), running back
and center back.


Capital City Bank is here for you.
The financial industry is rapidly changing, yet the Capital City Bank way of doing business
remains the same. Despite the current economic environment, we operate from a position
of strength and in the best interests of our clients. We take this responsibility very
seriously. You can trust your Capital City bankers to make decisions that are right for you
and for our community. Our doors are and will be- open for you. www.ccbg.com


flCapital City
at: -


Member FDIC


u7 BanK
More than your bank. Your banker.






12A* *Monticello News


F


Wednesday, September 24, 2008


-a---' '~*


al b


ur


tat


1. ACA vs. Nlunroe

Steve Walker
Realty, LLC
250 S. Jefferson St.
Nlonticello
S\\ \.SteveW\alkerRealty.com
1 997-4061 A


W%-I
ski 1a



could be the big


IT'S EASY! Just pick the winners of this
week's games featured in each ad and send us your
entry!
Each week, the entry with the most correct
picks (and the closest to the game score in the tie
breaker) will wv in a $20.00 check from Monticello
News or 2 tickets to Wild Adventures Theme Park.
The Second Place and the Third Place winners will
receive 2 movie passes each from Monticello News.


nnerl


6. Miami vs. North Carolina
Morrow Insurance Agency
380 S. Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL
(850) 997-3912


2. JCNIMHS vs. Branford


Jefferson Health Dept


Tobacco Free )
Jefferson -


I 5/WT
Hg*


342-0170
Florida Department of Health Tobacco
6b, Prevention Program _A


3.1 NMU HS is. Cotton j ale

atki ton'%t
brug *tore


997-3553
166 East Dogwood
Monticello


' 4. Wake Forest vs. Navy
Caminez,Brown & Hardee,
BMiKHI'ffRM


P.A.


cr,'-nal inui N ', rr.:.agr.il L
b.- 997-8181


5. FSU vs. Colorado


"- o rE,[HEVROLET
29-226-3901 206 Moultrie Rood
Thomasville. GA


Official Football Mania Rules


* One entry per person All entries must be on an official entry
blank. No photocopies accepted
* Entries must be complete\ filled out, legible and dropped
off at MAlimit clto Neis. 1215 N. Jefferson St.. Monticello. no
later than 5 pm on Friday or mailed to P.O. Box 42s. Monti-
cello, Florida 32345: postmarked by Fnday. *
* Judges decisions are final.
* Winners kill be announced each \Vednesday in the Monti-
Ct llo es1 ..
* Employees of the newspaper and their family members are
not eligible for the Football Mania contest
* Must be ten i li \ears old. or older to play.
* In the FSU vs Colorado, write down "hat you
think the final score \\ill be. This \\ ill be used to break a tie,
if needed

This Week's Winners

t.R.ooseveltpones ,

2Mabe Kyler
.- .f. .



.Artie Smi_1th' :

SPkrizescan bepickei uyii

1215 N. JefferionS*.<>
Monticello, Florida 323 444
r-.-------------------------------------t--

Official Entry Form
Name:
Address:
City:
State: ___ZIP:____
Phone:
Fill in the name of the team you think will win.
1 I.
...I IMnicioNe s :;:;,v,


19.
I
L -----------------
1_ _ _ _ _ _ _


7. Florida Gators vs. Ole Miss

,u-rwnonnrr snEinwr-s

DOMESTIC & IMPORTS
1''i N iEFFERtSON ST MONTICELLI.- FL 3 ,4-1
Fax: 850-997-1550
David McCune. Owner A


8. Duke vs. Virginia
SORENSEN TIRE CENTER
From Wheelbarrow to 1 8-Wheeler
We've got your tIree!
1300 N. Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL


9. Dixie Co HS vs. Williston


Bird Le;nback & Sparkman
Attorneys at Law
165 E Dogwood St. Monticello, FL


997-3503


10. John Paul II %s. Graceville


KELLER
WILLIAMS


' Call todaN 850-997-1691
MNarkRV'i- k".com
v \ .Adi ancedReSales.com
You Name t He'll Find It.
Weadv to Sl It. It's So i


jI
I
I
--------I...


..: .. - = v : ^ 5: ..


.i ootball picking



teams win, ou
",,* o .:. v-:.j
,. N .. "*>.


9


-----------------------------------


yA->


,0),


V,








Wednesday, September 24, 2008


Monticello News 13A


IFor Ret I


Apartments for Rent at
Pond. 1 BR/BA & 2 BR
Call 997-5007.


PRIME Downtown OFFICE Space -
Cherry Street Commons.
750 Sq. Ft. $540. Month.
500 Sq. Ft. $460. Month.
Call Katrina Walton/Coldwell Banker/
Kelly & Kelly Properties at 510-9512
8/31,tfn,c
Downtown Monticello Spacious
Newly Renovated 2/1 Furnished
and unfurnished apartments short
term or long term. With A/C,
Laundry, & Parking. Also have
office spaces for rent.
Call 850-284-7685.
7/23, tfn, c.
New 1BR Mobiles, furnished and
unfurnished. Adult Park, No pets.
$600-$650 a month includes elec-
tric. Deposit Required. 850-997-
1638. No calls before 9 am or after 9
pm.
7/30,tfn,c.
JEFFERSON PLACE APTS
1468 S. Waukeenah St. Office 300,
Monticello. 1 BR ($417) & 2BR
($455). HUD vouchers accepted,
subsidy available at times. 850-997-
6964. Handicap units open. TTY711
Equal housing opportunity.
8/6,tfn,c.
870 Sq Ft Office/Retail space on
busy N. Jefferson St. $500 A
month includes utilities. Call 997-
3666.
8/8,tfn,c.
Doublewide MH- 3br/2bth on 5
private, wooded acres $600 per
month. 850-363-5368.
9/17,19,24,26,pd.


lM ii~^


Lay-A-Way now for
5Occ SCOOTERS and 4
L.RS "TJST SCOOTERS
RT 2-1 NORTH, GREI
ASK FOR BOB 850-24
850-948-2788.


Coopers North Carolina Mountain Home
AIBA on 1 acre near Blue Ridge Mtns.
7/2,tfnc. Special $150,000. Call 997-1582
7/2,tfnc. 7/2,tfn,nc


Gravesites- (6) 4x10 lots for sale,.
up front, at Oakfield Cemetery. Re-
duced price, below cost. Call Earl
Parnell at 997-1557.
8/22,9/26,pd.



JACKSON'S DRUG STORE -
Have you been taken off your hor-
mone replacement? See our new
menopausal products. 997-3553
5/12,tfn,c
BACKHOE SERVICE:
Driveways, roads, ditches, tree and
shrub removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116, 933-
3458. 7/4tfn,c
MR. STUMP
STUMP GRINDING
509-8530 Quick Responses.
6/22, tfn,c

TRACTOR WORK
ROTARY FLAIL- BUSH
HOGGING Starting at
$37.50/Hr.
All Types of Tractor Work.
850-567-6715
11/16, tfn,c
I BUILD SHEDS, DECKS
Exterior Carpentry work
Call Bob 850-242-9342.
Sheds as low as $650.00.
8/6,tfn,c.
PRESSURE CLEANING/
SOFT WASHING:
Homes, Businesses, Sidewalks,
Driveways, Decks; Lic./Ins. Since
1977. Free estimates 997-4100, or
www.danburch.us
8/27, tfn,c.


Christmas
WHEEL-


S" Do you have a child attending Fla
ENVILLE, high/ Famu High and car pooling,is
Q2-9342 or NOT working? For an affordable fee
call Mr. Freeman Davis @ (850)
5/23,tfn,c. 510-5162 or (850) 421-8060.


F- 350 1990 Ford truck, flat bed,
Dual wheel w/ removeable side rails.,
Good Farm Truck in Good Condi-
tion. $ 4,200, call 997-1582.
8/29, tfn, nc.
89' F-150 Ford Green Pickup
Runs fine, power locks and win-.
dows, new paint job. $1,800. '
Call 727-415-4428 ask for Hunter.
9/17/tfn,nc.



^^E1^


GOATS & PIGS- $35.00 each or
will trade for hay rolls and feed.
997-0901 Leave message
7/2,tfn,nc




WANT TO PURCHASE HAY:
Small round bails "Quality Horse
Hay" 25 bails delivered in Lloyd
area, 222-6550.
9/19,24,26,10/1,pd.


850-997-4340
www.Tim Peary.com
Sellin- Real Estate Since 1972
Experience.can help!


One Acre Clark Rd $25.000)


New Listing 5 acres on Nash Road
wooded $8,500 per acre
Waukeenah 14 aacr ,9.S0:iac
Great Buy! 1 bedroom 1 bath home on
4+ acres screened front porch, covered
deck in back $89,500
Spacous near US 27 3 hm.pool, 2
oulbuilding l5 ac i3 25,0x)
In Town Treasure 2 bedroom 1 bath
beautiful floors $129,900
Thompson Valley Rd 2 horne 7.33 ac
mosd, cleared $175,000
Huge Price Reduction from
$165,QQQ03/2 mobile home 1.56 ac, big
bam, green hse $85,000
Murmuring Creek 5 2 acre,. septic
, Link 695W
Priced to Sell! 5 hillside acres in Aucilla
Shores $50,000
Mixed Use Property I.12re.
4 hu-sesiac allome ia$36,5t)' ac
Very Pretty 5 lovely acres on paved road
$15,500 per acre
D 1all 3.5 ac.' lened/ 2car gdrage/ pol/'
Mue--t bse. shop. pasture/ 10) pecans
365.000
Prime Commercial Property near
Pizza Hut 6.5 acs $650,000
Waukeenah Highway 27.99ac
pasture, fenced. pond $545.01)
Timberland 156 ac some pines divided
by Hwy $2,000/ac
RENTALS AVAILABLE


9/17,24,26,10/1,pd.






TABLE/FLOOR LAMPS- 2, Dark
Pine w/ beige shades, $25 each. Call
.251-1641
tfn, nc.
Electric Home Meat Grinder-
Like new asking $100 Call 251-
1641.
4/18/08 tfn n/c.


Well Pressure Tank new, used 2
months, $75 (Monticello) 407-810-
0708.
9/19,24,pd.
TWO single Craftmatic Beds w/
message, like new. $900 for both .
call 997-1658.
S. 9/17 tfn,c.
Mobile Home 2000 Single 14 x 56
new carpet vinyl, central air/heat
must be moved. Call 997-1204/294-
5831.
9/24-10/17,pd.
2006 Kabota Tractor, B2630
4 WD, 35 hp, 325 hrs. Front end
loader with bolt on forks, bush hog,
box blade. $ 11,900, call 850-342-
8004.
9/17,24,pd.
Clothing for the professional office,
brand names, gently worn. Sizes 8-
10, shoe size 7-8, $ 10.00 each 997-
8767.
9/24, 26, pd.


American Chestnuts, locally
grown, Extra LG. size $3.00 lb, LG.,
$2.25 lb. Call Fred at 997-5887.
9/24,26,10/1,3,pd.



Spiritual Advisor

Psychic Readings
by Tina Rose
Looking for answers to
life's difficult questions?
Concerning love, marriage,
business? Need guidance
and direction? If so, call
now for your brighter to-
morrow, today! Miss Tina
Rose guaranteesall guid-
ance and work. You won't
be disappointed.
850-544-9818
Tarot Card Readings
Psychic Readings
Astrology
Lucky Numbers


SHL

BRYNWOOD CENTER

Open Positions

Part-Time Dietary Assistant
Full-Time Marketing & Admissions Liaison
Part-Time Activity Assistant
Full-Time CNA's for 11-7 Shift

Apply in person: 1656 S. Jefferson St., Monticello
or call at 850-997-1800.
Fax resume to 850-997-7269.


IIELP WANTED FULL-TIME
Full-time position for South TFhomas County family home:
EXPERIENCED COQK iINCLL DE5 SOME HOL SEKEEPI.VGI
E\cellent pay and benefits. including health, dental and life
insurance. housing or housing allowance.


~~~1
~~eO-\ ~

~ I4$~


Send to:
Housekeeper
P.O. Box 7476.
Thomas\ ille. GA 31758


N\rNJ F
L, I'F' i rj(. rJb O 't i ; ,,-P FL jPI'L,'
C I-i'.sr!.- I.:.. 3y I t rr I ':tr -' y


The key to advertising success







1-866-742-1373

www.florida-classifieds.com


Legals










Jeffeiri-n Cc:unt\ Courthouse Arne\

lel ri Courn i.s ,conidJeiing appl, ing to the Florida Depjrimeni
of Cominiunit\ .Arffa' iDCAi loi a F) _1S Small Cites Conmmuniti De-
Sclopment Block Granri ICDBG i of up to 7iiri.i.1101



INF THE CIRCUIT COLIRT FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY.
FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION


IN RE: ESTATEOF
ALEXANDER MORRIS. JR
Decem-,d


File No. 08-27-PR


NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The jadmmintrajuin of the estate ,:t ALEXANDER MORRIS, JR..
deceased., u hioe dite oI death -v. a Octuber 25. 2006. is pending in the;
Circuit Court fli Jeller'on Count.. Flh.rida. Pri.bate DIIsion. the ad,.ires
oI %. which i% One C..'ur'thouse Circle. Jelfeison Counts Courthou-e. Room
10. MNinticell,. FI.rida The names and addresses ot the personal repre-
'.eritaiie and the personal representative e's attorney aire set forth belok.
I creditors .iof rhe decedent and other person, ha\ ing claims or de- -
nands against decedent*% estate on lhoni a cop. ot this notice is required
to be served must tile their claims %ith this court \\ ITHIN THE- LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
' OF THIS NOTICE OR 30l DA S AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF
A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM
All other r crediitois ot the decedent and othei persons hating claims
:r demands against decedent '- estate must file their claims !ith this court
\\WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA- :
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET:!
FORTH IN SECTION -3i3 "02- OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE ,
\\ILL BE FORE\ ER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH;
ABOVE. ANY CLAIM FILED TWO 121 YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED
The date o! lirsi publication ,.,f thi notice is September I 7.2l008


- Attorney for Personal Representai\e'-
Harold NI Knou les
Knoiu les & Randolph. P.A.
Florida Bar Nu -14354
3005 Highland Oaks Terrace
Taillahasee. Florida 32301
Telephone" i.S .ii -3'. h.
Far i, S)i 5 R61-11397 t

Antorney for Peronal Representatie


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S,_" r.',-' ,.:. ,..:.r, .. r ,, ,: t VisiUacksonville corn/showdown




Local Man Prevails In Scuffle

With Hoodlums
BEXAR COUNTY- Tom W., after using Thera-Gesic&
on a sore left shoulder, encountered two hoods break-
ing into a car in a parking lot. He whacked one of them
upside the head and ran them off. When asked why he
took the risk, he painlessly replied:
"None of your dang business!" i, /


Personal Representai\e'
Vera Morris
33S0 Fred George Road, #-403
Tallahassee. Florida 32301





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14A Monticell6o ews


t "t


Wednesday, September 2.1, 2008


LEGALS



PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS

TO BE VOTED ON NOVEMBER 4, 2008

NOTICE OF ELECTION.


I, Kurt S. Browning, Secretary of State of the State of Florida, do
hereby give notice that an election will be held in each county in
Florida, on November 4, 2008, for the ratification or rejection of
proposed amendments to the Constitution of the State of Florida.

No. 1
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE I, SECTION 2
(Legislative)

Ballot Title:
DECLARATION OF RIGHTS

Ballot Summary:
Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution to delete
provisions authorizing the. Legislature to regulate or prohibit the
ownership, inheritance, disposition, and possession of real property
by aliens ineligible for citizenship.

Full Text:

ARTICLE I
DECLARATION OF RIGHTS

SECTION 2. Basic rights.--All natural persons, female and male
alike, are equal before the law and have inalienable rights, among
which are the right to enjoy and defend life and liberty, to pursue
happiness, to be rewarded for industry, and to acquire, possess and
protect property;-except 4hat-the-ownership-, inheritancedisposition
and-possession-of-real property-,byaliens-ineligible-for-eitizenship
may-be-regulatedr--prohibited by la No person shall be
deprived of any right because of race, religion, national origin, or
physical disability.

No. 2
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE I, NEW SECTION
(Initiative Petition)

Ballot Title:
FLORIDA MARRIAGE PROTECTION AMENDMENT


Ballot Summary:
This amendment protects marriage as the legal union of only one
man and one woman as husband and wife, and provides that no
other legal union that is treated as marriage or the .substantial
equivalent thereof shall be valid or recognized.


Financial Inipact Statement:
The direct financial impact this amendment will have on state and
local government revenues and expenditures cannot be determined,
but is expected to be minor.

Full Text:

ARTICLE I,NEW SECTION
DECLARATION OF RIGHTS

Inasmuch as marriage is the legal union of only one man and one
woman as husband and wife, no other legal union that is treated as
marriage or -the substantial equivalent thereof shall be valid or
recognized.

No. 3
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTIONS 3 AND 4
ARTICLE XH, NEW SECTION
(Taxation and Budget Reform Commission)

Ballot Title:
CHANGES AND IMPROVEMENTS NOT AFFECTING THE
ASSESSED VALUE OF RESIDENTIAL REAL PROPERTY .

Ballot Summary:
Authorizes the Legislature, by general law, to prohibit
consideration of changes or improvements to residential real
property which increase resistance to wind damage and installation
of renewable energy source devices as factors in assessing the
property's value for ad valorem taxation purposes. Effective upon
adoption, repeals the existing renewable energy source device
exemption no longer in effect.

Full Text:

ARTICLE VII
FINANCE AND TAXATION

SECTION 3. Taxes; exemptions.--
(a) All property owned by a municipality and used
exclusively by it for municipal or public purposes shall be exempt
from taxation. 'A municipality, owning property outside the
municipality, may be required by general law to make payment to
the taxing unit in which the property is located. Such portions of
property as are used predominantly for educational, literary,
scientific, religioAs or charitable purposes may be exempted by
general law from taxation.
(b) There shall be exempt from taxation, cumulatively, to
every head of a family residing in this state, household goods and
personal effects to the value fixed by general law, not less than one
thousand dollars, and to every widow or widower or person who is
blind or totally and permanently disabled, property to the value
fixed by general law not less than five hundred dollars.
(c) Any county or municipality may, for the purpose of
its respective tax levy and subject to the provisions of this
subsection and general law, grant community and economic
development ad valorem tax exemptions to new businesses and
expansions of existing businesses, as defined by general law. Such
an exemption may be granted only by ordinance 6of' the county or
municipality, and only after the electors of the county or
municipality voting on such question in a referendum authorize the
county or municipality to adopt such ordinances. An exemption so
granted shall apply to improvements to real property made by or
for the use of a new business and improvements to real property
related to the expansion of an existing business and shall also apply
to tangible personal property of such new business and tangible
personal property related to the expansion of an existing business.
The amount or limits of the amount of such exemption shall be
specified by general law. The period of time for which such
exemption may be granted to a new business or expansion of an
existing business shall be determined by general law. The authority
to grant such exemption shall expire ten years from the date of
approval by the electors of the county or municipality, and may be
renewable by referendum as provided by general law.
(d) By-general--law -and- subject-4o conditions-specified
therein, there may- be granted an -ad-valorem-tax-exemption to-a
renewable-energy-source device-and-to-realproperty on which-such


device is-installed-and-operated,_to-the-value fixed by-generalaw
not. to. exceed.the-original cost-ofthe-deviceandjforthe-periodLof
time fixed by generaLlaw not to.exceedLten-years.


(d)(e-) Any county or municipality may, for the purpose
of its respective tax levy and subject to the provisions of this
subsection and general law, grant historic preservation ad valorem
tax exemptions to owners of historic properties. This exemption
may be granted only by ordinance of the county or municipality.
The amount or limits of the amount of this exemption and the
requirements for eligible properties must be specified by general
law. The period of time for which this exemption may be granted
to a property owner shall be determined by general law.
(e)(f) By general law and subject to conditions specified
therein, twenty-five thousand dollars of the assessed value of.
property subject to tangible personal property tax shall be exempt
from ad valorem taxation.
SECTION 4. Taxation; assessments.--By general law
regulations shall be prescribed which shall secure a just valuation
of all property for ad valorem taxation, provided:
(a) Agricultural land, land producing high water recharge,
to Florida's aquifers, or land used exclusively for noncommercia!L
recreational purposes may be classified 'by general law and
assessed solely on the basis of character or use.
(b) Pursuant to general law tangible personal property
held for sale as stock in trade and livestock may be valued for
taxation at a specified percentage o0 its value, may be classified for
tax purposes, or may be exempted from taxation.
(c) All persons entitled to a homestead exemption under
Section 6 of this Article shall have their homestead assessed at just
value as of January 1 of the year following the effective date of this
amendment. This assessment shall change only as provided in this
subsection herein.
(1) Assessments subject to this subsection provision shall
be changed annually on January 1st of each year; but those changes
in assessments shall not exceed the lower of the following:
a. Three percent (3%) of the assessment for the prior
year.


b. The percent change in the Consumer Price Index for
all urban consumers, U.S. City Average, all items 1967=100, or
successor reports for. the preceding calendar year as initially
reported by the United States Department of Labor, Bureau of
Labor Statistics.
(2) No assessment shall exceed just value.
(3) After any change of ownership, as provided by
general law, homestead property shall be assessed at just value as
of January 1 of the following year, unless the provisions of
paragraph (8) apply. Thereafter, the homestead shall be assessed as
provided in this subsection herein-
(4) New homestead property shall be assessed at just
value as of January .1st of the year following the establishment of
the homestead, unless the provisions of paragraph (8) apply. That
assessment shall only change as provided in this subsection herein.
(5) Changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to
homestead property shall be assessed as provided for by general
law; provided, however, after the adjustment for any change,
addition, reduction, or improvement, the property shall be assessed
as.provided in this subsection herein.
(6) In the, event of a termination of homestead status, the
property shall be assessed as provided by general law.
(7), The provisions of this amendment are severable. If'
any of. the .provisions.- of; this: amendment shall.;,: be,,:-h ld7
unconstitutional by any court of competent jurisdiction, the
decision of such court shall not affect or impair any remaining
provisions of this amendment.
(8)a. 'A person who establishes a new homestead as of
January 1, 2009, or January 1 of any subsequent year and who has
received a homestead exemption pursuant to Section 6 of this
Article as of January 1 of either of the two years immediately -
preceding the establishment of the new homestead is entitled to
have the new homestead assessed at less than just value. If this
revision is approved in January of 2008, a person who establishes a
new homestead as of January 1, 2008, is entitled to have the new
homestead assessed at less than just value only if that person
received a homestead exemption on January 1, 2007. The assessed
value of the newly established homestead shall be determined as
follows:.
1. If the just value of the new homestead is greater than
or equal to the just value of the prior homestead as of January 1 of
the year in which the prior homestead was abandoned, the assessed
value' of the new homestead shall be the just value of the new
homestead minus an amount equal to the lesser of $500,000 or the
difference between the just value and the assessed value of the
prior homestead as of January. 1 of the year in which the prior
homestead was abandoned. Thereafter, the homestead shall be
assessed as provided in this subsection herein.
2. If the just value of the new homestead is less than the
just value of the prior homestead as of January 1 of the year in
which the prior homestead was abandoned, the assessed value.pof
the new homestead shall be equal to the just value of the new
homestead divided by the just value of the prior homestead apnd
multiplied by the assessed value of the prior homestead. However,-,
if the difference between the just value of the new homestead and
the assessed value of the new homestead calculated pursuant to this
sub-subparagraph is greater than $500,000, the assessed value of
the new homestead shall be increased so that the difference
between the just value and the assessed value equals $500,000.
Thereafter, the. homestead shall be assessed as provided in this
subsection herein. ,-
b. By general law and subject to conditions specified ,
therein, the Legislature shall provide for application of this,
paragraph to property owned by more than one person.
(d) The legislature. may, by general law, for assessment
purposes. and subject to the provisions of this subsection, allow
counties and municipalities to authorize by ordinance that historic
property may be assessed solely on the basis of character or use.
Such character or use assessment shall apply only to the.
jurisdiction adopting the ordinance. The requirements for eligible
properties must be specified by general law.
(e) A county may, in the manner prescribed by general
law, provide for a reduction in the assessed value'of homestead
property to the extent of any increase in the assessed value of that
property which results from the construction or reconstruction of
the property for the purpose of providing living quarters for one or
more natural or adoptive grandparents or parents of the owner of
the property or of the owner's spouse if at least 'one of the
grandparents or parents for whom the living quarters are provided
is 62 years of age or older. Such a reduction may not exceed the
lesser of the following:
(1) The, increase in assessed value resulting from
construction or reconstruction of the property.
(2) Twenty percent of the total assessed value of the
property as improved.
(f) For all levies other than school district levies,
assessments of residential real property, as defined by general law,
which contains nine units or fewer and which is not subject to the
assessment limitations set forth in subsections (a) through (c) shall
change only as provided in this subsection.
(1) Assessments subject to this subsection shall be
changed annually on the date of .assessment provided by law; but
those changes in assessments shall not exceed ten percent (10%) of
the assessment for the prior year.
(2) No assessment shall exceed just value.
(3) After a change of ownership or control, as defined by
general law, including any change' of ownership of. a legal entity


that owns the property, such property shall be- assessed at just value
as of the next assessment date. Thereafter, such property shall be
assessed as provided in this subsection.
(4) Changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to
such property shall be assessed as provided for by general law;
however, after the adjustment for any change, addition, reduction,
or improvement, the property shall be assessed as provided in this
subsection.
(g) For all levies other than school district levies,
assessments of real property that is not subject to the. assessment
limitations set forth in subsections (a) through (c) and (f) shall
change only as provided in this subsection.
(1) Assessments subject to this subsection shall be
changed annually on the date of assessment provided by law; but
those changes in assessments shall not exceed ten percent (10%) of
the assessment for the prior year.
(2) No assessment shall exceed just value.
(3) The legislature must provide that such property shall
be assessed at just value as of the next assessment date after a
qualifying improvement, as defined by general law, is made to
such property. Thereafter, such property shall be assessed as
provided in this subsection.
(4) The legislature may provide that such property shall
be assessed at just value as. of the next assessment date after a
change of ownership or control, as defined by general law,
including any change of ownership of the legal entity that owns the
property. Thereafter, such property shall be assessed as provided in
this subsection.
(5) Changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to
such property shall be assessed as provided for by general law;
however, after the adjustment for any change, addition, reduction,
or improvement, the property shall be assessed as provided in this
subsection.
S (h) The legislature, by general law and subject to
conditions specified therein, may prohibit the consideration of the
following in the determination of the assessed value of real*


property used for residential purposes:
(1) Any change or improvement made for the purpose of
improving the property's resistance to wind damage.
(2) The installation of a renewable energy source device.

ARTICLE XH
SCHEDULE

Limitation on the assessed value of real property used for
residential purposes.
(a) The repeal of the renewable energy source property
tax exemption in Section 3 of Article VII shall take effect upon
approval by the voters.
(b) The amendment to Section 4 of Article VII
authorizing the legislature to prohibit an increase in the assessed
value of real property used for residential purposes as -the result of
improving the property's resistance to wind damage or installing a
renewable energy source device shall take effect January .1, 2009.


No. 4
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTIONS 3 AND 4 '
ARTICLE XII, SECTION 28
.(Taxation and Budget Reform Commission).


Ballot Title:
PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION OF PERPETUALLY
CONSERVED LAND; CLASSIFICATION AND ASSESSMENT
OF LAND USED FOR CONSERVATION


Ballot Summary:
Requires Legislature to provide a property tax exemption for real
property encumbered by perpetual conservation easements or other
perpetual conservation protections, defined by -general law.
Requires Legislature to provide for classification and assessment
of land used for conservation purposes, and not perpetually
encumbered, solely on the basis of character or use. Subjects
assessment benefit to conditions, limitations, and reasonable
definitions established by general law. Applies to property taxes
beginning in 2010.

Full Text:

ARTICLE VH
FINANCE AND TAXATION

SECTION 3. Taxes; exemptions.--
(a) All property owned by a municipality and used
exclusively by it for municipal or public purposes shall be exempt
from taxation. A municipality, owning property outside the
municipality, may be required by general law to make payment to
the taxing unit in which the property is located. Such portions, of
property as are used predominantly for educational, literary,
scientific, religious or charitable purposes may be exempted by
general law from taxation.
(b) There shall be exempt from taxation, cumulatively, to
every head of a family residing in this state, household goods and
personal effects to the value fixed by general law, not less than one
thousand dollars, and to every widow or widower or person who is
blind or totally and permanently disabled, property to the value
fixed by general laW not less than five hundred dollars.
(c) Any county or municipality may, for the purpose of
its respective tax levy and subject to the provisions of this
subsection and general law, grant community and economic
development ad valorem tax exemptions to. new businesses and
expansions of existing businesses, as defined by general law. Such
an exemption may be granted only by ordinance of the county or
municipality, 'and only after the electors of the county or
municipality voting on such question in a referendum authorize the
county or municipality to adopt such ordinances. An exemption so
granted shall apply to improvements to real property made by or
for the use of a new business and improvements to real property
related to the expansion of an existing business and shall also apply
to tangible personal property of such new business and tangible
personal property related to the expansion of an existing business.
The amount or limits of the amount of such exemption shall be
specified by general law. The period of time for which such
exemption may be granted to a new business or expansion of an
existing business shall be determined by general law. The authority
to grant such exemption shall expire ten years from the date of
approval by the electors of the county or municipality, and may be
renewable by referendum as provided by general law.
(d) By general law and subject to conditions specified
therein, there may be granted an ad valorem tax exemption to a
renewable energy source device and to real property on which such
device is installed and operated, to the value fixed by general law
not to exceed the original cost of the device, and for the period of
time fixed by general law not to exceed ten years.
(e) Any county or municipality may, for the purpose of
its respective tax levy and subject to the provisions of this
subsection and general law, grant historic preservation ad valorem
tax exemptions to owners of historic properties. This exemption
may be granted only by ordinance of the county or municipality.
Please See Legals Page 15A






+
15A Monticello News
Cont. From Page 14

The amount or limits of the amount of this exemption and the
requirements for eligible properties must be specified .by general
law. The period of time for which this exemption may be granted
to a property owner shall be determined by general law.
(f) By general law and subject to conditions specified
therein, twenty-five thousand dollars of the assessed value of
property subject to tangible personal property tax shall be exempt
from ad valorem taxation.
(g) There shall be granted an ad valorem tax exemption
for real property dedicated in perpetuity for conservation purposes.
including real property encumbered by perpetual conservation
easements or by other perpetual conservation protections, as
defined by general law.
SECTION 4. Taxation; assessments.--By general law
regulations shall be prescribed which shall secure a just valuation
of all property for ad valorem taxation, provided:
(a) Agricultural land, land producing high water recharge
to Florida's aquifers, or land used exclusively for noncommercial
recreational purposes may be classified by general law and
assessed solely on the basis of character or use.
(b) As provided by general law and subject to conditions,
limitations, and reasonable definitions specified therein, land used
for conservation purposes shall be classified by general law and
assessed solely on the basis of character or use.
(c)(b) Pursuant to general law tangible personal property
held for sale as stock in trade and livestock. may be valued for
taxation at a specified percentage of its value, may be classified for
tax purposes, or may be exempted from taxation.
(d)(c) All persons entitled to a homestead exemption
under Section 6 of this Article shall have their homestead assessed
at just value as of January 1 of the year following the effective date
of this amendment. This assessment shall change only as provided
herein.
(1) Assessments subject to this provision shall be
changed annually on January 1st of each year; but those changes in
assessments shall not exceed the lower of the following:
a. Three percent (3%) of the assessment. for the prior
year.
b. The percent change in the Consumer Price Index for all
urban consumers, U.S. City Average, all items 1967=100, or
successor reports for the preceding calendar year as initially
reported by the United States Department of Labor, Bureau of
Labor Statistics.
(2) No assessment shall exceed just value.
(3) After any change of ownership, as provided by
general law, homestead property shall be assessed at just value as
of January 1 of the following year, unless the provisions of
paragraph (8) apply. Thereafter, the homestead shall be assessed as
provided herein.
(4) New homestead property shall be assessed at just
value as of January 1st of the year following the establishment of
the homestead, unless the provisions of paragraph (8) apply. That
assessment shallonly change as provided herein.
(5) Changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to
homestead property shall be assessed as provided for by general
law; provided, however, after the adjustment for any change,
addition, reduction, or improvement, the property shall be assessed
as provided herein.
(6) In the event of a termination of homestead status, the
property shall be assessed as provided by general law.
(7) The provisions of this amendment are severable., If
any of the provisions of this ,amendment shall be held
unconstitutional by any court of competent jurisdiction,. the
decision Of such court shall not affect or impair any remaining
provisions of this amendment.
(8)a. A person who establishes a new homestead as of
January 1, 2009, or January 1 of any subsequent year and who has
received a homestead exemption pursuant to Section 6 of this
Article as of January 1 of either of the two years immediately
preceding the establishment of the new homestead is entitled to
have the new homestead assessed at less than just value. If this
revision is appro% ed in January,of20Q08,a person ho establishes a
new homestead as of January 1, 2008, is entitled to have the new
homestead assessed at less than just value only if that person
received a homestead exemption on January 1, 2007. The assessed
value of the newly established homestead shall be determined as
follows:
1. If the just value of the new homestead is greater than or
equal to the just.value of the prior homestead as of January 1 of the
year in which the prior homestead was abandoned, the assessed
value of the new homestead shall be the just value of the new
homestead. minus an amount equal to the lesser of $500,000 or the
difference between the just value and the assessed value of the
prior homestead as of January 1 of the year in which the prior
homestead was abandoned. Thereafter, 'the homestead shall be
assessed as provided herein.
2. If the just value of the new homestead is less than the
just value of the prior homestead as of January 1 of the year in
which the prior homestead was abandoned, the assessed value of
the new homestead shall be equal to the just value of the new
homestead divided by the just value of the prior homestead and
multiplied by the assessed value of the prior homestead. However,
if the difference between the just value of the new homestead and
the assessed value of the new homestead calculated pursuant to this
sub-subparagraph is greater than $500,000, the assessed value of
the new homestead shall be increased so that the difference

between the just value and the assessed value equals $500,000.
Thereafter, the homestead shall be assessed as provided herein.
b. By general law and subject to conditions specified
therein, the Legislature shall provide for application of this
paragraph to property owned by more than one person.
{e)(-d) The legislature may, by general law, for assessment
purposes and subject to the provisions counties and municipalities to authorize by ordinance that historic
property may be assessed solely on the basis of character or use.
Such character or use assessment shall apply only to 'the
jurisdiction adopting the ordinance. The requirements for eligible
properties must be specified by general law.
(fl)(e) A county may, in the manner prescribed by general
law, provide for a reduction in the assessed value of homestead
property to the extent of any increase in the assessed value of that
property which results from the construction or reconstruction of
the property for the purpose of providing living quarters for one or
more natural or adoptive grandparents or parents of the owner of
the property or of the owner's spouse if at least one of the
grandparents or parents for whom the living quarters are prove'
is 62 years of age or older. Such a reduction may not excc me
lesser of the following:
(1) The increase in assessed value resulting from
construction or reconstruction of the property.
(2) Twenty percent of the total assessed value of the
property as improved.


(g)(f) For all levies other than school district levies,
assessments of residential real property, as defined by general.law,
which contains nine units or fewer and which is not subject to the
assessment limitations set forth in subsections (a) through (dR(e)
shall change only as provided in this subsection.
(1) Assessments subject to this subsection shall be
changed annually on the date of assessment provided by law; but
those changes in assessments shall not exceed ten percent (10%) of
the assessment for the prior year.
(2) No assessment shall exceed just value.
(3) After a change of ownership or control, as defined by
general law, including any change of ownership of a legal entity
that owns the property, such property shall be assessed at just value
as of the next assessment date. Thereafter, such property shall be
assessed as provided in this subsection.
(4) Changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to
such property shall be assessed as provided for by general law;
however, after the adjustment for any change, addition, reduction,
or improvement, the property shall be assessed as provided in this
subsection.
(h)(g) For all levies other than school district levies,
assessments of real property that is not subject to the assessment
limitations set forth in subsections (a) through (d)(c-) and (g)(f)
+


shall change only as provided in this subsection.
(1) Assessments subject to this subsection shall be
changed annually on the date of assessment provided by law;
but those changes in assessments shall not exceed ten percent
(10%) of the assessment for the prior year.
(2) No assessment shall exceed just value.
(3) The legislature must provide that such property
shall be assessed at just value as of the next assessment date
after a qualifying improvement, as defined by general law, is
made to such property. Thereafter, such property shall be
assessed as provided in this subsection.
(4) The legislature may provide that such property
shall be assessed at just value as of the next assessment date
after a change of ownership or control, as defined by general
law, including any change of ownership of the legal entity that
owns the property. Thereafter, such property shall be assessed
as provided in this subsection.
(5) Changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to
such property shall be assessed as provided for by general law;
however, after the adjustment for any change, addition,
reduction, or improvement, the property shall be assessed as
provided in this subsection.

ARTICLE XII
SCHEDULE

SECTION 28. Property tax exemption and
-classification and assessment of land used for conservation
purposes. The amendment to Section 3 of Article VII requiring
the creation of an ad valorem tax exemption for real property
dedicated in perpetuity for conservation purposes, and the
amendment to Section 4 of Article VII requiring land used for
conservation purposes to be classified by general law and
assessed solely on the basis of character or us6 for purposes of
ad 'valorem taxation, shall take effect upon approval by the
electors and shall be implemented by January 1, 2010. This
section shall take effect upon approval of the electors.


No. 6
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 4
ARTICLE XII, NEW SECTION
(Taxation and Budget Reform Commission)

Ballot Title:
ASSESSMENT OF WORKING WATERFRONT PROPERTY
BASED UPON CURRENT USE


Ballot Summary:
Provides for assessment based upon use of land used
predominantly for commercial fishing purposes; land used for
vessel launches into waters that are navigable and accessible to
the public; marinas and drystacks that are open, to the public;
and water-dependent marine manufacturing facilities,
commercial fishing facilities, and marine vessel construction
and repair facilities and their support activities, subject to
conditions, limitations, and reasonable definitions specified by
general law.

Full Text:

ARTICLE VII
FINANCE AND TAXATION

SECTION 4. Taxation; assessments.--By general law
regulations shall be prescribed which shall secure a just
valuation of all property for ad valorem taxation, provided:
(a) Agricultural land, land producing high water.
recharge to Florida's aquifers, or land used exclusively for
noncommercial recreational purposes may be classified by
general law and assessed solely on the basis of character or use.
(b) Pursuant to general law tangible personal property
held for sale as stock in' trade and livestock may be'valued for
taxation at a specified percentage of its value, may be classified
for tax purposes, or may be exempted from taxation.
(c) All persons entitled to a homestead exemption
under Section 6 of this Article shall have- their homestead
assessed at just value as of January 1 of the year following the
effective date of this amendment. This assessment shall change
only as provided herein.
(1) Assessments subject to this provision shall be
changed annually on January 1st of each year; but those changes
in assessments shall not exceed the lower of the following:
a. Three percent (3%) of the assessment for the prior
year.
b. The percent change in the Consumer Price Index for
all urban consumers, U.S. City Average, all items 1967=100, or
successor reports for the preceding calendar year as initially
reported by the United States Department of Labor, Bureau of
Labor Statistics.
(2) No assessment shall exceed just value.
(3) After any change of ownership, as provided by
general law, homestead property shall be assessed at just value
as of January 1 of the following year, unless the provisions of
paragraph (8) apply. Thereafter, the homestead shall be assessed
as provided herein.
(4) New homestead property shall be assessed at just
value as of January 1st of the year following the establishment
of the homestead, unless the provisions of paragraph (8) apply.
That assessment shall only change as provided herein.
(5) Changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to
homestead property shall be assessed as provided for by general
law; provided, however, after the adjustment for any change,
addition, reduction, or improvement, the property shall be
assessed as provided herein.
(6) In the event of a termination of homestead status,
the property shall be assessed as provided by general law.
(7) The provisions of this amendment are severable. If
any of the provisions of this amendment shall be held
unconstitutional by any court of competent jurisdiction, the
decision of such court shall not affect or impair any remaining
provisions of this amendment.
(8)a. A person who establishes a new homestead as of
January 1, 2009, or January 1 of any subsequent year and who
has received a homestead exemption pursuant to Section 6 of
is Article as of January 1 of either of the two years
immediately preceding the establishment of the new homestead
is entitled to have the new homestead assessed at less than just
value. If this revision is approved in January of 2008, a person
who establishes a new homestead as of January 1, 2008, is
entitled to have the new homestead assessed at less than just
value only if that person received a homestead exemption on
January 1, 2007. The assessed value of the newly established
homestead shall be determined as follows:
1. If the just value of the new homestead is greater


than or equal to the just value of the prior homestead as of
January 1 of the year in which the prior homestead was
abandoned, the assessed value of the new homestead shall be
the just value of the new homestead minus an amount equal to
the lesser of $500,000 or the difference between the just value
and the assessed value of the prior homestead as of January 1 of
the year in which the prior homestead was abandoned.
Thereafter, the homestead shall be assessed as provided herein.
2. If the just value of the new homestead is less than
the just value of the prior homestead as of January 1 of the year
in which the prior homestead was abandoned, the assessed value
of the new homestead shall be equal to the just value of the-new
homestead divided by the just value of the prior homestead and
multiplied by the assessed value of the prior homestead.
However, if the difference between the just value of the new
homestead and the assessed value of the new homestead
calculated pursuant to this sub-subparagraph is greater than
$500,000, the assessed value of the new homestead shall be
increased so that the difference between the just value and the
assessed value equals $500,000. Thereafter, the homestead shall
be assessed as provided herein.


Wednesday, September 24, 2008
b. By general law and subject to conditions specified
therein, the Legislature shall provide for application of this
paragraph to property owned by more than one person.
(d) The legislature may, by general law, for assessment
purposes and subject to the provisions of this subsection, allow
counties and municipalities to authorize by ordinance that
historic property may be assessed solely on the basis of character
or use. Such character or use assessment shall apply only to the
jurisdiction adopting the ordinance. The requirements for
eligible properties must be specified by general law.
(e) A county may, in the manner prescribed by general
law, provide for a reduction in the assessed value of homestead
property to the extent of any increase in the assessed value of
that property which results from the construction or
reconstruction of the property for the purpose of providing living
quarters for one or more natural or adoptive grandparents or
parents of the owner of the property or of the owner's spouse if
at least one of the grandparents or parents for whom the living
quarters are provided is 62 years 'of age or older. Such a
reduction may not exceed the lesser of the following:
(1) The increase in assessed value resulting from
construction or reconstruction of the property.
(2) Twenty percent of the total assessed value of the
property as improved.
(f) For all levies other than school district levies,
assessments of residential real property, as defined by general
law, which contains nine units or fewer and which is not subject
to the assessment limitations set forth in subsections (a) through
(c) shall change only as provided in this subsection.
(1) Assessments subject to this subsection shall be
changed annually on the date of assessment provided by law; but
those changes in assessments shall not exceed ten percent (10%)
of the assessment for the prior year.
r (2) No assessment shall exceed just value.
(3) After a change of ownership or control, as defined
by general law, including any change of ownership of a legal
entity that owns the property, such property shall be assessed at
just value as of the next assessment date. Thereafter, such
property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection.
(4) Changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to
such property shall be assessed as provided for by general law;
however, after ..the adjustment for any change, addition,
reduction, or improvement, the property shall be assessed as
provided in this subsection.
(g) For all levies other than school district levies,
assessments of real property that is not subject to the assessment
limitations set forth in subsections (a) through (c) and (f) shall
change only as provided in this subsection.
(1) Assessments subject to this subsection shall be
changed annually on the date of assessment provided by law; but
those changes in assessments shall not exceed ten percent (10%)
of the assessment for the prior year.
(2) No assessment shall exceed just value.
(3) The legislature must provide that such property
shall be assessed at just value' as of the next assessment date
after a qualifying improvement, as defined by general law, is
made to such property. Thereafter, such property shall be
assessed as provided in this subsection.
(4) The legislature may provide that such property shall
be assessed at just value as of the next assessment date after a
change. of ownership or control, as defined by general law,
including any change of ownership of the legal entity that owns
the property. Thereafter, such property shall be assessed as
provided in this subsection.
.(5) Changes', additions, reductions, or improvements to
such property shall be assessed as provided for by general law;
however, after the adjustment for any change, addition,
reduction, or improvement, the property shall be assessed as
provided in this subsection.
(h)(1) The assessment of the following working
waterfront properties shall be based upon the current use of the
property:
a. Land used predominantly for commercial fishing'.
purposes.
b. Land that is 'aceessiible t the public and used for
vessel launches into waters that are navigable.
c. Marinas and drystacks that are open to the public.
d. Water-dependent marine manufacturing facilities,'
commercial fishing -facilities, and marine vessel construction'
and repair facilities and their support activities.
(2) The assessment benefit provided by this subsection
is subject to conditions and limitations and reasonable
definitions as specified by the legislature by general law.

ARTICLE XII
SCHEDULE

Assessment of working waterfront property.--The
amendment to Section 4 of Article VII providing for -the
assessment of working waterfront property based on current use,
and this section, shall take effect upon approval by the electors
and shall first apply to assessments for fax years beginning
January 1, 2010.


No. 8
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT
/ ARTICLE VII, SECTION 9
(Taxation and Budget Reform Commission)

Ballot Title:
LOCAL OPTION COMMUNITY COLLEGE FUNDING.


Ballot Summary:
Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution to require that
the Legislature authorize counties to levy a local option sales tax
to supplement community college funding; requiring voter
approval to levy the tax; providing that approved taxes will
sunset after 5 years and may be reauthorized by the voters.

Full Text:

ARTICLE VII
FINANCE AND TAXATION
SECTION 9. Local taxes.--
(a) Counties, school districts, and municipalities shall,
and special districts may, be authorized by law to levy ad
valorem taxes and may be authorized by general law to levy
other taxes, for their respective purposes, except ad valorem
taxes on intangible personal property and taxes prohibited by
this constitution.
(b) Ad valorem taxes, exclusive of taxes levied for the
payment of bonds and taxes levied for periods not longer than
two.years when authorized by vote of the electors who are the
owners of freeholds therein not wholly exempt from taxation,
shall not be levied in excess of the following villages upon the


assessed value of real estate and tangible personal ptop|.lO\: for
all county purposes, ten mills; for all municipal purposes, ten
mills; for all school purposes, ten mills; for water management
purposes for the northwest portion of the state lying west of the
line between ranges two and three east, 0.05 mill; for water
management purposes for the remaining portions of the state, 1.0
mill; and for all other special districts a millage authorized by
law approved by vote of the electors who are owners of
freeholds therein not wholly exempt from taxation. A county
furnishing municipal servicesmay, to the extent authorized by
law, levy additional taxes within the limits fixed for municipal
purposes.
(c) Counties served by an open-access public institution
whose primary mission and responsibility includes providing
lower level undergraduate instruction and awarding associate
degrees shall be authorized by law to levy a local option sales
tax to supplement the funding of the institution. The tax may not
be levied unless approved by the electors of each county served
by the institution. The local Option tax shall sunset after five
years and may be reauthorized by the electors as provided by
law. ,







16A* Monticello News


Wednesday, September 24, 2008


National


2ee4.


9
if


'4


Local veterinarian, Jody Spencer, reports that a recent
survey indicates that 40% of America's dog population is
overweight. If you or your veterinarian feels that your pet
would benefit from a reduction in body weight, this discus-
sion should help you to understand how to help overweight
dogs lose weight.
Very simply put, if your pet is overweight it is taking in
(eating) more calories than it needs. Set all exercise aside, ex-
cessive weight in an otherwise healthy pet is a direct result of
consuming unnecessary amounts of food.
If your pet is overweight it should be examined for heart,
thyroid or other metabolic disorders. A detailed history
should be taken with emphasis on frequency of exercise,
amount and type of food being provided and other parame-
ters relative to calorie requirements.
To begin, let us set the record straight on some common
misconceptions regarding obesity Healthy dogs do not need
to eat every day; the pet food industry has painted this picture
for us 6If the "eager eater". The impression is that a happy
healthy pet will eat every meal with gusto.
Do not try to entice yotir pet to eat if it isn't interested.* if
you provide a good quality food with a liberal amount of
water, your pet will eat when it wants and do better than hav-
ing to eat when you want.
Another common myth maintains that spaying or neu-
tering causes obesity This is absolutely false. Any pet,
neutered or not, will gain weight if it is over fed relative to its
energy requirements. The surgical procedure may slightly
Slow the pet's metabolism, as will normal aging, and it will
then burn calories off more slowly; therefore, it may require
$ss food. Keep in mind, the surgery doesn't cause the weight
#ain, eating too much does and you have control over that.
Let us explore four typical settings veterinarians en-
counter when presented with a pet that is overweight. See if
any of these sounds familiar. The quotes are the usual re-
sponses pet owners give veterinarians when they politely sug-
gest, "Perhaps your pet should loose a little weight."
Type 1: The "Nibbler" "But doctor, she hardly eats a
thing." The veterinarian's first thought is that whatever she
is eating, it is too much! This pet probably has food out for it
all day and nibbles a little at a time. When dinnertime comes
and the pet picks at the leftovers, it will take the choicest
morsels, leave the rest, and still not appear to haveeaten very
much. However over a 24-hour period the "Nibblers" calorie
intake is excessive and it gains weight.
Type 2: The "Beggar" "But doctor, this rascal won't
keep quiet unless she gets her treats. And she won't go to sleep
at night until she gets her little dish of ice cream." What has
happened, here is that the pet has discovered that the more
noise and fussing it produces the more likely it is to be re-
warded for this behavior. The owner finally "gives in" to keep
the pet quiet and the pet sees the food as a reward. In effect,
the owner is training the "Beggar" by rewarding its behavior.
It turns into a fun game but the pet's health may suffer if obe-
sity is the result.
Type 3: THE "Good Dog" "But doctor, she's such a good
dog that we don't want her to go hungry" This dog became
overweight because the owner's signal of. affection for their
pet has focused on feeding. (Usually each family member se-
cretly offers treats to the pet, and doesn't know that the other
family members are doing the exact same thing! It is an un-
derstandable trait but unfortunately for the pet it can be a case
of too much of a good thing. The owners' method of showing
affection should be more directed toward physical activity
than feeding. Think, "Fetch" not "Food".
Type 4: The "Gourmet Dog" "But doctor, she just re-
fuses to eat dog food." In this case, the pet has trained its own-


--A
".


.1 *-


ers to feed it such things as chicken, liver, ice cream, cookies,
etc. Although most table scraps are just fine to feed. (Stay.
away from bones of any kind!) This pet has been given 'a
choice of what it wants to eat and has chosen certain people
food. If a child is given a choice it would probably choose cake
or candy over vegetables, and its health would suffer. This
"Gourmet Dog" usually overeats because it isn't getting a
proper balance of nutrition, plus everything tastes so good
there is a reward factor in eating. The solution is, you choose,
not your pet!
What To Do About An Overweight Dog
(Be sure your veterinarian evaluates Thyroid Gland func-
tion in any overweight dog or cat. Hypothyroidism is a very
common instigator of excess weight in pets and this needs to
be corrected or your attempts to reduce your pet's weight will
probably fail. So even if your veterinarian says/thinks your
dog doesn't "look like a hyperthyroid case," request to blood
test for hyperthyroidism anyway. ,The veterinarians have
been fooled enough to make it a standard practice for every
overweight dog they are working with.)
First of all remember that research has shown that',min
general, a healthy dog can abstain from food for five davys1e ".
fore any noticeable health effects occur. They generally don't
have to eat every day
(Very small breeds are an exception, but unless there's re-
ally some medical problem present, missing a day of eating
isn't a major catastrophe.) Always be sure fresh water is avail-
able. So start out by feeding a very high quality complete afid
balanced dog food. Look on the ingredients list. I leat sholild
be the first ingredient listed, not corn. You may also want to
supplement with a vitamin/mineral/fatty acid product. Be
careful about over supplementing too! .
Now record an accurate pre-diet weight. Reduce by one
third your pet's total daily ration previously given. Include
in this total, all treats, snacks, or leftovers if you insist on
continuing to provide these. Reweigh your pet in two weeks.
(Remember if your pet begs for food, that's a good sign! But
don't give in. Read again if you have to about Type 2.)
If you find upon weighing your pet after two weeks that
it has lost even a little weight, you're on the right track; keep


Z.'a".1


up this 'schedule! If no weight loss is evident, again reduce
'by one third the amount being fed. Weigh the pet again in
two weeks. Depending upon the results either keep feeding
this amibunt or reduce again by one-third the total amount
being fed.
If you persist, a good outcome is certain. Many veteri-
narians believe you should not feed the "Reduced Calorie"
or "Lite Diet" or "Senior Diet." These diets have very re-
stricted fat levels to reduce the calories but by necessity have
increased the carbohydrate percentages. This increased car-
bohydrate stimulates additional Insulin secretion, which
tells the body to store unused calories for fat.
There are a multitude of overweight dogs that have ac-
tually gained weight on those "Reduced Calorie" weight loss
diets. Your dog needs a meat-based diet, high in protein
(which isn't stored as fat) and fat and low in carbohydrate.
Now, you have to adjust the quantity being fed to achieve a
state where the dog takes in fewer totals calories than it is
using for the day's energy requirements.
It is also very important to get everyone's cooperation in
restrict in g the pet's intake. There is usually someone in the
household who feels sorry for,the dieting pet and surrepti-
tiously provides "just a little" something extra. More help-
ful it would be for the person to take the pet for a walk or run
to burn off a few calories.
Keep in mind most overweight pets have a slow meqtabo-
l ism. They simply don't burn off those calories very fast and
in fact don't generally have "Eager eater" appetites. Because
of this slow metabolism, though, they don't require :very
much, so "just a little extra" will make a big difference 6ver
a period of time.
Remember, high quality, meat-based. food, control the
amount fed, provide more exercise, and be persistent. Help
your pet live a longer, leaner and more enjoyable, life. Many
types of dermatological problems are avoided if, the dog or
cat is consuming an optimum diet.
In some cases, adding a supplement such as DermCaps,
a popular Omega Fatty Acid supplement with a number of
beneficial ingredients, is the key factor in avoiding repeat
episodes of Hot Spots and other skin afflictions.


.


z







Wednesday, September 24, 2008



National


Motiticello News


* 17A


| Substances Dangerous To Dogs


D09916 humor.,

The AKC now recognizes the following breeds: l o
Collie + Lhasa Apso = Collapso, a dog that folds up easily for
transporting.
Spitz + Chow Chow = Spitzchow, a dog that throws up a lot.
Pointer ,Setter = Poinsetter, a traditional Christmas pet.
Great Pyrenees + Dachshund = a Pyradachs, a puzzling
ao Ph breed. s e
Pekingese + Lhasa Apso = Peekaso, an abstract dog.
Irish water Setter + English Springer Setter = Irish Springer,
a dog fresh and clean as a whistle.
Labrador Retriever + Curly Coated Retriever = Lab Coat Re- 60,
triever, the choice of research scientists. W
Newfoundland + Bassett Hound = Newfound Asset Hound, a
R' dog for financial advisors. *00
Terrier + Bulldog = Terrible, a dog that makes awful mis- .
takes. p d
Bloodhound + Labrador = Blabador, not a popular dog with
SCIA agents.
Malamute + Pointer = Moot Point; owned by.. .oh, well, it
doesn't matter anyway .
Collie + Malamute = Commute, a dog that travels to work. *O
Deerhound + Terrier = Derriere, a dog that's true to the end. WNW
Cr Cj-


Many residents share
foods they enjoy with their
dogs, unaware of any po-
tential danger that may lie
within. Local Veterinarian
Mike Purvis warns that
some foods humans eat,
are dangerous to dogs.
Some examples are: choco-
late (Theo bromine poison-
ing), onions, grapes and
raisins, some types of gum,
certain sweeteners and
Macadamia nuts.
It is currently believed
that the only dangerous
substance in chocolate is
cocoa, meaning that forms
of chocolate without this
ingredient, such as white
chocolate may become re-
evaluated for their safety in
the future.
The acute dangers from
grapes and raisins has been
uncovered only since about
2000, and made public
slowly since then. At pres-
ent the cause is not known.
Whatever the reason, since
only small quantities are
necessary to induce acute
renal failure, dogs should
not be fed grapes or raisins,
and sultanas or currants.
Cooked bones should
never be given to .dogs, as
heat changes the chemical,
and physical properties so


they can not be chewed
properly, splintering, into
jagged shards, and resisting
digestion.
Human medications
should not be given to a dog
as a substitute for their reg-
ular medication as some
can be especially toxic, es-
pecially Tylenol. Alcoholic
beverages.pose much of the
same hazards to dogs as
they do to humans.
Dogs may also find
some poisons attractive, in-
cluding antifreeze, snail
bait, slug bait, and rodent
poisons. Antifreeze may be
one of the most insidious of
poisons to dogs because of
its' sweet taste and because
a dog may walk upon or lie
down upon a spill and then
lick it off his body
Dogs must be kept strictly
away from antifreeze and
not allowed access to any-
place that has had a spill or
if it has not been com-
pletely removed.
Plants such as cala-
dium, dieffenbachia and
philodendron will cause
throat irritations and will
burn the throat going down
as well as coming up. Hops
are particularly dangerous
and even small quantities
can lead to malignant hy-


pothermia.
Amaryllis, daffodil,
English ivy, and tulip (espe-
cially the bulbs) cause gas-
tric irritation and
sometimes central nervous
system excitement followed
by coma, and, in severe
cases, even death.
Ingesting foxglove, lily
of the valley, larkspur and
oleander can be life threat-
ening because the cardio-
vascular system is affected.
Equally life threatening is
the yew, which affects the
nervous system. If any of
these or for safety's sake,
other plants are ingested,
get the dog to the veterinar-
ian immediately.
Many household clean-
ers such as ammonia,
bleach disinfectants, drain
cleaners, soaps, detergents
and other cleaners, moth-
balls and matches are dan-
gerous to dogs, as are
cosmetics such as deodor-
ants, hair coloring, nail pol-
ish or remover, home
permanent lotion, and sun-
tan lotion.
Zinc toxicity, mostly in
the form of the ingestion of
US pennies minted after
1982, is commonly fatal in
dogs where it causes a se-
vere hemolytic anemia.


Z~A~~hL


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18A Monticello News


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Wednesday, September 24, 2008


Monticello News 19A


OUTDOORS


Pasture Seminars Continue Thursday


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Jefferson-Leon pas-
ture seminars will continue
at the Leon County Exten-
sion Office 7 pm. on Thurs-
day, Sept. 25.
Dr. Steve Fisch of AVS
Equine Medical & Surgical
Hospital is guest speaker. His
presentation will help par-
ticipants to make better de-
cisions about their horses'
health.


Les Harrison and Jed
Dillard will discuss Barn
Pests and Poisonous Plants.
If you have suspicious
plants, bring them or a photo
of them to the seminar. Har-
rison will be talking about
rodents and insects.
Your participation in
these,programs is appreci-
ated, as is your feedback to
select the topics. The feed-
back from the county survey
has also been useful in un-
derstanding the industry If


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you have a survey and
haven't completed it, send it
in. If you don't have a survey,
contact Dillard at 342-0187
and he'll get one to you.
These programs are
meant to be an opportunity
for all folks in the equine in-
dustry to learn and build a
connected community If the
topics don't appeal to you,
show up just to visit with
other folks. Then voice what
you want to learn about. As
Woody Allen said, "The
world is run by the people
who show up."
If there are upcoming
events, concerns or accom-
plishments, let Dillard know.
You may be the first in the
Jefferson County commu-
nity to face an issue we all
need to know about, so speak
up. Lots of good things are
happening in the county and
spreading the word will give
the industry and community
the recognition it deserves.
For instance: Congratu-
lations to Landrie Folsom,
Sarah Randell, Cavallo
Farms, and Linda Fohl. .
Folsom and Randell, who
train at Cavallo Farms, ad-
vanced to the Marshall and
Sterling national finals in
Saugerties, NY. Folsom fin-
ished Grand Champion of
the Children's Hunter divi-
sion, Grand Reserve Cham,-
,pion over the entire field of
hunters, and third place in
the Hudson Equitation
Class. Randell rode "Final
Design" owned by Linda
Fohl to a very fast fifth place
finish out of. a field of 47.




ne to






I FORD FUSION


LIGHTNING... NATURE'S FIREWORKS


Lightning occurs with
all thunderstorms, and
Florida has been called the
Lightning Capital. The
American Red Cross ex-
plains that lightning occurs
when the action of rising
and descending air within a
thunderstorm separates
positive and negative
charges.
Lightning results from
the buildup and discharge
of electrical energy be-
tween positively and nega-
tively charged areas. Other
facts about lightning 'in-,
clude:
*The average flash of
lightning could light a 100-
watt bulb for more than
three months.
*Most lightning occurs
within the cloud or between
the cloud and ground.
*The air near a light-
ning strike is heated to
50,000 degrees, hotter than
the surface of the sun! The
rapid heating and cooling
of air near the lightning
channel 'causes a shock
wave that. results in thun-
der.
*To estimate the, dis-
tance in miles between you
and the lightning flash,
count the 'seconds between
the lightning and thunder
and divide by five.


*Most lightning deaths
and injuries occur when
people are.caught outdoors.
Most caSualties occur in the
summer months and during
the afternoon and early
evening.
*Your chances of being
struck by lightning are esti-
mated to be 1 in 600,000.
*In recent years, people
have been killed by light-
ning when boating, swim-
ming, golfing, bike riding,
standing under a tree, rid-
ing on a lawnmower, talking
on the telephone, loading a
truck, playing soccer, fish-'
ing in a boat, and even
mountain climbing.
Lightning myths and
facts... '
*Myth: If it is not rain-
ing, then there is no danger
from lightning.
... act: Lightning often
strikes' outside of heavy
rain and may occur as far
as ten miles away from any
rainfall.
*Myth: The rubber
soles of ..shoes or rubber
tires on a car will protect
you from being struck by
lightning.
*Fact: Rubber-soled
shoes and rubber tires pro-
vide no protection from
lightning. However, the
steel frame of a hard-


topped vehicle provides in-
creased protection if you
are not touching the metal.
Although you may be in-
jured if lightning strikes
your car, you are much
safer inside a vehicle than
outside.
*Myth: People who are
struck by lightning carry
an electrical charge and
should not be touched.
*Fact: Lightning-struck,
victims carry no electrical
charge and should be at-
tended to immediately
Contact your local Ameri-
can Red Cross Chapter for
information on CPR and
first aid classes.
*Myth:"Heat lightning"
occurs after very hot sum-
mer days and poses no
threat.
*Fact: What is referred
to as "Heat lightning" is aci
tually lightning from a
thunderstorm too far away
for thunder to be heard.
However, the storm may be
moving in your direction!
For additional informa-
tion on preparing for disas-
ter or to become a Disaster
Resistant Neighborhood
contact the Capital Area
Chapter of the American
Red Cross in Tallahassee at
878-6080 or visit the web site
at www.cacarc.org.


MSRP............................... 17,905
Discount ...............................-1,409
Ford Factory Rebate............. -1,000
Ford Credit Bonus Cash......... 500
Langdale PrIce$ 4,996


MSRP.......... ............ 22,510
Discount ............... ............ 2,018
Ford Factory Rebate..............-2,,500
Ford Credit Bonus.Cash...... 1,000
Langdale Price1 6,992


2008 FORD F-150 REG CAB 2008 FORD F-150 SUPER CAB


MSRP...................... ..... 20,780 MSRP ............................... 25,055
Discount.....................-.... 1,296 Discount......................... -1,582
Ford Factory Rebate............. 3.00I) Ford Factory Rebate..........,. 3, 1b11
Ford Credit Bonus Cash....... :. .011 Ford Credit Bonus Cash....... 1 .11ll1
,1 984 Aged Inv. Bonus Cash.......... _'.11
,Langdale Price- 16,973

FORD CREDIT BONUS CASH
Requires Ford Motor Credit Financing...


229-333-2300

t -20www.langdaleford.com
c '~ ^Downtown Valdosta
1-"1963-200 76
4769390 y


Daily Dove Hunt Permits Go


Or
Daily dove hunt per-
mits go on sale at 10 a.m.
EDT Sept. 18 for special-op-
portunity dove fields
throughout the state, the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) announced on Sept.
3.
Worksheets are avail-
able from FWC regional of-
fices and at
MyFWC.com/hunting
under "Special-Opportu-
nity Worksheets." Sports-
men may apply for these
permits at www.wildlifeli-
cense.com, by calling 1-888-
'HUNT-FLORIDA (486-8356),
at county tax collectors' of-
fices or license, agents.
The cost for the permit
is $35, which entitles one
adult and one youth (under
age 16) to hunt together, but
allows only ,one daily bag
limit of birds to be har-
vested between them.
Permits are available
for the following special-op-
portunity public dove
fields: Allapattah Flats
(Martin County 25 daily-
use permits), Brown Farm
(Holmes County 12 daily-
use permits), Caravelle
Ranch (Putnam County -40
. daily-use permits), Combs
SFarm (Baker County 10
daily-use permits), Frog
Pond (Dade County 37
daily-use permits), Fussell
Farm (Polk County 12


1Sale Sept.
daily-use permits), and
North Newberry (Alachua
County 17 daily-use per-
mits).
Sportsmen also have
the option of buying a $10
Youth Permit at the same
time they purchase a Dove
Hunt Permit. This entitles
the youth (under age 16),
while hunting under the
supervision of the adult
permit holder, to harvest
his own daily bag limit of
birds.
"These special-oppor-
tunity dove fields are
planted and managed by
the FWC and offer great
hunting opportunities in a


18
friendly, social atmosphere
that provides the perfect
setting for friends and fam-
ily, including youngsters,
to hunt together," said
'Kurt Hodges, FWC small-
game biologist.
Beginning Oct. 5, up-to-
date information on field
conditions and bird num-
bers will be available by
visiting the Dove Hunter's
Hotline at
MyFWC.com/special/dove.
For more information
on how you and your fam-
ily can get involved in
these unique special-op-
portunity dove hunts, visit
MyFWC.com/special/dove.


FP""P-








20A Monticello News


Wednesday, September 24, 2008


.. i 5 VM


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107


ll-y):-cllrril 11-1- 11OP W -11111 1 -M(N IP [[I--
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TRACTOR SEIMM"

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Glenn Hocip-es Sr.
Tallahassee, FL
LICH CNIC 1249486



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