Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00212
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: June 25, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00212
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text
..... ..... I ..... ....32
A (.
II cdectIC-Oi'


O NTICELLO


NEWS


140th Year No. 26 Wednesday, June 25, 2008 50 46+ 40



Fireworks Won't Happen This Year


Keith McKarron, with the Apalachee Regional Planning
Council, addresses the commission during the June 19
meeting.


State To Spend $5M


In Road Projects Here
\Work Is Part Of Five-Year Plan


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
The Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation
(FDOT) has pledged
$5.038 million for road
improvement projects
in Jefferson County dLur-
ing the 2009 fiscal year,
which begins this July
1.
Keith McKarron,
with the Apalachee Re-
gional Planning Council
(ARPC) presented the
information to the.
County Commission on
Thursday, June 19. as
part of the FDOT's five-
year program for the re-


gion. He explained that
the ARPC worked with
the FDOT on the plan on
behalf of the counties
and that the planned
projects included the
resurfacing of roads, re-
pair of bridges and in-
stallation of lighting
and railings at specified
locations.
McKarron said that
the pur pose of his pres-
entation was to afford
local officials an oppor-
tunity to review the
plan and fft't'er input.
The five-year plan, how-
ever. had changed
Please See Road
Projects Page 3A


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
The traditional Fourth
of July fireworks celebra-
tion will not be held this
year.
That was the word on
Monday, June 23, from
Wallace Bullock, the py-
rotechnic master who has
put on the fireworks
shows for the last 19 years.
"This would have been
our 20th year," Bullock
said. "But I'm not doing
it."
He said the decision
not to put on the show
stemmed from last year's
fiasco, which left his com-
pany some $5,000 in the
hole. The problems, how-


ever, have report-
edly been build-
ing up for some
time now, with
the event consis-
tently losing a lit-
tle more money
each succeeding
year. It's just that
last year's loss
was particularly
devastating, Bul-
lock said. He sim-
ply cannot afford
to continue to ab-


wallace BUIIOCK,
pyrotechnic mas-
ter; sorry to say
fireworks won't
happen this year.


sorb the losses,
he said.
Bullock was careful in
his wording of the situa-
tion. He didn't want to
alienate anyone. It's a
small community, he
pointed out. He also didn't


want to close the
door completely
on doing the ac-
tivity, in the event
an opportunity
presented itself
down the line.
But there existed
a lack of account-
ability in the area
of fundraising
that first had to
be resolved, he
said.
"It's question


of poor accounta-
bility of the funding," is
all that Bullock would say
on the matter.
He pointed out that it
costs between $10,000 and
$12,000 to put on the dis-'
play each year, not count-


ing the volunteers' time
and effort. At that, it took
three to four days of work
to put up and take down
the preparations for the
30-minute show.
As it is, he said, a lot
of communities will not
be holding Fourth of July
firework displays this year
because of the high costs
and shortage'of materials.
He himself had been in
possession of the neces-
sary materials, but had
since sold -
them. Thus he
could no
longer mount
the display,
Please See
Fireworks
Page 3A


Monticello News Photo by Laz Aleman, June 23, 2008
The Food and Drug Administration has cleared the tomatoes grown in 19 Florida counties, including Jeffersop, Madison,
Leon and Gadsden counties.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
It's not the kind of
question that consumers
normally ask their gro-
cers, but with federal
health authorities this
week zeroing in on farms
in central and south
Florida and Mexico as the
possible source of the
tomato-linked salmonella
outbreak, it's a question
that's suddenly worth the
asking: How safe are your
tomatoes?
Ed Strickland, owner
and operator of the Jef-
ferson Farmers' Market
on Railroad Street, has no


problem answering the
question. He readily
points out that his vine-
ripened tomatoes are
grown in Gadsden
County, one of 19 Florida
counties that the Food
and Drug Administration
(FDA) has cleared so far.
The other FDA-cleared
Florida counties are Jack-
son, Leon, Jefferson,
Madison, Suwannee,
Hamilton, Hillsborough,
Polk, Manatee, Hardee,
DeSoto, Sarasota, High-
lands, Pasco, Sumter, Cit-
rus, Hernando and
Charlotte.
Winn Dixie company
policy prevents manage-


ment at its 521 grocery
stores from communicat-
ing with the media. The
local, management re-
ferred the News to the
communications office at
the company's Jack-
sonville, FL, headquar-
ters, which did not return
the call. It has been re-
ported, however, that
Winn Dixie voluntarily
removed all Roma, round
red and plum tomatoes
from its stores' shelves
since the first reported
cases of salmonella sur-
faced and that it is work-
ing closely with the FDA
and Center for Disease
Control (CDC).


The CDIC defines sal-
monella as a bacteria-
caused infection that can
cause diarrhea, fever, and
abdominal cramps 12 to
72 hours after infection.
The illness usually lasts
four to seven days, and in
most instances, goes away
without treatment. But in
some cases, the diarrhea
may prove sb severe that
patients need to be hospi-
talized, especially if the
infection spreads from
the intestines into the
blood stream and other
body organs, in which
cases death may result.
Please See
Tomatoes Page 3A


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
With the start of a
new fiscal year looming
as soon as Oct. 1, county
officials have begun the
budget preparation
process in earnest.
Budget preparations
actually have been going
on in earnest for some
time now at the depart-
mental level, with the
non-constitutional opera-
tions cutting a combined
$500,000 so far from their
respective departments
and leaving an estimated
$350,000 yet to be cut by
the constitutional opera-
tions, under a best case
scenario.
Best case scenario be-
cause its officials' hope


that Amendment One
and the other tax reform
related measures don't
result in greater revenue
losses than the $850,000
that Property Appraiser
David Ward has esti-
mated. If the losses prove
greater than $850,000, it
will mean more cutbacks.
As it is, departments are
already operating at sub-
sistence levels, officials
say
County Coordinator
Roy Schleicher informed
commissioners on Thurs-
day, June 19, that he ex-
pected to pi'esent them
with drafts of each of the
non-constitutional opera-
tions' budgets at their
-July 3rd meeting, along
Please See
Budget Page 3A


Work Starts Tuesday On


Bob Cooper, spokesperson
for water system; says
dedication ceremony
planned in mid July.


Around Jeff. Co.
Bridal Page
Classifieds
Home Improvemei


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
The Gadsden County-
based company that was
awarded the contract for
the phase-2 expansion of
the Jefferson Communi-
ties Water System, Inc.,
(JCWS) started work on
the $2.7 million project on
Tuesday, June 24.
Bob Cooper, chief
spokesperson for the


2 Sections. 24 Pages
3-7A Legals
HA Outdoors
10A School/Sports
nt 9A Viewpoints


JCWS, told the News that
the company started lay-
ing pipe on Kinsey Road,
some five miles east of
Monticello. He said the
plan is to hold a dedica-
tion ceremony for project
some time in mid July.
The phase-2 expan-
sion will raise the sys-
tem's customer base to
about 1,350, or 400 more
residences, and it will add
another 40 miles of water


- mu w


10A
12A
8A
2A


Water System
line to the existing 94 ley, Blue Lake,
miles. Solomon Construc- Jordan, Boyd
tion Company, of Quincy, Ebenezer Chur(
FL, is doing the work. Rural Dev
Residents expected to an agency of t
benefit from the expan- apartment of Ai
sion are those who live off (DOA) is funding
the following roads: Bar- ect, as it did tI
rington, Old Lloyd or CR- part of the firs
158A up to Main Avenue the water system
near US 90, Murmuring eral agency aw
Creek, Osprey, Thompson Jefferson Cor
Valley, Curtis Mill, Au- Water System
cilla, Kinsey, Big Joe, Coo- lion in early 20


Wed 92/71
6/25 ,"'
Partly cloudy in the morning fol-
lowed by scattered thunderstorms
later in t.


Expansion


Hatchett,
Farm and
ch.
elopment,
he US De-
griculture
.g the proj-
he greater
t phase of
m. The fed-
'arded the
nmunities
$4.62 mil-
107 for the


Thu 85/71
6/26
Thunderstorms. Highs in the mid
80s and lows in the low 70s.


expansion. The award
consisted of a $1,206,000
grant and a $3,414,000
loan. One of the condi-
tions for receipt of the
money was that the sys-
tem must sign up an addi-
tional 400 customers
upfront, which it accom-
plished.
Rural Development,
in partnership with the
k Please See Water
System Page 3A


Fri 86171 n .
6/27 ..
Slight chance of a thunderstorm,


Officials Get Serious


About Doing Budget


A


i~I


i


: 41









2A o M\onticello) Newvs


Wednesday, June 25, 2008


VIEWPOINTS &


PINIONS


CHRISTIAN WAYS TO go of the anxiety. If you
REDUCE STRESS ... can't do anything about a
situation, forget it.


An Angel says, "Never
borrow from the future. If
you worry about what may
happen tomorrow and it
doesn't happen, you have
worried in vain. Even if it
does happen, you have to
worry twice."
1. Pray
2. Go to bed on time.
3. Get up on time so you
can start the day
unrushed.
4. Say No to- projects that
won't fit into your time
schedule or that will com-
promise your mental
health.
5. Delegate tasks to capable
others.
6. Simplify and unclutter
your life.
7. Less is more. (Although
one is often not enough,
two are often too many.)
8. Allow extra time to do
things and to get to places.
9. Pace yourself. Spread
out big changes and diffi-
cult projects over time;
don't lump the hard things
all together.
10. Take one day at a time.
11. Separate worries from
concerns. If a situation is a
concern, find out what God
would have you do and let


12. Live within your budg-
et; don't use credit cards
for ordinary purchases.
13. Have backups; an extra
car key in your wallet, an
extra house key buried in
the garden, extra stamps,
etc.
14. K.M.S. (Keep Mouth
Shut). This single piece of
advice can prevent an
enormous amount of trou-
ble.
15. Do something for the
Kid in you everyday.
16. Carry a Bible with you
to read while waiting in
line.
17. Get enough rest.
18. Eat right.
19 Get organized, so every-
thing has its place.
20. Listen fo a. tape while
driving that can help
improve your quality of
life.
21. Write down thoughts
and inspirations.
22. Every day, find time to
be alone.
23. Having problems? Talk
to God on the spot. Try to
nip small problems in the
bud. Don't wait until it's
time to go to bed to try and
pray.


24. Make friends with
Godly people.
25. Keep a folder of favorite
scriptures on hand.
26. Remember that the
shortest bridge between
despair and hope is often a
good "Thank you Jesus"
27. Laugh.
28. Laugh some more!
29. Take your work seri-
ously, but not yourself at
all.
30. Develop a forgiving atti-
tude (most people are
doing the best they can).
31. Be kind to unkind peo-
ple (they probably need it
the most.)
32. Sit on your ego.
33. Talk less; listen more.
34. Slow down.
35. Remind yourself that
you are not the general
manager of the universe.
36. Every night before bed,
think of one thing you're
grateful for that you've
never been grateful for
before.
GOD HAS A WAY OF
TURNING THINGS
AROUND FOR YOU
If God is for us, who can
be against us? (Romans
8:31)


3tep ae Ir .


TEN YEARS AGO
June 24, 1998
Opening activities 'for the final
week of the Watermelon Festival is
S"the Rotary Barbecue, beginning at
4:30 p.m. Friday at the Opera House.
Things continue moving rapidly
on the jail front. Last week, the
County Commission granted Sheriff
Ken Fortune permission to proceed
with preliminary steps necessary to
move the communications tower
from the existing jail to the new site
at the industrial park.
Bob Williamson on Tuesday for-
mally announced his intention to
seek the District 4 County
Commission seat as a Democrat.
in Congressman Allen Boyd will be
inMonticello on July 1 to meet with
'local residents and discuss con-
stituent services and federal govern-
ment issues.
The Apalachee Regional
Planning council (ARPC) will report
its findings on the Doug Wainright
subdivision at the July 2 meeting.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
June 22, 1988
Robin Baker is Jefferson
County's new Watermelon Queen.
First runner-up ,honors went to
'Marcie Day. Winner of the second
runner-up position was Teri Naylor,
I who tied for "Miss Congeniality"
with Kim Duncari. Amy Monroe, the
third runner-up, won two additional
trophies: the talent award and the
evening gown competition.
Jeanna and Kimberly Anne
Folsom, daughter. of Tom and Jean
Folsom of Monticello, have both
Made the Dean's List for the winter
semester.
The 1988 Watermelon Festival Jr.
Miss Winner was Felicia Floyd. The
first runner-up was Lataasha Byrd
Jand the second runner-up was Decca
Palladino.
J.B. and Marjorie Smith of
,'Drifton will be celebrating their 50h
wedding anniversary on July 3 at
Macedonia Freewill Baptist Church.
', "\ ' -.. .., - : .. .. .. ..


THIRTY YEARS AGO
June 22, 1978
Jennifer Yaun, the 16-year-old
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James
Yaun, danced her way to the 1978.,
Watermelon Queen title at the beau-
ty pageant last Friday.
The Jefferson County
Watermelon Festival Parade, which!
begins on Saturday at 10:30 a.m.,l
promises to be one of the largest ever:
seen in the county with more than 801
units participating.
The Watermelon Festival Talent |
Show which will be held at thel
Jefferson High School auditorium at 1
8 p.m. on.Friday, June 23, will offer a!
variety of performances by contest-
ants of all ages.
FORTY YEARS AGO I
June 22, 1968
Miss Margaret Miller has gradu-i
ated from Auburn University in:
Auburn, Alabama on June 3 with a!
BS degree in electrical engineering. I
Mrs. J.R. Cooksey, Jr., was given'
special honors by the Monticello ||
chapter of the Order of the Eastern
Star at its regular meeting held,
Tuesday evening in the Masonic
Temple.
The Jefferson County Country!!!
Club Watermelon Festival Dance
will feature Bo Chitty and the Top.
Hats from Valdosta, Georgia.
Mrs. J.R. Murdock entertained |
Friday evening at her home on:
Sunset Drive at dessert bridge.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
June 22, 1958
Mr. and Mrs. Carr Settle and!
Sandra of Moore Haven were busi-
ness visitors here.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
June 22, 1948
Miss Benji Hodges is i.
Monticello's representative at Girls ,
State.
Rev. and Mrs. J.W. Gardner, new-l-
pastor and his wife of Firstv
Methodist Church were honored last "I
Thursday evening at a reception held -//
in the recently remodeled parsonage.-
.. ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... .. :> : L


Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.

An Open Letter To Our Politicians


Dear Editor:


The Republican and Democratic
Parties have failed the American people,
from the President, right down to the most-
junior congressman.
The Republicans have lost their moral
compass, and thus their courage to do
right.
The Democrats are so controlled by a
few small groups of radical leftist social-
ists, that they are totally blind. We- don't
need any more government intervention
screwing everything up:
A few weeks,ago, our elected leaders
rejected legislation allowing us to drill for
our own oil. We have enough oil here to
become independent of buying from our
sworn enemies, yet our elected officials
allow China to drill 50 miles off our coast,
denying us this opportunity.
What is wrong with that picture? Our
technology has advanced to the point that
contaminating the surrounding areas of
an oil drilling site has been totally mini-
mized. Yet our elected officials continue
to cower under the pressure of radical
environmentalists and groups like
MoveOn.org, which continue to promote
the lie of global warming.
Do we have to be responsible for this
planet? Well, absolutely. The founder of
the Weather Channel has stated that Al
Gore and his cronies are wrong about


global warming. Where in the news did
we hear about these statements from a
real weather expert?
I pray the American people will wake
up before we follow a bunch of cowards
and fools to our own demise. Let's start
solving our problems with our own
resources. The fact that gas prices have
doubled in the last two years is not George
W. Bush's fault. The growing trend of
blaming Bush for all of our problems is
immature and lacks intellectual honesty.
We are purchasing the life-blood of
our economy (oil) from our enemies. They
can completely destroy our economy, if
we let them. Our economy would be stim-
ulated if the price of gas drops. Let's start
telling our politicians what to do, which is
the "will of the people," not the agenda of
small groups of power hungry elites.
Please, America, wake up before it's
too late. We must remember that freedom
always comes with a price. We have ene-
mies abroad, but much more dangerous
are the enemies we have within.
Freedom must be fought for continu-
ally, or those that seek personal power
will take it from us. It can happen here,
and it already has.

Sincerely,
Lawrence Beger
Monticello


Did You








A CATERPILLAR HAS MORE MUSCLES THAN A
HUMAN A CATERPILLAR HAS 2,000 MUSCLES.
THAT IS OVER 3 TIMES MORE MUSCLES THAN A
HUMAN









Wednesday, June 25, 2008


Monticello News 3A


.OUND


EFFERSON


COUNTY


Fireworks


Cont. From Page 1


even if the funding suddenly became
available.
"I have no products at this time,"
Bullock said.
Bullock approached the County
Commission last year on Oct. 4, following
the loss of the $5,000, and essentially
asked county officially to endorse him as
the sole responsible party for staging the
fireworks program. If he was going to
risk and suffer the financial conse-
quences, he wanted the full authority and
responsibility also, Bullock said at the
time.
"Volunteerism is not doing it," he
said. "This is not an open rodeo."
He said he wanted to oversee every

Road Projects


aspect of the program, from the selection
of the fundraising committee to the pres-
entation of the fireworks.
"I want to select the committee,"
Bullock said. "That way, if there's a loss,
it's my loss. My fish has been skinned
and fried too many times. I'm like a
chicken that's well done."
At the time, County Attorney Buck
Bird advised the board that it could give
the" enterprise its blessing, but it could
not sanction or endorse the event, as it
was essentially a private affair, notwith-
standing the benefit to the community.
"That clinched it," Bullock said on
Monday. "That was the hair that broke
the camel's back."

Cont. From Page 1


slightly since its formulation as a result
of the most recent legislative session, he
said. One change affecting this county, he
said, was that the resurfacing of CR-257
had been delayed a year. Instead of being
set for resurfacing ir the coming fiscal
year, as originally scheduled, the resur-
facing was now planned for the 2010 fiscal
year, he said.
The 2010 fiscal year begins July 1,
2009. CR-257 is the stretch of county road
between the outlying communities of
Aucilla and Lamont.
McKarron said the change resulted
from the fact the SCOP funding had been
one of the hardest hit. SCOP stands for
Small Counties Outreach Program, one
of two programs that the FDOT adminis-
ters to help small counties with their
road improvement projects. The other is
SCRAP, which stands for Small Counties
Road Assistance Program. The two pro-
grams together have brought millions of
dollars into Jefferson County and
account for the resurfacing or widening
of such roads as the Boston Highway, Old
Lloyd, and Nash.
Commissioners took the information
under advisement for review. One imme-
diate comment, however, concerned the
proposed lighting of the 1-10 and CR-257
interchange, which is virtually undevel-
oped. Commission Chairman Felix
"Skeet" Joyner wondered why the CR-257
interchange had been given priority for
lighting over the Lloyd or SR-59 inter-
change.
For one thing, the Lloyd interchange
was highly developed, he pointed out. For
another, he had been requesting that
lighting be installed at the Lloyd inter-
change for years, he said. Unless it was
that his colleague, Commissioner J. N.
"Junior" Tuten, had more pull with the
FDOT than he did, Joyner offered good-
naturedly, he didn't understand why the
one had been chosen over the other. The
CR-257 interchange is in District 1 and

Tomatoes


The very young, elderly, and frail, or
those with impaired immune system, are
particularly vulnerable.
Since the first report of the tomato-
linked salmonella surfaced in early April,
552 people in 32 states, including the
District of Columbia, have reportedly
contracted the disease. The latest report-
ed cases date from as recent as a few days
ago.
FDA investigators have now worked
their way down the distribution network
from the points of consumers' purchase
or consumption of the contaminated
tomatoes to the suspected points of origin
in central and south Florida and Mexico.
It is reported that the contamination is
likely to have occurred in a packing shed,
warehouse, supplier chain, or distribu-
tion center.
Strickland finds it a little inexplicable
how the source of the contamination can
be pinpointed, given the vagaries, of the
situation. He points out that that the
tomatoes currently on his shelves weren't

Budget


with several policy issues that would
require the board's direction. Schleicher
said commissioners would have an oppor-
tunity to review the various departments'.
budgets; compare the revenues and
expenditures columns, and see where the
department heads proposed to make cuts
and why.
The goal then was to discuss the vari-
ous budgets at the July 17th evening
meeting, and depending how the discus-
sions went, maybe set workshops to fur-
ther discussthe proposals if warranted,
he said.
"I'd like for us to complete the process
by early August," Schleicher said. "Our
departments have given us some pretty
good cuts. We'll discuss at the July 17
meeting what these cuts will mean. What
I call the county departments (non-consti-

Water System


Florida Department of Environmental
Protection (FDEP), funded the first
phase of the system, which was com-
pleted only a few years ago. Phase one
allowed for installation of, the basic
centralized water system that now
serves such outlying communities as
Aucilla, Boland, Lamont, Wacissa and
Waukeenah. It was the lack of quality


the Lloyd interchange in District 4.
McKarron promised to look into the
matter and report back his findings. He
also offered that such comments were
precisely the kind of local input that the
process called for.
A second ARPC representative pro-
vided an update of two FDOT-related
projects that county officials had request-
ed action on. The first involved a call for
an acceleration merge lane on US 27 at
SR-59 south of Lloyd. The second called
for reduced speeds and other appropriate
signage at the intersection of US 19 and
the Jefferson Cbunty High School road
near Drifton. The' ARPC representative
said the FDOT was1,'continuing to look at
both projects and wbuld report its finding
in the near future.
Commissioner' Jerry Sutphin
inquired about the status of the US 19
bypass around the courthouse. He point-
ed out that the small two-lane section on
US 19 north of the courthouse represents
the only bottleneck in the four-lane
highway between Tampa, FL, and
Atlanta, GA, and poses a potential disas-
ter all its own in the event of a mass
evacuation. The FDOT approved a feasi-
bility study of the bypass about two
years ago but nothing more has been
heard of the study. The latest approved
study is the third that the FDOT has
approved so far on the bypass, with
nothing ever coming of the two earlier
studies.
McKarron promised to look into the
status of the study and report back his
findings to the commissioners. He
offered, however, that US 19 was rather
unique in that it was considered an
intrastate instead of an interstate high-
way. What's more, the FDOT had deter-
mined that its traffic-bearing capacity
was adequate for its present level of
service, he said. But that level was sub-
ject to change and so it warranted
reevaluating its status, he added.

Cont. From Page 1


even blooms when the outbreak was first
reported in April; yet reports of.new con-
taminations continue to be documented
as late as June. How can this be, given the
short shelf live of tomatoes?
What's more, the tomato-growing sea-
son, like a great many other crops, gener-
ally start in the south of the state and
moves northward. So again, how can the
cases of contamination continue to occur?
It's almost as if the contamination would
have to be intentional, or somehow attrib-
utable to some other sources, to explain
the continuation of the problem after so
long, Strickland ventures.
Nonetheless, the FDA encourages
consumers to be cautious. Besides toma-
toes grown in the FDA-cleared counties,
the federal agency says it's okay to eat
cherry tomatoes, grape tomatoes, toma-
toes sold with the vines attached, and
homegrown tomatoes. The FDA encour-
ages, consumers to ask stores for the
source of the tomatoes, if they have any
question.

Cont. From Page 1


tutional operations) have done a yeo-
man's work on the budget."
Commission Chairman Felix "Skeet"
Joyner said that he, for one, wanted to
schedule the workshops regardless, to get
a better understanding of the situation.
He then instructed Schleicher to draft
a letter to the five constitutional officers
for his signature. He asked that the letter
request that the constitutional officers
enumerate in theiiresponses the monies
that each expected to carry over from the
current fiscal year into the new fiscal
year. Also, he wanted the constitutional
officers to enumerate the revenues that
each projected for t eir respective opera-
tions in the coming fiscal year.
"Give them until July 9," Joyner said,
referring to the deadline for submittal of
the requested information.

Cont. From Page 1


drinking water in some of these com-
munities that triggered the pursuit of
the water system.
Other accomplishments of phase
one included construction of three
water wells, erection of two elevated
storage tanks, and installation of
494,000 linear feet of distribution
lines.


City Man Arrested on Grand Theft Charges


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Jack Odom, 47, of Monticello was
arrested, June 13 and charged with grand
theft (Jefferson County charge), grand
theft (Leon County charge) and fraud
(Leon County charge.)
According to a Jefferson County
Sheriffs Office report, Deputy Chris Eades
received a telephone complaint from
Robert Alexander with Persica Florida
Nurseries, LLC, and he explained that
they had already filed a report with the
Leon County Sheriff's Office in reference
to an employee using his company fuel
card to purchase fuel without permission.
He stated that they checked the fuel
charges and discovered that Odom had
charged unleaded fuel to the card he was
issued.
Odom was a delivery driver and drives
a diesel powered company truck. His only
fuel purchases should have been for diesel
fuel. After reviewing the bills, they dis-
covered that Odom was charging unleaded
fuel as far back as August of 2007.
After LCSO began working the case, it
was discovered that only a portion of the
charges were made at store in Leon
County, other charges were made. in
Jefferson County.
LCSO advised Alexander to contact
l


JCSO and file a complaint for the- unau-
thorized fuel charges made here. LCSO
also advised Alexander to give JCSO their
case number, so Jefferson could obtain
any necessary information for the local
case.
Eades obtained Odom's information,
and Alexander told him that to use the
card, an odometer reading and last four
numbers of the user's Social Security
number has to be entered to make the pur-
chase. He added that Deputy G. Sellers
with LCSO interviewed Odom the day
prior, and that during that. interview,
Odom allegedly admitted that he made the
unauthorized charges. Alexander also
stated that Odom was terminated as a
result of those unauthorized charges.
After collecting further information,
including location numbers of the pur-
chases Eades reviewed the LCSO reports
and saw that Odom also told Sellers that
he had already told his supervisor
(Alexander) that he wanted'to pay back
the money.
Eades determined that Odom made
unauthorized purchases of $1,764.68 worth
of gasoline in Jefferson County, using the
company credit card.
Odom was transported to the county
jail and. booked on the local grand theft
charge. Bond was set at $2,500 and he
bonded out of jail the same day.


Tallahassee Man Arrested For Violation


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Steven Alexander
Bivens, 27, Tallahassee,
was arrested June 11 and
charged with two counts
of violation of probation
possession of cocaine
within 1000 feet of a
school.
According to a
Jefferson County Sheriff's
Office report, Bivens was
on Drug Offender
Probation from Jefferson
County and had violated
the prospective probation


by Violation of Condition,
which states, in part, "you
will not use intoxicants to
excess or possess any
drugs or narcotics, unless


prescribed by a physi-
cian."
On June 10, Bivens
admitted to the use of
cocaine and marijuana on
or around May 24, 2008.
Bivens tested positive for
marijuana in the office
June 10.
The Department of
Corrections requested
that Bivens be held with-
out bond pending review
of the case by the sentenc-
ing judge.
Bond was withheld
and he is being held in the
county jail.


Felon Arrested for Bullet Possession


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Leo Jason Jones, 26, of
Monticello, was arrested
June 13, and charged as a
felon in possession of a
firearm or ammunitions.
According to a report
from City Police, Officer
Jessica Schwartz was dis-
patched to 845 East King
St. at 3:21 a.m. to get a vic-
tim's statement in refer-
ence to a disturbance that
occurred at 2:33 a.m.,
between Jones and Norris
Thompson.


ON M--
Jones allegedly stated
that he 'wanted to get his
gun and "take care of"


Thompson and added that
he knew he was a convict-
ed felon and refused to
produce his handgun.
The report says Jones
stated that he didn't want
to get into any trouble and
then opened up a rolled up
T-shirt and emptied out
six small, caliber bullets
onto Schwartz's patrol
car.
He was placed under
arrest and transported to
the Jefferson County Jail.
Bond was set at $2500
and he remained in jail, as
of June 17.


Everything You Need \
Whatever information you're looking for, job listings,
sports highlights, school or local news, the newspaper
has got you covered. Call 850-997-3568 to have all of
this and more delivered to you bi-weekly.

Monticello News Et The Jefferson County Journal
1215 North Jefferson Street
850.997.3568


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4A Monticello News


Wednesday, June 25, 2008


OUND


EFFERSON


COUNTY


P Monticello Is No Debutante



At The Recession Ball


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Councilwoman Idella
Scott recognized city em-
ployees with a picnic at the
City Hall on Thursday,
June 12.


She states that the city
employees are all very de-
serving of this show of ap-
preciation, and the
recognition was long over-
due.
The employees enjoyed
themselves as they came


by on their lunch breaks.
They were able to visit, and
enjoy a good meal.
Scott and others were
up late the night before
preparing the baked beans
and cold salads. There
were also burgers and hot-
dogs with all the trim-
mings, desserts and cold
drinks.
Scott began recogniz-
ing the employees with
Certificates of Apprecia-
tion and goodie bags at the
June 3 City Council meet-
ing. She said that she will
continue to recognize them
this way until they have all
been personally thanked
and publicly recognized.
Those recognized to
date include: Roger Black,
Raymond Clark, Rochester
Proctor, and Greg
Seabrooks.


Gabrielle Thompson
Moloticello News
Staff II writer
In 1935. much of the
United States was caught in
the worst of the Depression.
struggling to survive.
Many small towns van-
ished as their residents mi-
grated away in search of
work further afield.
In Monticello, creative
and canny locals came upL
with a different solution,
and started the "'Buy It In
Monticello" campaign. Now
that we face a new type of
recession, one driven by
ever-rising fuel costs and a
lack of localized industry,
Monticello residents must
start looking towards home
for practical solutions in an
impractical world.
During the Depression
era, Monticello businesses
survived, and often thrived,
by implementing special
programs strictly for locals.
Coupons and special of-
fers gave the residents a
chance to spend their
money in worthwhile fash-
ion, while rolling stores
made it possible for rural
and city residents to pool re-
sources.
Such stores carried ne-
cessities from town to the
outlying farming commu-
nity, and often accepted
such things as produce,
eggs, milk, handicrafts and
canned or preserved goods
in trade.
Such goods were then
trucked back into town,
where they could be sold or
traded to other businesses
or placed on store shelves.
These days, much of
Monticello's annual income
revolves around tourism,
and the money that out-
siders spend in our commu-
nity The Watermelon
Festival and summer vaca-
tions have traditionally
brought in droves of
tourists and vendors, but
things may not be as certain
this year.
With the rising costs of
fuel, and the economic
downturn taking a toll on
travel and luxury income,
our local businesses are
turning their eyes home-
ward, and focusing on gen-
erating income within our
own ranks.,
"I wish they would quit
blaming us," one local gas
station manager says
wearily "We don't like these
prices either- we have to set
them where the companies
who we get our fuel from iell
us to.
We don't make any
money off of it, because
we're paying almost exactly
the same as you are per gal-
lon. It's depressing to be
yelled at for something that
is hurting us just as much
as our customers."
The managers of the
local Exxon/Wendy's, part
of the 1-10 corridor of busi-
nesses, were forthright and
honest about their predica-
ment. With gas sales down
by nearly half froan this
time last year and grocery
and restaurant sales
steadily losing ground, they
worry about their employ-
ees, and about their own
jobs. A sheaf of applica-
tions sits on their desks,
each one a job they wish
they could give.
"We just don't have the
traffic," they explain. "No-
body's driving, and we're
not getting enough local
business to hire more peo-
ple." Observing their slow
trickle of customers, I un-


derstand their plight. Their
problems are shared by
communities all over the na-
tion.
Such economic strug-
gles, however, can often be
mitigated or erased simply
by focusing within the area.
Local businesses are the
lifeblood of any community:
but especially so in a small
town. I've always found it
comforting to walk into a
business and be greeted by
name. or with questions'
about my family, pets. and
life.
Such customer service
goes far beyond the canned
and rehearsed lines of large
chain franchises, and truly
makes you feel as though
you are among friends.
Unfortunately, we are in
danger of losing such lux-
ury treatment if we don't
rally together in difficult
times and support one an-
other. As money gets
tighter, we must find ways to
make our budgets stretch,
and still live la dolce vita,
the sweet life. 1
Thanks to the rich vari-
ety of Jefferson County,
such things are not as diffi-
cult as we might think.
In a recent conversation
with a far-flung acquain-
tance, we were discussing
second honeymoons and ro-
mantic getaway weekends.
After searching for a way to
whisk his wife off on a mini-
vacation after the birth of
their first child, my friend
was disconsolate. He simply
couldn't figure out how to
afford the trip. After a
few minutes of conversa-
tion, we struck upon an
idea that would give him
everything he wanted at a
fraction of the cost. ,
With help from a local
florist who specializes in
gift baskets, and the serv-
ice of a hometown B and
B, my friend managed to
give his wife a lovely, re-
laxing weekend of being
pampered and wooed.
The best part, he con-
fided to me on the phone,
was that he had managed
an even better surprise,
presenting her with a


bank book for their new
son's saving account,
started with some of the
vacation fund he had
saved by staying local.
In Monticello, with
our wealth of cottage in-
dustries and beautiful
B&B inns, a romantic
weekend away from the
children is simply a
l)hone call away.
Rather than traveling
out of the area. you can
find fine French dining,
decadent gift baskets, or
even a woodsman's week-
end for the husband, all
within a few minutes
drive from home.
Such local businesses
truly do give you your
money's worth, as every
dollar spent with them is
another dollar available
for spending within the
community, and another
local job secured.
For the business own-
ers, there are often other
advantages to focusing lo-
cally. In addition to nu-
merous cottage crafts
available for wholesale
from local folks, one of the
directors of the world's
largest barter company is
located in town.
This can open the door
for an international mar-
ket for our industry, all
without having to travel
further than a few blocks.
By offering local discounts
to the community, you can
also draw more traffic
through your doors, and
reward the residents who
support your growth;
Such small kindnesses are
well worth the effort, and
are often remembered
more readily than imper-
sonal discounts offered by
large chains.
Monticello has weath-
ered the economic swings
and roundabouts in the
past through creativity
and our strong sense of
community. Despite the
current bleak reports
bombarding us through
the news, our local busi-
nesses remain optimistic,
and confident in their
ability to do so again.


C '"


Councilwoman Scott Honors


City Employees With Picnic


11


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Betty Pack

is retiring after 12 years

of devoted service.


Best wishes for a

wonderful retirement!



Farm Credit of Northwest Florida


The future of our economy is uncertain.
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HEALTH EDUCATOR
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The Jefferson County Health Dept has an
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coordinate a public health program in
Jefferson and Madison counties.
Annual Salary range: $29,000 $35,000 Min
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call 850.342.0170 Ext 2031








Wednesday, June 25, 2008


Monticello News 5A


OUND


EFFERSON


COUNTY


IUNNUNI1rVIAL5N0 A-


MARY LOUISE LEDINGTON


Mary Louise Leding-
ton, age 76 a homemaker,
passed away at her home
in Monticello, Friday, June
20, 2008.
f> Funeral Service was
' held Monday, June 23, 2008
at Beggs Funeral Home
Monticello Chapel, 485 E.
Dogwood Street, Monti-
G cello, Florida,, at 2:00 PM.
Interment followed the
- service at Oakfield ceme-
tery' in Monticello. The
family received friends
one hour prior to the serv-


Mrs. Ledington, was a


native of Wilmington,
Delaware and had lived in
Elkton, Maryland before
moving to Monticello. She
was of Pentecostal faith
and attended the Souls
Port Pentecostal Church in
Tallahassee.
She is survived by
three sons; Gary Stotz of
Quitman, Georgia, George
(Ricky) Stotz and Dana
Paul Stotz of Tallahassee,
one sister Betty Thomp-
kins of Wilmington,
Delaware, five grandchil-
dren and one great grand-
child.


Margie Lou Hartsfield
age 63, died Sunday June
22, 2008, in Monticello,
Florida.
Funeral services will
be Wednesday, June 25, 2008
at Beggs Funeral Home
Monticello Chapel, 485 E.
Dogwood Street, Monti-
cello, Florida, at 10:00 A.M.
Interment will follow the
service at Walker Cemetery
in Madison, County The.
family received friends at
Beggs Funeral Home Mon-
ticello Chapel Tuesday,
June 24, 2008 from 6-8 P.M.
Donations may be made to:
Big Bend Hospice 1723-1
Mahan Center Blvd Talla-
hassee FL 32308-5428.
Mrs. Margie, was a na-
tive of Lamont and had
lived in Tallahassee, Perry
and Nuttall Rise before
moving to Monticello. She


Garner 0. James Jr.,
43, died Friday, June 20,
2008.
Graveside service were
held 12 p.m. Tuesday, June
. 24, 2008 at Oakfield.Ceme-
tery in Monticello. Family
, received friends from 6 to 8
n p.m. Monday, June 23, 2008
at Culley's MeadowWood
Riggins Road Chapel (850-
* 877-8191). Memorials may
be made to Ebenezer Bap-
tist Church, P.O. Box 652,
Monticello, FL 32345.
Garner is survived by


was of Baptist faith and at-
tended New Home Baptist
Church in Perry
Margie is survived by
two sons; Hank (Amy)
Evans of Monticello
Florida, Clay (Jami) Evans
of Perry, Florida; one
daughter' Amy (Michael)
of Port St Joe, Florida; two
brothers Bud (Mercedes)
Hartsfield of Alabama, El-
bert Hartsfield of Monti-
cello; five sisters Lucy
Hughes of Monticello, Es-
ther (Wayne) Gueltzow of
Crawfordville, Lela
(George) McCrainie of
Perry, Florida, Rosa
(Bobby) Simmonrs'of' Ten-
nessee and Dorothy
(Patrick) McMullen of
Perry, Florida; three grand-
children Sarah, Tyler and
Kelli, her husband Earl
Parnell.


his wife, Joy Hammer-
schmidt James; his par-
ents, Garner and Grace
James; brother, Mike
James (and his wife Dina)
of Monticello; sister,
Kathy James Phillips (and
her husband Jerry) of
Monticello; four nieces,
Danielle and Heather
James and Zoe and Olivia
Hammerschmidt; many
good friends including
Jim and Angela. Moran
and other family mem-
bers.


Register for your chance to
win -2 tickets to
Wild Adventures Theme Park.
One winner will be drawn at
random.
Deadline for entry is 8-15 Noon,


June 25
Monticello Kiwanis
Club meets every Wednes-
day at noon at the Jefferson
Country Club on Boston
Highway for lunch and a
meeting. Contact President
Rob Mazur at 907-5138 for
club information.
June 25
A member of Congress-
man Allen Boyd's staff will
visit the Jefferson County
Public Library 9:30 11:30
a.m. on the fourth Wednes-
day of every month so that
the people of Jefferson
County have. the opportu-
nity to discuss issues of
concern.
June 26
AA meetings are held 8
p.m. on Thursdays at Christ
Episcopal Church Annex,
425 North Cherry Street.
For more information call
997-2129, 997-1955.
June 27
Monticello Rotary Club
meets every Friday at noon
at the Monticello/Jefferson
Chamber of Commerce on
West Washington Street for
lunch and a meeting. Con-
tact President Judson Free-
malt at 997-0370 for club
information.
June 27
Family Skate Night is
held 7 p.m. on the last Fri-
day of each month at the
Church of the Nazarene on
North Jefferson Street. This
event is free, as are the
skates if needed. There is a
small charge for snacks.
June 27-28
USDA Commodities
and Second Harvest will
welcome volunteers to bag
food packages 6:30 p.m. Fri-
day evening for distribution
9-11 a.m. Saturday at the
New Bethel AME Church
6496 Ashville Highway Con-
tact Essie Norton at 997-5683
for information.
June 28
Jefferson SHARE vol-


unteers will be stationed at
the Church of the Nazarene
1780 North Jefferson Street
8 to 9:30 a.m. Saturday with
the monthly food delivery
orders. Turn in Registra-
tion Copy when picking up
orders. Cash donations will
be accepted for the cost of
fuel for the volunteers. Con-
tact Martha Creel at 445-
9061 for more information.
June 28
The regular last-Satur-
day-of-the-month meeting
of the Tallahassee Crochet
Guild will be held 10 a.m. 2
p.m. at the Jefferson Arts
Gallery, 575 West Washing-
ton Street. This is a free
meeting. Bring your own
projects or work on some of
the Tallahassee Crochet
Guild projects. No children
please. http://www.divacro-
chet.com for updates.
June 28
AA meetings are held 8
p.m. Saturday at Christ
Episcopal Church Annex,
425 North Cherry Street.
For more information call
997-2129, 997-1955.
June 30
AA Women's Meetings
are held 6:45 p.m. Monday;
AA and Al-Anon meetings
are held 8 p.m. Christ Epis-
,copal Church Annex, 425
North Cherry Street. For
more information call 997-
2129, 997-1955. ,
June 30
Boy Scout Troop 803
meets 7 p.m. every Monday
at the Eagles Nest south on
Water Street. This is a Class
A Uniform meeting. For in-
formation contact Scout
Leader Paul Wittig at 997-
1727 or 997-3169.
June 30
Martin Luther King
Community Center meets 7
p.m. on the last Monday of
each month. Contact
-Charles Parrish at 997-3760
for more information.
Jul&i


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AA classes are held
every Tuesday evening 8
p.m. for those seeking help.
Located at 1599 Springhol-
low Road in the Harvest
Center. Contact Marvin
Graham at 212-7669 for
more information.
July_1
Monticello/Jefferson
County Chamber of Com-
merce Board Members meet
at noon on the first Tuesday
of each month. Contact Di-
rector Mary Frances Gram-
lifig at 997-5552, or
monticellojeffersonfl.com
'July 3
The monthly Commu-
nity Prayer Breakfast is
held 7 to 8 a.m. on the first
Thursday of the month for
breakfast and a meeting.
For more information con-
tact Coordinator L. Gary
Wright at 933-5567 'or
lgwright39(&,embarqmail.co
m
July 3
Monticello Main Street
meets at noon on the first
Thursday of the month at
the Monticello/Jefferson
County Chamber of Com-


merce. This is a "brown
bag" lunch meeting. Con-
tact the Chamber at 997-5552
for date changes and more
information.
July 3
Girl Scout leaders and
volunteers meet 6:30 p.m. on
the first Thursday of every
month, at the Eagle's Nest
on South Water Street, for a
general meeting. Contact
Diane Potter for more infor-
mation at 386-2131.
July 4
Ashville Area Volun-
teer Fire Department meets
6:30 p.m. on the first Friday
of each month, at the fire
station. Contact Fire Chief
John Staffieri at 997-6807 for
more details.
July 6
VFW Post 251 meets 5
Sp.m. on the first Sunday of
each month at the Memo-
rial Missionary Baptist
Church on South Railroad
Street, in the annex build-
ing, for a business and plan-
ning meeting. Contact Sr.
Vice Commander Byron
Barnhart at 251-0386 for
more information.


MARGIE LOU

HARTSFIELD PARNELL


GARNER 0. JAMES JR.


Don't Get Burned
By "Hot" Stocks
Provided by Robert J. Davison

Summer is officially here, which means, among other things,
that you should apply sunscreen when you go out in the hot
sun. But no matter what the season, you'll also need to pro-
tect yourself from another potential source of bums -"hot"
stocks.
Stocks that seem poised to "take off' will ahays iaptuL c in
vestors' imaginations. But the lure of these .to-.cks may be
particularly strong during, or following, period-s .:( market'
volatility, when investors are looking for potential bright.
spots.
However, it's usually not such a good idea to chase "hot"
stocks and here's why:


* You may be. relying on an unreliable source. You can
get a "hot stock tip" from anyone: your barber or your
brother-in-law, your cousin or your chiropractor, your
dentist or your dry cleaner. While all these people
probably mean well, they may not be the market ex-
perts on whom you wish to rely. But even the so-called
market "gurus" who tout stocks irn magazines, on televi-
sion or on the Internet may not be the best forecasters,
either, so you'll need to take their advice with a grain
of salt, especially as they know nothing about your in-
dividual situation.
You may be too late. You may actually find a hot stock
but by the time you do, it's also been "discovered" by
a lot of other investors. This usually means one of two
things: The stock has already peaked and is now start-
ing to cool off or the huge interest in the stock is driv-
ing up its price to an unsustainable level, given the
stock's earnings and other factors.
You'll be "buying high." Here's the classic rule of in-
vesting: Buy low and sell high. It's very good advice,
except that it's almost impossible to follow after all,
no one can really predict when a particular stock has
reached either its high or low points. However, that
doesn't mean you shouldn't at least try to pursue stocks
whose current prices are low and thus may be good
buys. But if you're purchasing a hot stock one that,
almost by definition, has risen sharply you've probably
already disqualified yourself from the "buy low" part of
the formula, which means your stock may have less
"upside" potential than other, cheaper stocks.
You may be buying a stock thai doesn't meet your
needs. Some stocks whether they're hot, cold or in-
between are simply not right for your individual
needs. For example, if you've built a diversified portfo-
lio, and you already have the right amount of "growth"
stocks, you might be throwing your holdings out of bal-
ance and increasing your risk level to a point beyond
your comfort zone by purchasing another growth
stock, no matter how hot it seems. (Keep in mind,
though, that while diversification is important; it can-
not, by itself, guarantee a profit or protect against a
loss.)

Ultimately, instead of chasing after hot stocks, evaluate each
stock on its own merits and prospects and on how it fits into
your existing holdings. A qualified financial advisor can as-
sist you in selecting those stocks that can help you achieve
your objectives. By doing your research, and by getting the
help you need, you may not always nab the hottest stocks-
but you'll be less likely to be scorched.



Robert J. Davison EdwardJones
Financial Advisor
205 E. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32344
Bus. 850-997-2572 Fax 866-462-9184
Cell 850-933-3329
robert.davison@edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com
Making Sense. of Investing


Mail to: Monticello News
PO Box 428 Monticello, FL 32344
Name:
Address:
Phone:
Do you subscribe:____


ol -


OJU-:








6A Monticello News


Wednesday, June 25, 2008


OUND


EFFERSON


COUNTY


Chamber Raffle Conley Speaks At
T~.ir, 12, Fnol Kiwanis Club Meeting


..
Monticello News Photo By Debbie Snapp, June 9, 2008.
Hydrangeas are in bloom now and can be seen all over town,
especially on East Pearl Street.

How To Care For Hydrangeas


Isabelle de Sercey
Camellia Garden Circle
Now is a good time to talk
about Hydrangeas because
they are blooming every-
where.
Few people know that we
are in the best geographical
location to grow them: North
Florida, South Georgia and
Alabama, but they do not do
well if not treated properly
Location: Unlike roses,
Hydrangeas do not tolerate
full sun. They will not do well
in heavy shade, such as under
an oak tree. The blooms will
be sparse and will not develop
fully
Instead, they prefer
morning sun, afternoon shade
and lots of water. Supplemen-
tal moisture is especially im-
portant the first year or two
and during droughts. Most of
my well established plants
had more dead branches than
usual and fewer blooms this
year, because last spring was
so dry and hot.
Changing Color: Hy-
drangeas come in a range of
colors, from deep blue to rose
and wine. Except for the white
varieties, you can change the
color by controlling the PH of
your soil. In other words, the
more acid in the soil, around
5.2 to 5.5, the bluer they will
get. This can be obtained by
adding aluminum sulfate
around the roots, but be care-


ful not to burn them.
On the other hand, if you
prefer them pink, add
dolomite lime to raise the soil
PH to about 6.0 to 6.5. But do
not expect to see them turn
color over night. I've seen a
big bush of pink on one side
and blue on the other, because
I played with its PH.
Pruning: The book says
hydrangeas should be pruned
as soon as the flowers have
faded. You should begin to see
new growth coming in from,
the base of the plant. To keep
the plant vigorous, selectively
prune out the dead and
weaker stems, both old and
new.
Don't prune out all the old
wood, since this is what will
keep flowering as the new
growth matures. I was talking
to a nurseryman about dead-
heading after the hydrangeas
finished blooming. He said to
keep the dry blooms that have
kept some color so they can be
used for dry flower arrange-
ments, but prune the
blooms that are brown or*
spent.
Fertilizing: Hydrangeas
grow best if they are fertilized
regularly. I use a slow six-
month release fertilizer
such as 13-6-6 in the spring
and plenty of water. I use a
drip hose around them and
they respond well to that kind
of irrigation.


Graham-Scurry-Nealy

Family Reunion 2008


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Graham-Scurry-
Nealy Family Reunion will be
held in Crawfordville. August
29-31, 2008 at the Wakulla
Shrine Club.
If you missed the Re-
union in 2007, you don't want
to be left out this year be-
cause all attending last year
had a good time.
Take a look at some of
the pictures on the family
website at http://Family-
lobby. com/ Grahams cur-
rynealy
The deadline for registra-


tion is August 10, so contact
Lillian Brown, president, at
544-0887 for registration fee,
and other information.
Organizers are looking
for family members to partic-
ipate in the Sunday morning
Worship Service. If you
would like to participate con-
tact Johnella at 894-8815 or
Lillian at 544-0887.
For family members that
would like to stay over an
extra day, there will be a
Labor Day Weekend Concert
and Summer Splash in Craw-
fordville on Sunday, August
31 at the Wakulla Shrine
Club.


Window Painting Workshop


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
One Heart Earth Center
is offering a Window Painting
workshop 10 a.m. Saturday,
July 12 at the Center location,
450 West Madison Street.
Participants will choose
to paint either topiaries or
angels under the instruction
of acclaimed folk artist Janet
Moses of Madison, who will
teach how to paint on win-
dows.


All materials will be pro-
vided, windows, paints,
brushes, patterns. Attendees
will learn, create, laugh, and
make new friends. They will
go home with a unique, one
of a kind window and won-
derful memories!
Windows will be
polyurethane so they can put
in a garden or in the house.
RSVP now to Sallie
Worley salliein-
dia@yahoo.com or 997-
7373 to save a space.


.L L~.-R~~0- U~ A ~7A uR~-


Second Prize is a day at the
salon with -a facial, mani-
cure, pedicure, hairstyle,
and a product basket all
compliments of Debbie
Ussery and Monticello Hair-
lines;
Third Prize is a one-
hour massage and body
wrap, donated by Jennifer
Ellis, LMT.
Fourth Prize is 50 gal-
lons of gas from John Mor-
ris and Morris Petroleum;
and Fifth Prize is four seven-
gallon or 15-gallon trees of
choice from Fred Beshears
and Simpson's Nursery


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Raffle tickets benefiting
the Monticello/Jefferson
County Chamber of Com-
merce are selling for $5 each
and six for $20.
The tickets will con-
tinue to sell until the August
5 drawing. Ticket pur-
chasers need not be present
to win.
The Grand Prize is $500
in cash. First Prize is a
weekend at Alligator Point
Beach Cottage contributed
by member Mike Reichman.


Jefferson Arts Inc. To


Host McCulloch Exhibit


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
An exhibit of oil paint-
ings by Keith B. McCulloch,
will open at Jefferson Arts,
Inc., with a reception from
2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, July 6,
and run through July 31.
On display will be
works mainly from the last
few years, including land-
scapes and still life oils.
The artist works prima-
rily with images derived
from quiet sublime mo-
ments he has experienced.
McCulloch started
painting as .a young child
and majored in art at Yale,
and moved to the Tallahas-
see area some 10 years ago.
"To me it is always a
miracle to see how a mark
on a surface can somehow
assume a dual role: first,


the textural presence of the
artist, and secondly, its de-
scriptive power within a
pictorial space. I tend to
vacillate between using the
mark as abstract subject,
and using it as a descriptive
tool," he says. J
The exhibit is free. The
Gallery is located at 575
West Washington Street,
and is open Wednesdays
and Saturdays from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m., or by appoint-
ment.
Jefferson Arts, Inc. is a
non-profit group, with a
goal of promoting art and
art education in the Monti-
cello area of North Florida
and South Georgia.
For more information
contact the Gallery at 997-
3311 or visit the website at
www.ieffersonartsgallerv.co


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Julie Conley was guest
speaker at the Monticello
Kiwanis meeting Wednes-
day, June 18.
She spoke as the Exec-
utive Director of the Jef-
ferson County Economic
Development Council.
Conley addressed the
Club about the history of
the EDC, which was
founded in 1999, and gave
the members a brief up-
date. on some future plans
for the Industrial Park.
She noted that the
County Commission is in
the process of finishing
the planning, permitting,
and construction of the in-
frastructure in the Indus-
trial Park.
Kiwanians meet at
noon on Wednesdays at
the Jefferson Country
Club on the Boston High-
way.


li IM U


Photo Submitted
Julie Conley, Executive Di-
rector of the Jefferson County
Economic Development Coun-
cil, updated Kiwanians on fu-
ture plans for the Industrial
Park.
For more information
about the Club contact
President Rob Mazur at
907-5138.


Nature Coast Eyecare
Institute in Perry is still
here for you! Dr. Shugar
may not be here physically,
but he is still here in the
hearts of his devoted staff.
Our philosophy is still the
same: treat each patient as
if he or she were a family
member, providing the
highest quality in state-of-
the-art of medicine.
Dr. Tiffany Torrans, OD
who has worked closely
with Dr. Shugar for the past
four years continues to pro-
vide care for his patients


five days a week.
Nature Coast is proud
to announce that we have
several board certified oph-
thalmologists/surgeons
who have joined our prac-
tice. Our new team of
physicians is here for all
your cataract, LASIK,
Glaucoma and diabetic eye
care needs.
We are accepting new
patients. Come join our
family! Give our office a
call to schedule an appoint-
ment (850)-584-8677 or 800-
870-6001.


Mary Jane Dickey Retires From Fire Rescue After 20 Years|


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
After 20 years of serv-
ice to the county with the
ambulance service, Mary
Jane Dickey hung up her
gear and retired June 7.
Her plans for the future re-
volve around spending
more quality time with her
family members, and her
colleagues at the depart-
ment. All agree that she
was a great asset to the de-
partment and the commu-
nity, as well as a top notch
humanitarian, and she
will be sorely missed.
Reflecting on Dickey's
influence, not only at the
department, but also
within the community, her
former colleagues note:
"In March of 1988, Jeffer-
son County citizens were
blessed with a wonderful
lady who joined the ambu-
lance service. Mary Jane
Dickey decided to become
an EMT while working at a
vet's office, and since then
has devoted much of her
time to being an EMT.
Through her work, and
otherwise, Dickey has
found a way to touch many
lives in Jefferson County,
including those of her
four-legged friends as well.
"While working with
the ambulance service,
Mary Jane also worked


with71 Healthly Ways, Memorial Hospital in
through Archbold Thomasville, GA.
Memorial Hos- for her excep-
pital, and tional serv-
found yet ice.
avenue "Dickey
to help h a s
resi been
dents there
here. t
S h e hold
has the

lesslyd
given hands
h ers r o
time, ef- h o s e
f o r t s leaving
a n d (t h is


zens and co- bringg new
workers alike. ives into it. She
Her dedication in as- has been the source
sisting others and provid- of comfort for many citi-
ing care for those in need zens and co-workers as
was evident in everything well. Her smiling face and
she did. cheery attitude brighten
"Dickey has worked
with more employees
through the former ambu-
lance service and the pres-
ent County Fire Rescue
than any other JCFR em-
ployee. She has receivedE c
honors throughout the
years for awards such as Dentures Partials e Relines
'EMT of the Year,' and has Repairs Extractions
also been recognized by Same Day Service On Dentui
area facilities such asTal- Acrylic Parlials, Repairs & Ex
lahassee Memorial H6sspi- By Appointment No Check.
tal and ArchIold -


LDNA BODY~ S U;]miSHO[P


WE TAKE THE
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ACCIDENTS


100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work Frame Straightening
FREE ESTIMATES INSURANCE WORK WELCOME

1630 E. Jackson St. Thomasville, GA
(located behind Langdale Auto Mall)
229-226-2077


everyone's day. Known to
her grandchildren, and
many other children, as
'MeMaw' she has,been part
of the lives of many chil-
dren, both of blood rela-
tions and others.
"Her smiling face, car-
ing hands and warm heart
will be missed by many.
Fortunately, she has in-
stilled much of her pas-
sion for caring for others
in the crew remaining at
JCFR and her efforts will
certainly continue to bene-
fit the citizens of Jefferson
County She will undoubt-
edly find ways to continue
helping and caring for oth-
ers in the years to come"
Her former colleagues
at the department are
presently in the process of
planning a retirement get-
together for Dickey, in
honor and celebration of
her many years of dedica-
tion to her career.


Nature Coast Eyecare Institute

Continues Work Of Dr. Shugar


-


I


0






Wednesday, June 25, 2008


FOUND


EFFERSON


COUNTY


End Of School Party .








.




Photo Submitted
( Enjoying an end of school party recently, are: from left: Rebeca Godwin,
Chantalle Pierce. Daisy Dee. Lauren Mosley. Summer Dee, Austin Gagnon, and
\,Shyanne Godwin. -
VFW To Host Politic ....: l, .. .I m

VFW To Host Political Forum


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
VFW Post 251 will
host a Political Forum
7:30 p.m. Thursday, June


26 at New Bethel AME
Church in the fellowship
hall.
All candidates have
been invited to attend.
The voting community is


also invited and encour-
aged to attend.
Contact Post Com-
mander Byron Barnhart
at 251-0386 for more infor-
mation.


Local Teenagers Perform



In Florida High Orchestra


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
On Monday, May 5
the Florida High Orches-
tra held its Spring Or-
chestra Concert with
three local teenagers
participating in the per-
formance.
Tres Brumbley
played the Double Bass
in the Seventh Grade
Section. Three tunes
were performed from
Shakespeare's England.
They were "Go From
My Window" and
"Greensleeves" by Arr.
Nicholas Hare; and "Pi-
rates of the Caribbean"
(main theme) by
Badelt/Arr. Lavendar,
Moore. 4
Steven Mann played
the Viola and Jacob Gray'
played the Double Bass in B
the Eight Grade Section. S
They performed "Dance Fl


FIu ,IU U UUIIIle.rU
Jacob Gray played the Double
ass in the 8th grade section of the
pring Orchestra Concert held at
lorida State University School.


Scenario" by Elliot del i
Borgo and "Fiddle Tunes 1
#1" by Arr. Merle Isaac.
The sixth, seventh,
eighth and high school or-
chestra. to-
gether played "Bile'em
Cabbage Down/Cripple
Creek Medley," a tradi-
tional piece for the grand
finale.
The Orchestra Con-
certheld at Florida State
University School was di-
rected by Terice Allen
and FSU Intern Rebecca
Murray
These three teen-
agers also participated
with the "Pick Jesus"
group that performed'at
the Gospel Sing during
the Southern Music Ris-
ing Festival in downtown
Monticello.
They are all members
of the Messiah Messen-
gers of Wacissa Pente-
costal Holiness Church.


Loca


Busine


ss


D directory


Call 997-3568 To Advertise Your Business


.N~AV


Monlicello News o 7A,,


J








8A Monticello News


Wednesday, June 25, 2008


PORTS/ SCHOOL


Photo Submitted


2008 Jefferson All-Stars Cal Ripkin League

Back Row: Coaches- Mike Holm, John Burns, Wayne Prvatt and Kevin Horne.
Middle Row: Hunter Horne, Tanner Aman, Capas Kinsey, Jade Greene, Jeffery Prevatt, Samuel Hanks and Charkeus
Cumitle.
Front Row: John Burns, Brandon Holm, Matthew Hutchinson, Nic Roberts, Casey Demott and Hunter Handley


Aucilla Christian Academy Last .Six Weeks Honor Roll


Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy Principal Richard Fin-
layson reports the honor roll
for the final six-week period
of the 2007-2008 school year.
Studnets on the roll and their
grade levels follow:
In K-5: All S+: Dawson
Bishop, AbbiGayle Cope, Ans-
ley English, Nathan Green,
Carl Hall, Brandon Hannon,
Gant Lee, Kaley Mincy, Car-
son Leigh Olson, Hope Ran-
dle, Abby Reams, Mylie
Rogers, Grayson Sircy, and
Ben Wurgler.
All S+ and S: Jacob
Barker, Hailey Clark, Kinsey
Clark, Kash Connell, Jocelyn
Davis, Austin Dunkle, Joshua
Eades, Jason Hamilton, Tay-
lor Knecht, Julianna Lindsey,
Bailey McLeod,. Grant Mer-
schman, Pierce Powers, Bryce
Rapson, Frank Roberts, Pey-
ton Shealey, and Austin
Wheeler.
Iri Grade 1:All As: Grace
Beshears, R.B. Bowen, An-
drew Burrus, Ryan Jackson,
Lynelle Loveless, Attalia
Smith, Dilyn Stowers, Nicolas
Swickley, Katherine Whichel,
and Cody Whiddon.
All As and B's: Alexis
Alexandrou, Brandon Bates,
Marissa Cooley, Mickayla
Courson, Evan Courtney, D.J.
Cox, Taylor Davis, Emily
Forehand, Ameer Khodr,
Amber Knowles, Hayley
Lewis, Hailey Lucas, Maggie
Mall, Ayush Patel, Kaleb Pop-
pell, Chloe Reams, Ashlyn
Rogers, Gabe Rouse, Megan
Schofill, Levi Stafford, and


Mackenzie Wirick.
In Grade 2: All As: Timo-
thy Finlayson, Camryn Grant,
Joe Walton, Mickaela Whid-
don, and Dan Wurgler.
All A's and B's: Jessica
Giddens, Robert Hall, Noah
Hulbert, Katie James, Sum-
mer Jenkins, Haley Jones,
Nour Khodr, Ryals Lee,
Megan McGinnis, Abigail
Morgan, Cannon Randle,
Grace Rouse, Brandon
Slaughter, Emily Smith, and
Ria Wheeler.
In Grade 3: All As:
Stephanie English, Sarah
Hall, Erica Keeler, Ramsey
Sullivan, and Kate Whiddon.
All As and B's: Traynor
Barker, Cali Burkett, Rebecca
Carson, Faith Demott, Skylar
Dickey Joe Hannon, Brittany
Hughes, Jenny Jackson, Lind-
sey Lawson, Hannah Lewis,
Cole MacNeill, Summerlyn
Marsh, Gatlin Nennstiel,
Kirsten Reagan, Will Sircy,
Jackie Walker, and Kirsten
Whiddon.
In Grade 4: All As: Ash-
leigh Bolstridge, Taylor
Copeland, Savannah Jenkins,
Tomas Swickley T. J. Swords,
Sarah Tharpe, Gaige Win-
chester, and Emma Witmer.
All As and B's: Morgan
Cribbs, Meagan Giddens, Sam
Hogg, Erin Lee, Ally Mall,
Taylor McKnight, Courtney
Watts,' and Justin Welch.
In Grade 5: All As: Mor-
gan Cline, Ricky Finlayson,
Sarah James, and Lindsey
Mincy
All As and B's: Cole Bar-


clay, Austin Bishop, Timmy
Burrus, Ty Chancy, Maddie
Everett, Abigail Floyd,
Cheyenne Floyd, Doug
Gulledge, Julie High, Winston
Lee, Carson Nennstiel, Kelsi
Reams, and Bryce Sanderson.
In Grade 6: All A's: Austin
Bolstridge, Hunter Home,
Aimee Love, and Annie Yang.
All As and B's: Casey De-
mott, Kayla Fulford, Ashley
Hebert, Caitlyn Holland,
Brandon Holm, Ashlyn Mills,
Jessica Webb, and Jessica
Welch.
In Grade 7: All As: Ashli
Cline, Jared Jackson, Whit-
ney McKnight, Hadley Revell,
and Wendy Yang.
All As and B's: Alexis
Burkett, Jay Finlayson, Kaley
Love, Ashley Schofill, Audrey
Waters, and Pamela Watt.
In Grade 8: All As: Tyler
Jackson, and Shelby Witmer.
All As and B's: Corey
Burrus, Levi Cobb, and Mar-
cus Evans.
In grade 9: All As: Taylor
Baez-Pridgeon, Kaitlin Jack-
son, Caroline Mueller, and
Abigail Vasquez.
All As. and B's: Clark
Christy, Anna Finlayson, Jes-


sica Hagan, Nikki Hamrick,
Kent Jones, Lisa Kisamore,
Rebekah Miller, Brittany
O'Brian, Marcus Roberts,
Ceira Roland, and Sarah
Sorensen.
In Grade 10: All As: John
Stephens, and Dana Watt.
All As and B's: Ryan Bar-
clay, Tiffany Brasington,
Kalyn Brown, Chelsea Hayes,
Tyler High, Jessica Hunt, and
Sydney Plummer.
In Grade 11: All As:
Chelsea Dobson, Ashley
Echols, Aaveh Green, Mallory
Plaines, Michaela Roccanti,
and Savannah Williams.
All As and B's: Erin Kelly,
Byron Love, Angela McCune,
Katelyn Levine, Olivia
Sorensen, and Luke Witmer.
In Grade 12: All As: Rebekah
Aman, Courtney Brasington,
Ben Buzbee, A. J. Connell,
Courtney Connell, Jayce
Davis, Lindsey Day,
Stephanie Dobson, Alfa Hunt,
Will Hartsfield, Prateen Patel,
Katy Plummer, Ramsey Rev-
ell, and Hannah Sorensen.
All As and B's: Jerel
Drew, Claire Knight, Whitney
Scarberry, Tristan Sorensen,
Paige Thurman.


State Online Courses


Available To Local Students


As local students think
about what courses they
will take next year, or what
credits they need to com-
plete to graduate, they may
explore what summer pro-
grams are available online,
to get a jump-start on next
school year.
Florida Virtual School
(FLVS) is the state's public
online school, which has
been in operation 10 years.
During the 07-08 school year,
50 half credit courses were
taken by students from Jef-


ferson County.
FLVS is a public school
- just like the school down
the street and state certi-
fied teachers lead all aspects
of the instruction. The vir-
tual school works in part-
nership with traditional
schools to ensure students
have access to the courses
they need to graduate as
well as to be prepared for
their next phase of their
lives, whether it is continu-
ing education or entering
the workforce.


A's Rained Out Early


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
In Sunday's baseball
game against Camilla, the
Jefferson A's were lagging
behind 11-2 when the sky
opened up and the bottom
fell out.
"It was a real gully-
washer," said Coach Jim
Norton. "Camilla is the
kind of place once it starts
raining or there is any
kind of inclement weather,
you better leave town
fast."
There were not a lot of
statistics during the game,
but Norton reported what
the A's did during the


game.
Scotty Norton started
on the mound, giving up
nine runs on five hits,
walking three and striking
out no batters.
Reggie Norton ended
on the mound, giving up
two runs, no walks and
striking out two.
At the plate, Scotty
Norton went one for two
and belted a homerun;
Scotty Norton went one for
two; and Reggie Norton
went also went one for two.
Action continues
Around the diamond when
the A's square off against
Miccosukee, 3 p.m., Sun-
day, at the field in Wacissa.


Festival Tennis Tourney,


FRAN HUNT
Monticello New's
StafT II writer
The annual Water-
melon Festival tennis tour-
nament will begin Friday
night, June 27 and con-
tinue through Sunday.
June 29. Because of a large
number of participants,
and additional interest,
matches will be conducted
at both the Recreation Park
and the Country Club.
The matches will begin
at 7 p.m. Friday night, and
continue at 8:30 a.m.. Sat-
urday and Sunday morn-
ing. Trophies will be
awarded to winners in two
USTA (United States Ten-
nis Association) divisions,
7.Q and 8.0 mixed-doubles
teams.
Event coordinator Tr-
isha Wirick said that many
local favorites will be on
hand for the tournament,
and thus far, there has been


one event, and $45 for both
events. For further infor-
mation contact Wirick at
509-1153.
Winning the 7.0 divi-
sion last year were the
team of Angie Delvecchio
and Dennis Kelly, after de-
feiting the finishing sec-
ond place team of Cindyv_
Wainright and Duncan
Tonkinson.
In the 8.0 division, the
team of Susan Goodwin
and Mike Tonkinson. took
first place after defeating
second place winners Sam
Rasco and Susan Martin.
Spokesperson Amy
Harrison said there were a
total of eight, third set tie-
breaking matches during
the tournament. "It was
some very good, stiff com-
petition," she added.


Tigers Begin

Summer Training


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Jefferson County
Middle/High School var-
sity football team began an-
nual summer workouts last
week and Coach Rodell
Thomas is whipping the
Tigers into shape for the
season. Tigers are demon-
strating that they have al-
ready greatly brushed up
on their skills in such a.
short time.
They meet twice per
day, Monday through
Thursday, at 3:30 p.m. to
5:30 p.m., and at 6 p.m. until
8 p.m.
On Mondays and.
Wednesday, the Tigers
workout in the weight
room, and on Tuesdays and
Thursday, they work on


outside agility skills.
In related news, the
varsity and junior varsity
football players will be at-
tending the Scentenary
preseason football camp in
Mount Pleasant, FL, Au-
gust 5-15. This is only the
second time the players
have ever attended the
camp.
Shortly after coming to
JCMHS, Thomas said that
he had taken players from
the other schools that he
has coached for in the past.
He stresses that the camp
attendance is mandatory
for those previously on the
team and those wishing to
play football.
The cost for the camp is
$100 per athlete and the
deadline for making the
payment is June 30.


FMB 43rd Annual Watermelon


Golf Tournament June 28,-29


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Farmers and Mer-
chants Bank 43rd Annual
Watermelon Golf Tourna-
ment is slated for June 28
and 29 at the Country Club,
and the Past Champions
Shoot-out will be held 5
p.m., June 27.
Although the tourna-
ment is already full with 96
golfers, Spokesman Chuck
Chambers said sponsor-
ships are still available for
$100. "Sponsors will have
their names placed on the
banner for three tourna-
ments," said Chambers.
He added that when it
comes to past champions,
in the past 42 years, there
have only been 19 champi-
ons
Eleven golfers took part
in the Past Champions
Shoot-out last year, which
resulted in Bobby Plaines,
taking the title. Plaines has
won five titles in the past.
During play, one player is
eliminated per hole until
one man remains standing
to be declared the Cham-
pion of Past Champions.
Additional golfers tak-
ing part in the Past Cham-
pions Shoot-out last year
included: Walt Lamb, seven
time champ; Plaines, five
time champ; David Jack-
son, four time champ; Mike
Grant, two time champ;


and Jarrod Sullivan, Billy
Grant, Rodney Huwat,
Tommy Brown, David
Hoover, Sam Plaines, Jr.,
and Manty Dickey
Following the first day
of the FMB 43r Annual Wa-
termelon Festival Golf
Tournament, a dance with
rock and roll band, Tom
and 'the Cats will be held
from 9 p.m. until midnight.
Tickets will be available at
the door for $20 each.
Jarrod Sullivan of
Madison was the winner of
FMB's 42nd Annual Water-
melon Golf Tournament,
after shooting a 66 and a 73
for 139, to finish with a
seven shot lead over his
nearest competitor.
Mike Grant and Dick
"Whitmer from the champi-
onship flight and Clay
Cantley, from the first
flight, all tied for second
with 146.
In 2006, Marcus Beck
won with 68 and 68, also
seven shots ahead of his
nearest competitor; Dick
Whitmer came in second
for the seventh time.
Winners of the tourna-
ment will have their names
engraved on the Plaque of
Champions that hangs in
the Country Club trophy
room.
Last year, 99 golfers
participated in the tourna-
ment, 31 more than the pre-
vious year's 68.


JEFFERSON COUNTY SCHOOL B(ARD TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT
SUMMER SCHOOL ROUTE SCHEDULE FOR 2008





ROUTE STARTING TIME 6:30 A.M. *
BUS #1 (WACISSA)
DRIVER: ANNIE WILLIAMS
WAUKEENAH HWY & HWY 59 (South End)
WEST CAPPS HWY & ARMSTRONG RD
BETHPAGE RD & HWY 259
THOMAS CITY CLUB
BUS # 2 (LAMONT)
DRIVER: ADA PENDER
CJ REAMS STORE
LAMONT
BOLAND AREA
THOMPSON VALLEY RD. & US 19 SOUTH
DRIFTON RD.

BUS #f 3 (LLOYD)
DRIVER: CHRISTINE FORD
LLOYD AREA
WILD TURKEY & HWY 158 (ENTRANCE TO LLOYD ACRES)
TAYLOR RD. & HWY 158 (ENTRANCE TO CHRISTMAS ACRES)
PINNEYWOODS RD. & HWY 158 (NORTH END)
WEST LAKE RD. & LAKE RD.
CHESTNUT ST. & N. WAUKEENAH ST. (L & E SEAFOOD STORE)
BUS # 4 (CITY & AUCILLA)
DRIVER: LORETHA YOUNG
AUCILLA AREA & LONNIE RD.
US 90 EAST & KWIKI MART
FLATWOODS & HWY 257 (NORTH END)
HARTSFIELD RD. & HWY 257
HWY 257 & HWY 146 OLD WATSON STORE
BASSETT DAIRY RD. & HWY 146
JEFFERSON ST. (NORTH)
CAPRI & PARKWAY PINES
Any questions, please call the Transportation Department at (850) 342-0138.










Wednesday, June 25, 2008







, ,':* .. .. .. .a.


Monticello News 9A


"._ .4 ,.
4. ,r '


.4' .. ': *'.- '. 4


-,,P'~43N


DOORS


Fix Door, Inc.

Garage Door Sales
Service and Repairs

Tony Williams
Office: (850) 342-1328
Fax: (850) 342-1302
Mobile: (850) 508-7851
433 Carolina St
Monticello, FL 32344


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d l'. L11d I :g 441' -IT,4A4Ad '16
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Office* 85'


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;0-997-4894
dIL PiCECIVAI


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S Al . .


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INTING




MONTICELLO NEWS Call For Quality ork
S' 45 years In The Trade
ijefterson IjomLirnal -I' JERRY COLE
121 s N Ieffei on st. PAINTING CORR
Monticello 850-997-7467 850-544-2917

997-3568 Residential Commercial
Interior Exterior
.- Wallpaper Hanging -








.l. Cons cto.. .-n Drain Cl.eaGning 4
R-m'd'ng er Heaters "
Repri .' '" 4.. S Ba2lows " '4NW' "221
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Phone: 850-948-7891 Pon -Lad (o
Cell: 850-973-7135 t, ',mofn *- u,
Fax: 850-948-2482- Y"Pr' o """.
Eiof flend (oniu
email:
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.& A*


anng .
Frme
handon


PROPERTY ENHANCEMENT
WAINRIGHTS LAND CLEARING
&
PROPERTY ENHANCEMENTS, LLC
Site Cleairin Culverts
Rock A\ liablee Site Clearing
Di i ewtay, Debris Removal
Hau.iling Excavating
Fill Dirt
Hunter Wainright,
President
R leiences Aviiulble Inred
'Free Emiiim e, Feel Free to
S.,i..ll i n n... initci t ie job
Business:
(850) 445-1492


I...,,...


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13323L Fe, llivneerG











10A Monticello News


Wednesday, June 25, 2008
1..


Automotiv


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FOR S-%lE
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Air C .,ri-il hmnL P,. i Sc .ii

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JACKSON'S DRUG STORE -
Hae \ou bhcen aijken o:ff \oiur hir-
mone replacement? See our new
menopausal products. 997-3553
5/12,tfn,c
BACKHOE SERVICE:
Driveways, roads, ditches, tree and
shrub removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116, 933-
3458. 7/4tfn,c

MR. STUMP
STUMP GRINDING
509-8530 Quick Responses.
s62/22,tfn,c

TRACTOR WORK
ROTARY FLAIL- BUSH
HOGGING Starting at
$37.50/Hr.
All Types of Tractor Work.
850-567-6715
11/16, tfn,c
HORSEBACK RIDING
LESSONS & HORSE
BOARDING
Call for more information
850-585-1781
2/20,tfn

-TRACTOR WORK-
BUSH HOGGING.
FINISH MOWING
Lite Loader and Grapple Work
Tilling and MORE
$40.00/Hr .
Call B & L Farms at
342-9911
6/4-27,pd.


HOUSEKEEPER & Eld
experience, references.
Call-850-94C-6764.


PIRA OFl Do%% ~ntofl n OFFICE Sp'.


C 51i I caui i a' d.ii .Id. eiBai
4. 1 gi. rd k i q Fi i -o*.hi l
C.3d Killinj '\ C--id o l Btisc.


%parl ilnem.: J ilI1. h 52
wh rimr . .i 2,

3 Park Iiidek *:.ii ,iii' (i'













Tabitiloor liamp,;-' dasilpine~
h 11XiIL i- 12 Cie.-Ih


Electric home intal grin
like ncw, asklng $l1UU.
251- 1641.

Oakfield Cemetery
6 Lots For Sale
12x20 upfront
Earl Parnell 997-1557
6/4 t]


NOTICE OF PROPOSED CITY ORDINANCE


The Cir, C..u- il :, ilhe CIr1, ,f Ml ..ntii.Lell-, pi...ot- ,o ad [op ic h .el-
, ,. .. ,11 .1ldi ll. l Ce

ORDINANCE 2008-114 \N ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MON.
TICELLO. FLORIDA. ESTABLISHING A CITIZENS COMMITTEE
TO DE\ ELOP DESIGN RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE CEN-
TR AL BLiSINESS DISTRICT AND 1EML'PORARILU' SUSPENDING
ZONINC, AND SITE PLAN .-\PPLICATIONS FOR PROPERTIES ON
THE COURTHOUSE SQUARE

['i. enln ic- iL'\i o the '.ldlaii.iilce lina, be inl.peted at Cwi, HAll. 245- S
Mulb ll', Siiet i M i..n cell>.' FI.-ida belm eeni ie hioui, :I '- 11.1 ni j nd
5 fIIp ll M i:'ndJ, ihi.'ugh F iid.,j' Public heririn on lie oidJirirc .,. ill
he held ,ii TLuC'eJ. lull I. 21IS ji 7 i.ii.1 p l at l Monticell. Cii, Hall
InrierL acted p.-' 111. 1 n., ppe.L at IheI nict'inle' nd be he.itd ith pie .petl
I,.i Iihe pipoed l J rddini.nce
.., 25/1s ,.c !


IN THE ClLCUi CO RTI OF THE SECONi- .iULDICIAL CIRCUIT IN -,ND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY. FLORIDA


i iB-JN K N A
PI III iitl.


-\'; 'I[ N C)Iii' liii ri


ider- .
TiNA M. LAFFERIT; __ UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TINA IM LA F.
FERTY; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the.herein
4/18,tfn, nc. named Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown
parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees,
spouses, or other claimants; TENANT #1 and/or TENANT #2, the parties inhnded


hru 6/27,pd.


Fresh Chicken Eggs, $2 per dozen.
Call 997-2344
5/30,tfn, nc.

NOW OPEN!
Hollands U-Pick BLUE BERRIES.
3502 Aucilla Road, Monticello, FL.
$8.00 gal. U-pick
$16.00 gal we-pick.
Call Justin 997-3404
6/11,13,18,20,25,27,pd.
Adorable CKC Shih tzu Puppies. 2
niales' 1 black' 1 brown $250 each. 1
female black & white $300.
850-443-4260
6/25,27,7/2,4,pd.

AKC Reg. Black Lab Puppies
Male and Female
Shots and \\ornied
Ready For Pickup
Call Mike 251 -S-l4
: 1 ,2'1,25,' pd.

1978 Ghenoe, Magic Trailer & 6
H.P. Evinrude $500. 997-6139.
6/25,27,pd.

TV 32" Sony, $300 obo. 342-1700.
6/25,27,pd.


lerly sitting 1995 Dutchman, 5th wheel, 38 ft, 3
axles, new refrigerator, new central
a/c,recoated roof, entertainment cen-
6/20,25,pd. ter, 14 ft slide out,washer/dryer,
Scompeleted renovation 11/07 in-
cludes timeshare. $15,900. Call 519-
3940.


Farming Land For Lease
call 284-7685.
5/21,tfn,c.







850-997-4340
www.TimPeary.com.
Selling Real Estate Since 1972
Experience can help!

Noble Subdivision 3br; 2ba Mobile
Home in excellent shape, carport, big
enclosed shop. carport $89.900
One Acre Clark Rd $25,000 '
Ship Home 3,'1 on 1 ac $120,000.
Spacious near US 27 3 2 hm pool,
2 outbuildings 2.5 ac $325,000
In Town Treasure 2 bedroom 1 bath
beautiful Iloors $129.900(
Thompson Valey Rd 2 2h.:.rme
7.33 ac.mostly-qleared $195,000
Great L.oation 32 rime 1 56 ac
big bam. green nrse S165.000
VMurnuring Creek 5.2 acres, septic
tank $69,500
The Budd House 4'2 rnigh ceilingsq-
great porches. 5385.000
Priced to Sell! 5 hiltl:Ie acres in
Aucilla Shores $50,000
Mixed Use Property 12 acres _4
house a,: ali.owe .36.500' ac
Very Pretty 5 lovely acres on paved
road $15,500 per acre
Horse Farm. 29 acres DW w/'
fireplace, stables, $329,000
Deal 4/3, 5 ac/fenced/2car garage/
pool/guest hse, shop pasture/100
pecans $365,000
Prime CommcIa Property near
Pizza Hut 6.5 acs $650,000
Waukeenah Highway 27.99 ac
pasture, fenced, pond $545,000
GovernmntIeatms Road ,..r,
Prap'lantd pne, big
oake r. ..

Timbfefand 156 ac some pines
divide by Hwy $2000/ac
RENTALS AVAILABLE


6/25,27,pd.





Monticello Christian Aeaedmy is
accepting applications for teachers.
Degree preferred but not required.
Inquire by calling 997-6048.
6/20,25,c.

Kennel Staff- Experince helpful,
but will train right person.' Must
love animals, be good with public,
be dependable, and have trans-
portation. Call 241-4073 anytime.

6/25, tfn, c.


Newspapers

For Sale

Clean 25 Ib Bundles
only $2 each
997-3568


to account for the person or persons in possession
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated
June 10, 2008, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in JEFFERSON
County, Florida, described as:
BEGIN AT THE SW CORNER OF THE NW QUARTER OF THE SE QUARTER
OF SECTION 8, TOWNSIDP 2 NORTH, RANGE 5 EAST, SAID POINT ALSO
BEING THE SW CORNER OF BLOCK "45" OF KIDDERS PECAN GROVE
#5, AS RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF JEFFERSON COUNTY.
FLORIDA, RUN THENCE NORTH 0 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 59 SECONDS
WEST 112.93 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY OF SR
S. 149-A, THENCE NORTH 50 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 41 SECONDS EAST
61.5 FEET ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE TO A POINT IN THE C EN
TER OF LINGO ROAD, THENCE NORTH 58 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 46 S EC-
'ONDS EAST 215.05 FEET ALONG THE CENTER OF SAID ROAD TO A.
POINT, THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST
265.45 FEET TO A POINT, ON THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF BLOCK -45,
THENCE WEST 230.13 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
BEING A PART OF BLOCK 45 OF KIDDERS PECAN GROVE #5 AS
RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
a/k/a 25 Arline Road, Monticello, FL 32344-4765 ,
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash. at the North steps of the Jef-
fersoni County Courthouse located at the intersection of US highways 19 and 90,
Monticello, Florida, at 11:00 o'clock a.m., on July 10, 2008.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
Dated at Monticello, Florida,-this 10 day of June, 2008.


Douglas C. Zahm, P.A.
18830 U.S. Hwy 19 N., #300
Clearwater, FL 33764
(727) 536-4911 phone / (727) 539-1094 fax


Kirk B. Reams,
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Tyler Sherrod,
Deputy Clerk


If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact the office of the court administrator at
(850)342-0218, within two (2) working days of your receipt of this notice; if you
are hearing; or voice impaired, call TDD (863) 534-7777 or Florida Relay Services
(800) 955-8770.
6/18,25/08,c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JESSE ROGERS,
File No. 08-34-PR.,
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of JESSE ROGERS, deceased, whose
date of death was December 18, 2007, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Jefferson County, Florida, Probate Division, File Number 2008-34-
PR, the address of which is Jefferson County Courthouse, 1 Courthouse
Circle, Room 10, Monticello, Florida 32344. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and the personal representative's attorney
are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and all persons having
claims against the decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent, o01
unliquidated claims, on wvhom a copy of this notice is served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3)
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or
demands against the decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent. ,
or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN *i
THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED. /
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABO tE
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE ;
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this notice is June 18, 2008. !
h I


Attorney for Personal Representative:
GEORGE E. LEWIS II
203 North Gadsden Street, No.6
Tallahassee, Florida 32301-7633
(850) 222-7266
FL Bar No. 0099850


Personal Representative:
FRANKLIN C. GLENN
PO Box 837
Wacissa, Florida 32361


6/18,25/08,c


NOTICE OF APPLICATION "
FOR WATER USE PERMIT

SN,.tice ri: hle b, pi'en that puiruant to Chapter 3-3. Fli.rida Statutes. the
'lhllom ing appli.n.ioni v lr t.. arer uie pciminti i haj i hJei been received ,4


i by ihe N.mh>h ei F- liida \\jalei MNnagenmen Dirn .i c
Applia.ition number I i6'-163 filed 06 I 16'2i.iS
O iM i Se'.ktes. Inc 1S6 \\lli- Road. NMI.rit-iceilu. FL 3234-4
Reque,[iig a mai'.mumn it hdraj'.al ot 3.456.iJlti gallons per da\
liHuol the Flhilidall Aqiittel S'Ieimi for \\aler Based Recreatiion us
1b', e..isting and piopoed facilitie,
General iithdria al l..icar,,ni n i in Jelers,'nr Counti TO3N.
RO-IE. Sec. 9. 16.33

Intere-ted perioni. ma, object t1 0i c.ontirient upon the applications or sub-
nia .a '. ilen request ltora copi. oat the .tafl reportii i containing proposed
.igeni. aciioTi liegaiding the applicjlioni i b\ n riding to the D silsion of
Rem'ui.ce Regul.aion o'I the No-irthv.est Flonida Water Management Di<-
inl.. jiaentin Terni Peteison. 152 Water Management Drine. Haana.
Floiid., 32.3'.'-'i71.11i. but .uch coniment, or requests must be received by
p m ,n lul II ,2I'Is .


No further public notice v.ill be pro% ided rewarding thtii these applica-
[ nisirlii Pitblicaion 'oll thli n-''ice Criun-Itutcs cori~tructi.e notice o this.
F pernil ippiication ti all ,ub-tjaniall', affected per.'ins. A cop' of the staff
report, i mu't be requested in order to remain ad\ ised ,of further pro-
.ceedinm,' and an, public hearing date Sub.taritall, affected persons are
entitled to request an adminitrai'.e hearing regarding the propo,;ed
u agency actiun by submitting a written request according to-the provisions
.1 of 28-601.201, Florida Administrative Code. Notices of Proposed Agency
Action will be mailed only to'persons who have filed such requests, 1
6/25/08,c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
File Number: 08-33-PR
ELIZABETH K. HAMILTON, Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of ELIZABETH K. HAMILTON. deceaed,'whose
date of death was January 28, 2008, is pending in the Circuit Court for Jeffterson
County, Florida, Probate Division under probate file # 08-33-PR, the address of
which is Jefferson County Courthouse, 1 Courthouse Circle, Monticello, Florida
32344. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims o .dempamts,gamsa
decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required i:-,e er. edn must file.
their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONtfi'S AFTER Tl .
TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR %. D1DAYS AFTER -
THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTERWTHE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME-PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILLBE-FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIdDS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS.BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this notice is June 18, 2008.

Attorney for Personal Representative: T. Buckingham Bird, Esq.
P.O. Box 247 Monticellb, Florida 32345 (850) 997-3503
Personal Representative: Mary Lynn H. Cullen
113 Cottonwood Place Decatur, GA 30030


6/18,25/08,c


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Wednesday, June 25, 2008


1-1 E 9B (E


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'u*. SFor All Your Wedding Needs
... ,, <* (c ,^ .-- ------
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Fresh Baked Breads
220 West Washington St. Cookies & Pies
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850-539-7201
Wed.-Sat.: until 6 p.m. m %.U.
Sunday: 12:30-5:30 ted ewintd
vww.cindyschapeaux.corn I
21 *ewh


.t.


iA Story Of Romancel
j d' -< j


Jaysree Raman arind Sean
Boland married at the Shalimar
Wedding Chapel in Las Vegas,
NV Friday, Feb. 22, 2008.
Raman was born in
Madras, India, March 31, 1969.
Her family came to the U.S.
when she was four years old,
and like every other immigrant,
they came here for better oppor-
tunities and a better life.
They settled in Jackson
Heights in the borough of
Queens in New York City At the
time, there were not many Indi-
ans in their community, which
is why she is very American-
ized.
She went to college in
Southern California but came
back to NYC after graduation.
She has a BA in Literature and
an MBA in Finance.
Boland was born in Nep-
tune, NJ, March 9,1969. His fam-
ily moved to Franklin, MA.
shortly thereafter where he
lived dintil age 14. He loved the
years he spent in Franklin and
did ndt want to move to Per-
tineville, NJ when his dad got a
big promotion.
Nevertheless, he finished
high school and college in New
Jersey Since then, he has been
moving up the ladder to Re-
gional Manager at Snyder's of
Hanover, NJ. He is currently
pursuing his Masters Degree in
Food Marketing at St. Joseph's
University'
Raman and Boland nMet on
match.com in August, 2004.
They had both been "on again
off again" with match.com for a
couple of years.


life.
She was at peace with her
Singleness. So she told herself
that she would meet Boland, get
the date over with, and then get
off match.com for good. Well, she
met Boland and was pleasantly
surprised. When she saw him,
she thought 'Whew' he was actu-
ally better looking than the pic-
ture he posted on the website.
What she noticed immediately,
and liked about him was that he
-was very confident, in a quiet
'%%rway
L!He was also comical when
she least expected it. She was
P very surprised and refreshed
.that she met a good-looking, con-
fident man who wasn't afraid to
..sayhhewanted to get married and
have children.
They had a phenomenal first
date, but both agree that it wasn't
love at first sight. They took it
one date at a time, and grew to
love and appreciate each other.
Raman says that meeting Boland
had restored her faith and given
her hope and inspiration.
As she mentioned, before
she met him she had come to ac-
cept and embrace a life of single-
ness, coming to believe that not
everyone finds someone and lives
happily ever after.
Finding Boland means that
At times Raman would be active meet with him. She was so put she now has someone who is
on match.com for a month or so off by the other three dates that rooting for her; someone to share
and get so frustrated with the she wanted to immediately get good and bad times with; some-
men she was meeting that she off match.com. But she stillhad one she can watch arid maybe
would need to take a five month one more date to get through help grow, and someone to raise
break, and so on. and that was with Boland. Ugh! a family with.
The week she met Boland, She had finally reached the Boland is the nephew of Art
she had been on three different point that she didn't care if she and Pat Morthier, of the Three
dates and was still scheduled to was single for the rest of her SistersRestaurant.."


When Bethany was born
with the some disability
as Colin, the DeVaults
called on Easter Seal.
Today, Colin swims like o
fish and Bethany rides
her bike. One in five
Americans has a disabil-
ity and Easter Seals is
there with expert help
hope and humanity. Cal
Easter Seals or visit
www.easter-seals.org


Creating solutions,
changing lives.


l E -.e


Monticello News 11A




.,,,.....


$AS told? by Jaysree PRamat
: ~ ~" .':'^ __l







12A" Monticello News


Down


On


At


Wednesday, June 25, 2008


Event


The


Farm


Willow


Pond


Aloh'lnfl l/l' NeAi' Pi-hllij By rii-bbi Sni:pp, Mayi 1 211058
The LXR "Down on the Farm" registration table was staffed by Hello Florida personnel who made name tags on the spot and filled
the guests in on the days' events held at Willow Pond.


The Grass is Growin'


and It Needs Mowin'.

Get the best deals of the year on John Deere mowing
equipment at GreenSouth's BIG GREEN TENT SALE.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Luxury Resorts & Ho-
tels (LXR) held its "Down
On The Farm" annual event
at Willow Pond, just north
of Monticello, again this
year for its associates and


their guests.
The carnival-like at-
mosphere brought some 300
guests to the area from all
over Florida and surround-


ing states.
A variety of games and
activities were spread
throughout the estate
amongst the big oaks, mag-
nolias, and dogwood trees.
The event is a thank you
to the partners, their guests,
and families from LXR and
included a- whole day of
food, fun, entertainment,
and contests for the whole
family and special parting
gifts were given to all.


Get to your local GreenSouth Equipment Location by June 28th for some of the best deals of the season!
We have a bigger on-the-tot inventory than ever, plus instant credit, great financing offers and more!
There's never been a better time to buy!


Fm* pirafe%9M34 rimnwlr9,
ItNna-livtw"ya mw Owe ta
ernaft f~n .fm eoeasm
rx 4. 1-.t1. 7:,Ustemow

dMow Oti ,of'ca' '.


LA105 Riding Lawn Mower
19.5HP John Deere Anti-Vibration System
single-cylinder engine
Electronic ignition for fast starts
Two-pedal automatic transmission
1,499 '15?=,,.
1 4LOW INTRODUCTORY
PAYMENTS


GREENSOUTH

Equipment, Inc.


Z81OA Pro Zero-Turn Mower
* 48" 7-Iron PRO Deck
* 22HP air-cooled Kawasaki' engine
* Heavy-duty ground drive

s6,799


Z425 Residential Zero-Turn Mower
* 23HP Briggs & Stratton V-twin, air-cooled engine
* 48" Edge-' mower deck with 1/4" cut-height increments

*3,899 $424
LOW INTRODUCTORY
PAYMENTS


OPEN UNTIL 4r-m ON SATURDAY!
STORE HOURS: M-F: 7:30am 6:00pm
Sat: 7:30am 4:00pm Sun: Closed
GreenSoullh- om
TALt.'I.HAS'SG.E, Fl. 2890 INDUSTRIAL PLAZA DRIVE...18501 877-5522
THONM.l ILLE, G-A 12793 US HWY 19 S....................(....229) 226-4881
CAI.R4 r.,, 2025 US HWY 84 EAST..................................(2291 377-3383


S Offe'r ands 6/29/108 rix!,;net mold 11 011 1100111111may01vary00by neater. Smoenrestrlictionsaplo d ld 0 specia0110160 and0bane; l nlol tic.1 l~dlhdiblo, so0 d our001demlid fordoebris Iand rinsth inaIncngpions.01 Avaiolable at participating dealers, '*Oier end0 6/2/080. Subject to
cred100it o fli 11 1Crdi 1 blm Ii 01,1111 Up1 'ollall10",1 d..(town pyet rlinfltOly no equrelold Taxes, ft&Oilt, 0set-Lip11.1n10deliver 1% y 1charges ..ld . . . . .wor niormutronIs pronided 1y
the 00111wme mnufactuarerto be oge011for11001 0110011 01111000onlly. Actual iterating Inasrlllollwar will 10100e o less J ohn roe m' eeand010yelo olor nG.' . ...S'0llE..''' '' 00tt50625MVN-4C


Grayson Boyd is taught a few bull riding techniques from
Dave Bradley, aka thebullguy.com during the LXR "Down on the
Farm" held at Willow Pond.


AMonicello InVe s Pnolo By Debbie Snapp, May 3. 2008
Grayson Boyd gets a "lion face" from artist Kathryn McCoy,
aka "Ceil the Mime" during the LXR "Down on the Farm" held at
Willow Pond.


Monticello News PhotO iy uebble bnapp, Mvay 3, 20UB.
The LXR "Down on the Farm" fun day event brought Claire
Grace Nunnally, granddaughter of Janegale Boyd, out for a day of
outdoor fun and bull riding.


Held




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