Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00198
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello, Fla
Publication Date: March 19, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00198
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text


















.ONTICELLO


NEWS


140th Year No. 12 Wednesday, March 19, 2008 500 460 +4



City Suffers Another Raw Sewage Spill


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
The city continues experiencing
sewage overflow problems because of
malfunctioning equipment, a situation
that could potentially lead to more
threatened fines from the state.
City officials attribute the latest
overflow to a pump that burnt out at the
Hickory Street lift station, in combina-
tion with the recent heavy rainfall and
the many inflow and infiltration prob-
lems with the sewer system. City Man-
ager Steve Wingate reported to the City
Council on March 4 that 10,000 gallons


of raw sewage spilled because
of the mishap.
The problem, he explained,
was that one of two pumps at
the lift stations quit pumping.
Aggravating the situation, rain-
water infiltrating into the sys-
tem further overwhelmed the
station's pumping capacity and
flooded the facility, submerging
the control panel.
Wingate said city employees
took the appropriate measures
to deal with the situation,'sprin-
kling lime on the ground to neu-
tralize the wastewater and


City Attorney
Bruce Leinback
warned the council
that the state is
watching the city
closely.


pouring chlorine powder on
the standing water to kill bac-
teria. The city also reported
the accident to the Florida De-
partment of Environmental
Protection (FDEP).
To correct the problem,
Wingate had a new pump with
50 percent more pumping ca-
pacity installed at the station
and also had the control panel
removed from the floor and in-
stalled at a higher level, so that
it would not get submerged in
future.
"It was $5,500 to repair the


old pump," he explained. "For $6,600, or
$1,100 more, we got a pump that gives us
50 percent more output."
Wingate's recommendation to the
City Council was that it approved the re-
placement of the second pump with an-
other new one, thereby giving the
station 100 percent more pumping ca-
pacity and eliminating the potential for
any future spills.
The city only recently escaped hav-
ing to pay heavy fines to the FDEP for
past sewage spills by undertaking two
projects that aim to prevent future
spills.
Please See Raw Sewage Page 2A


Semi, Camero Crash


Monlicello News Photo By Fran Hunt, March 12, 2008
This 1997 Chevrolet Camero, driven by Erasmo Martinez of Thomasville,
was southbound on US-19 in the outside lane, just north of 1-10, March 12,
when Martinez made an improper lane change in front of a semi rig driven
by Bradford V. Hobbs, 42, of Renssellar, IN, resulting in a crash which to-
taled the Camero.


Two Vehicles


Collide
FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Thursday, March 13, a minor
fender-bender resulted in two
vehicles sustaining an estimated
$1,000 damage each.
The Monticello Police De-
partment reported that at 6:20
p.m., a 1998 Chevrolet driven by
Sandra Carolina Siren of Wau-
keenah Highway, was on N. Jef-
ferson in the southbound lane,
stopped at the intersection of
Jefferson and Chestnut St., with
the right turn signal on.
Rosa Zegler Scott of Lamont
was driving a 2001 Chevrolet
Please See Vehicles Col-
lide Page 2 A


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Two people were uninjured and one
received minor injuries, following a
crash Wednesday morning, March 12.
Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Bill
Grubs reported that at 9:45 a.m., Wednes-
day, March 12, Erasmo Martinez, 29, of
Thomasville, with passenger Manvela
Justo, 32, also of Thomasville, were driv-
ing a 1997 Chevrolet Camero southbound
on US-19 in the outside lane, just north of
1-10.
Bradford V Hobbs, 42, of Renssellar,
IN, was driving a 2004 Kenworth and
pulling a trinity gas trailer, traveling
southbound in the inside lane.
Martinez improperly changed lanes
in the path of Hobbs, who took evasive
action and swerved to the right to avoid
impact.
The left-rear fender of Hobbs' vehicle
struck the right rear of the Camero.
Justo received minor injuries and
was transported to Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital for treatment. Martinez and
Hobbs were uninjured.
Grubbs said that the crash was not al-
cohol-related and all involved were wear-
ing their seatbelts.
Please See Crash Page 2A


Monticello News Photo By Fran Hunt, March 17, 2008
A minor fender-bender resulted in this 2001 Chevrolet van driven by Rosa Zegler
Scott of Lamont, to rear-end a 1998 Chevrolet driven by Sandra Carolina Siren of Wau-
keenah Highway, who was on N. Jefferson in the southbound lane, stopped at the inter-
section of Jefferson and Chestnut St., with the right turn signal on. Both drivers were
unharmed and both vehicles sustained $1,000 damage.


Postage Rates

To Increase

Again

LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
Effective May 12, the US Postal Service (USPS)
will implement a rate increase for its mailing serv-
ices.
This means that first-class mail, standard mail,
periodicals, packages and special services will cost a
little more. Indeed, the USPS is quick to underscore
that the average increase will be at or below the rate
of inflation, as measured by the Consumer Price
Index.
Consumers can expect a first-class mail stamp to
cost 42 cents for a letter weighing up to one ounce, up
one penny from the present 41 cents. The cost of other
mailing services will go up as follows: first-class mail
(two ounces), 59 cents; postcard, 27 cents; first-class
mail large envelope (two ounces), $1.00; certified mail,
$2.70; first-class mail international to Canada and
Mexico (one ounce), 72 cents; and first-class mail in-
ternational to all other countries (one ounce), 94
cents.
The USPS emphasizes that customers can con-
tinue to use the 41-cent Forever Stamp after the price
increase.
"We will have five billion Forever Stamps in stock
to Please See Postage Increase Page 2A
Holistic, Regional Approach Urged

Economic Development


Council Meet
LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
The need for a more holistic and regional ap-
proach to economic development was at the heart of a
discussion sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce
and the Economic Development Council (EDC) at the
fellowship hall of Christ Episcopal Church on Thurs-
day morning, March 13.
Designed specifically for local elected officials
and planning organizations, the workshop featured
presentations by Beth Kirkland, executive director of
the Economic Development Council of Tallahas-
see/Leon County; Travis Yelverton, director of Exist-
ing Industry, Economic Development Council of
Tallahassee/Leon County; Roger Miller, of Wired
Northwest Florida Initiative, Florida's Great North-
west; Pamela Tedesco, vice president, Workforce Ini-
tiatives, Florida's Great Northwest; and Sheryl
Rehberg, executive director, North Florida Workforce
Please See Economic Page 2A


Clean Up Your Lots Or Else


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
City officials con-
tinue their attempts to
address the issue of
abandoned houses and
vehicles, but without


much success so far.
City Clerk Emily An-


derson and City Man-
ager Steve Wingate in-
formed the City Council
on March 4 that they had
mailed certified letters
to several individuals,
warning them of possi-
ble city action if they


didn't do something to
clean up their vacant,
derelict or overgrown
properties. But so far,
the response had been
negligible, they said.
Please See Lots
Page 2A


City offi-
cials have
been trying
to get rid of
abandoned
structures
such as this
one for years.
Such aban-
doned struc-
tures abound
in certain
parts of the
city.


S2 Sections. 26 Pages
Around Jefferson Farm,, Outdoors 14A
County 4-7A Sports School 8A-9A
Bridal IA Spiritual
Classifieds 12A Pathways Section B
Legals 13A Viewpoints 2-3A


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


Check Out Our B
Section for All
Your Local
Church News!


-~ --









2A Monticello News Wednesday, March 19, 2008






IEWPOINTS & PINIONS





Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.


Writer Comments About Mays House 1


. Dear Editor:
An article in your Nov. 2, 2007 edition reported on
the open house and blessing for The Mays House, at 925
E. Washington Street, in Monticello. The house is now
home for Carrie Ann and Company, a local catering
business.
I wanted to expand on the article somewhat and
thank the current owners on behalf of the Mays family.
Brian and Henry Searcy, who were included in the
photograph accompanying the article, along with
Brian's wife Ashlee, are the great, and great great
grandsons of Mr. and Mrs. Dannitte Hill Mays, builders
of the house.
The house was built in 1922 by my grandparents,

Raw Sewage Cont. From Page 1A
City Attorney Bruce Leinback was mindful of these
recent threatened fines by the FDEP when he advised
the council to accept Wingate's recommendation.
"I recommend we put in the two new pumps so that
we don't have any more spills," Leinback said. "The
FDEP is watching us very closely. We don't want any
more consent orders."
The city's sewer and water committee is scheduled
to take up the pump purchase issue this week and make
a recommendation to-the City Council at the April 1
meeting.
Meanwhile, the city is preparing to go forward with
an $872,000 project that will address the inflow and infil-
tration problems in the sewer system. Wingate said the
city held a pre-bid conference on the project on
Thursday, March 13, in preparation for putting the proj-
ect out for bids.

Postage Increase Cont. From Page 1A

meet demand," states the USPS website. "We also will
have a 62-cent stamp available after May 12 for one-
ounce nonmachinable first-class mail letters, such as
square greeting cards."
Jim Bennett, postmaster at the Monticello Post
Office, explained that Forever Stamps were created
about a year ago in response to consumers' concern
about the rising cost of mailing services. The Forever
Stamps can be purchased at the current 41-cent price
i and will be honored by the USPS irrespective of rate
I inceOseisuTheoretically, a 41-cent Forever Stamp would
be honored years hence, even if the-price of a first-class-
stanp-went up to $1.00 or more. The price of aForeveer
Stamp will go up to 42 cents after the May 12-rate
* increase. It's therefore to customers' advantage to buy
booklets of these stamps at the current rate.
b The USPS notes that the May 12 price change will
be the first under the new Postal Accountability and
Enhancement Act (PAEA). In the past, the USPS pre-
sented proposed rate changes to the Postal Regulatory
Commission (formerly the Postal Rate Commission),
which oversaw a 10-month public regulatory proceed-
ing.
The commission then sent its findings to the USPS
Board of Governors for approval. Under the PAEA, the
USPS has greater pricing flexibility and may increase
postage rates annually. The USPS, in fact, plans to
adjust its mailing services each May.
"By law, these prices can increase an average of no
more than the rate of inflation as measured by the
Consumer Price Index," the USPS website states. "We
plan to provide 90 days' notice of the new prices each
year to.help mailers prepare for the change."
Other pricing highlight, per the USPS website: No
change in the first-class mail single piece additional
ounce price; lower additional ounce price for presorted
first-class mail letters; lower pound price for standard
mail saturation and high-density flats; shape-based
pricing for first-class mail international letters, flats
and parcels; first-class mail international price groups
expand from five to nine groups.
For more information, visit www.pbpostalinfo.com
and www.usps.com/prices.

Lots Cont. From Page 1A


"It's very frustrating,
because people don't pick up
certified mail or don't
respond" Anderson said.
She said that a few resi-
.dents had responded and the
problems had been resolved "
over a telephone conversa-
tion. But the majority had
simply ignored the letters, she
said.
Absent action from the prop-
erty owners, it fell to the city
to take action, Anderson and
Wingate said. They let it be
known that city action would
entail costs, however. Their
question was, did the council
want the city to proceed with
condemnations and possible
demolition costs?
Another factor for consid-
eration was that city employ-
ees couldn't undertake the
demolitions because of liabili-
ty issues, they said. It would
mean hiring private contrac-
tors to take down the build-
ings.
"It could cost a lot, we
don't know," Anderson said.
The council instructed
Anderson and Wingate to
gather information on how
much it might cost to engage a
private contractor to demolish
the buildings. They also
instructed the two to look into
the possibility of the fire
departments burning the
buildings as part a training
exercise an idea that has
been proposed previously but


has never come to fruition.
Councilman Tom
Vogelgesang has emerged as a
strong proponent of action on
the issue, even if it costs the
city. He believes that the prob-
lem is one that has been
around for a long time and
that needs addressing now.
Indeed, Mayor Gerrold
Austin, another strong propo-
nent of action, pointed out
that he has been trying to get
the city to do act on the prob-
lem for about five years. I
Vogelgesang believes that
if the city demolishes a couple
of the structures, other
landowners will get the mes-
sage that the city means busi-
ness.
"I think we need to move
forward on this," Vogelgesang
said. "If we take down a cou-
ple of houses, people will see
we're serious."
He said he also wanted to
see action on the removal of
abandoned vehicles from city
streets and lots. The City
Council engaged in much dis-
cussion on the issue in the lat-
ter part of last year, with the
police chief offering at one
point to have his officers tick-
et and have the abandoned
vehicles removed. But then
the city's contract with the
towing company expired and
several members of the coun-
cil were replaced or stepped
down in the last election, rele-
gating the issue into limbo.


before US Highway 90 existed. The road at that time
dead ended just east of the house. The Mays descen-
dants are extremely grateful to the new owners, Denise
Vogelgesang and Carrie Ann Tellefsen, not only for
naming it the Mays house, but for bringing it back to
life with their flourishing business and painstaking
renovations and repairs.
It's good to know that the house is Once again a pro-
ductive and vibrant part of Monticello and Jefferson
County. We are truly appreciative of Carrie Ann and
Company for including the Mays family in their open
house ceremonies.
Sincerely,
Wayne Searcy

Economic Cont. From Page 1A


Development Board.
Miller and Tedesco discussed Florida's Great a
Northwest and the Northwest Florida and Workforce
initiatives. Florida's Great Northwest is a regional eco-
nomic development organization serving 16 counties
from Escambia to Jefferson. The group's aims is to cre-
ate high skills jobs and diversify the economic base in
the region by focusing and attracting target industries,
such as aviation/aerospace and defense, alternative
energy, financial services, and medical/life sciences.
In order to achieve its goal of growing a vibrant and
sustainable regional economy by 2015, Florida Great
Northwest launched a $15 million initiative in 2006 that
aims "to expand employment and advancement oppor-
tunities and catalyze the creation of high-skill, high-
wage opportunities in the region's economies."
Specifically, the program seeks to develop training
programs that are designed to create a skilled work-
force for the target industries. Toward that end, the
organization awards grants ranging from $500 to $5,000
for job training and educational efforts that lead to the
creation of skilled workers who can satisfy the job
demands of the target industries.
As an example, Tedesco noted that the region needs
191 new heavy equipment operators every year to keep
up with current demand. She pointed out that at pres-
ent, the Department of Transportation has numerous
highway construction projects that have been approved
and funded but can't go forward because of the lack of
trained heavy equipment operators. This was one of the
critical needs that the program was addressing, she *
said.
Rehberg discussed the North FIdrida Workforce
Development Board (NWWDB), one of 24 groups in the
state whose missions are to recruit, train and place
individuals in employment, as well as helping business-
es find skilled and reliable employees. The NFWDB
serves a six-county area that includes Jefferson. Among
its many services, the agency screens potential employ-
ees, does job fairs and helps with resumes preparation.
Diane Head, meanwhile, explained the Florida
Ready to Work Initiative, a component of the workforce
development program that ensures employers get
skilled and reliable employees.
"Florida Ready takes the guesswork out of hiring,"
Head said. "It tests applicants job skills and work
habits and identifies employees with the most poten-
tial."
Applicants are credentialed according to their skill
levels and those needing remediation are referred to
the appropriate services. Head assured the audience
that the results of the tests were reliable and valid.
Kirkland focused on the importance of regionalism
and working together to attract economic development
to the area.
"Regionalism is the key," Kirkland said.
"Regionalism is important because if you market on a
regional basis, you increase the pool of investors. Leon
County is almost full, but when we look to the sur-
rounding counties, there is a lot of land yet. But we
need to know how much of this land is available."
Kirkland then focused on the Our Region Tomorrow
Initiative, which takes in a nine-county area, including
Jefferson and Thomas County in Georgia.
"We market the entire region as a set," said
Kirkland, proceeding to catalogue the area's economic
development assets, in terms of its roads, railroads, air-
ports, educational facilities and other necessary infra-
structure.
She said that every community needed a unique
tagline to market itself. The tagline for the Our Region
Tomorrow Initiative, she said, was "be part of our
secret".
Kirkland pointed out the economic development
model was changing and practitioners of the profession
had to change to keep current with the new develop-
ments.
"Economic development is transitioning and wq
need to read and prepare to keep up," she said.
Communication also was essential and could stand
improvement between Jefferson and Leon counties, she
advised.
"Let us know your secrets about this county so we
can get the word out to the rest of the world," she
urged.
Yelverton gave an overview of a software package
that is available to economic development organiza-
tions to give them control over local economic policy
and business retention. The program reportedly serves
as a tool to help define, organize data, analyze and
report existing company information, thereby "giving
community decision-makers invaluable insight into the


Crash Cont. From Page 1A

The Martinez vehicle was totaled with an estimated
$5,000 damage. Hobbs' Kenworth sustained no dam-
ages. Sheriffs deputies assisted at the scene with traf-
fic control and Fire Rescue responded for highway
cleanup.
Martinez was charged with improper change of
lanes and no driver license.


Emerald Kinsley, Publisher

Easter Bunny vs. Jesus

Who Will Win?
Boy, this weekend sure is going to be busy, for most folks.
Easter church services, Easter. dinners, dyeing Easter eggs,
Easter egg hunts, Easter baskets, and Easter family celebra-
tions will fill our weekend time.
I love Easter. I love dyeing Easter eggs, I think as much as
I did when I was a small child. I still get the cups down, vine-
gar, and dye and Cheltsie and Brooke (and myself) go at it.
And of course we still have eggs hidden for the two girls to
find, however now we don't have to get up at 5:00 am in order
to sneak and hide them. There are still Easter baskets on the
couch for the girls to find, and the Easter Bunny still hasn't
learned to wipe his feet when he comes in my house each year.
However, his little white footprints from the door, to the
couch, are just not as impressive as they were years ago. (My,
oh my, where have the years gone? Where are my two "little
girls" that used to be so excited to see the "mess" the Easter
Bunny left while jumping through our house?)
Sometimes in the rush and excitement of the Easter
Bunny, and. hunting eggs, we forget to remember and to
remind our children WHY we celebrate Easter. I think the
Easter Bunny, sometimes gets more credit .for Easter than
Jesus actually does.
With Easter upon us, it made me think of something I
heard Joyce Meyers (one of the greatest speakers of all times,
in. my opinion) say. She was speaking on how we do/should
treat other people. She said, "Jesus got up every day and went
forth to do good to others. That's all. His purpose in life was
to go out and do good to others."
This is how we should be living our lives doing good for
others. That's all. Day in and day out do something good for
someone else.
The day we die and we stand before God on Judgment Day,
the Lord WILL NOT ask us, "How did other people treat you in
your life?"
The Lord WILL ask us, "How did you treat other people
during your life?"
Until .then... I'll see you around the town.




BEHOLD


EasTer M ace!


Vehicles Collide Cont. From Page 1A
van southbound in the inside lane and rear-ended
Sirens' vehicle.
Scott advised MPD Cpl. Joel Oquendo that Siren did
not have a turn signal on, stopping suddenly in front of
her, so she was unable to react.
At close observation, Oquendo found that it did have
the right turn signal on. Scott was charged with careless
driving and Siren was charged with no driver's license.
The crash was not deemed alcohol-related and both
women were wearing their seatbelts and were
unharmed.



NkNTICELLO



iEWS o

EMERA4D GREENE KINSLE) Lkw atDl 16i ul Ao M
Publisher/Owner ,, i;: d ., n,, .rd...pn
WI' CICHON (m i ,.,,no' DpiPS,\I \
Managing Editor Suibnp .ri RaTes
SFlonrida $45 per year
LA4RO AI.EM.niG Out nof-State $. per year
La o A A, ,ISIldl a. l<,a] tjiC i .a Indiuded)
Senior Staff Wnierse
P.O. Box 428
1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, Florida 32345
850-997-3568
Fax: 850-997-3774

E-mail: monticellonews@embarqmail.com
Established 1964
A weekly newspaper [USPS 361-620] designed for the express reading
pleasures of the people of its circulation area, be they past, present or future res-
idents.
Published weekly by ECB Publishing, Inc., 1215 North Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL 32344. Periodicals postage PAID at the Post Office in
Monticello, Florida 32344.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MONTICELI ,0 NEWS, P.O.
Box 428, Monticello, FL 32345.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news mat-
ter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the
best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investi-
gate any advertisement submitted.
All photos given to ECB Publishing, Inc. for publication in this newspaper must
be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. ECB
Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline.









Wednesday, March 19, 2008 Monticello News 3A






VIEWPOINTS & PINIONS


TEN YEARS AGO
March 18, 1998
For the second time in just a little over
two weeks, a judge denied a state request
that county officials be compelled to pro-
vide a more appropriate setting for court-
room proceedings.
If you were in Monticello last
Wednesday, you're probably wondering
about the old-fashioned wagon train with
flanking outriders that clopped through
town about noon, headed east. The Ride
For Life Wagon Train, numbering seven
wagons and 13 people is reportedly
embarked on a mission to raise money for
children's charities.
Recreation Park Director Kevin Aman,
announced today that he is a candidate for
the Group 1 seat on the City Council.
The County has hired the services of
two financial advisors in the,hope that the
latter can secure federal funding for con-
struction of the jail.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
March 16, 1988
I More than 150 county students went to
the Leon County Civic Center last Friday
Sto participate in the fifth Annual Big Bend
Very Special Arts Festival.
The construction of the two tire play-
1 grounds at the elementary school was com-
pleted over the weekend by close to 200
volunteers.
There is increasing evidence that the
Florida National Guard may have a unit
stationed in Monticello this fall.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
March 16, 1978
Low salaries appear to be a factor in
Sthe high turnover rate at the Monticello
Fire Department. At the present time, the
,"city has three full-time firemen who have
...;been employed for one month. The radio-
- dispatcher has been with the squad for six
months.


V i


Visitors ill haN e a special oppormunit
to tour a wide variety of Monticello homes
on April 8 and 9 when the Jefferson
Historical Association presents its annual F
Tour of Homes.
After purchasing the building that
housed the old Badcock store on the
Courthouse Circle with the hope of build- 1
ing a courthouse annex on the site, County
Commissioners now have no immediate
plans for the building due to lack of
money.
FORTY YEARS AGO
March 16, 1968
Stuart Simpson has been reappointed
to a two-year term on the Florida
Agricultural Advisory committee, repre-
senting the Florida Seed Industry.
Police Chief Alfred Foster, who coor-
dinated the effort to circulate the petitions
urging Dr. J.B. Brinson Jr., to keep his
medical practice in Jefferson County,
reported Monday that 1,531 citizens have
signed the petition.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
March 16, 1958
A stage version of "Womanless
Wedding" said to be entirely new and dif-
ferent is scheduled to be presented by men
of the Aucilla PTA on Friday, March 14.
There will be a covered dish super
March 18, at Masonic Temple in honor of
Grand Instructor, Mrs. Margaret Hamby of
Perry.
Eastern Star members, who motored to
Perry were Worthy Matron, Mrs. Clara
Keen, Mrs. Lucy Mae Thompson, Mrs.
Myrtle Shuman, Mrs. Dollie R. Fountain,
Mrs. Emma Duyer, Mrs. Carolyn Ward and)
Mr. and Mrs. John Large.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
March 16, 1948
Bobby and G.T. Devane, long time
*residents of Monticello, last Saturday .
opened their new Texaco service station on i
N. Jefferson Street.


-----------~ ('1,


Monticello News
Deputies arrested
Katrina Laverne Lee, 45, of
815. N. Jefferson St. on
March 10, and charged her
with battery. Bond was set
at $2,500 and she bonded
out the same day.
Rodney Hill, 30, of 1425
E. Clarks St., Apt. 1, was
arrested March 10 by
deputies and charged with
contributing to the delin-
quency of a minor after
accusations were made
about him smoking mari-
juana and snorting cocaine
in the presence of children.
Bond was set at $10,000 and
he bonded out the following
day.
Tanya Jessica Reid, 31,
of 1425 E. Clark St., apt. 4,
was arrested by deputies
March 10 and charged with
contributing to the delin-
quency of a child after
accusations were made that
she had smoked marijuana
and snorted cocaine in the
presence of children. Bond
was set at $5,000 and she
bonded out of jail the fol-
lowing day.
Shantria Crumity, 19,
of 730 Rhodes St., was
arrested by deputies March
10, and charged with bat-
tery and public affray.
Bond was set at $2,500 and
she bonded out the same
day.
Tiffany Walker, 20, of
930 S, Railroad St., turned
herself i" to the county jail
March 11, she was charged
with public affray. Bond
was set at $500 and she
bonded out the same day.
Frank Marrone, 84, of
2100 Autumn Lane,
Tallahassee, was arrested
March 11 by deputies and
charged with two counts of
violation of probation
(VOP), dumping commer-
cial litter, and VOP,
improperly disposing of
hazardous waste.
Karen Melody Laseter,
29, of 28 Notre Dame St.,
was arrested by deputies
March 11 and charged with
writ of attachment. Bond
was set at $205 and she
bonded out the same day.
Henry Lee Howard, 30,
of 1230 Curtis Mill Rd., was
arrested by deputies March
12, and charged with VOP,
driving under the influ-
ence, and driving with


license suspended or
revoked. Bond was with-
held and he remained .
housed at the county jail
Monday afternoon, March
17.
Antuan Scott, 24, of 528
SW 13th Terraze,Fernan-
dina Beach, FL, was arrest-
ed by deputies March 12,
and charged with VOP,
grand theft motor vehicle,
and VOP, fleeing and elud-
ing officer. Bond was with-
held and he remained
housed at the county jail
Monday afternoon, March
17.
Walter Francis, 37, of
520 Ash St., was sentenced
by court March 12, to pay a
$1,000 bond for contempt of
court, child support. He
was transported to'the
county jail and bonded out
the same day.
Kenneth Bernard
Williams, 31, of 9656 Old
Lloyd Rd., was ordered by
the court March 12, and.
given the choice to either
pay $1,500 in back child
support and contempt of
court, or spend 60 days in
the county jail. Williams
chose to do the jail sen-
tence.
Isaac Dewayne Wooten,
44, 857 N, Waukeenah St.,
was arrested March 14, and
charged with uttering, petit
theft, failure to appear
(FTA), burglary, felony
theft, and FTA, driving
with license revoked habit-
ual offender. Bond was set
at $2,500 and he remained
in the county jail Monday
afternoon, March 17.
When his bond is made
here, Leon County has a
hold on him, so he will be
transported there.
Ruben Hernandez, 18,
of 37 Rocky Kennels, was
arrested by police March 15
and charged with no valid
driver license and attach-
ing tag not assigned. Bond
was set at $100 and She
bonded out the same day.
Darryl Marcio Gilbert,
45, of 1203 % Harlem St.,
Tallahassee, was arrested
by police March 15 and
charged with driving with
license suspended or
revoked, possession of mar-
ijuana less than 20 grams,
VOP, driving with license
suspended, and possession
of drug paraphernalia.
Bond was set at $1,000 and


ne remained in me county
jail Monday afternoon,
March 17.
Leon County also has a
no-bond hold on Gilbert
for5 VOP, so when he is
released here, he will be
transported there.
Jamaal Reshad
Sermon, 27, of 9067
Foxwood Dr., S.,
Tallahassee, was arrested
by deputies March 15, and
charged with knowingly
driving with license sus-
pended, and possession of
marijuana less than 20
grams. Bond was set at
$1,000 and he bonded out of
jail the same day.
Eddie James Walker,
25, of 617 Chiropee Ct., Apt.
#D,. Tallahassee, was
picked up by police March
15, and transported to the
county jail for transit to
Leon County on warrants
for VOP, burglary of a
dwelling, VOP, grand theft,
and VOP felony theft. He
was transported then same
day.
Earnest Brooks, 47, of
830 N. Mulberry St., was
arrested by police March 15
and charged with resisting
arrest without violence.
Bond was set at $250 and he
bonded out of jail the same
day."
Veronica Odom, 33, of
11205 1st St., was sentenced
by the court to three days
in the county jail on
charges of petit theft. She
was released March 17.
Joseph Christopher
Norton, 42, of 192 Gaffney
Side, was arrested by
deputies March 16 and
charged with driving under
the influence. Bond was
set at $500 and he bonded
out the same day.
Deputies picked up
Andrew Lutz, 32, of 2413
Cambridge Ave., PA on
March 16, as a courtesy for
the state on what was to be
his release date from
Jefferson Correctional
Institution.
Pennsylvania put a
hold on Lutz's release for
charges of rape, sexual
assault, terrorist threats,
and indecent assault. He
remained in the county jail
Monday afternoon, March
17, due to PA not being able
to retrieve him until some-
time the middle of the
week.


Dan Mathis


Dan began to work for the Mont- I love to do," he says.
icello News in September 2007, and is In his spare time, Dan "rocks" with
an advertising executive. He lives in his band, Reckless Reality. When the
Madison, FL, and is single. band is between gigs, he interns at his
"I've always been in sales," Dan brother's Tattoo shop, Taboo Ink., in
says. "You have to do what you love, Chipley, FL.
and I love talking on the telephone His plans for the future are to "grow
with business owners." old, with Emerald as my boss, and to
What he likes most about his posi- make the most of her company and my
tion is the salary. "I'm at the highest career by becoming regional sales coor-
rate I've ever been, and I'm doing what dinator."


Jtep 13acri Tinjr


--


'-'"*'---


- 11








4A Monticello News


Wednesday, March 19, 2008


FOUND


EFFERSON


COUNTY


"Project Lifesaver"


Available Here


FRANHUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Jefferson County now has
trained law enforcement offi-
cers on call 24-hours a day 7-
days per week, who can track
residents suffering from de-
mentia, Alzheimer's, autism or
Down Syndrome when they get


Knowles, and Assistant Com-
mander Sgt Ray Lacey head the
teams.
The Project Lifesaver pro-
gram is sponsored by the Jeffer-
son County Sheriff's Office, and
the Jefferson Senior Citizen's
Center thanks Sheriff David
Hobbsforbringing the program
to the county


Monticello News Photo By Fran Hunt November 6, 2007
Deputy Rick Knowles in the field with Sgt. Bill Burns train-
ing on the Project Lifesaver equipment in the location of the
wristband transmitter.
lost and can't find their way Hobbs purchased the'
home or wander aimlessly equipment and brought the
Those sufferingfromthese Project Lifesaver program into
medical conditions wearaProj- the county in early November
ectLifesaverradio-transmitting The project is a rapid-re-
biacelet,which allows officials .,,sponse;,partnershig fb between.
tolocate them quickly law enforcement and the fami-
Commander Capt: Rick lies 'of those suffering from;


Alzheimer's disease andrelated
disorders such as Down syn-
drome and autism.
Hobbs stressed the Project
Lifesaver program will depend
on the support of the commu-
nity Funding for the pro-
gram's comes from private
donations, corporations, civic
clubs and government grants
when available. All contribu-
tions are used directly for the
programs operations, including
rescues, equipment, and educa-
tion.
Hobbs said he heard about
the units and researched them
extensively and determined
that the program would be an
asset here for not only the
county but also the Sheriff's De-
partment, for several reasons.
It is tried and true radio
technology that provides track-
ing through a wristband worn
by the participant, 24 hours a
day seven days a week, which
transmits the signal over sev-
eralmiles. Eachparticipanthas
an individual signal specifically
for him or her If they wander,
they can quickly be located.
'"And, if a resident from
here wanders off in Tallahas-
see, we can call Tallahassee, give
them the proper signal for the
wandering personandthey can
quickly locate them," said
Hobbs.
Headdedthatcountiespre-
senting using Project Lifesaver
included Leon, Wakulla and
Franklin, and all Jefferson
County deputies completed the
mandatory three-day training
course for the proper use of the
device. Deputies must be certi-
fied to use the technology


vionticello News rnoio uy i-ran umnt November ., zUu
Deputies in the classroom of the Sheriff's Department in November, obtained instruction from
Cathy Gardner of the Leon County Sheriff's Office on the proper use of the Project Lifesaver equip-
ment.


The device cuts down on
both excessive use of man-
power and man-hours nor-
mally used during a search; It
cuts down on the time that a
wandering victim may become
hurt, injured orfindthemselves
in a dangerous or-deadly situa-
tion; Search times are reduced
from hours and days to min-
utes.
Project Lifesaver is a
proven lifesaving system that is
reliable, responsive, practical
and affordable.
Project Lifesaver is impor-
tant because statistically
speaking, approximately 4.5
million Americans have
Alzheimer's and related disor-
ders. Of these, 60 percent will
wander during the course of
the disease. Many wander at


night, when usual search op-
tions are difficult. They can
also become paranoid and ac-
tually hide to avoid rescue.
This technology can locate any
wanderer during the day or
night, in any weather, even if
he/she is not cooperating in
his/her own rescue effort.
Project Lifesaver was es-
tablished in April 1999 as an
initiative of the 43" Search and
Rescue Company of the Chesa-
peake Sheriff's Office, in
Chesapeake, VA.
Presentations of the pro-


Pat's,


gram are available to local
clubs, churches, and civic or-
ganizations.
Caregivers or those know-
ing someone who may benefit
from this program, or have any
questions or those wishing to
setup presentation, are asked
to contact Program Directors
Nan or Steve Baughman at 556-
7279.
Contributions may be
made payable to the Jefferson
Sr. Center/Project Lifesaver,
care-of, Nan Baughman, PO
Box 853, Monticello, FL, 32344.


Jewelry


New Shop In Town


You give them food, clothing and shelter.

Big whoop. They want cell phones.



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E Embarq Holdings Company LLC. EMB1.08-33298


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Pat's Jewelry, owned by Pat Aaron-Long opened Feb-
ruary 26, located at 150 W Washington, Feb. 26. Busi-
ness hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. until 4
p.m. The phone number is 997-5912.
Aaron-Long brings with her, approximately 50 years
of experience in the jewelry business, including buying
for a major jewelry company in Tallahassee.
Her shop offers a wide variety of precious metals,
including gold, silver, platinum, and titanium, as well as
every precious stone available. "I have a very nice selec-
tion," said Long. She added that prices range from very
affordable to the very extravagant and expensive. "I
have unique items that can't be found anywhere else.
When an item is gone, I can't guarantee being able to lo-
cate another one."
She carries jewelry for men, women, and teens, and
pieces to suit a variety of tastes.
She also fills special orders for one-of-a-kind pieces.
"Anything one can imagine, metal, design, stones, I can
get," she said.
Items also sold in the shop include painted col-
lectibles, giftware, and signed lithographs.
Aaron-Long runs specials every month, such as
watches for March, necklaces for April. May features
Mother's Day and graduation gifts, and June, Father's
Day gifts.
Her reason behind opening a business here is be-
cause Monticello doesn't have a jewelry store. "I love
jewelry and I'm sure all ladies do, but oddly enough,
since I opened the shop, all of my sales so far have been
to men," she remarked.
She does offer layaway plans, and she takes Visa,
4 MasterCard, and Discover cards. "So come on in and
find the jewelry that is uniquely you," she invites.



4' -yo


IVionilcello news nhuiu oy rran nuunt ivarun 0, oUUO
Pat Aaron-Long owner of Pat's Jewelry discusses the vari-
ety of pieces available in her shop and her ability to locate,
original pieces and practically anything a customer desires.









Wednesday, March 19, 2008 Monticello News 5A






FOUND EFFERSON COUNTY


March 19
Monticello Kiwanis
Club meets every Wednes-
day at noon at the Jeffer-
son Country Club on
Boston Highway for lunch
and a meeting. Contact
President Rob Mazur at
907-5138 for club informa-
tion.
March 19
Social Dancing will be
held through March on
Wednesday evenings at the
Monticello Opera House
with beginning dance
classes 7 p.m. and open
dancing 7:45 p.m. There
will be complementary re-
freshments with the $5 ad-
mission fee, $3 for students
13 and up. Contact the


Opera House at 997-4242 for
more information.
March 20
Jefferson County
Health Disparities Task
Force Meeting is scheduled
for 10 a.m. Thursday at the
Jefferson County Health
Department, in the Annex
conference room. Contact
the health department at
342-0170 for more informa-
tion.
March 20
4-H Fashion Revue and
Share the Fun talent show
will be held 6 p.m. Thurs-
day at the Opera House.
Contact the Extension Of-
fice at 342-0187 for more in-
formation.


March 20
,AA meetings held 8
p.m. on Thursdays at
Christ Episcopal Church
Annex, 425 North Cherry
Street. For more informa-
tion call 997-2129, 997-1955.
March 21
Auditions for the Jef-
ferson Idol will be held Fri-
day at the Teen Center, for
the competition on Friday,
April 4, during Kick Butts
Week. Contact Darwen
Hinton at 342-0170 x2082 at
the health department for
more information.
March 21
Monticello Rotary Club
meets 'every Friday noon
at the Monticello/Jeffer-
son Chamber of Com-


merce on West Washington
Street for lunch and a
meeting.
Contact President Judson
Freeman at 997-0370 for
club information.
March 21-22
USDA Commodities
and Second Harvest will
welcome volunteers to bag
food packages 6:30 p.m. Fri-
day evening for distribu-
tion 9-11 a.m. Saturday at
the New Bethel AME
Church 6496 Ashville High-
way
Contact Essie Norton
at 997-5683 for information.
March 22
AA meetings are held 8
p.m. Saturday at Christ
Episcopal Church Annex,


Fer's G il Tour Goodwood Pltatio


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Members of the Founders Garden Circle celebrated
Valentine's Day Feb. 14, at their monthly meeting, by
touring the Goodwood Museums and Gardens, in Talla-
hassee.
A luncheon was enjoyed at Paula's Cabana Caf6' on
the premises.
The day full of sunshine and delicious foods and a


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delightful, informative house tour, reminiscent of a
kinder gentler lifestyle. Club members remarked about
the serenity and beauty of the premises.
In attendance were: Beulah Brinson, Gloria Brown,
Becky Clayton, Kaye Fearneyhough, Toni Lane, Leonia
Maresch, Claudette McRae, Suzanne Peary, chairperson,
J.C. Smith, and Ardis White.


Photo submitted
Founders Garden Circle members dine at Paula's Cabana
Caf6 during a tour of the Goodwood Gardens in February. From
left to right are Artis White, Suzanne Peary, chairperson, Gloria
Brown, Toni Lane, J.C. Smith, Leonia Maresch, Kaye Fearney-
hough, Beulah Brinson, Claudette McRae, and Becky Clayton.


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(located behind Langdale Auto Mall)
229-226-2077


425 North Cherry Street.
For more information call
997-2129, 997-1955.
March 24
Boy Scout Troop 803
meets 7 p.m. every Monday
at the Eagles Nest on
South Water Street. Par-
ents are encouraged to at-
tend this meeting.
For information con-
tact Scout Leader Paul Wit-
tig at 997-1727 or 997-3169.
March 24
AA Women's Meeting
is held 6:45 p.m. on Mon-
days; AA and Al-Anon
meetings are held at 8 p.m.
Christ Episcopal Church
Annex, 425 North Cherry
Street. For more informa-
tion call 997-2129, 997-1955.
March 24
Masonic Lodge #5
meets 7:30 p.m. on the sec-
ond and fourth Monday at
the Hiram Masonic Lodge,
235 Olive Street in Monti-
cello. Contact Roy Faglie at
933-2938 for more informa-
tion.
March 25
AA classes are held


every Tuesday evening at 8
p.m. for those seeking help.
Located at 1599 Springhol-
low Road in the Harvest
Center. Contact Marvin
Graham at 212-7669 for
more information.
March 25
Triple LLL Club meets
at 10:30 a.m. on the fourth
Tuesday of each month in
the fellowship hall of the
First Baptist Church Mon-
ticello for a meeting with a
program and speaker, and
potluck lunch. Contact the
church at 997-2349 for more
information.
March 25
Jefferson County Com-
munity Coalition meets
9:30 a.m. on the fourth
Tuesday of the month in
the Public Library Confer-
ence Room.
Big Bend Hospice Car-
ing Tree will provide infor-
mation on their services.
For more information
contact Donna Hagan at
948-2741 or
dha-
gan(@healthvstartimt.org


Retiring? Watch Out for
Investment Scams
Provided by Robert J. Davison

If you're planning to retire soon, you have a lot to anticipate:
more time with your family, the chance to travel, the freedom
to pursue your hobbies, and so on. Yet, there's one thing you'll
want to avoid during your retirement years: investment scams.
Unfortunately, retirees are the number one target for invest-
ment con artists. Unscrupulous people do engage in abusive
practices, arid they seek out the elderly. However, you are far
from defenseless against this kind of behavior. You can avoid
being "scammed" by following these suggestions:
Ask for credentials, background and references. As amazing
as it may seem, anyone can call himself or herself a "financial
advisor" or similar term. Before working with anyone, ask for
credentials, and find out how this person plans to work with
you. You may want to ask these types of questions:
What securities licenses do you hold?
How long has your company been in existence?
How are you compensated?
How frequently will you communicate with me?
Which methods will you employ to determine if an
investment is suitable for my risk tolerance and indi-
vidual needs?
Can you give me the names of some references?
If you are dealing with a reputable financial professional, he or
she will be happy to answer these and other questions. But if
you notice someone acting nervously or evasively when you
pose these inquiries, break off communication instantly; you
simply cannot afford to trust someone who is less than 100
percent forthcoming with you.
Don't be overly cooperative at first encounter. If a stranger
calls and asks for personal or financial information, be suspi-
cious. Con artists are good at winning their way into people's
confidence; furthermore, if you are a polite individual, you
may feel it's rude not to listen. This combination of their
smooth talk and your good manners can be dangerous. You are
under no obligation to listen to anyone on the phone; if you
suspect you are talking to a predator, simply hang up or ask to
be placed on a "do not call" list.
Never say yes to "you must act now" offers. If you receive
an investment offer that "must" be acted upon immediately,
walk away fast. Any offer that sounds too good to be true is
too good to be true. Legitimate investment opportunities will
still be around tomorrow and next week.
Always stay in charge of your money. Never work with any-
one who is eager to take "total control" of your money. True
investment professionals will make recommendations based on
your needs, communicate with you regularly and involve you
in every step of the investment process.
Take action immediately if you have trouble retrieving prin-
cipal. Unless you are investing in a fixed-term vehicle, such as
a bond, you should be able to receive your funds or profits
within a reasonable amount .of time. If the broker you are
working with "stalls" you when you say you want to pull out
your principal or profits, report him or her to securities regula-
tors.
By taking these steps, you can help avoid being victimized by
con artists. So, stay vigilant, seek out honest advice- and
enjoy your retirement years.

Robert J. Davison EdwardJones
Financial Advisor
205 E. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32344
Bus. 850-997-2572 Fax 866-462-9184
Cell 850-933-3329
robert.davison@edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com
Making Sense of Investing








6A Monticello News


Wednesday, March 19, 2008


FOUND


EFFERSON


COUNTY


Recognition Banquet


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post 251 and Ladies Auxiliary
presented its annual Awards
and Recognition Banquet
Saturday, Feb. 23, at the
Howard Middle School
Cafetorium.
A skit was performed
with the audience partici-
pating as members of The
Tater Family In Action,
and Senior Vice Post Com- J
mander Byron Barnhart as
narrator.
The skit was intended to
help leaders work with the dif-
ferent personality types in their
clubs, organizations, and in the
work place.
Local middle school student
winners in the Patriot's Pen
essay contest were recognized
with a certificate and cash.


'These are:
Claudia Gail Richburg, first
place local, and fourth place dis-
trict, $100; Yasmire S. Whigham,
second place, $75; and Christo-
pher Haugen,
-third place,
$50.


VlUticiNIU Iews rnulu uy UCUUIe OIIdapp ruuarucy Zo, ZUuo
Deputy Kevin D. Tharpe, left, was recognized as Law En-
forcement Officer of the Year by the VFW Post 251 and Ladies Aux-
iliary during its annual Awards and recognition Banquet on Feb.
23. Sheriff David Hobbs was also recognized for his work. Both
were given certificate of appreciation.


Monticello news Pnoto by uebDie Snapp ieoruary za, 2008
Patriot's Pen participant and local middle school student
Yasmire S. Whigham was awarded second place and recognized
with a certificate and $75 during the annual VFW Post 251 and
Ladies Auxiliary Awards Banquet on Saturday, Feb. 23. Here she
proudly displays her certificate for a job well done.


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Patriot's
Pen participants
were each
awarded $25.
These are:
Jalexia Nicole
Sloan, Charlett
S. Carter, and
Phidell Jawaun
Lewis.
Voice of
Democracy essay
contest winners
and their awards
are: Rebecca
Aman, first
place local and
second place dis-
trict, $100; Kas-
sandra Simpkins,
second place


local, $75; Breana E. Harvey,
third place local, $50; Lena
Odom, Voice of Democracy, $25.
Special recognition went to
Don Burton. Fire Fighter Of
B The Year: Kevin D. Tharpe,
Jefferson County Sheriff's
Department Law Enforde-
ment Officer Of The Year;
ois Hunter, Outstanding
public Servant; C.P. Viller,
outstanding Community
ervant; and to Sheriff
avid Hobbs. ^
Special birthday recogni-
ion was given to District,11
commander John Nelson,
third year position. He spoke
briefly about his campaigning ef-
forts for State Surgeon, health- .
care advocacy on behalf of all
military veterans in Florida. He
has been busy visiting all the dis-
tricts in Florida.
In recognition of Black His-
tory Month, Shirley Washington
told the story "The Negro
Mother."
Commander's Awards were
given to post members including
the Member Of The Year pre-
sented to Linda Kearse, the only
female commander.
President's Awards were also
given to Auxiliary members,
with special recognition to
Teresa Madison.
Post officers include Ned
Hill, commander; Byron Barn-
hart, senior vice commander;
Thomas Saunders, junior vice
commander; Sam Madison Sr.,
adjutant; and Lonnie Griffin,
quartermaster.
Ladies Auxiliary officers in-
clude Mary Madison, president;
Shirley Washington, senior vice
president; Alberta Barnhart,
treasurer; and Willie Ann
Dickey, junior vice president.


Kiwanians Welcome


Lt. Governor Al Eppinger
L Photo Submitted
Kiwanis Club
President Rob
Mazur, on left, wel-
S comes Lt. Gover-
nor for Kiwanis
6Division Ill Al Ep-
S pinger, on right, to
the March 12 meet-
ing. He brought the
membership up-to-
date on pertinent
district informa-
tion.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Lt. Governor for Kiwa-
nis Division .III Al Ep-
pinger visited with
Monticello Club members
and their guests during
the Wednesday, March 12
meeting at the Jefferson
Country Club on Boston
Highway.
Eppinger brought the
members up-to-date on
the progress of 'the Mira-


cle Field, for underprivi-
leged children in Division
III.
The Miracle Field will
be built in June and, the
Monticello Club partici-
pated in the fundraising
efforts for it.
He also conducted a
survey of the members to
identify areas of opportu-
nity with regard to the
levels of service and fel-
lowship in Jefferson
County.


Innovative Partners

Coalition, Inc Is Awarded

$45,000 Grant
DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Innovative Partners Coalition, Inc was awarded a
$45,000 grant from the Department of Health.
The program will provide services to families of Jef-
ferson County, to promote abstinence education to re-
duce teenage sexual activity, teenage pregnancy, births
to unwed teens, and the transmission of sexually trans-
mitted diseases.
For program information and participation contact
Byron Barnhart at 850-251-0386.


Anderson Works


On Display At The Arts


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Jefferson Arts, Inc.
will host a new exhibit
opening Sunday, April 6:
"Paintings from Here to
There: The Gulf Coast to
the Red Hills of Tallahas-
see."


Through the eyes and
brush of watercolor artist
Penny L. Anderson, this
show will take you on a vi-
sual tour from the Gulf
Coast to the Red Hills of
Tallahassee. I
Anderson is a lifelong
artist whose work is in nu-
merous private collections
from California and Maine
to New York and Florida.
For the past three
years she has been devel-
oping a relationship and
understanding of the
unique world of the.
Monticello News Photo by Debbie Snapp February 23, 2008 Florida Panhandle.
Voice of Democracy participants Kassandra Sirppkins So often Ijust need to
was given second place local and $75 for her efforts and paint the weather, the
recognized during the annual VFW Post 251 and 1.adies water, the moss hanging
Auxiliary Awards Banquet on Feb. 23. from oaks along the per-


Easter CantataC9tpaL


Set At Lamont W&CI
Dentures Partials Relines
B a t s Repairs Extractions
Same Day Service On Dentur
Acrylic Partials, Repairs & Ex


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Three local churches
have come together to
perform an Easter Can-
tata 6 p.m. Saturday,
March 22, hosted by the
Lamont Baptist Church,
121 River Road, Lamont.
The Choirs of Cen-
tral Baptist Church, Eliz-
abeth Baptist Church,


and Lamont Baptist
Church will present
"The Way, the Truth, and
the Life".
The Cantata will be
followed with fellowship
and refreshments.
Rev. Charles Johnson,
pastor, Lamont Baptist,
invites all to this special
Easter performance.
Contact him at 997-6870
for more information.


fect horizontal and verti-.
cal lines of Tallahassee,"
she relates. "Its shrimp
boats, old and new build-
ings and a magnificently
diverse flora and fauna."
Join the Jefferson Arts
members for the opening
reception of this vibrant
work between 2 to 4 p.m.
Sunday, April 6.
The exhibit is free and
open to the public.
It will be on display
April 6 through April 30,
at the Gallery, 575 West
Washington Street.
The Gallery is open
Wednesday and Satur-
days 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. or, by
appointment.
Jefferson Arts, Inc. is a
non-profit group with a
goal of promoting art and
art education in the Monti-
cello area of North Florida
and South Georgia.
For more information,
contact the Gallery at 997-
3311 or, visit the website at
www.jeffersonartsgallery.c
om.


VFW


Annual Award


I









Wednesday, March 19, 2008 Monticello News 7A





FOUND EFFERSON COUNTY





Eight Residents Receive Access Ramps


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Saturday March 8 was a happy day for
six Jefferson County residents, and Satur-
day March 15, for two addi-
tional residents, who are now
able to leave and enter their
homes easily thanks to area
Rotary clubs and the Florida
National Guard.
The National Guard's
Construction Battalion, based |
in Quincy Florida, spent part
of their drill weekend build-
ing access ramps from south
of Lloyd to the extreme north-
east of the county "It's good
training for our troops," said I
Commanding Officer Captain
Jason Neuman. "We're glad "
to be able to help people in the L
community too."
Since severe winds had
been through the area-the pre-
vious Friday, two building National
sites had no power, and gener- for handicap


ators had to be brought out froni the Talla-
hassee Armory By the end of the day there
were six brand new ramps across Jefferson
County.
"Rotary clubs across the area banded to-


S' ihnoto buomliRea
Guard Staff and Rotarians recently built six ramps
pped citizens here.


gether when the need was seen for access
ramps for people with a dis-
ability who may not be able to
afford one," said Lisa Raleigh,
a Rotarian and chair of the
Ramp Up! Committee. "
Judson Freeman, the
president of the Monticello
Rotary Club, really got things
going with this project, since
the Monticello Club often
helps people who need ramps
in this area.
Since the project started,
James Muchovej, the incom-
ing president of Monticello
Rotary has designed four
ramps, and is also assisting
actively on building days.
For information about
volunteering to build home
access ramps, call Lisa
Raleigh at 212-3334.
For information if you
need a home access ramp, call
Patricia Day at Ability 1st- This ph
The Center for Independent ramps cons


Living at 575-9621.


Photo Submitted
hoto shows an example of the many handicapped
structed around the county


I FrminBlyadEriiMnd[Dayl1A


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Solomon Lodge No. 6 invites the Jeffer-
son County community to its 2008 Family'
and Friends Day program entitled "Bringing
our Families Back toGod" 3 p.m. Sunday.
March30.


The program will be held at Welatmuee .
MB Church, 76 Avalon Road.
Keynote speaker will be Bishop Dr
Lorenzo Hall, pastor of The Greater El-
Bethel-el Divine Holiness Church in Jack-
sonville.
For more information contact Art Brown
at solomonlodge6@qmail.com or 284-3250.


Boyd Backs Plan To Invest


In Renewable Energy, Create New Jobs


Congressman Allen
Boyd (D-North Florida) on
March 3 supported the Re-
, ewable Energy and En-
ergy Conservation Tax Act
of 2008 (HR 5351), land-
mark legislation that will
make significant new in-
vestments in renewable en-
ergy sources, create
hundreds of thousands of
jobs, and help to end the
country's dependence on
foreign oil. The Renewable
Energy and Energy Con-
servation Tax Act is a fis-
cally responsible bill that
invests in renewable en-
ergy without adding to the
deficit.


"This legislation marks
a major investment in in-
novation and American job
creation while still adher-
ing to the fiscally responsi-
ble pay-as-you-go budget
rules," Boyd said. "By in-
vesting in renewable en-
ergy sources, we can help
to reduce our reliance on
foreign sources of energy
and put our country on a
path to more affordable, en-
vironmentally-friendly, and
stable fuel sources."
The'Renewable Energy
and Energy Conservation
Tax Act extends and ex-
pands tax incentives for re-
newable electricity, energy,


SLife Power & Praise Church
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office, kitchen & social hall
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Good income potential


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and fuel, as well as for
plug-in hybrid cars and en-
ergy efficient homes, build-
ings, and appliances. The
legislation also includes
clean renewable energy
bonds for electric coopera-
tives and public power
providers, like those in
North Florida, to finance
facilities that generate elec-
tricity from renewable
sources. To pay for renew-
able energy incentives, HR
5351 repeals unnecessary
tax subsidies and loopholes
only for large, integrated
oil companies through nar-
rowly targeted provisions.
"Let's innovate, not
mandate, and that's exactly
what this legislation is
about-providing the in-
centives for the private sec-
tor to lead our nation to
energy independence,"
Boyd said. "There is no
doubt that ending our de-
pendence on foreign oil
and utilizing renewable en-
ergy sources will make our
country and our economy
stronger, and this bill gets
us closer to those goals."
The Renewable Energy
and Energy Conservation
Tax Act has been endorsed
by various renewable en-
ergy agricultural, rural
electric, and environmen-
tal groups, including the
American Council on Re-
new'able Energy, the Na-
tiodal Farmers Union,
Florida Power & Light
Company, the National
Rural Electric Cooperative
Association, and the
League of Conservation
Voters.


USDA Commodities


Food Program Planned


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The USDA Commodities Food Dis-
tribution Program and Second Harvest,
sponsored by New Bethel AME Church,
Elizabeth MB Church, and Hickory Hill
MB Church will be held Saturday,
March, 22 at the New Bethel AME
Church at 6496 Ashville Highway
Distribution is held on the fourth


A member of Congress-
man Allen Boyd's staff will
visit Monticello on the
fourth Wednesday of every
month so that Jefferson
County residents may have
an opportunity to discuss
issues of concern.
Boyd's staff is trained to as-
sist constituents with a va-
riety of issues related to
various federal agencies.
Boyd says it's important
that his staff be available
for those who are unable to
travel to either his Panama
City or Tallahassee offices.
The staff member will
be at the public library on
Water Street 9:30-11:30 a.m.
on March 26.


Saturday of each month, with volun-
teers bagging orders 6:30 p.m. on the
Friday, March 21.
Monetary donations to purchase
food, and donated food items for the
program will be accepted, as are volun-
teers to help with the program.
For more information, or to volun-
teer, contact Essie Norton at 997-5683,
Nellie Randell at 997-5605, or Ruth Ann
Scurry at 997-3102.



[cy McKown




Turns 80


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Lucy McKown cele-
brated her 80th birthday
on Friday, March 7, with a
three-day weekend with
her daughters Annette
Denson, Bunny Ritchie,
and Kaye Bruce in Savan-
nah, GA.
Though she didn't get
to visit with her favorite
cook/cookbook author
Paula Deen, she did get to
eat at her restaurant,
"Lady and Sons."
She also got the oppor-
tunity to eat at "Uncle
Bubba's Restaurant" while
there. Bubba Hiers is the
brother of Paula Deen.
Mckown claims to have
all of Deen's cookbooks.


Photo Submitted
Lucy McKown is wished a
Happy 801h Birthday by Bubba
Hiers.


THE CITY OF MONTICELLO SUPPORTS FAIR HOUSING


The City of Monticello is committed to ensuring fair treatment in housing by avoiding
discrimination, providing equal opportunity, and taking affirmative action to correct past
discrimination. The City of Monticello implements civil rights laws which are designed
to protect persons regardless of race, religion, national origin, family status, color, gender,
or handicap in the choice of housing. If you believe you have been a victim of housing
discrimination, contact the Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity, Room 5116,
Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW, Washington,
D.C. 20410-1000; (202) 708-2878. For more information, contact the Fair Housing
Information Clearinghouse, P.O. Box 6091, Rockville, MD 20850; (800) 245-2691.

A FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/HANDICAP
ACCESS JURISDICTION


m <..j......- ,IL


Jefferson County Health.Department

Just move Jefferson
For Women

Spring brings a new start for Jefferson's Women

Jefferson County Health Department is sponsoring 100 women 45 years
and older to receive up to 3 free months of fitness training.

Join Now !

Spaces are limited call now.

For more information call :
Preston Mathews
Office phone number: 973.5000 ext 119
Cell phone: 545.1334

FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF

HEALTH









8A Monticello News


Wednesday, March 19, 2008


PORTS


Blabalots Tennis Team




Win Two Latest Games


FRAN HUNT
Monticello New
Staff Writer
In the match against
the Golden Eagle Maver-
icks, March 6, the Bla-
balots, ladies' A-league
tennis team, took vic-
tories in five of six
matches.
Team #1, Katie
Brock and Susan \
Goodwin, won by for-
feit.
Team #2, Patty
Hardy and Cindy Wain-
right, won the sets, 6-0,
and 6-4.
Team #3, Laura Kirch-
hoff and substitute Susie
Grosvenor, lost the first set, 2-6,
won the second, 6-3, and lost the
tiebreaker, 3-6.
Team #4, Karen Davis and Cathy Neal,
won the sets, 6-1, and 6-2.
Team #5, Trisha Wirick and Lindsey
Taylor, won the sets, 7-5, and 6-4.


Team #6, Jennifer Ellis and substitute
Roslyn Bass, won the sets, 6-2, and
6-1.
In the match against the
Killearn Racketeers, March
13, for the first time in recent
memory the Blabalots won
six of six matches and did-
n't drop even one set.
Team #1, Brock
and Neal, won the sets, 6-2,
) and 6-2.
Team #2, Hardy and
Wainright won the sets, 6-0,
and 6-4.
Team #3, Angie Delvecchio
and substitute Susan Webb,
won the sets,,6-3, and 7-5.
Team #4, Davis and Neal,
won the sets, 7-5, and 6-3.
Team #5, Wirick and Taylor, won
the sets, 6-2, and 6-4/
Team #6, Ellis and Bass, won the sets,
6-0, and 6-0.
The Blabalots will face the Glen Arvin
Classics, 9:30 a.m., Thursday, March 20, at
Tom Brown Park.


NFCC Moves Up To #6 In State!


North Florida Com-
munity College's Sentinel
Baseball team moved up
to # 6 in the statewide
Florida Community Col-
lege Activities Associa-
tion (FCCAA) Coach's
Poll this week. The team
moved up from #9 after
its 23-4 standing for the
2008 season was posted.
Florida Community
College baseball and soft-
ball coaches vote for the
Top 10.
"Obviously we are
pleased with our progress
and feel we are back on
track with our progress,"
said NFCC AthleticDirec-
tor/Head Baseball Coach
Dr. Steve Givens. Dr.
Givens said three of the
six conference schools are
ranked ahead of NFCC


and four of the confer-
ence teams are ranked in
the Top 10. "Our toughest
schedule is ahead of us,
and our players recognize
the toughest part of our
schedule is ahead;' Dr.
Givens said it's prema-
ture to celebrate with 20
of the toughest games of
the season left to play.
The Sentinels moved
up after the team charted
a 23-4 record with wins
over Patrick Henry Com-
munity College March 10
at home in double-header
games. In those games,
NFCC won 8-6 and 8-3.
In the first game,
NFCC's #1 Anthony R.
Green/North Cobb
HS/Kennesaw, GA was
the winning pitcher.
NFCC's #23 Ben Adle-


burg/Lawton Chiles
HS/Tallahassee, FL got 2
hits, according to Dr.
Givens.
In the second game,
NFCC's #12 William S.
Waller/Baldwin Middle-
Senior HS/Baldwin, FL
was the winning pitcher.
NFCC's #4 Brant D.
Hamilton/Glenwood
School/Phenix, AL and
#15 Juan A. Perez/Uni-
versity HS/Orlando, FL
both got home runs.
The Sentinels' next
home game will be March
18 against Gulf Coast
Community College at 2
p.m. The Sentinels play
on the NFCC Campus on
Sentinel Field. The public
is encouraged to come out
and watch these young
men play baseball.


2 1/2 TO 3" 6.5'
3 TO 3 1/2" 6.5'
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Lady Warriors Win



Four Of Five Games


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Lady Warriors won four of last five
games to stand 8-2 on the season.
In the game against Madison High,
March 6, Madison won 17-10.
On the mound, Taryn Copeland
pitched four innings and gave up seven
hits and four walks. Lindsey Day pitched
one inning and gave up two walks, and no
hits; and Bethany Saunders pitched two
innings, giving up two hits and three
walks, while acquiring Aucilla's only
strikeout of the game,
At the plate, leading hitters included
Day, with two for four with two RBIs and
two runs; Erin Kelly, two for four with
one RBI, one run; and Nicole Mathis, two
for three with three RBIs.
Aucilla took a 12-9 victory over John
Paul II, March 11, collecting 16 hits with
two errors.
Copeland pitched five innings, giving
up four hits, six walks, and striking out
five batters; Kelly pitched half an innings
and acquired no recorded statistics.
At the rubber, leading hitters in-
cluded Chelsey Kinsey, two for three with
two RBIs, one double, one triple, and
three runs; Day, three for three with two
RBIs, two doubles, and one run; and
Copeland, three for four with two RBIs,
and two runs.
The Lady Warriors faced RF Munroe
in back-to-back contests March 14, taking
the first game with an 8-4 win. Aucilla


collected 11 hits and committed one error.
Copeland pitched five innings, giving
up four walks and striking out two; and
Ashley Schofill pitched two innings, giv-
ing up three walks.
Leading the Lady Warriors at bat,
were Saunders, two for four with two
RBIs, and one run; Day, two for three with
one RBI; and Olivia Sorensen, two for
three with one run.
In the second game, Aucilla downed
Munroe, 9-7. ACA collected 13 hits and
committed two errors.
Copeland pitched three innings and
gave up one walk and struck out two.
Schofill pitched three innings, giving up
two walks, and striking out three.
Kinsey went 2 for 4, 1 RBI, 3 runs;
Kelly, 3 for 4, 2 RBI, 1 run; and Sorensen 2
for 4, 1 RBI, and 1 double.
Lady Warriors defeated Taylor
County, 9-4, March 15.
Aucilla collected eight hits and com-
mitted one error, while Taylor acquired
seven hits and committed five errors.
Copeland pitched all seven innings,
giving up five walks and striking out four.
Leading the way at the plate were Kinsey,
who went two for five with two RBIs and
one run; and Saunders, two for four with
one RBI and one run.
On the mound, Copeland stands at a
5-2 season; and Schofill is at a 2-0 season.
The Lady Warriors face off on the di-
amond for the first time this season
against Altha, 4 p.m., March 25, here; and
Maclay, 4 p.m., Match 27, here.


Lady TigerJVs 0-3 On Season


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Following four sched-
uled games since the be-
ginning of the season, the
Jefferson County Mid-
dle/High School junior
varsity softball team
stands 0-3 on the season.
During the season-
opener against Taylor
County, Feb. 14, the Lady


Tigers lost 20-15.
"It was a good game be-
tween the two teams," said
Coach Hattie Ruth Jordan.
Facing off against
Trinity Catholic, Feb. 19,
Jefferson fell to Trinity 15-
8. "The girls played well
but our opponent played
better..
The game against Holy
Comforter, slated for Feb.
26 was rained out. The


girls played Taylor County
March 3, and were defeated
20-8. "The young team is
working out errors to help
better their skills so that
they will be able to com-
pete with surrounding
teams in the area," said
Jordan.
The next game is
slated against Hamilton
County, 5 p.m., Tuesday,
March 18, there.


JV Warriors Stand 3-3


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
After splitting two of five recent
games, and three rainouts, JV Warriors
stand 3-3 on the season.
The game scheduled against Melody
Christian, Feb. 29 was rained out, as was
the game slated against Madison Central,
March 4.
The Warriors downed Madison Acad-
emy, 15-5, March 6. Jared Jackson was
credited as the winning pitcher, with five,
strikeouts.
On the rubber, Jackson went four for
four; Jacob Newberry, two for four; and


Levi Cobb, two for three.
The game against North Florida
Christian, slated for March 7, was rained
out.
The Warriors lost to Brookwood, 7-6,
Tuesday, March 11.
Hans Sorensen was credited as the
winning pitcher with four strikeouts. At
the plate, Philip Watts went two for four;
and Cobb two for three.
The Warriors will square off against
Melody Christian, 4 p.m., Friday, March
14, here.
The previous game slated against
Melody Christian earlier in the season
was rained out.


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Wednesday, March 19, 2008 Monticcllo News 9A





SCHOOL


ACA


Juniors,


Seniors


Fish
Cole Slaw
Fruit Choices
Cheese Grits
Hushpuppies
Milk



Easter Holiday

1 r-<<-'2


Pizza
Vegetable Salad
Fruit Choices
Cinnamon Roll
Milk


Roast Turkey
Creamed Potatoes
Green beans
Fruit Salad
Hot Rolls
Milk



Chicken
Quesadilla
Corn on the Cob
Sour Cream &
Salsa
Fruit Choices
Cinnamon Roll



Cheesburger
Lettuce, Tomato &
Pickle
Oven Fries
Fruit Choices
Milk


Enjoy Luncheon, Prom


Photo Submitted
The Aucilla Christian Academy 2008 Senior Class enjoyed the luncheon, sponsored by the Junior Class. Pictured, back row left
to right: Rebekah Aman, Claire Knight, Courtney Connell, Stephanie Dobson, Lindsay Day, Ramsey Revell, Whitney Scarberry, Court-
ney Brasington, and Katy Plummer. Middle Row left to right: Hannah Sorensen, Tristan Sorensen, Bethany Saunders, Chelsey Kin-
sey, Nicole Mathis, and Paige Thurman. Front Row left to right: Will Hartsfield, Prateen Patel, Hunter Greene, Rob Searcy, and AJ
Connell. (Not Pictured: Elliott Lewis, Alfa Hunt, Kyle Barnwell, Ben Buzbee, Jayce Davis, Jerel Drew, Michael Kinsey, Reggie Walker,
and Woody Vollertson)


UNINSURED??

*. We have a sliding-fee program for those who
qualify at Tri-County Family Health Care.
8Ei,,,,dh st"0b 850-948-2840
TRI-COUNTY FAMILY HEALTH CARE
193 NW US 221 Greenville, FL 32331
Mon., Wed., Fri. 8am-5pm; Tues. 10am-5pm; Thurs. 10am-7pm
North Florida Medical Centers, Inc.
Phamac


I :*-- Eft". *
THE PRESCRIPTION roR


Free Delivery For
Prescriptions
Jackson's Drug Store
166 E. Dogwood Monticello -
S 850-997-3553


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Medication
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Are You In Need Of
Chiropractic Services?

Dr. Michael A. Miller


180 S. Cherry St., Suite D
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M 007 19/1n1


3116 Capital Circle NE, Ste.2
Tallahassee, FL 32308
OrA -110 A~rWA4


OJU-


0ZUU


/-uu M:a.= U-50-668--
Now excepting Blue Cross Blue Shield and most other insurances


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Aucilla Christian
Academy juniors at-
tended a special lunch-
eon, March 7, and their
prom, March 8.
As is tradition, the
ACA juniors planned,the
events, chose a theme,
and raised all funds, as a
gift to the seniors.
"Night Under the
Stars in Paris," was the
theme chosen this year.
The luncheon took
place noon Friday, at Car-
rie Ann and Company,
decorated by the juniors
in the style of a French
cafe.
Students socialized,
enjoyed their meals, and
especially the ongoing
antics of Lisa Reasoner,
as the French mime,
Marcel Marceau, who
kept them laughing
throughout the event.
There were 52 stu-
dents and 11 adults in at-
tendance, and eighth
graders were the servers.
The menu consisted of'
Caesar salad, grilled sir-
loin tips, twice baked po-
tatoes, saut6ed green
beans with almonds, and
chocolate mouse with
whipped cream topped
with a fresh strawberry
for dessert.
Souvenirs included
an Eiffel Tower key-
chain, copy of the menu
in French, and two crys-
tal glasses lettered in
gold with the theme,
date, and image of the
Eiffel Tower.
Prior to the prom,
Saturday night, students
met with photographer
Betsy Barfield at Lake
Ella, in Tallahassee, for,
photographs, after which
they scattered to differ-


Jefferson County Seminole Club invites you to attend an

EMERITUS LUNCHEON
To Honor 50 year graduates of FSU

Thursday, March 27, 2008
11:30 am- 1:00 pm
Monticello Opera House

Speaker will be Eddie Woodward, Archivist for Heritage Protocol
Memorabilia from throughout the years of student life
at Florida State University will be on display

Public is invited Tickets $15
Limited Seating ~ Call 997-3112 for tickets


Monticello News Photo By Fran Hunt March 7, 2008
Enjoying food and fellowship during the 2008 ACA Prom Luncheon are (clockwise from left):
Kasey Joiner, Hunter Greene, Erin Kelly, Katlin Levine, Olivia Sorensen, and Savanah Reams.


ent locations in the city
for dinner. In keeping
with the theme of the
prom, many students
chose to eat French food
at Chez Pierre.
The prom was held at
the Silver Slipper, deco-
rated in a festive French
theme, complete with a
miniature replica of the
Eiffel Tower.
Students in evening
gowns and tuxedos were
served hors d'oeuvres of
cheese sticks, chicken
drumettes, potato chips
and dips, a tray of mixed
fruits, brownies and soft
drinks.
The local band, 19-
South provided live
music for the students
who danced to midnight.
Serving as chaper-
ones were Rhonda and
Terry Dobson, Michelle
and Keith Tharpe, and
Richard Finlayson. Rick
Dollar provided security.


Monticello News Photo By Fran Hunt March 7, 2008
Juniors and Seniors were entertained, during their 2008
Prom luncheon, by a mime, Pictured are: Alfa Hunt (far left) and
Rebekah Aman (far right).


Photo Submitted
The ACA 8th Graders are chosen as servers during the prom activities, each year, Pictured left
to right: Shelby Witmer, Skyler Hanna, Vicki Perry, Levi Cobb, Philip Watts, Tyler Jackson, Trent
Roberts, and Keli Dollar.


No School


I hol WeIu 000









10A Monticello News


Wednesday, March 19, 2008


a team event to

fight cancer


2008 Jefferson County Relay For Life


AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY


RELAY FOR LIFE FACTS


* The Ameri-
can Cancer Soci-
ety Relay For
Life is an
overnight cele- :
bration of life
and cancer sur- .
vivorship.

* Relay For u '"
Life is a unique


team event de-
signed to raise
awareness about cancer and raise funds
to support the research, education, advo-
cacy, and patient services vital to the
American Cancer Society's mission of
eliminating cancer.

* Relay For Life is community-driven.
It is a great way for the community to
work together in the fight against cancer.

* Teams of people, including local busi-
nesses, friends, families, hospitals, reli-
gious organizations, and clubs gather at
community sites and take turns walking
laps.

* One of the really wonderful pieces of


tions.


* Every dollar we
raise goes toward
fighting cancer. Con-
tributions to the Relay
For Life help the
American Cancer So-
ciety fight cancer in
four main ways: re-
search, education, ad-
vocacy and patient
services.


* The American Cancer Society funds
more than $100 million of cancer research
a year.

* More than two-thirds of all,cancer
deaths are preventable and we teach peo-
ple every day how to live healthy lifestyles
and get regular check-ups.

* The American Cancer Society's advo-
cacy initiative strives to influence public
policies at all levels. We work to educate
policymakers about cancer and how it af-
fects the individuals and families they rep-
resent.


the Relay For Life program is the Sur- This is the bread and butter of our 5I4
vivors Lap, which kicks off the event, work-the programs and services we offer
Each cancer survivor is introduced and people who have been diagnosed with can-
all survivors complete the first lap cer. Programs like Look Good...Feel Better
around the track before being joined by and.J9,ad to Recovery are staples. But can-
the other-rtictpartfts t" rabdallyt-t-ecerId s-nd their family ,ali9su -*. Relay F
way for us to keep in mind why we par- call the Society at 1-800-ACS-2345, 24-hours Tacoma, W
ticipate in Relay For Life. a day, 365 days a year, and a trained cancer forts and v
information specialist will help them with a practicing
* After nightfall, one of the main high- information and referrals and direct them walked sol
lights of Relay For Life is the Luminaria to resources in their community No other $27,000 for
Ceremony. Hundreds/thousands of lumi- organization does this. Dr. Klatt I
naria candles dedicated to loved ones line To become a part of this year's Jeffer- that first y


the track and are left burning throughout
the night to remind participants of the
incredible importance of their contribu-


We invite you to become

part of the celebration at


son County Relay For Life event, contact
Marianne Goehrig at 219-0722 or Michelle
Brantley at 997-2701


y4

RELAY
FOR LIFE


After dark, the Relay For Life celebration will include a special Luminaria Ceremony.
Encircling the track with lights of hope,, the Luminaria Ceremony reaches for tomorrow with each
candle of life and touches the stars for only a moment to remember those of yesterday.
-Your donation will place a luminaria along the pathway to memorialize or honor someone you love.
The bags will stay lit throughout the evening, reminding us that HOPE LIVES among us. The Luminaria
Ceremony-begins just after dark. Please complete the form below to honor or remerrber a loved one
who has battled cancer.
- ------------------------------------------------- 7---------------------- -------- ---------- ----------------.,
__ April 25-26, 2008
:,0 i 0i rF m Heldoat
Jefferson County High
Your name:. School
School
Address: Luminaria Ceremony
Begins at 9:00 p.m.
City: State: Zip:
Return your order form to:
Phone (H): (W): _American Cancer Society
2619 Centennial Blvd. Suite 101
Email:. Tallahassee, FL 32308
Or fax 850-297.0592
Or Give to Your Team Captain
Credit Card: Visa MasterCard AMEX Discover .

Account #: EXP: Signature:
Name ,In Memory In Honor Donation Amount
El []1




Total Donation:
THE MINIMUM SUGGESTED DONATION IS'$5 PER BAG. Please make checks payable to the American Cancer Society.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION
OF CONSUMER. SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL- FREE, 1-800-435-7352, WITHIN THE STATE. REGISTRATION
DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT. APPROVAL OR RECOMMENDATION BY THESTATE.


. Relay
fundraiser
ment that
participatE
cer. It's at
that takes
* Relay F
A celeb
A nation
A comn
A family
An ex
event
A team
business t(
An opp
survivors
been diag
caregivers
who have I
A volui
* Relay I
community
Teams are
ligious
schools, b
public emi
profession
* Typical


IT'S NOT TO LATE TO START A TEAM

Register Your American Cancer Society
Relay For Life Team Now


The American Cancer
Society Relay For Life of
Jefferson County is just
around the corner. Mark
your calendar for April 25
and 26.
Register your team
today by calling Jo Morris
at 997-4985. This "celebra-
tion of life" brings the Jef-
ferson County community
together in a unified effort
to fight cancer.
Former and current
cancer patients, their fami-
lies, businesses, civic or-
ganizations, and the public
are invited to take part in
this exciting team event.
Relay For Life takes
place from 6:00 pm on
April 25 until noon on
April 26 at the old Jeffer-
son County High School
Track Field (located on
Water Street.)
Relay For Life is the
American Cancer Soci-
ety's version of an athletic
relay, but with a new twist.
Relay For Life is a family-
oriented event where par-
ticipants enjoy the


camaraderie of a
and also raise fun
support the activi
the American Car
ety.
Participants c
at the Relay site,
they are not takin
turn walking, the
part in fun activil
enjoy local enter
Teams from c
nies, churches, or
tions, hospitals, a
schools collect do


and can win individual
and team prizes for their
efforts.
th "Relay For Life brings
f ^ the progress against can-
cer to the forefront," said
Dana Lastinger, Jefferson
County Relay For Life
a Chairman. "Many partic-
E ipants are our family,
friends, and neighbors
] who have dealt with can-
cer themselves. Their in-
volvement is proof of the
NT TO progress that has been
MjCER not only reducing death
rates, but also improving
the quality of life follow-
team ing cancer treatment.
ids to "The funds raised en-
ities of able us to continue our
ncer Soci- investment in the fight
against cancer through
-amp out research, education, ad-
and when vocacy, and patient serv-
ig their ices," said Lastinger.
)y take For information
ties and about how to form a team
ainment. or become involved in
ompa- Relay For Life please call
dganiza- Dana Lastinger, at 508-
nd 2174 or Jo Morris at 997-
nations 4985.


UICTnfDV / DUII P flcfDuV


m ar / ra


* WasIWFUU aI U


OF RELAY FOR UFE
'or Life began in 1985 in nity stadiums, teams have 10 or more
'ashington, through the ef- members who each raise funds, and
vision of Dr. Gordoht Klatt, commit to having one member of the
ig colorectal surgeon, who team on the track for the duration of
.o around the track at the the event.
' of Puget Sound, raising
the fight against cancer. Relay For Life honors cancer sur-
himself walked 83 miles vivors during the first lap--the sur-
rear. vivors truly become the celebrities of
the event.
For Life is not just a
--it is a nationwide move- Participants typically include the
offers an opportunity to influential community leaders in
e in the fight against can- business, politics, religion, health,
bout being a community and education. Relay For Life activi-
up the fight. ties bring together a diverse group of
rich, poor, African American, white,
'or Life is: blue-collar, professional--all spending
ration the night camping out around the
wide movement common thread of wanting to strike
unity festival back against cancer.
ly event
citing, energizing, fun One of the very special moments
in each Relay For Life is the Lumi-
builder for corporate and naria Ceremony that takes place in
teams the evening. Hundreds, and in many
ortunity to honor cancer cases, thousands of luminaria bags
(anyone who has ever are placed around the track inscribed
nosed with cancer) and with the names of loved ones who
and pay tribute to those have lost their battle to cancer or as a
lost their battle to cancer way to honor a cancer survivor.
nteer driven activity.
Relay For Life truly provides a ve-
For Life is an overnight, hicle that maximizes the participa-
y-based, team event. tion in the fight against cancer at.the
formed from families, re- community level.
groups, organizations,
businesses, corporations, No matter who you are, we can
iloyee groups, health care help. Contact the American Cancer
als, and more. Society at 1-800-ACS-2345 or www.can-
cer.org, 24 hours a day, seven days a
.ly held at school/commu- week.


Luminarias Honor Our Loved Ones


American Cancer Society's
Relay For Life Luminaria Ceremony


Emerald Greene Kinsley
Monticello News
The Jefferson County TO Pul
Relay For Life will conduct
its Relay For Life event on f
April 25 'and 26, at the old
Jefferson County High
School track field (located
on Water Street).
The highlight of the
evening, for everyone in at-
tendance, is the Luminaria
Ceremony, held at 9 pm.
The American Cancer
Society's Relay For Life Lu-
minaria Ceremony is one of
the most beloved cere-
monies during the two-day
event. The Luminaria Cere-
mony is conducted in order on hi
to recognize those touched
by cancer in Jefferson County
Individuals, or companies, can make
contributions in memory of those who
have lost the fight with cancer or memo-
rials may be purchased in honor of those
who have survived. Each will be recog-


nized by a lighted luminaria
displayed at the Relay For
Life event. The Luminarias
line the track and are left
burning throughout the
night to remind participants
of the incredible importance
of their contributions.
Luminaria contribu-
tions/memorials can be
made by contacting Mari-
anne Goehrig at 219-0722 or
Michelle Brantley at 997-2701.
There will also be a memo-
rial slideshow of pictures of
those who have lost their bat-
tle with cancer. Citizens may
turn pictures in to Colleen
Harmon at the Jefferson
County Health Department.


Include your information on the back
of the picture, so it can be returned to
you.
Pictures that were in previous years
slideshows will be included this year
also, and do not need to be re-submitted.


Porm

is page





Wednesday, 1\Iarch 19, 2008 Monticello News 1 lA


RIDAL


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W di n s C e l e b r a io n s
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VSIIrivaeFuntin, l Ocsin


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Loca


Business Directory


Misty Edge
Carriage Rides


Call 997-3568 To Advertise Your Business


.LT


Monticello News 11A


Wednesday, March 19, 2008










12A Monticello News


Wednesday, March 19, 2008


For____ I e EaHl p W anted


SPACIOUS Newly Renovated
1/1 apartments and 2/1 Furnished,
Short term available. w/AC, Laun-
dry, & Parking. Also have
office spaces for rent.
Call 850-212-3142
12/07,tfn,c


PRIME Downtown OFFICE
Space Cherry Street Commons.
750 Sq. Ft. $540. Month.
500 Sq. Ft. $460. Month.
Call Katrina at 510-9512
8/31,tfn,c

JEFFERSON PLACE
APTS., 1468 S. Waukeenah St.
Office 300, Monticello. 1 & 2
BR/HUD vouchers accepted. 850-
997-6964 TTYL 711 Equal
Housing Opportunity.


10/12,tfn,c


Coopers Ridge New Home Spa-
cious 1600 sq. ft. 3 Bdr./2 Ba with 2
car Garage Close to everything.
$950. Mo. Matt Robinson 942-
7250 Evenings. 11/14,tfn,c


STOCK TRAILER covered
16' tandem tag along with center
gate, New deck, 5 new tires, new
paint, Asking $3,000. 251-2437.
997-0901.
'4/11;tfn,nc
CUSTOM DESIGN SHEDS
FOR YOUR NEEDS, YOUR
CHOICE OF DOORS, ELECTRIC
WIRING, WINDOWS, COLORS
& CONFIGURATION. CALL
JOSIAH AT 877-597-4337
2/20 thru3/21,c

GOATS 12 weeks old $50. ea,
997-0901 Leave message
3/14,tfn,nc
PIGS 10 mo. old, Females, $100.
ea. 997-0901 Leave message
3/14,tfn,nc






Jesus' ressurection changed the
world. It could change you, too.
Join us on Easter Sunday, at either
7:00 or 11:00 AM. Christ Episcopal
Church, three blocks N of the court-
house. 997-4116.
3/19, c.


850-997-4340
www.Tim Peary.com
SeinReal Estate Since 1972
Experience can help!
Noble Snbdiision ibr," :bj
DoubL-uide Lrge \i.ork.shup
$5 _c,.,,, ,
Intown 2 bedroom i bath home
woxl floors. high iet$eilinr. $,.o.:.
One AcreCL.ak rt. .:..:..:
Aucila Forest &Meadows 2.5 acres
month op.:n $:%,_.
ChristmasAcres i'2 MH. Iircpbcuc
d ,:cl -. ..::
Waukeenah 14 )Int--iL,.,:.,,- .
Spacious near US "3z j hm, r. 1, -
outbuildings 2.5 ac $375,000
SOLD Springfield Church Road
acrt u"rricde h1ll.de $c,.o:C:,
Curtis Side Rd i. Ibr .A..n .i..
asking $r35,ooo
Thompson hal ey Rd -:home7.33
ac rnoth dtared $i'-,,:
SOLD Rainbows End 3 :h. 29.7ac
pool $379,000
Hillside Big Oaks ,2 co.i on County
Road 5314t"-'
Great Location :- -,,.mc i 4, ac, big
barn, green hse $165,0oo
Hay Spur Rd 6.73 or 11.73 acs planted

MurmnuringCreek 5.2 acres, septic
tank $72,900
The Budd House 4/2 high ceilings/
great porches, $385,000
Pricedto Sell! 5 hillside acres in
Aucilla Shores $50,000
MixedUse Property 12 acres 4
hout-cs'iac allc,,td $36,5oo/ac
PVery Pretty 5 lovely acres on paved
road $15,5oo per acre
Horse Farm 29 acres DWw/
fireplace, stables, $329,000
Deal! 4/3,5 ac/fenced/2cargarage/
pool/guest hse, shop pasture/ioo
pecans $365,000
Prime Commercial Propertynear
Pizza Hut 6.5 acs $650,000ooo
Waukeenah Highway 27.99 ac
pasture, fenced, pond $545,000
Income Prop 3MH on4 acres 4
allowed $n8,5oo
Timberand 156 ac some pines divide
by Hwy $2750/ac


1 Acre Building Lot Close to
town. Private No, Restrictions
$32.000. 510-3013


Credit Score 620 and up,
nancing avail. no PMI, no b
payoff, call Pamr
w/Re/Max today. @ 997-4
3/12,tfn,c





NEED CASH ?
GOT JUNK ?
GOT JUNK CARS & TI
I BUY SCRAP META
CALL 850-838-JUNK (
State Certified Scal
1/9-


HIGH QUALITY WOOD CON-
STRUCTED. Storage SHEDS
and MINI BARNS. Custom De-
signed to fit your NEEDS. 7Call
Josiah today at 877-597-4337.
S 2/20,22,27.29,3/5,7,12,14,19,21,c


LOST Jack Russel w/ Black col-
lar "Rowdy"all white w/ brown
head & tail. 11 pounds, REWARD
Missing since 3/2/08 997-2784 or
510-6273
3/5,tfn, nc




JACKSON'S DRUG STORE -
Have you been taken off your hor-
mone replacement? See our new
menopausal products.
5/12,tfn,c

BACKHOE SERVICE:
Driveways, roads, ditches, tree and
shrub removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116, 933-
3458. 7/4tfh,c

MR. STUMP
STUMP GRINDING
509-8530 Quick Responses.
,,6122, tfi,c
TRACTOR WORK
ROTARY FLAIL- BUSH
HOGGING Starting at $37.50/
Hr.
All Types of Tractor Work.
850-567-6715
11/16, tfn,c

I BUILD SHEDS, DECKS
Exterior Carpentry work,
window and door replacement.
Call Bob: 850-242-9342
10x12 Shed w/Porch Delivered
$1,500. 11/7,tfn,c
HORSEBACK RIDING
LESSONS & HORSE
BOARDING
Call for more information
850-585-1781
2/20,tfn




1990 Ford Industrial Flat Bed
with Hyd.'Lift Gate. Good Cond.
New Tires, Removable side bodies
$4,500. OBO 997-1582
1/2,tfn, nc

1986 Chevy Van Automatic 72,000 mi.
Good Condition. Handicap accessible w/
Wheel chair Lift. $2,800. Call 850-556-
1717. 3/12,14,19,21,pd




MONSTER GARAGE SALE
Antiques, major Christmas deco-
rations, household items &
decor, books, baskets, crafts, 80
Kaptain Drive, Waukeenah,
Southern Grove Estates 2/10
mile south of HWY 259 on U.S.
27 March 28;30, 8am-3pm rain
or shine.
3/19, 21, 26, 28, pd.

YARD/MOVING SALE Friday
and Saturday the 21st and 22nd.
Household items, Blankets, Clothes,
kitchen items, computer items, pic-
tures, furniture, tools, MH/towbar,
and more. 4616 Old Lloyd Road,
Monticello, (850)-342-9800 8 am till
6pm.
3/19, 21,pd.


ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Apply in person at the
Monticello News at 1215 N. Jefferson St. Monticello, or fax resume to
997-3774. 2/22,rtn


1/4,tfn,c KENNEL STAFF Kalan-Kennels experience helpful but will train
100% fi- right person. Must love animals, be good with public, be dependable, and
iad credit have transportation. Call 241-4073 any time. 3/12,tfn,c
Bowling
4647 Cooks and Servers Part-time Servers must be at least 18. Call Sage @
997-2341.
3/14,19,21,26,c

The City of Monticello is accepting applications for the PART TIME posi-
tion of Dispatcher. Duties include answering multiple phone lines, taking cit-
izen complaints, using radio to dispatch officers to calls. Computer literacy
is a must, as well as general office duties. Must possess a high school diploma
or equivalent and be able to work under pressure, training is provided. Salary
and benefit information' is available upon request. Submit application and re-
RUCKS sume to Monticello Police Dept. 195 S. Mulberry St. Monticello, FL 32344,
LS !! March 26, 2008 EOE/Drug- Free Workplace.
5865) 3/19, 21, c.


es
4/02,c


Tutor Wanted- for English / Creative writing. 590-6312.


3/19, 21


f\NF

:l-- r,1-.A I NL I P. -' ,ix
AD' -1 1





The key to advertising success










1-866-742-1373


www.florida-classifieds.com









FREE 4-NIGHT VACATION!
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Over 1000 Homes Must Be Sold!
FLORIDA STATEWIDE
Auction Date: April 5-16, 2008
Free Brochure 800-963-4558
USHomeAuction.com


cahes


fih after


p. BEXAR COUNTY- TomW appliedThera-gecsi
to his aching casting arm aid immediately caught a
40 lb Barking PalnKto Bluegill. Whsn asked
I f where re caught tl fiah, Tom painlessly replied,
'None of your dang busiinss!"
Stay tuned for another Thera-Gesic5 moirent!




STOP LEG CRAMPS

BEFOIE I -f-Y S 10 1 'OU cllcet



S!.,, e


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MONDAY 3/17/2008 THROUGH 3/23/2008
ANNOUNCEMENTS

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Wednesday, March 19, 2008 Monticello News 13A







,EGALS


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR
SJEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 08-30-CA
DIVISION:
VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., etc.
Plaintiffs,
vs.
FRED BLACKWELL, et al.,
Defendants.


TO: Fred Blackwell
Last Known Addres
2992 Fred George L
Tallahassee, FL


NOTICE OF ACTION
Unknown Spouse of Fred Blackwell
Ss Last Known Address
Iane 2992 Fred George Lane
Tallahassee, FL


or or
390 South Marvin St. 390 South Marvin St.
Monticello, FL 32344 Monticello, FL 32344
Travis Degrees Michael Jones Unknown Spouse of Travis D. Michael
Jones Last Known Address Last Known Address
2992 Fred George Lane 2992 Fred George Lane
Tallahassee, FL Tallahassee, FL
or or
390 South Marvin St. 390 South Marvin St.
Monticello, FL 32344 Monticello, FL 32344
Ernestine Broxie aka/Ernestine Hampton Unknown Spouse of E rnestine


Broxie
Last Known Address
2992 Fred George Lane
Tallahassee, FL
or
390 South Marvin St.
Monticello, FL 32344
Estate of Lewis Hampton
Lewis Hampton
Last Known Address
2992 Fred George Lane
Tallahassee, FL
or
390 South Marvin St.
Monticello, FL 32344


Last Known Address
2992 Fred George Lane
Tallahassee, FL
or
390 South Marvin St.
Monticello, FL 32344
Unknown Spouse, Heirs, Children of.

Last Known Address
2992 Fred George Lane
Tallahassee, FL
or
390 South Marvin St.
Monticello, FL 32344


Montgomery Ward Credit Corporation
Last Known Address
1600 Summer Street Stamford, CT 06927
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on i he fol -
lowing property in Jefferson County, Florida:
Exhibit A
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on Lance Paul Cohen, the Plaintiffs attorney,
whose address is Cohen & Thurston, P.A., 1723 Blanding Boulevard, Suite
102, Jacksonville, Florida 32210, within thirty (30) days from the first date
of publication of this notice, on or before April 12, 2008, and file the orig-
inal with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition.
Dated on this 3rd day of March, 2008.


Lance Paul Cohen, Esquire
COHEN & THURSTON, P.A,.
1723 Blanding Boulevard, Suite 102
Jacksonville, FL 32210
904/388-6500
Attorney for Plaintiff


Kirk B. Reams
CLERK OF THE COURT
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
By: Tyler Sherrod
Deputy Clerk


Exhibit A: Abstract of Title
Fund File Number: 46-2007-65
To all that certain real property situate, lying and being in the county 'of
Jefferson, State of Florida, described as follows:
PARCEL NO. 1: THAT PORTION OF LOT NO. 16, IN THE PALMER
EASTERN ADDITION OF SAID TOWN OF MONTICELLO AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAN OF SAID ADDITION AS LAID OFF BY
BEN DILWORTHS, ALSO KNOWN AS LOT 16 OF DILWORTH'S AD-
DITION AND DILWORTH ADDITION, WHICH IS DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS, TO-WIT: THE NORTH 3/8 OF THE EAST HALF
OF LOT 16 OF DILWORTH'S ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF MONTI-
CELLO, FLORIDA, MEASURING APPROXIMATELY 110 FEET
EAST AND WEST AND 75 FEET NORTH AND SOUTH.

PARCEL NO. 2: LOT 24 AND THE NORTH 20 FEET OF LOT 25 OF
BOWMAN'S ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF MONTICELLO,
FLORIDA AND ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT OF SAID AD-
DITION AS THE SAME APPEARS IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA IN DEED BOOK HH, PAGE 485,
AND TO WHICH REFERENCE IS HEREBY EXPRESSLY MADE.
SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA.

PARCEL NO. 3: 1/2 UNDIVIDED INTEREST IN THE SOUTH 80
FEET OF LOT NO. 25 OF BOWMAN'S ADDITION TO THE TOWN
OF MONTICELLO, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT
OF SAID ADDITION AS RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA IN DEED BOOK HH, PAGE 485
AND TO WHICH REFERENCE IS HEREBY EXPRESSLY MADE.
TOGETHER WITH 2005 CLAYTON MOBILE HOME, 72 X 32 manu-
factured home, Serial No.: WHC014178GAAB
3/12/08, 3/19/2008,c


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING: The District Board of Trustees of
North Florida Community College will hold its regular monthly meeting
Tuesday, March 25, 2008 at 5:30 p.m. in the NFCC Student Center
Lakeside Room, NFCC, 325 NW Turner Davis Dr., Madison, FL. A
copy of the agenda may be obtained by writing: NFCC, Office of the
President, 325 NW Turner Davis Dr., Madison, FL 32340. For disabil-
ity-related accommodations, contact the NFCC Office of College Ad-
vancement, 850-973-1653. NFCC is an equal access/equal opportunity
employer.
3/19/08, c.

LEGAL NOTICE
. In accordance ith Flonda Statue A Public Auction will be held on April,
12 10:00 a.m. for Chevy car vin# 2G1WN54X4P924092. To be sold as is
for towing and storage charges. Conditions and terms at Auction, Stewarts
g Towing 175 S. Jefferson St. Monticello, Fl 32344.
3/19/08,c


I______________~~i_*_~~~~


The Monticello Citn Council % ill conduct a public hearing on fluoridation
of city dater during the regularly-scheduled CitN Council meeting on April
I si 7i (1 01I p m The meeting % ill take place at Catt Hall. 245 S Mulberry
Street. Monticello.


IN THE CIRCUIT COLRT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION

CITIBANK N.A. AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVE.
ICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF NOVEMBER 30, 2 1 S ERIE S
2001-1,
Plaintiff, CASE NO.: 08-13-CA
vs. DIVISION:
SARAH MAE DEAN A/K/A SARAH M. DEAN A/K/A S ARA MAE
DEAN A/K/A SARAH MAE HALL A/K/A SARAH DE AN H ALL
A/K/A SARA DEAN HALL A/K/A SARA MAE DEAN HALL. et I.
Defendantss.
/ NOTICE OF ACTION

LORETHA JACKSON
Last Known Address: 187 Tin Top Rd.
Monticello, FL 32344
Current Address: Unknown

ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING B. THROUGH.
UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDI IDUIAL DE-
FENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE.
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN IN T E R E S T
AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS
Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Address: Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property in Jefferson County, Florida:
BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THAT CERTAIN
PARCEL OF LAND IN THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF T H E N\ L/-4
OR SW 1/4 OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 4 EAST.
AS DESCRIBED IN DEED BOOK "AA", PAGE 349 OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND RUN
THENCE EAST 210 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 210 FEET.
THENCE RUN WEST 210, THENCE RUN SOUTH 210 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING ONE ACRE. MORE OR
LESS, AND BEING A PORTION OF THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF
LAND THAT WAS CONVEYED UNTO WILLIE POPPELL FROM
THE TRUSTEE I. I. FUND OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA BY DEED
DATED AUGUST 15, 1956 AND RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN TRUSTEE I I
FUND DEED BOOK 1, PAGE 447, AND TO WHICH REFERENCE IS
HEREBY MADE.
THIS BEING THE SAME PROPERTY DEEDED TO JOE JONES ANFD
LAURA MAE JONES, HUSBAND AND WIFE, BY SARAH MAE
DEAN BY DEED. DATED THE 28TH DAY OFAAPRIL, I F64. AND OF
RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF JEFFERSON, COUNTY FLORIDA, IN OFFICIAL
RECORD BOOK 20, PAGE 9, AND TO WHICH REFERENCE IS
HEREBY MADE A/K/A 187 TIN TOP RD. MONTICELLO. FL 32344-1
9435
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a cop, of your
written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, it anN. on Al-
bertelli Law, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 777 South Harbour Is-
land Blvd., Suite 940, Tampa, FL 33602, and file the original .. iih thi,
Court either before service on Plaintiffs atloTffey, c-oilTtedlatcll thlere-
after; otherwise, a default will be entered against you fot the relief de-
manded in the Complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 3 da:r of
March, 2008.
Clerk of the Circuit court By: Tyler Sherrod, Deputy Clerk
3/12/08 3/19 08.c .


NOTICE OF PROPOSED CITY ORDINANCE

The City Council of the City of Monticello proposes to adopt the follow -
ing ordinance: ORDINANCE NO. 2008 03 AN ORDINANCE OF THE
CITY OF MONTICELLO, FLORIDA, ESTABLISHING A CITIZENS
COMMITTEE TO DEVELOP DESIGN RECOMMENDATIONS FOR
THE CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT AND TEMPORARILY SUS-
PENDING ZONING AND SITE PLAN APPLICATIONS FOR PROP-
ERTIES ON THE COURTHOUSE SQUARE.

The entire text of the ordinance may be inspected at City Hall, 245 S. Mul-
berry Street, Monticello, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00
p.m., Monday through Friday. Public hearing on the ordinance will be held
on Tuesday, April 1, 2008, at 7:00 p.m. at Monticello City Hall. Interested
persons may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the pro-
posed ordinance.
3/19/08, c.

NOTICE OF PROPOSED CITC ORDINANCE

The City Council of the City of Monticello proposes to adopt the tolloEI- I
ing ordinance: ORDINANCE NO. 2008 04 AN ORDINANCE A NI END'
ING CHAPTER 54 OF THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF THE CITY '
OF MONTICELLO, FLORIDA TO AMEND SECTION 54-50(12 TO
CLARIFY OFF-STREET PARKING REQUIREMENTS FOR PROP-
ERTIES LOCATED IN THE B-1 ZONING DISTRICT; PROVIDING
FOR A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EF-
FECTIVE DATE

The entire text of the ordinance may be inspected at City Hall, 245 S Mul-
berry Street, Monticello, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5 11.1
p.m., Monday through Friday. Public hearing on the ordinance will be held
on Tuesday, April 1, 2008, at 7:00 p.m. at Monticello City Hall. Interested
persons may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the pro-

3/19,18. c

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
. ON FLLIORIDATION OF CITY WATER


SIN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 08-05-PR
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALEX R. RITTER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of ALEX R. RITTER, deceased, whose
date of death was December 18, 2007, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Jefferson County, Florida, Probate Division under probate file # 08-
05-PR, the address of which is 1 Courthouse Circle, Monticello, Florida
32344. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or de- '
q mands gairist decedent"s estate on whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or .
demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this notice is March 12, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative Personal Representative
T. Buckingham Bird, Attorney at Law Bill Holland
P.O. Box 247 Monticello, Florida 32345 6255 53rd Street
(850) 997-3503 Vero Beach, FL 32967

3/12/08, 3/19/08,c

IN THE CIRCUIT COLIRT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
'OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY

Case No.: 07-CA-306
GLENN ALEXANDER and
LINDA D ALEXANDER,
Plamintir.

ALTON OLIVER and NARTOSA
OLIVER. iointly and severally,

Delenda-nt
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Fore-
cliui e dateJd the 11th day of March, 2008, and'entered in Case No. 07-CA-
3(i6. ol the Ciicuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Jefferson
Count Flo iid, wherein GLENN ALEXANDER and LINDA ALEXAN-
DER. are the Plaintiffs and ALTON OLIVER and NARTOSA OLIVER
and IEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA, are Defendants. I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at the NORTH DOOR OF COURT-
HOLISE ,i ihe jefferson County Courthouse, in Monticello, Florida, at
I I 00 a m on the 10th day of April, 2008, the following described prop-
ertm a, se lorth in said Final Judgment, to-wit:
Lot 24 ot Nobles Addition to the Town of Monticello, Florida, as
per map oi plat thereof recorded in Plat Book "B", Page 19 in the
Office ot the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Jefferson County,


Floidi 1
ANN PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUSLIS
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM N'
\V WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
In .oL 01 dance with the Americans with Disabilities Act as of I'IN ,
i ADA because of their disabilities, disabled persons who need special
. accmniimodaiion to participate in this preceding should contact the ADA .
. C.oiJdin.io al Room 10, Monticello, Florida 32344 or Telephone (S501'
S34.2-1'21 .S p i to such proceeding at (800) 955-8770 or (800) 955-8771
Datedl ilin- I day of March, 2008.


KIRK B. REANMS
Clerk of the Circuit Courti

Tslei Seinodf. Depuit Clerk


Robetc E. MoNis%. Esquire
MomI' La Fiiim
245 Ea.i \\'ahingl.t n Sitet.
Moni>ello. Floiid 1:344
i' 50.i1 "7.-114411


1,26.,IN c


Everything You Need
Whatever information you're looking for, real estate,
job listings, sports highlights or local news, the
newspaper has got you covered. Call 997-3568 to have
all of this and more delivered to your doorstep daily.
MAonticello News Et The Jefferson County Journal
1215 North Jefferson Street
850-997-3568


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY,. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 08-05-PR
IN RE ESTATE OF
.ALEX R RITTER,
Decei.jed
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The adminitraiion of the estate of ALEX R. RITTER, deceased, File
Number i.oS-1i -PR is pending in the Circuit Court for Jefferson County,
Fli ida. Pi obate Division, the address of which is 1 Courthouse Circle,
Monincello. Florida 32344. The name and address of the personal repre-
:eniate and of the personal representative's attorney are set forth
belo'
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All pel sons on whom this.notice is. served who have objections that
challenge the validityy of the will, the qualifications of the personal rep-
resentaine. enue, or jurisdiction of this Court are required to file their,
obiections.\ ith this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or de-
mand' against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is served
% Ihin ihiee months after the date of the first publication of this notice
music file [heir claims with.this Codrt WTIHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TI[ON OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or de-
nmands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this
court \\ IT H IN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this notice is March 12, 2008.
Attorney% For Personal Representative:
T BUCKINGHAM BIRD BILL HOLLAND
PO Bo\ 247 6255 53RD STREET
Monticello. FL 32345 VERO BEACH, FL 32967
850-997-3503
FL Bar ID #00i11i6176


3/12/08, 3/19/08,C


~~LElgas








14A Monticello News


Wednesday, March 19, 2008


ARM/ OUTDOORS


-- U


FLORIDA LIVESTOCK




MARKET REPORT


For the week ended March 13, 2008-
Feeder Steers: Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 Ibs 125.00 156.00
300-400 Ibs 112.00 145.50
400-500 Ibs 99.00 131-.00


Feeder Heifers: Medium & Large
200-300 lbs 110.00 140.00
300-400 lbs 99.00 120.00
400-500 Ibs 94.00 110.00


Frame No. 1-2


Slaughter Cows: Lean 750-1200 lbs
85-90 percent 49.00-55.00
Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade No. 1-2
1000-2100 lbs 61.00-70.00


SG H


.Gulf Grouper Harvest Reopens


The recreational and commercial
harvest of red, gag and black grouper in
Gulf of Mexico federal waters and the
commercial harvest of these species in
Gulf state waters reopened March 15.
During the open-harvest season in all
Gulf waters, recreational anglers may
keep no more than five red, gag and
black grouper in any combination daily,
except that only one of these fish may be
a red grouper. The captain and crew of
for-hire vessels fishing in the Gulf may
not retain the recreational grouper bag


limit.
Minimum size limits of 20 inches
total length for red grouper and 22 inches
total length for gag and black grouper
apply to sport anglers in the Gulf.
The minimum size for the commer-
cial harvest of red grouper in the Gulf is
20 inches total length and the commer-
cial minimum size for Gulf gag and
black grouper is 24 inches total length.
Red, gag and black grouper in the
Gulf are also managed by an established
annual commercial harvest quota.


Drought Conditions Persist


Across Suwannee Region


Lazaro Aleman
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
The average rainfall in the Suwannee
River Water Management District
(SRWMD) during February was a little
higher than the historical average for the
month, but not enough to reduce signifi-
cantly the overall rainfall deficit for the
last 12 to 24 months.
Figures released by the SRWMD on
March 10 show that the district received
an average of 4.83 inches of rain during
February, compared with the historical
average of 3.89 inches for the month.
Even so, the 12-month rainfall deficit was
12.75 inches and the 24-month rainfall
deficit was 27.2 inches.
Indications from the US Drought
Monitor are that parts or all of Jefferson,
Taylor, Lafayette, Dixie, Levy, Gilchrist
and Alachua counties were abnormally
dry or in moderate drought as of Feb. 26.
The good news is that the US Seasonal
Drought Outlook showed, as of Feb. 21,
that improvement was likely in these
areas. At the same time, the National
Weather Service Climate Prediction Cen-
ter is predicting below-normal precipita-
tion through May.
The highest rainfall in February was
recorded in Madison County, which re-
ceived eight to 10 inches in some areas,
while Dixie, Gilchrist and Levy counties
received below normal rainfall.
Jefferson County, for its part, re-
ceived 7.08 inches in February, well above
the 4.64-inch average for the month and
the 3.28 inches recorded in February 2007.
So far, the county has received 44.50
inches during the last 12 months.


The district reported that groundwa-
ter levels rose by an average of .66 feet
since January, as indicated by readings at
93 monitoring wells. The district has-
tened to add that it took most of the read-
ing prior to the Feb. 21-23 storms.
"Seventy-two percent of the readings
were below the 10th percentile, compared
to 82 percent in January," the SRWMD re-
port noted.
The district defines the percentile as
the percentage of the monthly levels that
are equal to, or below, the current
month's level.
The report noted that 36 wells set new
February lows, and that two set new his-
toric lows. The district issued 10 emer-
gency permits for dry wells during
February, for a total of 184 emergency
permits issued between April 1 and Feb.
29.
As for surface waters, the district
noted improvements in lakes, which in-
creased an average of .60 feet.
In Jefferson County, Sriead's Smoke-
house Lake was at 82.34 inches in Febru-
ary, up 4.11 inches from the 78.23 inches
recorded in January The Aucilla River,
meanwhile, registered 47.64 inches in
February, slightly below the 48.29
recorded in February 2007 and below the
50.13-inch average for the month.
The district continues to urge water
conservation. On Jan. 8, the district's
governing board issued a Phase II Water
Shortage Order that included mandatory
water restrictions for all use categories,
including residential, commercial, indus-
trial and agricultural. The order and ac-
companying restriction go into effect
April 7.


CAR & TRUCK CENTER.

2008 FORMD FO'S


$500 Rebate + 0'APR 60 MOS.

Starting at $1 4, 993


2008 EXPEDITIONS & SPORT TRACS


MOS.


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