Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00216
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello, Fla
Publication Date: July 23, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00216
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text



















140th Year No. 30 Wednesday, July 23, 2008 50# 4s4 + 44


Landowner 8



Ask To Draw



59 Ialn


IIIIMll];llllrmF


Budget Issues/Cutbacks

Addressed During Mooting


County Fire Departments Use Ultra High Frequency


Forum Focuses On: Offices: Of -Tax

Collector, School Superintendent


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello Newts
Senior Staff Writer
County officials'
Chicken Littl4 predic-
tions about the sky-
falling effects of the
.expected revenue
losses due to Amend-
ment One now appear
may have been a' tad
ove~r estimated.
It seems that the
latest calculations put
the actual loss at
$111,000, not the
$850,000 to $1 million


that officials had been
predicting for months.
A July 16 memo to cont-
missioners from coor-
diniator assistant John
MIcHugh tells the story
"I am pleased to in-
form you that David
Ward, county property
appraiser, has certified
the county's taxable
value for the 2008/2000
fiscal year," M~cHugh
reported. "Last year 's
gross taxable value was
$601,554,534, this year's
gross taxable value wiill


be $588,143,641, a differ-
ence of $13,410,893."
Bottom line, at the
current milage rate of
8.32 mills, the net loss
to the county would be
$111,579, an amount
that McHugh aq~knowl-
edged "is significantly
less than what we have
been preparing for."
It's also possible
that if the state gives
the county the $100,000
or so that it has indi-
cated it would do to off-
set the revenue losses


caused by Amendment
One, the county will
end up breaking even
in the end.
Even so, Commis-
sion Chairman Felix
"Ske'et" Joyner was al-
ready predicting that
state revenues would
be down 25 to 30 per-
cent next year because
of declining gasoline
tax revenues.
Officials attributed
the unexpected bonus
to a seven percent
growth rate last year


that
the y
said
would
likely
pot be
r e-
peated
for the John MlcHugh
c~om Jefferson Co.
i~n g Coordinator
yea r.Asalatant
Th e3 y--
merntioned also that the
unexpected $13,410,893
Please See
Tax Page 3A


NFCC Fall Schedule
: of Classes. Register
Now! Classes start
August 25.
See TIoday's Insert .
Dining Out
Guide
Page 8A


Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer .
An unexpectedly con-
troversy erupted Tues-
day night, July 15, in the
second of the Chamber
of Commerce sponsored
candidates' forums, rel-
ative to the office of Tax.
Collector, which is being
sought by incumbent
Lois Hunter and chal-
~lenger Caroline Car-
swvell, both -Demnocrats.
.Meanwhile,, Bill
Brumfeld and Charles
Parrish -- the two Dem-
ocratic~ challengers in
the Schoo~lSuperintend-
ent race -- heaped criti-
cismi on the` current
administration, while
incumbent Phil Barker
defended his perform-
anlce `and accomplish-
ments during his eight
years in office.


.the Tax Collector race
arose over a glossy card
that the Carswell cam-
paign has circulated in-
.dicating that the Tax
Collector office al-
legedly ha's been losing
an aggregate $1,8410,000
in fees every four years
- at an annual cost of
$460,000 .to taxpayers
since Hunter took office
ill 2000.
The! backside! of the
card gr'aphs the alleged
decline, from a profit
peak of $151,000j suppos-
edly generated in fees by
the office in 1998 under
the former~ tax; collector,
to a loss of $300,000 in
2006 ~under Hu~nter.
Hunter's response to :
the allegation can be
summarized in one
SPlease See
Forum Page 3A


Monticello News Photo By Laz Aleman April 28, 2008
Although surface waters have reportedly recovered, many rivers remain low, as evident by the receding water
level- at the head of the Wacissa Rivgr in Jefferson County.


LAZARO' ALEMAN
Monficello News
Senior Staff Writer
It was back to the
drawing board for de-
partment heads last
week relative to their re-
spective budgets, in
light of new informa-
tion projecting better
than expected revenues
for the coming fiscal
yTear.
At the' least, rpom-
missionesashkeaddtshedte-

identify the' items or
services that they were
proposing t cut and
maybe add some of
these back into their
budgets in light of up-
wardly revised revenue
figures.
At the same time,
commissioners indi-
cated that they expected
the constitutional offi-
cers to make greater
cuts to their respective
budgets.
The preliminary


budget
figures
th'a t
commis-
sioners
r e
v ie wed
at theCommission
work Chairman Follx .
shop on "Skeet" Joyner;
Thurs wants constitu-
day, July tional offces t
1 7 ,share a bigger
showed portion ofthe
that budg cukts.

departments proposed
cutting a 'combined
$600,181 from their
budgets, whereas the
constitutional officers
were proposing to cut a
combined $38,575 from
their operations.
Ambulance, fire,
roads, solid waste, li-
brary and such consti-
tute what officials
describe as the county
departments. The Sher
Please See
Cutibackcs Page 3A


LAZARO ALEMAN.
Monticello Newus
Senior Staff Writer
At a time' when
~drought conditions are
prompting the two
water management dis-
tricts that oversee Jef-
ferson County to put out
advisories calling for
the voluntary reduction


.of water use, one of the
districts is evaluating
two permit requests that
would extract up to 5.9
million gallons daily
from the Floridan
Aquifer for water-based
recreational uses.
The two water man-
agement, districts shar-
ing jurisdiction over


Je'fferson County are
the Suwannee River
Water Management D'is-
trict (SRWMD) and the
Northwest Florida
Water Management Dis-
tr~ict (NWFWMD),
which is considering the
two water use applica-
tions.
One applicant is


Orvis Services, Inc, a
Vermont-based com-
pany that sells sporting
and recreational goods
and supplies and that
owns a 6,000-acre planta-
tion in the county. Orvis
is asking to withdraw a
maximum, of 3,456,000
Please See
Gallons Page 3A


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Jefferson County
Fire Rescue Chief Jim
Billberry recently an-
nounced, that as of
Wednesday, July 2, all
county fire departments
Made the upgrade from
the previous VHF (Very
High Frequency) to
UHF (Ultra High Fre-
quency) radio equip-
ment.


Billberry said the
change would allow for
better communications
with the dispatcher, en-
hance the ability for
firefighters to coinmu-
nicate with each other,
and better serve the
community.
The handheld
portable UHF radios for
all county fire depart-
ments were distributed
Tuesday evening during
the Firefighter 1 class,


held at the'Emergency
Operations Center.
The VHF handheld
portables are to be
turned in to Bilberry's
office at Fire Rescue.
"The mobile radios in
all JCFR first line appa-
ratus have already been
programmed for opera-
tion," Billberry said
Monday
Sheriff's Office Sgt.
Kevin Huffmaster in-
structed his personnel


some months ago to
sound a high/10w tone
for JCFR un-its respond-
ing to calls for service,
as they do with the vol-
unteer districts. "This
tone is to alert all listen-
ing stations that the
JCFR is responding to
an emergency and so
that any volunteer or
off-duty personnel in
the area are aware of
-Please See Fire
Departments Page 3A


2 Sections, 22 Pages
BAroumd Jeff. Co. 3-7A Legals_
Cria Page 10A Outdoors
Cassifieds 12A School
Dining Out Guide 8A Viewpoints


Wed
70 /1
Partial cloudiness early, with scat-
tered showers and thunderstorms
in the a.


ThU 89ff
Scattered thunderstorms. Highs in
the upper 80s and lows in the low
70s.


7 2


,,, \


13A
14A
9A
2A


A few thunderstorms possible.


~EW


ON...... E


Tax Reform Effoct Not As Dire As Predicted


Water to be used



for recreational


purposes


I





i

Happenings At Waccissa Volunteer Fire Department


EMERALD GREENE CMSSlHEDANDLEGRADE
DeadlineforclassifialsisMonda at12:00 .6
Publisher/0wner ye pi
RAY CicHoN oc or ownerarwar
usagesator s na.
. InnoALEHAN Out-of-StateS52per ear
senior staff wliter (state a locat taxes mcludedy


Reading and Bdok Signing
.
27 Author $ Can
Outh C.Yh 0171
00tect th Cl- Orl 1
Awarded the Bronze Medal for Noalic
in the 2,007 Floipit & Book Aw


Come and En"oy an Ev4
Live En e tainment.
.
As part of Janet s & Company
254 SW Range AVE Madison FI

.q 850-973-3971
FRIDAY T JUTY 25th
.
7PNs 9PM

RAL LY IN TH T ALLEY

(IAST OF EVERY MON1R)

.
V0 US1C, EX Of IC fell5, J (0,)EO'S


Established 1869
A weekly newspaper [USPS 361-620] designed for the express reading pleasures of the people of its circulation area,
be they past, present or future residents.
Published weekly by ECB Publishing, Inc., 1215 North Jefferson St. Monticello, FL 32344. Periodicals postage
PAID at the Post Office in Monticello, Florida 32344.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MONTICELLO NEWS, P.O. Box 428, Monticello, FL 32345.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news matter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of
the management, will not be for the best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investigate any
advertisement submitted.
All photos given to ECB Publishing, Inc. for publication in this newspaper must be picked up no later than 6 months from
the date they are dropped off. ECB Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline.


2A Monticello News






IE WP OIN TS


Wednesday, July 23, 2008






PINI ON S


Putting aside that neither of these
men were raised in the Wacissa area, as
with the few remaining volunteers, one is
a previously qualified EMT/firefighter
for a nearby volunteer fire department,
and the pther has 22 years of US Naval
Firefighting/first aid training.
Where other counties may be relegat-
ed to having their emergency personnel
commute to work, one would have to
agree having two volunteers available
nearly 24 hours a day, living around the
corner from the firehouse, is definitely
advantageous.
A legitimate reason for dismissing
someone who offers to help you in your
time of dire need (as a sign sits on the fire-
house property pleading for volunteers)?
Were the local donations, county funding
being appropriated properly? Were there
petty personal conflicts? Was it because
of the ability to accept constructive
criticism? Is something being hidden?
A new chief is in place, a new board is
in order, a board where residents' safety
comes first, not family or personal differ-
ences. The town of Wacissa deserves it.

Lt. F. Kolb III, USN ret.


TEN YEARS AGO
July 22, 1998
Voters will get an opportunity to
decide the outcome of five contested races
for City Council, County Commission and
School Board seats.
Seems if it's not one thing, it's anoth-
er. Just about when the courthouse
restoration project is about finished and
residents are commenting about how
betau bt1hemb sesn.100king, a new
The City Council is considering the
acquisition of a corporate credit card for
its members. Thei issue came up once
before but nothing came of it. Recently,
the issue was raised again by Councilman
Willie Cuyler. Criyler thinks the city
should possess a Gorporate credit card
that members can use at their discretion
arn r e t scos ase n
seminars in other cities.
Restoration work on the second floor
of the City Hall building is expected to
begin in a couple of months.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
July 22, 1988
Judge Kenneth E. Cooksey has
announced his intention to retire from the
bench at the end of the year. Cooksey's
departure come after 36 years as an active
Judge but two years before his term is to
have expired.
Steve C. Walker, Jr. is a candidate for
re-election to his seventh term as county
Property Appraiser in the September
Democratic Primary.
Mordant "Heedly" Bishop, vice-
chairman of the board of county commis-
sioners, has announced his candidacy for
re-election for a fifth term in District I.
Stephen C. "Scooter" Walker, Jr. has
joined the staff of Farmers and Merchants
bank as a management trainee.
Jim Norton, assistant principal at
Jefferson County High School, holds a
coaching record of only one losing team in
29 years.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
The board C2 commission, in
a regular meting on July 19, voted that the
Petition for an Administrative Hearing on
,the turnback of State Road 257 be with-
drawn provided the Department of
' Transportation resurfaces State Road 59


from State Road 20 to I-10.
State Senator Pat Thomas, Quincy
businessman, a member of the Florida
Legislature since 1972, qualified last week
as a candidate for re-election to the North
Florida Fourth Senatorial district seat.
Sammy Gray, a lifelong resident of
Jefferson County, qualified for the
District 2 County Commission post.
Marlorle Jacobs, a New York guid-
cemcounselor handed ghtoe of dMa oe
work at Herricks Senior high School.
Airman Arden M. Davis, Jr., son of
Mr. and Mrs. Arden M. Davis, Sr.,
Monticello has been assigned to Keesler
AFB, Miss., after completing Air Force
basic training.
The Howard class of 1958 held its 20th
year reunion here July 15-16.
advi rmDnrC p isd tne e
National FHA/HERO meeting held at the
American Hotel in Bal Harbor, Florida,
July 17-20.
FORTY YEARS AGO
July 27, 1968
Mr. and Mrs. W.R. Ellett and daugh-
ter, Suzanne, returned Wednesday from a
vacation trip to Alabama where they vis-
ited relatives there.
Mr. and Mrs. Harstill McSwain of Ft.
Swain, Ark., were recent guests of his
cousin, Mrs. C.A. Fulford and family.
Vaughn. Evans returned Saturday from
two weeks at Army reserve Camp.
Richard Roundtree of Tallahassee was the
dinner guest of Mr. and Mrs. O'Neal
Beckwith Sunday. *
FIFTY YEARS AGO
July 29, 1958
The new educational building at the
First Methodist Church is completed and
an open house will be held on Sunday.
The issue is filled with advertisementE
.and pros and cons on the race track. I
Mrs. Alfred Foster entertained with ai
luncheon Saturday at The Capri honoring
her sister, Miss Mary Lucille Cook of
Jacksonville.
SIXT HARS AGO
The home of Mr. and Mrs. H.F.
McClellan at Drifton was the scene of a
very pleasant family reunibil Sunday,
Julyl8.Theoccasionwasthe75"birthday'
of his mother, Mrs. J.C. McClellan. 5


Dear Editor:
In an area where volunteers are few
and far between, the Chief (who has since
resigned,) and "board members" of the
Wacissa Volunteer Fire Department
found it necessary, on or about April 1,
2008, to dismiss two of its newest volun-
teers from its already inadequate num-
ber. The reason given was because of
unsatisfactory performance, which is yet
to be substantiated.
Contrary to the remaining volun-
teers, both of these men, as a result of
their fluid employment schedules, are
capable of responding to emergencies
nearly 24 hours a day.
Collectively, they, and they alone,
responded to nearly 30 calls the first four
months of the year, accounting for
approximately 90 percent of all emergen-
cies answered durmg that period, and for
the last year, contributed at least $20
hours a month, conducting vehicle and
firehouse maintenance and training.
Considering the county's Fire Rescue
Department dislocation and delayed
response time, this capability had to
increase the local fire rescue readiness
and town residents safety, exponentially.


A message every adult
should read because
children are watching you
and doing as you do, not as
you say.
When you thought I
wasn't lookmg I saw you
hang my first parting on
the refrigerator, and I
immediately wanted to
paint another one.
When you thought I
wasn't looking I saw you
feed a stray cat, and I
learned that it was good to
be kind to animals. "
When you thought I.
wasn't looking I saw you
make my favorite cake for
me, and I learned that the
little things can be the
special things.in life.
When you thought I
wasn't looking I heard you
say a prayer, and I knew
that there is a God I could
always talk to, and I
learned to trust in
Him.
When you thought I
wasn't looking I saw you
make a meal and take it to


To0 400W
Socks are only for
bowlmg-
You never use an
umbrella because you know
the rain will be over in five
minutes. A good
parking place has nothing
to do with distance from the
store, but everything to do
with shade.
Your winter coat is
made of denim.
You can teH the
difference between fire ant
bites and mosquito bites.
You're younger than
thirty but some of your
frienAd are er Tnder 70
degrees is chny.
You've driven through
Yeehaw Junction.
Every other house in
your neighborhood had
blue roofs in 2004-2005.
You know that anything
under a Category 3 just isn't
worth waking up for.
seas ardereoanda flor na
basis with the Hurricane
list. They aren't Hurricane
Charley or Hurricane
Frances. You know them as
Andrew, Charley Frances ,
Ivan and Jekanne. what a
snowbird is and when
they'111eave.
allig our itsh ckuaallysigg
'Downge.South' means Key
West, the import for all the
CUBANS to AMERICA.
Flip-flops are every-
day wear. Shoes are for
business meetings and
church, but you HAVE
worn flip flops to church
before.
You have a drawer full
of bathing suits, and one
sweatshirt
You get annoyed at the


a friend who was sick, and
I learned that we all have
to help take care of each
other.
When you thought I.
wasn't looking, I saw you
give of your time and
money to help people who
had nothmg, and I learned
that those who have
something should give to
those who don't.
When you thought I
wasn't looking I saw you
take care of our house and
everyone in- it? and I
learned we have to take
care of what we are
gived.
When you thought. I
wasn't looking I saw how
you handled your
responsibilities, even
when you didn' t feel good,
and I learned that I would
have to be responsible
when I grow up.
When you thought I
wasn't lookmg I saw tears
come from your eyes, and
I learned that sometimes
things hurt, but it's all


700PG4 Fl
tourists who feed seagulls.
A mountain is any hill
100 feet above sea level.
You know the four
seasons really are:
hurricane season, love bug
season, tourist season and
summer. -
You've hosted a hurricane
party.
You can pronounce
Okeechobee, Kissimmee ,
Withlacoochee and


right to cry.
When you thought I
wasn't looking I saw that
you cared, and I wanted to
be everything that I could
be...
When you thought I
wasn't lookmg I learned
most of life's lessons that I
need to know to be a good
and productive person
when I grow up.
When you thought I
wasn't looking I looked at
you and wanted to say,
'Thanks for all the things I
saw when you thought I
wasn't looking.'
Each of us (parent,
grandparent, aunt, uncle,
teacher, friend) influences
the Ilfe of a child.
How will you touch the
laye ofso many today?


.


Micanopy.
You understand why
it's better to have a friend
with a boat, than have a
boat yourself.
You were 25 when you
first met someone who
couldn't swim.
You've worn shorts and
used the A/C on Christmas
and New Years.
You recognize Miami-
Dade as Northern Cuba &
HIALEAH as NORTH
WEST CUBA .


P.O. Box 428
1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, Florida 32345

-s'i~e37 74

E-mail: monticel-
lonews@embarqmail.com


I 01LT9T T [1{\
. 1 011 1 .KAlit?


Live simply.
Love generously.
Care deeply.
Speak kindly.
Leave the rest to God.


oMAQn IP...


ORF



J.ION





Fire Departments
Cent. From Page 1


T8X Cont. From Page 1

in additional property taxes the certified tax roll and
represented only the ad-val-. largely attributable .to the
orem side of the equation; it seven percent growth rate. It
did not take into account the. must also be pointed' out thait
state-generated revenues .that in hfis presentation to com-
the county shares and that missioners on O'b. 21 on ~his
are down because of high fuel analysis of the implications o~f
prices and the downturi in Amendmnent One, Ward was
the housing market. catheful to stores: that. his'
One commissioner at assessment was v~ery prelimi-
least tried to makie political naryr.~ Ie ~ketit emphasizing
hay of the new figures. throughout the pi-esentation
Commissioner Jerry Sutphin that' th itnimbers ~were still
kept wondering about the coming in and the situation
great discrepancy between verymuch influx~.
the $850,00010oss that the prop- The state at the time was '
erty appraiser had initially predicting the revenue losses
estimated and the current to the country as~ a result of
$111,000 .figures. What Amendment Qne would -be.
accounted fbr the miscalcula- about $300,000.
tion? Could the new numbers For budgeting purposes,
be trusted? Sutphin asked. however, local officials chose
The response was that thle to go with the mor~e dire revi;:
new numbers were based, on enue loss predictions.


Fou O 0 0 Cnt. From Page 1


Cutua CKS

iff Tax Collector, Property
Appraiser, Board of County
Commission, Clerk of Court
and Elections Supervisor
make up the constitutional
offices. '-'1
The budget figures pre-
sented~ to commissioners
reflected expected revenue
losses of between $85'0,000 and
$1 mmiliori as a result: of the
adoption of Amendiment One
and other property tax reform
measures. The projected rer-
einue losses~have now been
d. sclto $111,0 bae dn
te i~cently cer 100 d ea roln
But, back to the figues
:presented to commissioners
on Thursday night.' The ~fig-
ures: show a $600,101 differ-
ence between the combined
total' of $6,332,416 that all
county departments received
in the, current' fiscal year and
the $5,732.235 that the ar
requesting for the.comeing fse
cal year, which runs Oct. 1
through Sept. 30.
comb nd cunt w pa te
ments are expected to~ gener-
afe e487,4 $8 4, oues, a
$5,732,2'35 that they are
r qustin
equn smoe instances, the
departments are expected to
generate less money than
thatcom ng fiscealu yar. T
Road Department is one such
example. It is requesting
$1,523,287 for the coming fiscal
ypiir (a decrease of .$393,166
brom its current fiscal year
bdget of $1,916,453) but is
expected to generate only
$1,142,040, a difference of
$381,247 to the negative.
lancLie ofor iceahmb -
requesting $637,574 for the
mmgeas ofs$ 6,000 from itn

$6 1, 4) bcu is expece tt
generate $400,000, a difference
of $237,574 to the negative.
dep ether i stand etso
generate more than what they
are requesting.
One example is Building
Inspections, which is request-
ing $159,593 (a decrease of
ar297b5u ero is$ 8 n )tbstc
expected to generate
$183,014.81 mn revenues, a dif-
ference of $23,422 to the posi-
tive.
toAnote is fue pro ec
$632,711 (same as the current
fsca yea s,9 ,ut is x tedetso
a difference of $264,173 again
to th@os all cases, how-


235 North Jefferson St.
Across from Jackson's drug store
Beside Edenfields Hardware


Clo I EsShe, tETSES,& aSW8T

J0T the fTR at a Ordable prices

COmne Check Us Out!


Wednesday, July 23, 2008


M/onticello News 3A


gallons per day for water base
recreation,
The ~second applicant is
Red Hills Property, LLC,
. based in Lakeland, FL. Red
Hils Property is requesting
to withdraw a maximum of
2,520,000 gallons from the
Floridan Aquifer, also for
'water-base recreation. The
request for the Red Hills
Property identifies the prop-
erty'as TO3N, ROSE, Sec. 22,
which the Property
Appraiser's office identifies
as a 102.9-acre parcel south-
east of the Boston Highway
(CR-149) near the intersection
of Fulford Road.
Both requests appeared
in small, olie-time legal
notices posted bty the
NWFWMD in the Montice'llo
News on June 25 and July 3,
2008, respectively. The News
has requested in writing the
staff's recommendations for
the .two projects, per ~the '
instructions on the legal ad. ~
Both information ~requests
are pending completion of the .
evaluations. But the New~s
was able to- speak on Fridar,
July 18, with Lauren Connell,
the NWFMD hydro g'eologist
evaluating the Orvis' applica-
tion.
Connell explained that
the Orvis'- request was for the
renewal of a historic use that
has. been in existence sinde
about 2000. She said the water
would be used, to inundate
five ponds in low-lyring areas,


plus another one-time pond,
to create wetlands conditions
favorable to a waterfowl habi-
tat for hunting purposes ulti-
mately. Such permits are nor-
mally for 10 years, she said.
"The Floridan Aquifer is
very high in that area,"
Connell said. ~"They are able
to make such withfirawals
without impacting the
aquifer. This is not a new use.
It'p a historic use. It won't cre-
ate an additional impact on
the aquifer."
She emphasized that the
water withdrawals normally
occurred during a few months
of the year during the fall and
actually' averaged about
200,000 gallons within a 24-
hour period. The nearly 3.5
million daily gallon on the *
application represented the
maxhilium daily withdrawal
possible, she said. .
Was the NWFWMD tak-
ing into consideration that
the region reportedly~ is exp'e-
riencing the worst drought
since 1955 and that groundwa-
ter levels remain low desplfe
the: recent rains?
"I would say yes, that
would be considered," Connell
sa~id.
It turned out upon further
questioning that ~the assess-
ment that the aquifer could
support the withdrawal of
large volumes of water was
based on data compiled in
1996. The reason for the lack of
more recent data was that it


took several years to compile
new information and remake
the publication, Connell
explained.
"But definitely, current
climate and drought condi-
tions wil be taken into
account," she said, emphasiz-
ing that the evaluation was
still ongoirig. :
She said depending on the
progress of the evaluation, it
should be completed and a rec-
ommendation submitted to
the NWFWMD .Governing
Board for a decision at either
the Sept. 25 or Oct. 23 board
meeting.
As, recent as July 2, the
montlyly hydrologic condi-
tions report released by the
SRW1VD noted a continuing
deficit in groundwater levels
for June and advised county
residents to continue volun-
tary water reductions meas-
ures. The NWFWMD itself
issued a water shortage warn-
ing in June 1, 2007, that agency
spokesperson Lucinda Scott
confirmed on Monday, July 21,
is still in effect because the
groundwater levels have not
recovered sufficiently.
That NWFWMD advisory
specifically states that "Water
'based .recreation use should
be reduced...Filling, refilling
and. makeup water for these
facilities should be mini-
mized."
SLloyd resident David Hall
brought the issue of the two
permit requests to the- atten-


tion of the News and the
County Commission. Neither
the News nor commissioners
had been aware of the two
requests previously.
Commissioners in partic-
ular were a little dismayed by
the lack of notification from
the NWFWMD, especially in
light of a comment from
County Coordinator Roy
Schleicher that when he con.
tacted the district to inquire
about the lack of local knowl.
edge of the issue, the response
had been that the district con-
sidered the legal advertise-
ment in the News to constitute
sufficient notification.
The legal ads put the onus
on individual interested ~in
learning more about the proj-
ect by requiring that such per-
sons contact the agency in
Writing by July 11 for the
Orvis' application and July 28
for the Red HiUs~ Property
application. It clearly states in
,each ad that no further public
notice, wml be provided
regarding the applications,
other .than the one-time
irotice.
County commissioners
specifically remembered that
in a meeting with representa-
tives of the SRWMD and
NWFWMD on Feb. 20, 2008, an
agreed and promised that.bet-
tol communications would be
hallmarks of their interactions
in future, especially where it
concerned permitting issues
that impacted the county.


the emergency and/or dan-
ger," Bilberry said.
"Huffmaster and his
JCSO Communications Unit
provide vital assistance to the
JCFR and the volunteer dis-
tricts. The stress on the dis-
patchers was compounded by
the failure of the VHF system
and lack of long-range clear
communications.
Billberry said Huffmaster
was very helpful in getting
newi radios for all firefighters
and volunteers. Former JCFR
Chief Mark Matthews said
that the funds to obtain the
needed equipment are award-
ed through the state through a
specials tax levied on traffic
violations. "$12.50 of each of
those fines goes back into the
county in which the fines
were collected, specifically for
the administrated emergency
communications fund.
"Every couple of months,
the state sends a check to the
County Clerk's Office, which
allocates thie money where
needed," said Matthews. He


added that up until now, the
county had not really tapped
mnto those funds, which made
them available for the equip-
ment upgrade.
In related npws,
Monticello Police Departmhent
Chief Fred Mosley reported in
May that MPD received radio
equipment donated by the
Franklin County Sheriffs
Office which served to
upgrade the radio equipment
so officers could communicate
at a higher level with
deputies, county and city dis-
patch, as well as with each
other. Mosley had one of his
officers, who is also a radio
technician, install the donat-
'ed equipment to save the
department and taxpayers
dollars. That installation is
now complete and the equip-
ment in full use.
Mosley explained that
MPD would also keep the VHF
equipment available, in case
of any communications sys-
tem~ failure, to, be used as
backup equipment.


Sword: "lies".
"The County Commission
approves my budget every
year," Hunter said. "Please
believe~ thiat if my office had
been losing money to the tune
that myobpponent alleges, com-
missioners would have, done
something about it long ago.
Can anyone -see the Board of
C:ountyCommissioniers, which
is dedicated to fiscal responsi-
bility, have mie losing a quar-
ter~ of a milliori dollars each
year without doing anything
ib~out ~it? 'This is accurate

I C-!arswll for heri part,
trrtained that her allegatiion
psbased oninrmation
ot thie Clerk ofCourt's
office. She wasn't suggesting
.; that anythig illegal was bemng
done, blit she was saying that a
miore b'usmnesslike approach to
the operation. would generate
more money, .she' said. Her
poilit, she ~said, was, that the
office hild been. fee-fu~nded
before and wa~s. taxpayer-funl-
ed now and. costing twice as
much to operate.
IHunter rejected thieallega-
tion, stating that the office had
been budget funded2 when she
took it over, that the loss of the
business~ of a fast-title compa~-
~ny accounted for the redUction
mn fees, and that improvements
in customer services account-
ed for~ the cited operational
mecrease.
The one issue diomiinated
and constituted the sum of the
exchanges between the two
candidates and between the
candidates and interviewer
Bob Davison. .
Carswell expounded~ on
he ddfeene wh teg ofi
when the public asked the
questions. She accused Hunter
of withholding public, record
information in disregard of
state law and of allegedly
attempting to charge more for
the release of the public
records than hhe sahw allowed. -

used her authority by holding
public records hostage,
Carswel said.
Cat'swel wud do ifferewha i
elected?
The first thing she' would .
do was to take down the win-
dow .blinds that shielded the
constitutional officer's office
from public view, Carswell
said. The second was to make
records more accessible to the
public. And third and more
1ef sfi iesnc twothded of b
sekmng bor hfe eagneratmng
nesses.
SHunter aimed "to put the
rufm~sy ofice was losing $1
unlion, why wouldn't the
County Commission or the
state shut me down?" she fired
back during the closing state-
ments, again calling the infor-
main inwila c ie te. "i so
mislead the taxpayers to win
an office, what will that person
do once in office? This office is
about integrity. It says some-
mddngabotoh a phea os ine gi
ing to mislead."
sttCarswell stood by her
"I too have read my oppo-
benk's flydeor tha says 'sfts nod


said. "But in business manage-
menit, you have to be able to fix
what's not broken sometimes-
to improve things.
Competency 'and ingenuity is
what will take us places. I -
stand by my numbers that
were certified by the Clerk' of
Court. My integrity is impor-
tant to me."
SThe two challengers for
the office of School
.Superintendent were~ more
restraint in their criticism of
the incumbent. But they didn't
hold back completely, essen-
Stially accitsing the laitter of
failed leadership.
SBarkeP' flu rife; opening
statement cited his accom;
plishments'tin office durinsgtthP
last eight years. These inclu~d-
ed mocreased F'CAT scores,
higher school grades, ~salary
increases for district employ-
ees,- the construction and open-
ing of a new high school and
the purchase of-land for anew
Selemenitary school.
Brumfield accentuated his
39 years of public school teach-
S-ing, his eight years on the City
Council and two terms as
~Monticello mayor, and his
selection as Teacher of the
Year m ithe 1990s. His reason
for seeking thle office .was the
drastic decline that the school
system~ had undergone since
the 1980s, "when we were
tops he said.
"People don't have confi-
dence mn our school system,"
:Brunfield' said. "'They don't
have confidence in the schools.
It saddens me. "
Parrish likewise accentu-
ated his 24 years of teaching m
the 1)i~blic school system and
apect of11ocealm gve emenry
the last 31 years. He too
lamented the decline of the
school system, which he said
should be the best~ m the state.
"We're just not doing. the
job that we need to be doing,"
.Parrish said. "Our system has
no been what it cadl be, what it
Barker tried to explain
"the tall order" that constitut-
ed the effort to improve school '
2gr eshannd C tsecoraed. mice
inmented the school grading sys-
tem, the grades of the three
local schools had fluctuated up
and down from year to year,
each time giving a snapshot of
students' performance at a
point in time.
"(The grade) tells the dis-
trict where we are letter-wise,"
Brer ruaed,i dbtit do sni '
t at the s udese em'ke du i
and a challenge. But every
year, we look at the data, deter-
fmine what aa a w kneed tto
That's a tall order."
How did the continuing
decline in enrollment impact
the district? '
The problem, Barker
ex lained,t eas thatestate fmd
numbers to the tune of about
$7,000 per student annually
Every time a student left the
school district to attend school

wetwth te stuEnt, he sad
Still, the school system was
dksire ttos detac taintwm n
standing the loss of funding, he
sd"That's a challenge,,,


Barker said.
Davison asked the chal-
lengers what they would do
specifically to bring students
back into the system?
Brumfield said he would
personally interview parents
.who wanted to pull their chil-
dren from the local schools to
learn the reason for their dis-
satisfaction. He would put
more emphasis on teaching
students reading and writing
at the elementary school,
where students' academic
foundations were. laid. He
would demand teacher dedi-
cate ~time and energy bey~ond
the ~eight-ho~ur daay. He rouldd
establish a parent advisory
'b infhrittee td 11'Gp him make
school-related decisions.
Parrish said the first thing
he would do was mecrease
'parental involvement. Parents
presently had the~impression
that the adininistrationl didn't
listen to them, he said. They
didn't have a clear picture of
what the system wanted or
where it was headed.
"The superintendent has
to be a strong person who
stands fii'm and does .not
change to suit certain groups
or special interestss" Parrish
said. ""If we get a superintend-
ent who's involved in the com-
munity, then we can tuirn
around our school systemm"
Dbavisoni pressed the two
challengers on the question of
parental' involvement. Given
the fact of broken and dysfunc-
tional families and other socie-
tal problems, how ekacly did
they propose to increase
parental mnvolvemeritt?
Both essentially punted in
thiBre s s.d conceded it
would be dillicult. He gave the
current administration credit
for takliking' a step in the right
direction with the recent hir-
ing of a coordinator to lead a
parental involvement pro-
gram. Parrish merely stated
tha te poe nde tlo st
can't wait until the kids are in
middle school before trying to
get the parents involved," he
sadBarker was asked why
the administration .had
approved a charter school
given that it would take more
students and more FTE fun~d-
ing away from the school dis-
trict?
He essentially answered
that state law mandated that
the charter school be
crroedi te amet all the
"Personally, I would have


preferred us `not to have a
charter school, but it met all
the requlirenients," he said.
By state law, the district
also had to make available to
the charter school the old
Howard Middle School vacant
buildings, he added.
Brumfield and Parrish
conceded that they too would
have had no choice but to
approve the charter school if
it met all thie statutory
requirements. But they would
have questioned the reason
for the move or done some-
thing about the ~problem:
before it got to the' point that
some parents' felt a need `to
establish .such a school, they
answered respectively.
Responding to questions
from the public, Briumfield
said he would support reintro-
ducing art, music, drama and
other liberal arts into the
school. Parrish said he would
Support bringing more voca-.
tional courses back ,into the'
schools.
A member of the public
.asked Barker if school district
employees ~should send their
children to other than the
public schools, an apparent
reference to Barker's decision
to enroll his son at Aucila
Christian Academy. .
"It's a parent's decision,"
Barker responded. "It's a par-
Sent's decision;"
In their closing remarks,
the thiree candidates reiterat-
ed their major themes.
"Look at what we have
and look at~what we have
dolie," Parrish-said. "Do ive
want to .continue the way
we're going or do you wanlt to
ntakegepromgress ad make a
Barker focused on his
proven leadership
-"Thiere's no question that
we have a lot of work to do,"
Barker said. "But when the
issues and challenges arise,
you have never seen me ever
hdhmg u de menideskI ase i
the challenges. Every decision
I make is in the best interest of
the community. It's not time
uomak ar tdae "We have too
Brumfield ge ve- a lengthy
response on the five Cs oflead-
ership, which included
courage, confidence, and con-
viction
"I believe I have the lead-
ership qualities," Brumfield
said. "I promise you that if I
can't make a change in four
ymaas Itwat p om se ak. I
Christian and a man."


c ont. From Page lg

ever, funds raised in one oper-
ation can't be diverted tb
make up for a deficit in anoth-`
er operation.
As for tlie constittitiohat
offices,- only the CCljerk of
Court, Property A praiser'
and Sixpervisor of Eplections
are.making reductions to
their :budgets from the cur-
Sent fiscal year.
The Clerk of Court officei
is proposing to cut $10,000
from its current budget: of
$200,000 to $199,000; the
Property ~App ~iser office is:
itsp mget: bridji t fr 5 ,0d0
to $444,002; a nd the
SSupervisor o~f Elections' is pro-
Sposing to put $1-3,577 fiont its
current budget of $223,4a3 to
~$209,856.
The only constitutional
'operation projected to gener
ate rvne sthe Ta
Cellectr 'ouieelsrwh .ich
expected to bring in $290,000
in fees. That' makes for. a tdif-

te $60 ,493 2h !te~ o
bined constitutional offices

n ath $290,0 that te Tex
Collector's office will gner-
at.The total dollar amount
for other entities 'that the
county either is required to
fun o e ecs $63Tnd68isf re
current fiscal year arid
$663,925 for the previous fiscal
year. These amounts take in
required funding, such as the
county court, public defender .
and state attorney, and elect-
ed expenditures, such as for
the Chamber of Commerce,
Economic Development
IC 011i and the legislative
flying commi tee.
Commission Chairman

rco d Tusdayt yTs toat
tswtohuld notosuppohtt budg
on county departments and
spared the constitutional
oficeds1ike to know how we
came up with the $600,00(),"
Joyner said. "I don't want'
$600,000 worth of services cut
and $38,000 worth of services
cut on the other hand. I want
departnent head toien nf
cut services to a bare mini-
mum. We've got one depart-
ment cutting $381,000 and oth-
ers cutting zero. This won't
wokommissioners are
scheduled to hold a second
wo tho bpeg nnits at oadm
Tuesday, July 29 at the court-
roue annex on West Walnut


EFFERSON


OUND


COUNTY


Gallons


Cont. From Page 1





BOYD TO HOST TELE-TOWN

HALL ON GAS PRICES,

CH EPENDEIREE


Congressman Allen
Boyd will hold a live tele-
phone town hall meeting
on Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.,
July 30. The live confer-
ence call wm focus on high
gas prices and energy in-
dependence. The tele-
town hall will give the
people of North Florida
the opportunity to voice
their opinions or concerns
on fuel costs, the energy
crisis, and other issues.
"I am looking forward
to this additional opportu-
nity to hear from the peo-
ple of.North Florida and
answer their questions,"
said Boyd. "High gas
prices are on the forefront
of all of our minds, and I
am eager to have a con-
structive: dialogue. about
the enliErgy 7 crisis aiid
other issues of concern.
Holding, a tele-
town hall meeting will

- g;. oro::
time. My hope is that this


that will continue to build
andstrengthenrelationships
in local communities.
Those interested in at-
tendingshouldemailNicole
Stookey atnicolestookey@
def.state.fl.us
Necia Little, program ad-
ministrator for child protec-
tive investigations, relates
that the last review was held
in Gadsden County The goal
is to hold events in various
counties throughout tly cir-
cuit.ContactLittleat488-0500
x 2235 or 508-7671for more in-
formation.


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Do you experience heaviness, cramping, -
or weakness in your legs when walking?
If so, you may have a condition called Peripheral Artery Disease or
Risk Factors .
PAD. PAD is a blockage of the arteries in the-legs that can lead to
A 50ge over a higher risk of Heart Attack and Stroke. People over 50 have an
Smoking increased risk, and men are at greater risk than women of developing
Diabetes the disease.
Hi h bi d Ifyou're experiencing symptoms of PAD, call the Tallahassee Memorial
High cholesterol or triglycerides Heart & Vascular Center at (850) 431-2727. We are a comprehensive
vascular center experienced m the diagnosis and treatment of
Obesity Peripheral Artery Disease.
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For more formation on Peripheral Artery Disease visit us
on the web at wwatmh.org/PAD.




Tallahassee Memorial For more information on upcoming screenings, please-call
Heart & Vascular Center (850) 431-2727 or visit www.tmh.org/PAD
The physicians) referred to herein are independent practitioners
and are not agents or employees of TMH.


Wednesday, July 23, 2008


4A Monticello News


DEBBIESNAPP
MonticelloNews
Staff Writer
The Department of Chil-
drenandFamilies(DCF)will
present a community al-
liance business plan per-
formance review for fiscal
year 2007-2008 1 to 3 p.m.
Wednesday, July 23, at the
Monticello Opera House. .
This is an opportunity
for the community and com-
munity partners and stake-
holders of DCF to review
performance and accom-
plishments, share joint suc-
cesses, and identify priorities


T h e -
Fourth Quar-
ter gonfer-
ence for
Bethel AME
Church, New
Bethel AME 9-
Church, and
Mt. Pleasant
AME Church
was hosted at
Philadelphia
AME Church,
July 13, with
Presiding
Elder Oscar Charles (O.C.)
WBiams in charge.
The meeting was
opened by Williams, with
the song "One More Time."
Leading the prayer was
Rev. Denise Banks, fol-
lowed by the hymn "What
a Friend We Have In
Jesus."
The Scripture was
taken from St. John 14,
Chapter 1-14, and read by


Rev. Marietta
Cromartie .
Rev. Helen*
Johnson-John-
: son presented
the Presiding
Elder.
Conference
secretary ie s
were: George
Evans, Jolin
Peck, Eddie
Gallon- Jr. and
Mary Keaton,
Marahs was
Eric Evans. Conference Re-
porter was Mary Hagan.
Presiding Elder
Williams delivered an in-
spirational message on
"Positioned to be Blessed."
The main points were:Po-
sitions carry obligations
and responsibilities. Posi-1
tions must-be directed by
the Holy Spirit, and cannot,
be carried out in the flesh
and your higher calling
will never happen unless
vo..... .
Business Reports were
given from officers of all
-sh e ofes(WiHiams),
district Advisor, extended
greetings and well wishes
to thel coE npered ided id-

formation on the elect ior\
of Rev. John E White as
Bishop, during the general

ur c dn a a d
premiums in advailee.
*dic 'I'he .prayer and bE
ion was one
.Williams.


St 9 MD 8
I U. MgagU U


O


will be another effective
and beneficial communi-
cation tool for me and for
the people of North
Florida."
Boyd will be using a
phone service to call
households in North
Florida. If the phone is
answered, the person will
hear a recorded message
from Boyd asking them to
stay on the line to join in
the conference call.
If they choose to do so,
they will be automatically
connected to the live town
hall meeting, where they
will have the opportunity
to ask questions of Boyd
or jtist listen insto the call.
To participate in
Boyd's Live Tele-Town
Hall Meeting on gas prices
aild energy independence
on Wednesday, Ally 30,
simply call toll free, 1-877-
229-8493, at 7:30 p.m. with

',::::-:,dl c 0 ?
ately into the call.


if "
(
PATHWAYS
ook for our special
church section in e er
LVecinesday's
iviontsceno News
VlorM TIC'E.LI._O INE.WS
Call 997-3568 today to start home
delivery at your doorstep tomorrow!


Participating young
people become official
Young Eagles with the
flight, receiving a certifi-
cate signed by the pilot, and
the Young Eagles cliairmazi
Harrison Ford.
The names of the pilots
and participants are also
included in the "World's
Largest Logbook," which is
on permanent displaying
the EAA AirVenturer Mul
sount in Oshkosh, WFi and
online through the Young
Eagles website.
The-Young Eagles pro-
gram was unveiled by the
Experimental Aircraft As-


f Doctors
supplies mass met-
chandisersinde-
pendent
nurseryme
and land
--bscapers
primarily
in the
contigto-
o u s
south -
eastern
stated
from Vir-
ginia to
Texas.
In addition to his
service to FMB,
Besheats has served as a
director and officer for Vi
sion 2020 Veriture Capital
Fund, the National Pecan
Growers Association,
Southeastern Pecan Grow-
ers Association, Florida
Pecan Growers, Farm
Foundation and Northwest
Florida Farm Credit Asso-
ciation.
Farmers & Merchants
Bank, founded in 1907, is
one of the oldest and
strongest fmancial institu-
tions in Florida. Head-
quartered in Monticello.
FMB offers a full range of
banking products and serv-
ices, and operates five
.
branch offices m Tallahas-
see, plus individual offices
in Monticello, Madison
and Greenville, FL, and
Thomasville, GA.


association (EAA) in July,
1992, and is a world wide or-
ganization with 170,000
members who enjoy all
facets of recreational
flight. The program goal is
to allow young people be-
tween the ages of 8 and 17'
to experience positive ac-
tivities and discover possi-
bilities available to them
withiiilh"e world ,df avia-
tlon. The ebi"ife is
wwwayoungeagles.OES

DB DE AS
BU OO UM


FMB Board


Scott Sutor, of Monti-
cello, has given more than
300 young people a free
demonstration airplane
ride, as part of' the EAA
Young Eagles program,
which is introducing a new
generation to the world of
flight.
Sutor is among the
more than 40,000 pilots
around the w@eldiwho have
donated their tittle and aif4
craft to the:effortaAllipilots
in the Young Eagles pro-
gram explain the safe oper-
ation of airplanes, and the
principles of flight before
the short trips.


R. Michael Sims,
preSident and
CEO of Farm-
ers & Mer-
chants
Bank, an-
nounces
the-addt-
tion of
Fred H. .
Beshears
to the
Bahk's
Board of
Directors.
Sims com-
mented. "Fred
Beshears is.not only
a well-respected business-
man ill Monticello, but
throughout his industry as
well. Most recently, he was
selected as the Jim Moran
Institute at .Florida State
University Entrepreneur
of the Year recipient. He
will be a tremendous addi-
tion to our Board of Direc-
torse
Beshears is president
and owner of Simpson
Nurseries in Monticello,
which is entering its lo7th
year of continuous opera-
tions and is one of the.
largest nurseries in the
southeast, specializing in
the production of fruit,
shade, pecan and ornamen-
tal flowering trees as well
as evergreen trees and
shrubs.
Simpson Nurseries


0 vis on E< CONIZED WORLD CLASS HEALTH CARE


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EFFERSON


OUNTY


OUND


Fourth Quarter


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a
Local Pilot Involved


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Beer, Wine, Tob ~T

1715 Apalachee Pkwy ~ll
Tallahassee, FL 3230
(In K-Mart shopping pla F~

-.850-329-62ii


__


COUNTY


AROUND


FRANCES LOUVENIA

HARRELL RABON


JOHN~ "H~AYDEN" HIOLT~N-
~~Jeremy Holton
:and Amy
Williams
announce the
a rriva l of their~otn e'adn
son john


"Hayden",


uly hin3, 2008,

~*liYIRP. seven pounds
nine ounces and
measured 20 inches long. He is welcomed by his big
sister, Hannah Holton; paternal grandparents Be-
lindai and Stanton Holton, of jasper, PL; maternal
grandparents Laura and Corky Williams of Wacissa
PL; several great grandparents, aunts, uncles, and a
C ~host of cousins and friends.


,. -
(/


100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint WCork Frame Straightening
FREE ESTIMATES INSURANCE WORK WELCOME

1630 E. Jackson. St. Thornasville, GA
(located behind Langdale Auto Mall) '
2 2 9- 2 2 6- 2 077


ht~~E~P~Slfi~il


1


3116 Capital Circle NE, Ste.2
Tallahassee, FL 32308
S850-668-4200
lId and most other insurances


* e *


Wednesday, Julyr 23, 2008


Monticello News 5A


I


$h gl@ MLC~ C1 uil @g 3 D HatHoine
THE PRESCRIPTION Fon eR

p~-~s6 V Free Blood
Free Delivery For Pressure
Prescriptions Check
SJackson's Drug Store
S166 E. Dogwood *Monticello Gifts
S850-997-3553 ao
cap Counselings


Dr. Michael A. Miller


July 23
A member of Congress-
man Allen Boyd's staff will
visit the Jefferson County
Public Library 9:30 11:30
a.m. on the fourth Wednes-
day of -every month so that
the people of Jefferson
County will have the oppor-
tunity~ to discuss issues of
concef'n.
:"July 23
1Vionticello Kiwanis
Club~ meets every Wednes-
day at noon at the Jefferson
Country Club on Boston
Highway for lunch and a
meeting. Contact President
Rob Mazur at 907-5138 for
club information.
July 23 31
Jefferson Arts, Inc., will
display the oil paintings of
artist Kieith McCulloch
through July 31. This ex-,
hibit is free and open to the
public. Works of local
artists wil also be on dis-
play at the Gallery, 575 W.
Washington Street.. The
Gallery is open Wednesdays
and Saturdays froni110 a.m.,
to 2 p.m., or by appoint-
ment. Jefferson Arts, Inc., is
a non-profit group with, a
goal of promoting art and
art education in the Monti-
cello area of North Florida
and South Georgia. For
more information, contact
the Gallery at 997-3311 or
visit our website at www~jef-
fersonartsgalleryccom.
July 24
AA meetings are held 8
p.m. on Thtursdays at Christ
Episcopal :Chiurch~ Ahnex,
425:, North -!Gherry -Street.
.For more information call
997-2129, 997-1955.
July 24
The Jefferson Democ-
rats wil hold their 4th RH-
nual "Beait the Heat" party
7 p~m. Thursday at the Mon-
ticello Opera House. Special
guest is Florida's Chief Fi-
nancial Officer Alex Sink.


Lots of Democratic candi-
dates will be on hand to
greet folks.
July 24
The WILD Bookmobile
wil be in the area on Thurs-
day at Jefferson Arms
Apartments 1-2 p.m.; Lam-
ont Chevron Fast Track 4-5
p.m.; and Union Hil AME
Church 5:30-6:30 p.m.
JulV 25
Family Skate Night is
held 7 p.m. on the last Fri-
day of each month at the
Church of the Nazarene on
North Jefferson Street. This
event is free, as are the
skates if needed. There is a
small charge for snacks.
July 25
Monticello Rotary Club
meets every Friday at noon
at the Monticello/Jefferson
. Chamber of Commerce on
West Washington Street for
lunch and a meeting. Con-
tact Preside'nt Judson Free-
man at 997-0370 for club
information.
July 25-26
USDA Commodities
and Second Harvest wil
welcome volunteers to bag
food packages 6:30 p.m. Fri-
day evening for distribution
9-11 a.m. Saturday at the
New Bethel AME Church
6496 Ashyille Highway Con-
tact Essie Norton at 997-5683
for information.
..July 26
AA meetings are held 8
p.m. Saturday at Christ
Episcopal Church Annex,
425 North Cherry. Street
For more information call
997-2129, 997-1955. -'~
July 26
Jefferson SHARE vol-
unteers will be stationed at
the Church of the Nazarene
1780 NOrth Jefferson Street
8 to 9:30 a.m. Saturday with
the monthly food delivery
orders. Turn in registration
copy when picking~ up or-
ders. Cash donations wilbe


accepted for the cost of fuel
for the volunteers. Contact
Martha Creel at 445-9061 for
more information.
July 28
AA Women's Meetings
are held 6:45 p.m. Monday;
`AA and Al-Anon meetings
are held 8 p.m. Christ Epis-
copal Church Annex,. 425
North Cherry Street. For
more information call 997-
2129, 997-1955.
July 28 `
Martin Luther King
Community Center meets 7
p.m. on the last Monday of
'each month. Contact
Charles Parrish at 997-3760
for more information.
SJuly 28 '
Yoga classes at One
Heart. Earth Center 9:30
a.m. Monday. Cost is $10.
Contact Sallie Worley at 997-
7373 for reservations.
SJuly 29
AA classes are: held
every Tuesday evening 8
p.m. for those seeking help.
Located at 1~599 Springhol-
low Road in the Harvest
Center. -Cont~act Mairvin
'Graham at 212-7669 for
more information. .
August 1
Ashvile Area Volun-
teer Fire Department usu-
ally meets 6:30 p.m. on the
first Friday ~of each month,
at the fire- station. This
month's meeting will be
held on Thursday because
of the holiday weekend.
.Contact Fire Chief John
Staffieri at .997-6807 for
more details.
August 1-3. 2008 '
`JCHS Class of 1998 Rie-
union. Contact Kajsa Henry
food4themind@ yahoo.com,
228-4887, and shanomiaf
@hotmail.com.
August 3 .
VFW Post 251 meets 5
:p~m. on the first Sunday of
each month at the Memo-
rial Missionary Baptist


Church on South Railroad
Street, in the annex build-
ing, for a business and plan-
ning meeting. Contact Sr.
Vice Commander Byron
Barnhart at 251-0386 for
more information.
August 4
VFW Ladies Auxiliary
Post 251 meets 6:30 p.m. on
the first Monday of each
month at Memorial MB
Church. Contact Mary
~Madison at 210-7090 for
more information.
August 5
Monticello/Jefferson
County Chamber of Com-.
merce Board Members
meet -at noon on the first
Tuesday of each month.
Contact Director Mary
Frances Gramling at 997-
5552, or monticellojeffer-
sonfl.com
August 7
The WILD Bookmobile
wil be in the area on Thurs-
.day at Jeffersoil Arms
Apartments 1-2 p.m.; Lam-
'ont Chevron Fast Track 4-5
p.m.; and Union Hill AME
Church5:30-6:30 p~m. Book-
mobile services are made
available through a State of
Florida Communities Car-
ing. Grant.
Auigust 7~
1Vonticello Main Str~eet
meets at noon on the first -
Thursdai ~of .'lle nronth ait
the IVdnticello/Jeffeison
County. Chamber. of' Cm-
merce. This. is ta :"browit
bag" lunch meeting. Con-'
tact the Ch~amber~ai9;9 555~
''for date changes' and more;
inforlmatiori.
August 7! '~
Girl Scout leaders and.
volunteers meet 6:30ipt~mi6.on-
the first Thu~rsday of every
.month, at the Eagle's Nest
on Sou;t~h Water Street, for a
general m~eeting. Contact.
Diane Potter for riore info$;:
mation at 388 2131;.


Mrs. Frances Rabon,
77, a homemaker, died Fri-
day, July 18, 2008, in Talla-
has see
A graveside funeral
service was held Monday
July 21, 2008, at 11:00 in
Roseland Cemetery, Monti- *
cello. The family received
friends Sunday, July. 20,
2008, from 2-4 at the home
of her daughter, Sherry
Boland. Donations may be
made to Big Bend Hospice:
1723-1 Mahan Center Blvd
Tallahassee 32308-5428


Mrs. Rabon was a na-
tive of Lamont and -a life
long resident of Jefferson
County. She was of Baptist
faith and a member of the
First Baptist Church of
Monticello
She is survived by two
daughters: Wanda (Ken)
Fortune, and Sherry
Boland; two sops, William
L. (Carlene) Rabon, and
John L. (Patty) Rabon, al
of Monticello; 8 grandchil-
dren; 7 great grandchil-
dren, and a sister, Helen
Marsh, of Monticello.


Di On. S~a, Islayout Sl 1
When 'lbmorrow Starts Without IMe

When tomorrow starts without me
And I'm not here to see
If the sun should rise and find your eyes
All filed with tears for me
I wish so much you wouldn't cry
The way you did today
Wile sinking ofthe many things

I know how much you love me

As deuacch tim teat yuu think of me
I know you'll miss me too.
But when tomorrow starts without me
Please try to understand
That an angel eame and called my name
And took me by the hand
And said my place was ready
In heaven far above
And that I'd have to leave behind
All those things I dearly love.

Junior Stokley, Betty Formbty, Ann Jordi


~an


180 S. Cherry St., Suite D
Monticello, FL 32344
9r r~1Ar


58 0-`


WE TAKE THE
DE1C C DOENTTSOF


97 -140V ss ~
Now excepting Blue Cross Blue Shie


JEFFERSIN


~IOXI~XI~X~X~JXiX~X~


~PXL~EX~JXOXPX~


UNINSURED??
We have a sliding-fee program for those who
qualify at Tri-County Family Health Care.
Phicon850-948-2840
TRI-COUNT.Y FAMILY HEALTH CARE
193 NW US 221 Greenville, FL 32331
Mon., We~d., Fri. Eiam-5pm; Tues. 10am-5pm; Thurs. 10am-7pm
North Florida M medical Centers, Inc.





7


Mai. o 028 .x MotbloF 1.32345
Name:
Address:
Phone'
Do you subscribe:


The Monticello Rotary Club
and A Doctor's Heart, Inc
proudly presents
Robert Olen Butler
Pylitzer Prize Winning Author
With Local Musical Legend
Michael Purvis


The Fourth Annual
Hors D'oeuvres
For the Brain and Soul
(a reading with musical interaction)
Combined with the finest cooks in Monticello
Heavy Hors D'oeuvres
Cash Bar
6PM Saturday, August 9, 2008
Monticello Opera House
$35/person* Seating Limited -` Reservations Recommended
Call Monticello Chamber of Commerce 997-5552
or the Monticello Opera House 997-4242
or Wes Scoles at 906-9840
*Proceeds fund third world medical mlaelona


ADDII 50 W
Take Entry Test
Get Financial Aid

Start Alug. 25


Flexible Class Schedule
Online Classes
North Ftrida Community(Adge
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Wednesday, July 23, 2008


6A Monticello News


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Mrs. Nather Lee Henry
will celebrate her 85mh birth-
day Saturday July 26, at her
home in the Linton Commru-
nity
Family and friends are


invited to attend this special
celebration hosted by her
children.
She is the proud mother
of three daughters, three
sons, a daughfer-in-law and a
son-in-law, 27 grandchildren,
35 great grandchildren, and
three great-great grandchil-


dren.
"Grace and mercy have
brought me this far thank
God. That's what living is all
about," she says.
Henry was born on July
28, 1923, to Ida and Martell
Johnson, and has lived in Jef-
ferson County all her life.


and what they plan to
accomplishment.
The establish-
men't is located

atS 22 or

.B~ grand
"P~ opening
was held in
'~f~ February
of this year,
offering
hand tossed
i, and spun New
~York style pizzas
hey prepared the old
ory offashion way, and made
to order.
Guest speakers to the July 9 meeting of The pizza
the Monticello Kiwanis were Teresa and Scott duhi ae
St. Clair, owners of. Monticello Pizza fehdiya s
Kitchen. They shared their story of how theyth maira
came to settle in Monticello, start their busi-
ness, and upcoming plans for expansion. sauce. Also daily


DEBBIE 'SNAPP
Monticello Newos
Staff Writer
Monticello Ki

w a n s e m b rs

and Scott St.
Clair to
speak at the
We dnesday,
July 9, meet-
ing about
their Monti-
cello Pizza
Kitchen business
Together t
shared their ste
how they came
to settle in Mon
ticello, the start
of' their busi-
ness, and their
upcoming plans
for expansion,


The exact time of
taping will depend on
the scheduling of a
ii tchniianguest s p e a k e r a n d v id e o
For information ap-
plications and forms re-
a~i. ~~ -~-- --spond by email to
Danielle at
dowens@gscab.org no
later than July 25.

Daitcl. ...I Ennm



UHIOR Hill AME church


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello Newls
Staff Writer
Girl Scout models
and actresses are
being recruited at this
time for a Girl Scout
television commer-
cial/PSA.
No experience is
necessary. Just be
your wonderful Girl
Scout self
Criteria for recruit-
ment includes: Girls
must be courteous and
respectful; Girls must
have written permission
from ~a parent; Girls
must be in Girl Scout
uniform or Girl Scout
casual attire, though
this need not be a pre-
requisite as there wil be
Girl Scout shirts avail-
able.


are~ lunch spe-
cials. Products
used in their pizza mak-
ing business are pur-
chased locally.
The menu offers
Pizza, calzones, Strom-
boli, lasagna, eggplant
Parmesan, garlic knots '
and a fresh-cut daily
salad bar.
a.tore hours aoe dg

throg rc~ dand -o
liveries 'can be niade
within a seven-mile ra-
dius, farther depending
on the order size, 6 to 9
p.m. Thursday through
Saturday. Call 977-PIES
to order.
The new location on
Dogwood Street will
open as soon as they are
given the state's ap-
proval. It will be at this
0Catiion that the menu
Will Offer Philly cheese
'Steak sandwiches and
hot wings.
Teresa and Scott
have two daughters,
Hannah and Haddy


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Veterans of. Foreign
Wars (VFW) Post ~251 and
Ladies Auxiliary will host a
District Community Politi-
cal Forum 7:30 p.m. Thurs-
day, July 24, at Union Hill


AME Church.
All district and at-large
candidates are welcomed to
participate. Area voters are.
encouraged to attend.
For further, informa-
tion about this and other
events contact Co~mmander
Byron Barnhart at 251-0386.


~
~.' II ii-
.iil
~b;ia~i~o


I


Nursing Assistant. Success-
ful program graduates may
also be eligible to apply to
take an examination to be~-
come a nationally recog-
nized patient care
technician.
Applicants must, have a
high school diploma or GED;
proof of Rubella immunity
and a TB test; physical .
exam, and criminal back-
ground check. Students
must also meet basic educa-
tion levels and takrethe
TABE. test within six
months of making applica-
tion. The TABE, is given reg-.
ularly at the NFCC campus
and may be scheduled by
calling 850.973.9451. Details
about the program and en-
trance requirements are
available online at
www.nfec.edit, (Ke ~ord:
PCT).
Financial aid and schol-
arships are available to qual-
ified students.
Allied health staff and
faculty are available~ to help
you through the process. For
an application and informa-
tion, contact Melody Foust
by telephone 850.973.1'662 or
email fustM@nfec.edu.


There is a shortage bf
healthcare professionals in
the nation and the north
Illorida area is no exception.
Join the ranks of respected,
rewarding nursing profes-
sionals. Become a Patient
Care Techniician! '
The Patient Care Tech
program at NFCC is accept-
ing applications through .
July 31 for the fall 2008 term.
PCT Classes begin Aug. 11.
The PCT program is a 20
credit hour program de-
signed 'to prepare students to
begin work ait the technical,
assistant level in a variety of
settings including hospitals,
extended care facilities,
physicians' offices, health-
care agencies, and private
homes under the suzper'vi-
sion of a registered nurse.
After completing the
PCT prOgram, students are
eligible to make application
to the Florida State Board of
Nursing for examination
and licensure as a Certified


Register for your chance to .
win 2 tickets to
Wild Adventures Theme Park.
One winner will be drawn at
random.
Deadline for entry ig a-15 NO...


JEFFERSON


UND


OUN&r\TYB'~


Pizza Henry Celebrates 85 Years


Kiwanis' Hear


K tce Ftur 8 C1 0 SRU


0801818 4n ActPOSSes Neded


NMW Palient Care Techelolan Pga
N~w Acep~a AppidaWr

















10ISESMOUTH



Jefferson County
Journal

997-3568

SHAPE UP
R. C. Mclean MD, Board Certilled
LOSE WEIGHT THE RIGHT WAY
ADU LTS. AND CHILD REN
Inc u es.
Individualized Diet P~lan
Protein Supplements
Medications
Energy Pack
Total Body Composition
Metabolic Analysis
Credit Card, Debit Card, Cash and Some Insurance
Some Financial help is available for qualified participants

CALL TODAY FOR

MOE EAIL
U"U It57


1 I Ir ~4 4t


I) ( )


(I (I


0'


01


I) HH


I i


B thel AME Church
held -ts Vacation Bible
School July 14-18, with
some 60 individuals at-
tending nightly. The
theme was "Walk it out to-
gether in the way of
Jesus." Each night a les-
son was presented about
strengthening family rela-
tionships.
Monday night's lesson
was called "Get to Step-
ping." Tuesday night's
presentation was called
"Learning Together." On
Wednesday the focus was
on "Dancing in the
Street." Thursday's focus
was: "Keep on Keeping
On", and the week closed
with the lesson "Walking
Together."
After each lesson, a
corresponding activity
was completed and a rep-
resentative from each
class gave a review of the


lesson. Teachers were: Rev
John Smith Jones, Jr., and
Sisters Ester Grant,
Louiza Larry, Gwynn
Seabrooks, Frances
Collins, and Shaundra
Buggs.
The Woman's Mission-
ary Society, the Usher
Boards, the Trustee
Board/Commission on
Health, choir, and the
Steward ~Board provided
the meals each night.
Assisting in food
preparation and service
were: Katie Evans,
Frances Collins, Wendy
Evans, Mary Hagan, Char-
ity Resard, Valissa King,
Tammie Harris, Johnnie
Mae Wiliams, Dorothy
Bell, Ester. Grant, Gwyn
Seabrooks, Hosea Brrooks,
and Athony Russell.
All participants re-
ceived Certificates of
Completion.


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GRAND OPENING
OPEN FOR LUNCH
MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 11:30 A.M. 2 P.M.
SUN. THRU THURS. 4:30 P.M. TO 10 P.M.
FRI. & SAT. 4 P.M. 11 P.M.
ii Serving traditonal~apanese culisine
& Sulshi, specializing in Hibachi
cooking by experienced chefs.
In Mahan Shopping Center
Next To Publix
3111 Mahan Dr. junte 15
Tallahassee, Fl. 3230:8 850-6056-2138 \
WE ACCEPT MAJOR CREDIT CARDS
RESERVATIONS ARE ACCEPTED


RICHIE'S SUBS & SWEETS


Wednesday, July 23, 2008


8A Monticello News


A Special From
Shannon Chiristman
When saving money, meals in
restaurants are rightfully one of
the first expenses to be cut, but if
you hate to cook as much as I do,
budgeting for a meal or two out
each week may save enough of your
sanity to be worth the expense. On
the days you do choose to eat out,
you need not empty your wallet to
ge't a good meal. Here a few ways
to save on restaurant meals:
Go ouit for breakfast or lunch.
The 4:00 lines at Florida buffets
may be fodder for amateur comedi-
ans, but those senior citizens know
how to make their money stretch.
Most restaurants have menus with
lower price ranges for breakfast
and lunch, so if you can plan to
have your day's largest meal dur-
ing those times, you can keep
your bill down by eating be-
fore the dinner crowd takes
.all the good tables.
Compromise on atmos-
phere. You may love to eat
at restaurants that seem ~t; !\ I
nothing like your own
familiar dining table at
home or that set the
mood for romance or
fun, but you're likely to
pay more for that trendy
decor. Local, no-frills
restaurants usually offer
'better food for lower prices. o
Those with families may
have more fun at localr~estau-
rants, anyway The kids can feel ,
comfortable enough to be th~em-
selves, and the parents don't have to
worry about annoying the distin-
guished-looking business party at
the next table. .
Make an appetizer your meal.
Appetizers' portions are often as
generous as those of pricier en-
.trees, and today's menus have a.
wide variety of food in the appe-
tizer section.
Share entrees. Because restau-
rant entrees often have enough
calories for two meals, why not
make them into two meals? Find
something on the menu that an-
other person dilling wiith you also
enjoys and' split the meal. If you
can't agree on an entree, you can
still share.' Accept any side dishes
you don't, want (instead of telling
the server to liix them) and pass
them on to someone else at your


table. .
Skip drinks and dessert. These
small items usually have propor-
tionally high price tags. Ordering
water in place of even non-alco-
holic beverages (let alone cocktails)
may save enough to cover a kids'
meal. If yodfrave something sweet
at the end of the meal, stop at a gro-
cery store on the way home and buy
a gallon of ice cream enough to
feed the whole family for the price
of one dessert at the restaurant
Consider leftovers. When decid-
ing where to go to eat, thinkabout
whether you will be able to bring
anything home. Buffets can easily
fill you once, but other restaurants
offer enough


about three dollars more than the
salad itself. In essence, you get an
extra meal for $3 not a bad price,
especially if you take most of it
home.)
Use coupons. Clip them from
the newspaper and direct mailings
or buy an Entertainment Book,
Bonus Book, or Kids Stuff Book if
you eat out frequently enough to
make the purchase worthwhile.
Coupon books have the extra ad-
vantage of leading you to new
restaurants .you might not have
tried `before.
Check out Restaurant.com.
Local restaurants and some chains
offer reduced-rate gift certificates
through this website ($10 certifi-
cates for $3 and $25 certificates for
$10). Be sure to read the. fine print;
you wil probably have to spend
,more .than the certificate is
worth. Nevertheless, buying
.ahead will allow you to enjoy
a restaurant out of yobur in-
tended pr-ice range. By the
way Entertainment.com is'
offering a : .worthwhlile
joint deal with Restau-
rnscom through the
ed of- February buly
anEntertaininent book
or $10 ~off the regular
rce and get $25 to spend
atRestaurant.com. (My
faiypaid $22179, includ-
ing shipping, for our- local
Entertainment. book and en-
bjoed a $SA ideal, to 1$4 -la
week.)
Tell the restaurant what frou.
think. Check the bottom ~of your re-
ceipt to see if you can take a formal
telephone survey Some surveys
offer sweepstakes entries .in' ex-
change for your opinion, but others
wml give you coupons toward your
next visit. Eveni if you aren't asked;
to give your opinion, some restau-
rants wil send you coupons whenl
you write to praise or complain1
about their service.
Wherever you choose to eat on a
night out, be sure to enjoy yourself.
No matter how much or little you
pay, remember that you do not have
to cook or clean up, and enjoy the
company of others who are eating
with you. The money spent on.din-
ing out buys more than just food; it
buyrs some time out of the kitchen
and a chance to sit down and relax
with friends and family.


food for two meals at a similar
price. Be sure to ask for a take-.
home box for anything you can't
finish. Leftover restaurant meals
make great lunches for the follow-
ing day. -
SFill up on starters. Italian
restaurants often include delicious
salads and breadsticks with or
meal; Mexican restauranitshae
chips and salsa. Enjoy these extras
when they're offered and take honie
more of your meal for the next day.
It may even be worth the expense to
pay a bit extra for a good salad bar
and save most of the entree to take
home. (Likewise, check the prices
on menus that offer just the salad
bar for a set price. You may be able
to get the salad plus an entree for


ITALIAN SPECIALTY SUBS

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W ham! Bom! .-l~t _77Tj


NOTICE OF PUBLIC
MEETING

THE DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY ANNOUNCES A WORKSHOP
TO WHICH THE PUBLIC IS INVITED


SUBJECT: Possible Agreements with JCSB and
CARE Charter Schools:

1. School Food Service
2. Transportation



Don't Let Bear Miarket Devour
YOur Invrestmentt Strategy

Provided by Robert J. Dav~ison

If you're an investor, you've probably been less thian
ecstatic lately when you open tphe news aper an~d see
what's ha pening in the stock market. From October
2007 to thpe end of June, the Dow Jones Industrial Aver-
age fell about 20 percent. And stock prices continued to
s de during the first two weeks of July. Are we ing a bear
market"? And, if so, how should you respond?
First of all, you might want to know a little bit about
the nature of bear markets. By one commonly used defi-
nition, a bear market occurs when stock prices have de-
clined~ by 20.percent or more. Bear markets last, on
average, about 14 months; a two-year bear market is con-
sidered to be on the long side. Generally speaking, a bear
market is triggered by'i unexpected etrditfs or ~economic:
conditions, which, in 2007 and 2008, include the credit~
crunch and soaring oil prices. And bear markets.can end
as quickly, and as unpredictably, as they began.

You may well feel the need to do something. Here's
an idea: Why not approach a bear market the same-wiay
you would an actual bear? Consider these suggestions:

Stay calm. If you were to ever encounter a real bear,
you d need to avoiding panickting. And the saine is true
with a bear market. You can't control stock prices, but
you can control your reaction to them. If you remain
calm and survey your individual situation with an un-
derstanding of w at's hap ening in the broader mar-
ket, you'll ~e likely to m~a e rational decisions.
Make no sudden moves. When facing a bear, you can't
make sudden moves. And when you re in the midst of
a bear market, you also want to avoid reacting too
quickly. If you've built a portfolio of quality invest-
ments that are suitable for your goals, risk tolerance
and time horizon, stay the courseand stick with your
long-term strategy- even during a bear market.
Don't try to "outrun" a bear. Just as bears are faster
than you are, the movements of the stock market are
typically too quick for most people even so-called
market experts to anticipate. Nonetheless, many
people try to "outrun" a bear market by jumping out
of it, thinking that they can profit from missing some
of the market's worst days. But when you head to the
investment sidelines, you can also miss some of the
market's best days, too. Either way, you're trying to
Time the market, and it's almost impossible to do so
consistently.


Even if you follow these ideas, you may find it hard
to stay positive in the midst of a prolonged~ slump. Stay-
ing invested throughout market ups and downs can help
you work towards your long-term strategy.
By observing the rules for dealing with a bear and by fo-
cusing on your long-term strategy you can not only sur-
vive a bear market, but also use it to your advantage.
And that thought should make your situation more
"~bearable.")
This article was written by Edward Jones for your Ed-
ward Jones financial advisor.


Robert J. Davison EdwardJones
Financial Advisor
205 E. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32344 Ir
Bus. 850-997-2572 Fax 866-462-9184
Cell 850-933-3329
robert.davison~edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com
Making Sense' of Investing


tends to be a blessing to
the community by going
beyond its four~walls."
In addition to provid-
ing free backpacks and
school supplies, the
church will provide free
food, drinks, and enter-
tainment.
Throughout the day,
members of Restored
Glory Christian Center
wnl be on hand to answer
questions about the
church and to meet and
greet the community.
If you would like to
make donations to this
worthy caused go to
http://www. whambamsch
ooliam.com and view the
supply list. Additional in-
formation, and directions
to the event are also listed.


I ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1111111111 -L_--l-III 1...


BEAT TH HEAT PARTY


SPM Thursday, July 24
Monticello Opera House

Special Guest
Hon. Alex Sink, Florida CFO

Meet Democratic Candidates for
local and state officeS

Heavy Hors D'oeuvres

IVusic by the Gordon Scott Ban


Paid for by the Jefferson Democratic Party


Wednesday, Julyr 23, 200>8


Monticello News 9A


2


DATE:
TIME:
PLACE:


July 28, 2008
4:00 P.M.
1490 W. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32344


Iach Grade
f1 antibacterial hand sani-
tizer, 16 oz.
In grade 2:
2 boxes 24 count crayons
2 boxes 24 count, #2 yellow
wooden pencils
glue stick
6 pocket folders, without
pi'ongs: preferred colors:
blue, green, red, yellow,
orange, purple
1 ruler with inches and
centimeters
l box each of quart and gal-
lon ziplock bags .
2 bottles of hand sanitizer
crayon box
In grade 3:
1 box crayons, 18. Fr 24
..count
36 pencils, #2
20 pencil cap erasers
300 sheets wide ruled
loose-leaf paper
4 folders with pockets and
brads
2 spiral notebooks, 70 page
count
11large box Kleenex tissue
1 plastic supply box
1 backpack with no
wheels
1 antibacterial hand soap
1 bottle 16 oz. antibacter-
ial hand sanitizer
Sbox ziplock bags
1 pack typing paper
In grades 4 & 5:
crayons, 24count
1 pkg. colored pencils, 24
count
1 pkg. bold colored m~ark-
ers
2 highlighters
2 pkg. #2 pencils
1 pkg. mechanical pencils
Fiskar scissors
4 glue sticks
4 pkg. wide rule paper
4 wide rule spiral note-
books, 1 each red, blue,
green, yellow, 70 pages
each.
8 pocket folders with
prongs, same colors as
notebooks
1 pkg. notebook dividers
1 b x gallon size Ziplock
1 container Clorox wipes
1 bottle hand sanitizer, 16
oz.
1 box Kleenex
1 book bag with child's
name on it
2 pkg of pens, 1 set of red, 1
set of black
I tray of watercolors
1 Ziper pnc h 1 der not
a pencil box)
fourteatnod f nts from
teach rs: Pase o not
any of the items except
the book bag. We will sort
these items and use them
throughout the year
There is no need to
purchase a pencil box, be
cause baggies will be used
to store supplies. All sup-
plies are needed by the
second week of school.


List For I
With the opening of
District Schools just a
month away, Jefferson E1-
ementary School reports
the list of supplies re-
quired for each grade, to
allow parents ample op-
portunity to make the pur-
chases. .
Supplies required in
each grade follow:
In Kmndergarten:
1 backpack with no wheels
2 boxes crayons (16 colors,
regular size)
2 bottles white school liq-
uid glue, 4oz. size
1 pair Fiskar scissors,
stainless, child size, with
- -blun~t end
2 boxes facial tissue
(Kleenex) (Class is shar-
ing)
1 pkg. pencils, #2, not
jumbo
1 school supply box
1 16 oz. bottle of hand sani-
tizer. (Class is sharing.)
In grade 1:
2 boxes crayons (16 colors,
regular size)
12 pencils, #2, yellow only
4 pencil erasers (cap)
2 bar erasers
4 glue sticks
2 bottles white liquid glue,
4 oz.
1 box ziplock freezer bags,
1 gallon size
1 box ziplock freezer bags,
quart size
1 container wet wipes
1 large box of tissue
(Kleenex) .
1 Fiskar scissors, stainless
6 folders with pockets (non
graphic, no middle fasten-
ers) *
1 backpack (no wheels)
l antibacterial hand soap


MoHnenlaoh Mh roebeeon
named to Mar~yville Col-
lee's Dean's List tfor the
Qupa ng ati ns feo the
Dean's List include a
grade point average of at
least 3.6 in all worked un-
dertaken, with no grade
below a "C." .Only full
time students are consid-
ered for the Dean's List.
Monroe, who gradu.
ated from North Florida
Christian in 2005, is ma-
joring ~in English -litera-
ture at the College. She is
the <\azghter, of Melanie
aid -D.Lloy~d Mouroe, of
jPldh~fer, Gditaththi '' a


S.H in Ah Moniog ''


EDUCATION


&


CHO OL


Sd o

DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Wham! Bamn!
School Jam! 2 wil be held
10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Saturday, .
Aug. 2, at Clifford Brown
Memorial Park on Chase
Drive in downtown Monti-
cello.
Hosted by the Restored
Glory Christian Center,
students returning to
school this fall wnl receive
free backpacks filed with
school supplies for the
New Year.
The purpose of this
event is to get Jefferson
County students off to a
great start for the school
year. ,
Pastor Eddie Yon
states: "Our church in-


MOnroe Named To


Dean s List At Maryville


JES Notes School Supply


Jefferson Democrats


0ur schools. Our child ren. AII local.


















































Start your new life together in a new
*
'Immy K. Lary Spac~e that reflects your personalities
Ae d ",i~~adging with our Redesign and Personal
Shopper services.
850-519-1961
Give the new bride and groomz a gift that will last for
years with our Redesign and Personal Shopper gift
certificates. We can do one room or the entire home.
www.househuggerdesigns.com email: tklary@househuggerdesigns.com


Frank' and Mary Brooks
Own ers
785 E. Cypress Street
Monticello, FL 32344
Mon -Sa. -1
Cell Phone (Frank ):~. S t.8 1
850-509-7506
"Where Your Clothes Cell Phone (Mary):
Always Come Clean" 850-509-7507


Wednesdayr, July 23, 2008


10A* M /onticello Newis


C;


~
i


anir:~r'.s~~ ~rprentle:n
.:: ~ *es rigt oshf~~a i ng~~ 84Ii~


practical. Most of~ all, be realistic. If you love
going to the movies, don't drop them completely
Instead, try to cut back on the number of times
you go or start a new traditionn of movie nights at .
home.

*Take advantage of tax-saving plans.
If you're planning to have children, look into
some specific tax-saving accounts or the 529 plans
now. The cost of a higher education is steadily ris-
ing, so the prospect of paying for a four-year col-
lege education is not an insignificant obligation.
If you have the option of saving f6r retirement
through an employer-sponsored retirement plan,
such as a 401(k), open an account immediately
You can defer a certain amount of your pretax
salary into the account. In many cases, your em-
ployei will match a portion of your savings. In
this way you have the double advantage of saving
money on taxes now and building your retire-
ment account for the future.

*Build emergency reserves.
Be prepared for unexpected events such as job
loss or major household repairs with an emer-
gency account equal to three to six months' ex-
penses. To build up this account, have between 2
and 10 percent of your paycheck automatically
deposited into savings--consider an online say-
ings account, which offers higher yield and is
easy to manage.

Learn More
More information on budgeting and other
personal finance topics is at www.yourmoney-
counts.com.


(NAPSI)-Two out.of three married couples
consider money a major source of potential con-
flicts in their marriages, according to a survey
conducted by the non--profit Consulfer Credit
\Counseling Service. As newlyweds prepare to
make exciting' plans for their new life together,
Lor~etta Abrams, senior vice president of Con-
sumner Affairs, HSBC-North America, offers the
following, tips to help couples address the chal-
lenges of managing money together:

Z Develop a financial goal.
Shar~e your plans together. Create a list of
short-, mledium- and long-term goals and then
compare notes (buying a house or a car, having
children, moving to a new city or starting a busi-
ness). For each goal, figure out how much money
you need to get there and how long you think it
should take.

*Decide how to handle the money.
Will the two of you maintain separate ac-
courits and divide up household expenses or wil
you maintain separate discretionary accounts
ith a combined household account? Are you
wi ing to merge all finances? Let your individual
"mny personalities" dictate the right approach
oryou. If you share similar habits and priorities,
cmbining all finances may be the perfect ap-
proach; however, if your habits are vastly differ-
ent, it may make sense to maintain separate
accounts.

*Create a budget together.
Check your past spending history and calcu-
late your past debts. You have probably each de-
veloped very different money styles. Spending


I



Thursday night out with your friends or buying
season tickets for your favorite team may stil be
in the cards but talk it through so you're clear
about priorities. Create a budget that will let you
maximize your income and track your actual
cash flow to make sure you're staying within the
boundaries you've set for yourself. Usually, it's a
month-to-month projection of the amounts all~o-
cated to each expense item based on your income.
When you make a purchase or pay a bml, write it
down and subtract it from the total you planned
for that expense. .
Sticking to a budget can be difficult and at
times frustrating and there's no guarantee you'll
see huge savings in the short term, but these two
suggestions may make the process easier:
Go digital--Budgeting software packages and
online resources can help. Most programs can
perform basic budgeting tasks as well as sophis-
ticated transactions.
Keep it simple--Most experts agree that the
key to a successful budget is to keep it simple and


I,


Fingers & Toes Hail Salon
1122 Thomasville Road, Suite #5 Tallahlassee


SR


B~DAL ~:AC~~


( M one~ Zaks Por









P


I
" *


It


i.:
~.~ *,


a~


"hfPI
f'31

,... .
~,i-Jtr~
:";:t:: ~UJ-~l re

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:i :2
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:*,

I i~ ~li~ace


r
'~I;L';s


BARNHART PEST
CONTROL &
HOME INSPECTIONS

850-251-0386

Call today and let
us handle your
pest control needs!


*Landscape Consulting


DUSnIN w.-u-6
CONSTRUCTION
Custom Homes
Residential
Commercial


Call For Quality Work
45 years in The Trade
JERRY COLE
PAINTING CORP.
850-997-7467 850-544-2917
Residential Commercial
Interior Exterior
~ Wallpaper Hanging -


Burnette

Plumbmo


Well Service


Remodeling *Builtl-n Bsoocases
Wood Rot Flooning Alurminim
Enclosures Tnlm *Fencing
Doors Decks *Windows & More

850-567-0759
www.dustinwells.coni
jl Licensed & Insured CBC 1252005



PO~PANE
owens Propane, Inc,
::i I "Sarysco WiVh A 5mrIc'
:208 West Screven St.* Q uitrnan, GA
229-263-5004
uiiiS:1C .=lT a-i senal ~




IAskAbopy S


MvONTICELLO NEWS


Sefferson lournal

1.215 N Jeffetrson St.
hlontcello

997-3568


~: p85


RUCIO i i'




!I 1.oi red 1e MY

'... .. .. . .. ..
,. ,,.1 ,, c. ., ..n
lse 5-5613


ALLibG'l. Fu


Enter rises
e7 Repa~ir and Remiod~l
,ualirn Guarantecd!

military Pollicet &i
refughtErT Di-colunts!
Liranied alnd Inrured
;50-510-9681


Phone:8so-94-7891
Cell: 850-973-Il35
Fax:so 85-982482
emal:


Officef 850-997-8484
Pulrtbr nl Uil IJnl


,,


2369 Dills Rd. Monticello


Need A
phic Designer. r


illboard Design :
OSterS
lyers
A.RT. I CALN DO IT!
CalLsa a~t


I)I )()'


Gral


K ESSLER
850-997-3454



New Construction
Licensed & Insured
Mark Kessler
850-997 4540


seller's Tile.. i
has got y-ou coveed


M~srb e I.I tre f ill.I. 1.. e
Grouts, Thin-set and
Waterproofing


combined Ki~Furricane
Ipr-otectionz witF.Zlegant syle
850.562.8550
Garage Doors~- Garage Door Openers
Sales~Senrice~InstalIlation

TFamhiy Owneclr'Oprate
Since 296^6
moval,~ eddoors or~icia.com1


. B
* P
* F


1710 Capital Circle N.E.

850-656-8453


NEED


-~-.1C"
.~Lbr~'

I


f*

rb G


~~ 51~"'



~pJ1 3~


liiyLII~


C~
E~i:!
.n;;u~:~'IF1~E~':IL:".' rc~ :ai
~'lr
,~
110


r'
~ 1I ':'I
ICT ~'!

~L-.i
I


* Complete Landscape
Design
Irrigation Repair
SLawn Maintenance


7


~gr(
~B


L


~21~i~


,


0-973-140


AND CLEARING


i'Ne Construe rn Dram C eamng
Remodeling e~lr Hueaes
R~pso a


.ane..
knLWCenn~-um~
*Adabs*Fr m Hunjc
,,, ,,,j~rr





1990 Ford F-350, Flat Bed, remov-
able side bodies, Hyd. lift gate,
Good condition. $4,400, obo.
997-1582 tin, nc
FOR SALE
2003 KIA- SORENTO
850-508-3391
Excellent Condition!
1 Owner, $10,000
70,500 miles; V6 3.5 Liter;
Automatic Transmission; 2WD .
Air Conditioning Power Seat
Power Steermng Roof Rack
Power Windows Leather Seats
Power Door Locks/keyless entry
Premium Sound
Front Side Air Bags
Diutd 1e- Cru se Control
ABS (4-Wheel) Alloy Wheels
4 Wheel Traction Lock (rain/snow)
6 Disk in-dash CD Changer
Two-Tone Paint
Wood Grain/Leather Steering
wheel rtn, nc

Church bus for sale 1984
International $1,000 or best offer.
Call:: 850-997-4504.
7/23,25,30,8/1,6,8,pd.
'86 GMC Conversion Vian '
loaded. New Goodyear tires, runs
great, $1,000 251-1641. .
7/23,25,7/30,nc.




WoiW! 90 MILES PER GAL.
50 CC AND rJP
JUST SCOOTERS
RT .221 NORTH, GREENVILLE,
ASOK FOR BOB 850-2~42-9342 or
5/23,tfn,c





JACKSON'S DRUG STORE -
H~ave you been taken off your hor-
Inone raeuecein rt? See our nw

51,tfn,c


Hr~~,s oads, dite e tre a
shrib: removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116, 933-
3458. 7/4tfn,c

SMR. STUMP
STUMiP GRINDING
509-8530 Quick Res~ponses.
6/2, tfn, c


HELP WANTED FULL-TIME
Full-time positions open for South Thomas County Plantation:
Experienced Cook
Excellent pay and benefits, including health, dental and life
Insurance; housing or housing allowance.
Send to.


~se rd P.O. Box 7476,
t ~Thomasville, GA 31758






AoverTSardo tuTwoRIs OF FLOwson
anIseIcaIP I Display | Merro Daly



The key to advertising success












-WWW.flOrida-classifieds.corn



WOman plays piano for

14 straight hour s after using
Thera-Gesic* -
BEXAR COUNTY- Afteapiper appying Thera-Gesic
to her arthritic hands, Mary Ann W. played piano
jazz music for 14 straight hours. When asked
why she played so long, especially since she never ,
took lessons nor played piano before, she painless- E?
ly replied, "N~one of your dang business!"
Go painlessly wiith Them-Gesice ]


LOST
GOLDEN RETRIEVER- 2yr old male
w/ red collar- children's pet
(Sam JakoP Ios 8%- 1 9 Nar
7/16,18,23,25,nc.




Avon Reps needed in this Area! Start
your own business. For a $10 Kit call
Cindy!!! 850-843-5550
7/11- 7/30,c.




Microwave Oven $30
Hewlett-Packard Inkjet Printer $60
Panasomec Answering '& Fax Ma- .
chine $75
Bcce ai~es 18 speed $50
7/4,-7/30, pd.
TABLE/FLOOR LAMPS- 2, Dark
Pine w/ beige shades, $25 each. Call
251-1641
Electric Home Meat Grinder-
Lienew asking $100.00 Call 251-
4/18/08 tfn n/c.
Hurricane Season is here
Titan 5500 5/15 KW diesel Genler-
ator. Brand new $1195 call 997-
3101 after 8:00 am before 7:00 pm.
7/16-30, pd
Corn, Beans, Peas. Florida Farm
Fres.N ps iide tsd UPick

7/23,pd.



Apartment for Rent at Coopers
Pofid. 1 BR/1 BA.
Call 997-5007.
7/2,tfn,c.
PRIME Downtown OFFICE Space
-Cherry Street Commons.
750 Sq. Ft. $540. Month.
500 Sq. Ft. $460. Month.
Ca~llKatrina Walton/Coldwe~llBanker/ :
Kelly & Kelly Properties at 110-9512
8n,tfn,c


Ri ver, creeks, hard woods, natural pmne, i
planted pine, some with development
potential, all have excellent
hunting. View our website
for maps, timber data, etc.
St. Re gis Paper Co., 478-987-9700
WWW. Stregis pa per. co~m


G~ot A Cuite Photo?


Send It To UIs
And W~e' ll S hare
It With Our Re ader s


K ids Do gs
Strange Stu ff Etc .

IMOntiCellO rOWS s

P.O. Box 428

M1~onticello, FL 32345

"You Can' t Be Writhout It"


STATE WIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR
MONDAY 7/21/2008 THROUGH 7/27/2008


12A* Monticello News


WIednesday, July 23, 2008


Aucilla Christian Academy is currently accepting applications for a
transportation mechanic position. Qualified applicants must have diesel
mechanic experience and extensive knowledge of diesel engines. Also,
must be a positive, Christian role model. For more information or to
apply, please contact the school at 997-3597.
7/23,25,c.
Testing Specialist (Part-timne) wanted at North Florida Community
College (20 hrs per week). See www.nfec.edu for details.
7/23,25,30,8/1,c.
Advertising Sales Representative (salesman) needed.
Must be a team player, able to handle multiple tasks, and.be able to get along
with an entire office staff. Must have good personality and LOVE to talk on
the telephone. Apply in person only at the Monticello News newspaper of-
fice, located at 1215 N. Jefferson St., in Monticello. Please.... if you're not
sure how an alarm clock works or you average more than two dramatic in-
'cidents in your life, per week, or simply only work because you are bored,
or feel that you must complain on a daily basis or fight with co-workers,
please do not apply.


GOATS & PIGS- $35.00 each
997-0901 Leave message
7/2,tfn,nc
WANTED: good home with
fenced yard. We are 2 loving
mixed breed puppies, 10 months
old, current on shots & heartworm,
neutered. Leave a message for us
with Marisa at 997-8709/509-
2590. Signed Duke and Hunter.
7/23,25,30,8/1,nc '


Announcements


Land For Sale

PUBLIC LAND AUCTION
Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee
Land Parcels, Liquidation Prices,
Low Minimum Bids, Qwner
Financing, Everyone Qualifies,
Invest Now, Register to' Bid
Today at www.billyland.com
(800)724-0551.

Miscellaneous

ATTEND COLLEGE IONLINE
from Home. *Medical,
*Busitiess, : *Paralegal,
*Coniputers, *Criminal Justice.
Job placement: assistance.
Computer available. Financial
Aid .if qualified. Call (866)858-
2121, www.CenturaOnline.com.

AIRLINES A4RE HIRING
Train for high paying: Aviatioin
Maintenance Career. F;AA
approved program. Financial aid
if qualifiedd Job placement
assistance. CALL Aviation
Institute. of Maintenanice
(888)349-5387.

NOW AVAILABLE! 2008
POST OFFICE JOBS. $18-
$20/HR. NMO EXPERIENCE,'
PAID TRAINING, FED
BENEFITS, VACATIONS.
CALL (800)9'10 994 TODAY!


7/23,tfn '


'\"~y U IIY LY \1
your classified ad in over 100
Florida newspapers reaching
over 4 MILLION readers. Call
this newspaper or (866)742-1373
for rnore details or visit:
www.florida-classifieds.com.

Auctions

AUCTION-REAL Estate, 1302
US Hwy 98, Daphne, AL,
(Eastern Shore Mobile Bay)
formerly auto dealership 175,000
sf+/- (4+/- acres) 29,000 +/- sf
multi use building-Aug 14 1:00
PM, GTAUCTIONS.COM,
(800)996-2877, GRANGER,
THAGARD 8c ASSOCIATES,
INC. Jack F Granger#873.

Business~ Opportunities

ALL CASH CANDY' ROUTE
Do you earn $800 in a day? 30
Local Machines and Candy
$9,995. (888)629-9968
1102000033. CALL US: W~e will
not be undersold!

Employment Services

Learn to Operate a Crane or Bull
Dozer Heavy Equipment
Taminig. National Ce~rtificeationt


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Home for Rent in City 3 Br 1 Ba
$650. Month plus Deposit. Call
264-3391
7/18,23,25,pd.

FOR SALE or LEASE -
1900 sqeft. D.W. on 1 1/4 acres
located near I-10 in Monticello 3
BR/2 Ba. Rent per Month $750.
. ale Prwet $102,000. Call 850-

7/18-30,pd.
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72,tfn,c.
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Couples in religiously mixed
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Christ EpiscopalthChurchhthree
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Call (800)580-1146 or go to
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Instruction

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Call Becca 997-8018
7/18,23,25,pd.


7/18,23,25,c.


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850-997-4340
www.TimPetary.com
Selin Resli Estate Since 1972

OnaAcre Clark Rd $25,000
Wauk~eenah 14ares $9,80/ac :
Ship Home 3/1 on 1 ac 5120,000.
New Listings 1 bedroom 1 bath home
on 4+ acres screened front porch,
covered deck in back $96,500

outbu ldngs 2 ac $5000hnpo2 .
In Town Treasure bedroom bath
beautiful floors $129,900
Thompson Valley Rd 2/2 home 733
ac mostly cleared 5195.000
Under Contract Great Location 3/2
home 1.56 ac, big bamn, green hse
$165,000
urmiuring Creek 5.2acres, septic
tank $69,500
The Budd House 4/2 high ceilings/
great porches, $385,000
Priced toSell! 5 hil~lskeacresin
Aucilla Shores $50,000

4 ho ss/c aloe 3,a) ac
Vev sat 5lve~ cres on paved

Horse Farm 29 acres DW w/
fire lace, stables, $329,000
Deall 4/3, 5 act fenced/ 2car gara e
poollguest hsshop, pasture/100 in

PrmeHCom eria Poeh near
Waukeenah Hiahway 27.99ac
pasture, fenced, pond $545,000

Petty 2 ces w/ Rlate pins big

Timberlandi56 ac some pines dwide
by Hwy $2000/ac
RENTALS AVAILABLE


IN THE iEh




SSIFI EDS 2
















IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION

File Number: 08-36-PR
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM B. HUNTER, SR.
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of WILLIAM B. HUNTER, de-
ceased, File Number 08-36-PR is pending in the Circuit Court for Jeffer-
son County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1
Courthouse Circle, Monticello, Florida 32344. The name and address o
the personal representative and of the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.

ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this notice is served who have objections that
challenge the validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdiction of this Court are required to file their ob-
jetoswith this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is served
within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice
must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.

The date of the first publication of this Notice is July 16, 2008.
Attorney For Personal Representative:
T. BUCKINGHAM BIRD JANA H. GRUBBS
P. O. Boxt 247 4132 S. Jefferson
Monticello, FL 32345 Lamont, Florida 32336
850-997 -3503
FL Bar ID #0006176
7/16,23/08,c


I I
1 ~I I'


I. --
--


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDAIIIII~~~~~~~IIIII

PROBATE DIVISION

CASE NO: 08-44PR


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FL~lilDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RICHARD EARL TAYL~OR,
File No. 07-94PR
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
'ID ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ESTATE:
The administration of the estate of Richard Earl Taylor, deceased,
File Number 07-94PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Jefferson
County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1 Courthouse
Circ Iaesad adess 30 the personal representative and that per
sonal representative's attorney are set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is served
within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice
must file their claim with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate of the decedent must file with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE.
SALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.

The date of the first publication of this Notice is July 16, 2008

Attorney for Personal Representative:
Harry Lewis Michaels
P.O. Box 10069 Tallahassee, Florida 32302-2069
(850)570-7437
Floridapar No. 054696

Personal Representative:
Gretchen Taylor
570 Campground Road
Lamont, Florida 32344
7/16,23/08,pd -


MICHAEL. A. REICHMAN
Attorney for Personal Representative
P.O. Box 41
Monticello. FL 32345
(850) 997-5100 '
FLA BAR NO: 183518


mmmmmm


/ Out of State .... $52.00


C

I


I


I
&


Wednesday, July 23, 2008


Monticello News 13A


NOTICE
The Jefferson County Board of County Commisioners. Will meet for a
budget workshop on Tuesday. July 29, 2008. 9:00 am to 11:00 a.m. At the
Courthouse Annex, West Walnut Street. Monticello. FL. The Public is in- ;
vited.
7/23/08.c. :


BETTY lLOIS McALLISTER,
Deceased.

NiOTICE' OF ADMINISiiTRATIO N
The administration of the estate of BETTY LOIS McALLISTER de-
ceased, Case No: 08-44PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Jefferson
County, Florida. Probate Division, the address of which is Jefferson
County Courthouse, Monticello, FL 32344. The names and addresses of
the personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
'All interested persons are requiired to file with ths Court, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate and (2) any objection by an interested per-
son on whom this notice was served that challenges the validity of the
Will, the qualifications of the, personal representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion ofthe Court. -
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVTER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has begun on July 23, 2008.


RONALD W. HOENSTINE, JR.
Personal Representative


effers' rna

0~ CI OUTH


mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmI II II ~1(


Phone Number:


In State ........... $45.00


VI

i:


IN RE: ESTATE OF .


NOt looking forward to hearing your kids whine

all summer long about being bored ? Keep them

busy with all of the activities listed in the newspaper.


SSubscription Renewal New Subscriptio n-


Naine:


Add ress:


Please fill out and mail this back' with a check or

money order made out to

MOnticello News P.O. Box 428, Monticello, FL 32345
mmmmmmmm--mmmmm----- memmm
























The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FW) announces
the formation of the Imper-
iled Butterflies of South
Flrida Workgroup (IBWG)
to directly address the sig-
nificant declines experi-
enced by a number of South
Florida butterflies.
The public is invited to
log on to the IBWG's inter-
active Web site at
htrtp:..'. 'share2.myfwc-com I
~BWG default~asps to ~ex-
change information and
learn about the ongoing ef-
forts to protect imperiled
species, including the en-
dangered Miami blue but-


I dpndence from high e



prices all summer long!


RMICOss It 985y to OWHr a Joh~n Dee~re w th

fl'N;ANCING all summer Long!

~ii~atdlu ty 14d thru August~ 41 'I. '


NOTICE OF PUBLIC H6REARIG
Ju 28.00s
5:01 p.m.
PU'RSUIAN~TO PROVIIOiS OF SECTION 10tl.03oF THE FLORIDA
STATUTS.NOTCEIS HEREBY GIVENO THAT A PUBLIC HEARING WILL
BE HELD)BYTHEDISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OF`JEFRSONVCOUNFYY,
FlLORID ON JULY 28, 2008 AT 5:01 P.M. IN TH DESMOND) M. BISHOP
ADSouTsmanoLD~.Nav o.N,90 WEST WASHINGTONNSTRE
~MONTICELLO. FLORIDA FOR THE PURPOSiE OF CONSIDERING; TH
ADOPTION OF TIE PROPOSEDMItLLAGE AND TENTATIVEBUGT FOR
THE FISCAL YEAR 2008-2009.


GREEN OUTH


Equipment, Inc.


1. Adopt Tentalrve ~linage Roe Resonlunon rar zoos8-2oes
2. Adapt the Tentative Budget Resolutonn
3. Set Dite for Flual Budget leaning
4, Approvee Capital Outlay~ Project LIst~


GSEx150723MN-4C


14A* M~onticello News


Wlednesday, July 23, 2008


Gulf Red Snapper Sport


Seao openedd UntiI Aug. 5_
The recreational har- rlBL crew of for-hire vessels in
vest season for red snap- ~P ~ "the Gulf may not keep the;
per in Gulf of Mexico u---, recreational bag limit.
federall waters wil remain The minimui~m size
open until Aug. 5. Gulf limit for recreational red
federall waters extend be- snapper in. the Gulf is 16
yrond nine nautical miles inches total length.
'rom shore. off of Florida. More information
The red snapper sport i about red snapper man
harvest season opened on in all Gulf waters off agement and regulations
April 15 in Gulf state wa- Florida is two fish per per- is available online at
:ers and will close Nov. 1. son, and the captain and M~'vFW\~C.com/marine/.
F'lorida Gulf waters extend
ria ilsiom shore out to nine nau- AeW Ru f Reef Fl I821'


conservation. and manage-
ment issues surrounding
the Miami blue.
"This We~b site aims
to advance awareness and
promote understanding for
butterfly conservation, the
habitats that sustain them
and the roles they play as an
indicator species in the
larger environment," said
Mary Truglio, an FWC biol-
ogist and IBWG steering
committee member.
The IBWG continues to
work together to increase
and/or stabilize imperiled
butterfly populations in
South Florida and to safe-
guard important habitats.


The daily red snapper
bag limit for sport anglers


f
f

f

t
f

t


terfly
Local, state and federal
agencies, the North Ameri-
can Butterfly Association
and the University of
Florida, joined together to
form thne IBWG because of


The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (F'WC) re-
minds anglers that new
rules went into effect June
1 requiring that all people


for any reef. fish species
must carry and use circle
hooks, de-hooking devices
and venting tools.
The new rules 'are in-
tended to help more Gulf
reef fish survive if they
must be released when they
are not legal to harvest.
Many reef fish species in
the Gulf, especially red
snapper and gag grouper,
need protection, and an-
glers can help maintain
and rebuild reef fish stocks
by properly handling and
releasing fish.
The new rules require
adll persons harvesting any
species of reef fish from a
vessel in Gulf waters to
possess and use non-stain-
less steel circle hooks when
fishing with natural baits.
Gulf anglers also mUst
carry and use a de-hooking
device and, a venting tool
whein needed to release
reef fish from a vessel.
Reef fish species include
all snappers, groupers, sea
bass, amberjacks, gray trig-
gerfish, hogfish, red porgy
and golden tilefish.
A circle hook is a fish-
ing hook made so that the
point is turned perpendicu-
lar to the shank to form, a
circular or oval shape. If
you're fishing for reef fish
from. a vessel in Gulf state
waters (from. shore out to
nine nautical miles), you
must use a non-offset circle
hook. Research has found
that circle hooks are more
likely to hook fish in the
mouth, instead of the
esophagus or stomach,
which reduces harm to the
fish.
A de-hooking device is
an instrument that allows
the hook to be secured and
the barb shielded without
re-engaging when the hook.
is removed from a Gulf
'reef fish. It must be blunt,
have rounded edges and be
of a size appropriate to se-
cure the range of hook
sizes and styles used for


Gulf reef fish.
De-hooking devices
~come in` a variety of shapes
and sizes. .Use one that
works best for the fish you
are releasing. If a fish

=",7:.:ho bi hookrar th
from a boat, it may be bet-
ter to cut the line as close
as possible to the hook in
stead of Itrying to remove:

Reef fish that come;
from depths of 50' feet or:
more may undergo expan-
Ssion of the gasses m 'the
swimn bladder as they are
brought to the surface.
Signs of this ~condition -are
protrusion of the stomaach
from its mouth, bulging
eyes and a bloatted belly,
Proper use of a venting tdoo
wnil help the fish survive by
allowing it to safely return
to the bottom.
A venting tool is a
sharpened, hollow instrul-
ment, such as. a hypoder-
mic syringe' with the
plunger removed or a 16-
gauge needle fixed to a hol-
low wooden dowel. Larger
gauge needles may be
harmful to the fish, and a~
tool, such as a knife or ice~
pick, is not allowed to vent
Gulf reef fish.
You can deflate aC
bloated Gulf reef fish by~ in-g
serting the needle of a vent--
ing tool into the body cav its'
at a 45-degree angle under a'
scale in an area one to t wo
inches behind the base of:
the pectoral fin. Insert the
needle just deep enough to
release the trapped gas and
so the fish can be returned
to the water with minimal
damage.
If the stomach is pro-
truding from the mouth,-
don't puncture it or try to
put it back into the mouth.
It wil return to its normal
position following the re-
lease of a properly vented
fish.
More information
about the newr Gulf reef
fish gear rules, including
frequently asked questions
about the new rules, fish
handling and release tips,
and FWC's new catch and
release brochure is avail-
able online at
]MvFWIC.com/anarine.


OPEN UNTIL 4,-Mt ON SATURDAY! .

` STORE HOURS: M-F: 7:30am 6:00pm
-s ~Sat: 7:30am 4:00pm Sun: CLosed
- -----GreenSouth.com

TALLAHASSEE, FL
2890 IN DUSTRIAL PL;AZA DRIVE................. (850) 877-5522
THOMASVILLE, GA
12793US HW 19 .....................................I 2-;8


CHAIRPERSON OF SCHOOL BOARD


SUPERINTNDN OF SCHOOLS


C~ERO. GA
2025 US HWY 84 EAST. ................(229 377-3383
'Offer ends 8/16/2008. Some restrictions apply. other sp~eclai rates and terms may be available, so see your dealer for details and other finsacing op noi poanoniaii irD
by the engine mianufacturer to be used for comparison purposes only ActualR operating h~orsepower wlill be less Johni Deeres green and yelicw color ssl power, i orato is crow


ded


ImperiledButterflies. Website Unveiled


Re quir ements in Effect




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