Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00197
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello, Fla
Publication Date: March 12, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00197
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text










-*~ -~


ONTICELLO


140th Year No. 11 Wednesday, March 12, 2008


50 464 +44


SMPD Busts Burglary/Theft Suspects


Monticello News Photo By ueDbie snapp Marcn b, zuu2
Jefferson Elementary School instructor Indy Mack was
named District Teacher of the Year, Thursday, March 6. Su-
perintendent Phil Barker presents Mack with yellow roses and
yellow and blue balloons in a surprise visit to her classroom.


Indy Mack Named 2008


District Teacher Of Year
RAY CICHON
Monticello News
Managing Editor
In a surprise visit to her classroom at Jefferson
Elementary School, Thursday, March 6, Indy Mack
learned that she was chosen 2008 District Teacher of
the Year.
Superintendent Phil Barker, accompanied by
members of the district administrative staff, and
School Board members, presented Mack with yellow
and blue balloons and a bouquet of yellow roses.
Available faculty, and students from other class-
rooms joined in congratulating Mack, along with
her son, Norman, also a JES student.
Mack is a grade three teacher, who has taught in
Florida for 14 years. Her principal, Dr. Rhonda
Flanagan, said of Mack: "She demonstrates her love
and passion for working with academically diverse
student populations, by instilling in them the desire
to achieve, and by implementing an endless reper-
toire of interventions to ensure success.
Parent Brenda Graham remarked: "I have wit-
nessed first hand Mrs. Mack's love for her profes-
sion and each child whom she teaches. She is smart
and witty, and cares about each child as if he/she
were her own. She approaches each situation, with
utmost professionalism and dedication, and always
welcomes parental involvement.
Jefferson County Middle/High School Teacher
of the Year Nominee Derrick Martin, and Mack, re-
ceived plaques of recognition and miniature brass
school bells at the School Board meeting, March 10.
Mack now qualifies to compete for State Teacher
of the Year.

City Begins Process To Set,

Design Standards For Square

(Citizen Protests Idea,

Calls It A Nightmare)
LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
The City Council on Tuesday night, March 4, for-
mally took up consideration of a proposed ordinance
that sets up a citizens' committee to determine archi-
tectural and other design standards for the Courthouse
Square and central business district.
The ordinance requires that the mayor-appointed
eight-member committee return to the City Council
within a six-month period with a set of design recom-
mendations for the square and central business dis-
trict, including identification of the properties
appropriate for inclusion in the overlay zone, the loca-
tion of the buildings within the zoning overlay, and the
parking and landscaping requirements.
The city, meanwhile, will suspend reviews of re-
zoning and site plan applications within the court-
house square for the six-month period. The square is
defined as the area immediately surrounding the court
Please See Design Standards Page 2


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Within the past week
officers of the Monticello
Police Department ar-
rested four suspects, rang-
ing in ages 15-20, in.a city
burglary/theft group.
MPD Captain Roger
Murphy reported that in
the past two months, there
have been several burgla-
ries, thefts and two motor
vehicle thefts within the
city.
MPD received a tip


that some of the stolen
property might be located
at the residence of a 17
year-old. Officers were
able to search the resi-
dence and recovered a
stolen stereo system taken
in a burglary on Wau-
keenah St., and they recov-
ered a shotgun taken
during as burglary on Mul-
berry St., along with items
that were from the recent
theft of a Ford SUV on
King St. (Feb. 20) and lo-
cated the following morn-
ing, wrecked and


aban-.
doiled.

Branch
Rd


15-
year-
old "as.
also Gregory Lamar
questioned after an alert
citizen who was familiar
with the SUV theft, called
police after noticing that
the 15 year-old was wear-
ing a very unique jacket


was
taken
from
inside
the
SUV at ^ :,
the
time it
was
stolen. Larry Hall
Murphy reported that
virtually every officer at
MPD worked on the cases
around the clock, locating
Please See Burglaries
Page 2


Five Seriously Injured In Crash
r.. .-..... .-. .- FRAN HUNT
/." "Monticello News
f e lStaff Writer
A Saturday after-
noon, March 8, crash in
S Capps resulted in two
Monticello women and
three children receiving
Ct serious to critical in-
juries.
Florida Highway Pa-
trol reports that Colleen
Cheri Varley, 19, of Le-
land, MI, was driving a
A. 2000 Oldsmobile van
southbound on US-19 and
4 -stopped at the intersec-
tion of US-27.
Michelle White, 25, of
Monticello, was driving a
2002 Ford SUV west-
bound on US-27 with
Tracy Jackson, 31, one
two-year-old and two five-
'Fyear-olds, all of Monti-
Monticello News Photo by Fran Hunt March 8,2008 cello, as passengers.
A Saturday afternoon crash in Capps resulted in two Monticello women, and two five-year Varley entered US-27
olds, receiving serious injuries and a two-year-old being critically injured. The crash was the in the path of White, and
result of another driver pulling off of US-19 south and into the path of the westbound vehicle, the front of Varley's vehi-
Only the driver of this vehicle was wearing a seatbelt and the two occupants were ejected. Please See Crash Page 2


County Escapes Brunt of Storm


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
County residents es-
caped the brunt of Friday
morning's storm, March
7, with its high winds and
rain.
Emergency Manage-
ment Director Carol
Ellerbe said there was no
official-touchdown of a
tornado in the county, but
damages were sustained
from downed trees, limbs,
power lines and high


winds.
Ellerbe said that the
storm was straight-line
winds of approximately
75-80 miles per hour,
rather than a tornado
touchdown. It appears
that the tornado traveled
for approximately three
miles from Lake Miccosu-
kee to the kennels at
Mays Pond Plantation on
West Lake Rd., in the
northwestern portion of
the county
From the early morn-


I--,,- I


Monticello News Photos by Fran Hunt March 7, 2008
This tree was one of many downed by Friday's March 7
storm. The tree on US-59 blocked an entire lane of traffic until
it could be removed. Because of falling trees, approximately
1,400 residents went without power for several hours, while
crews worked to restore power.


ing hours, emergency
personnel manned the
Emergency Management
office, as law enforcement
officials, including the
Sheriff's Office and
Florida Highway Patrol,
worked fervently
throughout the county
due to property damages,
downed trees blocking
roadways, and assisting
Leon County with barri-
cading White House Rd.
to prevent motorists from
entering the area of Capi-


tola, where a tornado had
reportedly touched down.
Power crews also worked
continually to restore
power outages to resi-
dents and businesses, and
remove any trees, debris
or downed power lines.
"We were very fortu-
nate," said Ellerbe.
"There, was no loss of life
nor injuries in the
county."
JCSO Major Bill Bul-
lock reported that Mays
Please See Storm Page 2


City Will Continue


Charging F
LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
After much back-
and-forth discussion on
the issue, Monticello of-
ficials have decided that
the city will continue
charging for the services
it provides during pa-
rades and other public
events, if at a reduced
price.
Mayor Gerrold
Austin propnised that the
issue would be resolved
at the March 4 meeting
and it was. By a 4-1 vote,


or Parades
the City Council ap-
proved a charge of $400
for events that require
the closing of major
roads such as US 19 and
90, and $100 for events
that require the closing
of only city streets.
Austin alone voted
against the measure, ar-
guing that the city
should provide the serv-
ice free.
At issue specifically
are the services ren-
dered by police officers
Please See Parades
Page 2


A 2 Sections, 28Pages t' "Copyrighted Material
Around Jefferson Outdoors/Farm 9-11A
County 4-7A Sports 8A SyndicatedContent
Bridal 13A Spiritual Snc ae en
Classifieds 14A Pathways SectionBial 415A S u News
Legals 14-15A Viewpoints 2-3A Available from Commercial News Providers"


*^^ssazmsmES-iisjia^;a-.ag^'^^.^








2A Monticello News Wednesday, March 12, 2008






VIEWPOINTS & PINIONS


Burglary Cont. from page 1
and conducting interviews of witnesses, suspects and
locating stolen property.
Additional criminal charges are pending, and MPD
officers believe they have apprehended all those responsi-
ble for the recent rash of thefts.
Suspects arrested include Larry Hall, 18, of 45773 N.
Salt Rd., who was charged with petit theft motor vehicle
parts and criminal mischief;
Gregory Lamar, 20, of 659 Lamar Rd., who was
charged with grand theft motor vehicle, criminal mis-
chief and battery; a 15-year-old charged with grand theft
motor vehicle, burglary and grand theft of a residence,
and he was arrested for an outstanding pick-up order
issued for absconding from a court-ordered program;
and a 17 year-1old who was charged with grand theft
motor vehicle.
Bond was set for Lamar at $10,Q00 for grand theft
motor vehicle, $500 for criminal mischief, and $500 for
simple battery. He remained housed at the county jail
Monday afternoon, March 10.
Bond for Hall was set at $250 and he bonded out of
jail the same day. The teens were released to the cus-
tody of their parents.


Crash Cont. from page 1

cle struck the right side of White's vehicle, which over-
turned on US-27 and came to a rest on its roof.
Two occupants of White's vehicle were ejected from
the vehicle. White and her passengers were transport-
ed to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital for treatment. The
two Monticello women and two five year-olds sustained
serious injuries. The two-year old infant was critically
injured. Varley was uninjured.
FHP did not deem the crash to be alcohol-related.
White and Varley were wearing seatbelts; the three
children and Jackson were not.
Varley was charged with violation of right-of-way.
Her vehicle sustained $2,500 damage, White's vehicle
sustained $6,500 damage.
The Jefferson County Sheriff's Office assisted with
traffic control.


Storm Cont. from page 1
Pond Plantation received Energy said that high
the worst of the damage winds both Friday and
to the county. "We had Saturday, resulted in
two houses out there numerous outages in the
damaged, including one county. ,
having the roof ripped She said that from
off. The wind also approximately 6 a.m.
destroyed a dog kennel until 9 p.m. Friday,
and damaged a barn, but approximately 1,400 cus-
frtunrrately, there was no tomers were affected by
loss of human, canine, or the power outages.
.1vestock life." He added Crews from outside of
that Mays Pond the area were called in to
Plantation workers assist with repairs of
cleared the roadways for downed wires, power
motorists in the area. poles and clean up.
Many trees were "Most workers
uprooted, snapped off and. worked throughout the
twisted throughout the night, many getting only
area. to three hours sleep
County Road before they had to return
Department to work," said Newkirk.
Superintendent David Saturday's problem
Harvey reported that was also due to high
workers responded to a winds which started
few calls pertaining to early in the morning
blocked roads in the causing a problem with
county. "Most of the high voltage transmis-
wind damage was caused sion lines in the
by a lot of dead drought- Waukeenah area.
stricken trees and limbs Approximately 1,200
down in roadways," customers experienced
reported Harvey. "The power outages from
County Road Department about 11 a.m. until 4:30
employees did an excel- p.m. "Most of the outages
lent job. Many did the were restored by
work of several workers." Saturday afternoon," she
Power outages were said.
experienced throughout Ellerbee said that as
the county and of Monday morning, all
spokesperson Lisa power had been restored
Newkirk of Progress throughout the county.



MONTICELLO 1



NEWS
EMERALD GREENE KINSLEy CLASSIFIED AND LEGAL ADS
EMERALDGREENE U Kl INSLE Deadline for classifieds is Monday at 12:00n:m.
Publisher/Owner Deadline for Legal Adverisement is Monday at 5 p.m.
There willbe a '29 charge for Affidavits.
RAY CICHON CwcutnoN DEPARTMENT
Managing Editor Subscription Rates:
Florida $45 per year
LAZARO ALEMAN Out-of-State $52 per year
Senior Staff Writer (State & local taxes included)
P.O. Box 428
1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, Florida 32345
850-997-3568
Fax: 850-997-3774

E-mail: monticellonews@embarqmail.com
Established 1964 *
A weekly newspaper [USPS 361-620] designed for the express reading
pleasures of the people of its circulation area, be they past, present or future res-
idents.


I'd like to take this
column space to say
"Happy Birthday" to my
Mother, Mary Ellen
Greene.
Every week in her
columns she takes the
time to send birthday
wishes to our whole
family, and I'd like to give
the same love and respect
back to her.
My Mom celebrated
her birthday on Monday,
March 10th. She turned 69
years old, exactly 30 years
older than me, with our
birthdays only being one
week apart.
As children growing
up, we "know" our mother
does a lot for us, and we
"know" she loves us, but
we never truly grasp how
much, until we become
mothers, ourselves. The
sad realization behind this
is... that I feel that a man
never really does grasp
the TRUE LOVE of a
mother (for he never
becomes one.)
Don't get me wrong I
love my Daddy and I
KNOW my Daddy loves
me (more than anything
in the world) but a
"Mother's Love" stands
second to none in this
world.
I always felt that
special love growing up. I
NEVER had to wonder, or
ponder, whether I was
loved or not. (By both of
my parents) I was hugged,
kissed, and told daily how
much I was loved and
appreciated. But again I
say, "a 'Mother's Love'
stands second to none in
this world."
Your Mother is the
one that becomes your
own personal taxicab.
She's the one that kisses
away the tears and
bandages the scrapes and
cuts. The one you crawl
in bed with in the middle
of the night ('cause you're
scared to go to your Dad's
side of the bed and wake
him up.) Mothers wake up
at all hours of the night to
continue to take your
temperature and give you
more medicine to help you
feel better. She brings you
Milk Toast on a dinner
tray, on the couch, to help
you feel better. And my
favorite.... She scratches
your back, every night,
and sings "The Old
Rugged Cross" and
"Amazing Grace."
My Mom is the
greatest role model that
God could have given me.
She has the patience of


Happy Birthday Mom


Job, a virtue I wish I had
inherited.
A friend of mine e-
mailed me a poem about
mothers. As I read it, that
day, I thought about
myself, and my children.
As I began writing this
column, however, I
thought back to that poem
and thought about my
mother.
"I'm Invisible"
It all began to make
sense, the blank stares, the
lack of response, the way
one of the kids will walk
into the room while I'm on
the phone and ask to be
taken to the store.
Inside I'm thinking,
'Can't you see I'm on the
phone?' Obviously not; no
one can see if I'm on the
phone or cooking, or
sweeping the floor, or even
standing on my head in the
corner, because no one can
see me at all. I'm invisible.
The invisible Mom.
Some days I am only a
pair of hands, nothing
more: Can you fix this?
Can you tie this? Can you
open this?
Some days I'm not a
pair of hands; I'm not even
a human being. I'm a clock
to ask, 'What time is it?'
I'm a satellite guide to
answer, 'What number is
the Disney Channel?' I'm a
car ,to order, 'Right around
5:30, please.'
I was certain that these
were the hands that once
held books and the eyes
that studied history and
the mind that graduated
summa cum laude but
now they had disappeared
into the peanut butter,
never to be seen again.
She's going, she's going,
she's gone!
One night, a group of
us were having dinner,
celebrating the return of a
friend from England.


Janice had just gotten back
from a fabulous trip, and
she was going on and on
about the hotel she stayed
in. I was sitting there,
looking around at the
others all put together so
well. It was hard not to
compare and feel sorry for
myself as I looked down at
my out-of-style dress; it was
the only thing I could find
that was clean.
My unwashed hair was
pulled up in a hair clip
and I was afraid I could
actually smell peanut
butter in it. I was feeling
pretty pathetic, when
Janice turned to me with a
beautifully wrapped
package, and said, 'I
brought you this.' It was a
book on the great
cathedrals of Europe. I
wasn't exactly sure why
she'd given it to me until I
read her inscription: 'To
Charlotte, with admiration
for the greatness of what
you are building when no
one sees.'
In the days ahead I
would read no, devour -
the book. And PI would
discover what would
become for me, life-
changing truths, after
which I could pattern my
work: No one can say who
built the great cathedrals -
we have no record of their
names. These builders gave
their whole lives for a work
they would never see
finished. They made great
sacrifices and expected no
credit. The passion of their
building was fueled by
their faith that the eyes of
God saw everything. A
legendary story in the book
told of a rich man who
came to visit the cathedral
while it was being built,
and he saw a workman
carving a tiny bird on the
inside of a beam.
He was puzzled and
asked the man, 'Why are
you spending so much time


carving that bird into a
beam that will be covered
by the roof? No one will
ever see it.' And the
workman replied, 'Because
God sees.'
I closed the book,
feeling the missing piece
fall into place. It was
almost as if I heard God
whispering to me, 'I see
you, Charlotte. I see the
sacrifices you make every
day, even when no one
around you does. No act of
kindness you've done, no
sequin you've sewn on, no
cupcake you've baked, is
too small for me to notice
and smile over. You are
building a great-cathedral,
but you can't see right now
what it will become.'
At times, my
invisibility feels like an
affliction. But it is not a
disease that is erasing my
life. It is the cure for the
disease of my own self-
centeredness. It is the
* antidote to my. strong,
stubborn pride. I keep the
right perspective when I see
myself as a great builder.
As one of the people who
show up at a job -that they
will never see finished, to
work on something that
their name will never be
on. The writer of the book
went so far as to say that
no cathedrals could ever be
built in our lifetime,
because there are so few
people willing to sacrifice
to that degree.
When I really think
about it, I don't want my
son to tell the friend he's
bringing home from
college for Thanksgiving,
'My mom gets up at 4 in the
morning and bakes
homemade pies, and then
she hand bastes a turkey
for three hours and presses
all the linens for the table.'
That would mean I'd built
a shrine or a monument to
myself. I just want him to
want to come home. And
then, if there is anything
more to say to his friend,: to
add, 'You're gonna love it
there.'
As mothers, we are
building great cathedrals.
We cannot be seen if we're
doing it right. And one
day, it is very possible that
the world will marvel, not
only at what we have built,
but at the beauty that has
been added to the world by
the sacrifices of invisible
women.
Great Job, MOM!
I LOVE YOU!
Emerald


Design Standards Cont. from page 1


house, while the central
business district takes in
all structures within a two-
to-three block ,radius of the
courthouse.
The idea is to set up
standards and require-
ments for architectural
designs in the square, such
as building dimensions,
heights and setbacks, there-
by giving this focal point of
the town uniformity and
coherence, architecturally
speaking.
One critical element in
the equation is establishing
a build-to line, meaning
that buildings must come
right up to the sidewalk
(the Opera House is a per-
fect example of a build-to
building). Another impor-
tant consideration is offer-
ing incentives for property
owners to construct two-
story buildings that can
provide upstairs space for
shops, galleries, restau-
rants and such activities
that add vibrancy and vital-
ity to the downtown.
In the absence of such
standards, it's feared that
growth will occur haphaz-
ardly, erasing much of the
town's historic character.
Landscape architect
Winston Lee, who is behind
the idea, argues that now is
the time to impose the stan-
dards, while the town is
still able. Once the growth
occurs, as it is sure to do
once the current economic
slump passes, it will be too
late, he says.
Winston offers the
example of Edenfield
Hardware Store or another
of the buildings that cur-
rently define the square
being destroyed by fire or
natural disaster. In the


absence of standards, the
landowner could convert
the site into a parking lot
or put up a structure that
was contrary to the rest of
the square, he says.
At Tuesday night's first
reading of the ordinance, a
required first step in. the
process for adoption, local
realtor Winston Connell
protested the intent of the
ordinance and what he
viewed as the council's
"rush" to adopt it. It's not
the first time that Connell
has appeared before the
council to protest a pro-
posed change in the city.
The last time he came
before the council was to
protest the making of cer-
tain streets into one ways
and diverting traffic from
the downtown district to
make it more pedestrian
friendly.
Connell confessed on
Tuesday night that he had
"just gotten wind of this",
meaning the council's con-
sideration of the ordinance.
But he was opposed to the
formation of a committee,
which, things being as they
were, would naturally be
predisposed to come up
with a slew of recommen-
dations that the council
would then feel obliged to
adopt.
"If they're all leaning
one way, it will put you on
the spot," is the way
Connell put it. "I feel there
is a rush to adopt this."
Connell's stated objec-
tion, from his somewhat
convoluted presentation,
appeared to be that rear
parking and buildings that
came right up to the side- *
walk, as the ordinance
would require, posed a safe-


ty hazard, both in terms of
traffic and crime.
"Building to the side-
walk is a nightmare,"
Connell said, recalling for-
mer times when the town
had more buildings that
came right up to the side-
walk. "What's wrong with
building in the back of a lot
and having parking in the
front. I feel more comfort-
able with parking in the

Parades-
and street maintenance
employees, the first moni-
toring traffic and providing
public safety during such
events and the second
cleaning up during and
after the events.
Proponents of the fee,
most notably Councilman
Tom Vogelgesang, argued
that the city incurred a def-
inite cost in providing the
services and-should be
compensated, if only at a
minimum. Vogelgesang
argued that the $100 and
$400 charges covered the
basics. And unlike previ-
ously, when the fees varied
and weren't tallied until
after the event, the new
rates would be standard
and known from the onset.
Opponents of the fees,
namely Austin, argued that
events such as the
Watermelon Festival and
Martin Luther King Jr.
Day festivities represented
economic boons to the com-
munity and so rightly
should be underwritten by
the city as part of the eco-
nomic development effort.
In the end, Vogel-
gesang's argument pre-
vailed.
Charles Parrish, presi-


front. I think you need to
table this."
Mayor Gerrold Austin
explained that the first
reading was a very prelimi-
nary step in the process. He
invited Connell to partici-
pate in the committee that
would be formed and to def-
initely revisit the issue,
when the committee began
its considerations. Connell
promised to be there.

Cont. from page 1
dent of the Jefferson
County Branch of the
NAACP, sparked the
debate in December when
he challenged the fee being
charged to the annual MLK
Parade, which was held
Jan. 21. He questioned why
citizens and taxpayers
should have to pay for
what was essentially a pub-
lic service that the city
should provide.
Representatives of the
Watermelon Festival
backed Parrish's request.
The city started charg-
ing for the services it pro-
vided during parades and
other public events about
four years ago to cover its
costs. Before that, it
absorbed the costs of pro-
viding the services.


ired ol roots LeaKing ana Deing put
on the long waiting list for a new
roof? You're not alone.
CALL NOW 1-800-260-6491
and you will be back to normal
with-in 10 days.
ALL CREDIT ACCEPTED
PAYMENTS $49/MO
SOURCE ONE HOME SERVICES


Published weekly by ECB Publishing, Inc., 1215 North Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL 32344. Periodicals postage PAID at the Post Office in
Monticello, Florida 32344.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MONTICELLO NEWS, P.O.
Box 428, Monticello, FL 32345.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news mat-
ter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the
best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investi-
gate any advertisement submitted.
All photos given to ECB Publishing, Inc. for publication in this newspaper must
be picked up no later than 6 months from the date they are dropped off. ECB
Publishing, hr'. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline.









Wednesday, March 12, 2008 Monticello News 3A






VIEWPOINTS & PINIONS


TEN YEARS AGO
March 11, 1998
Because of the proposed change to
the county's Development Code con-
cerning high-density subdivisions,
planners put off a decision Thursday
night on the controversial subdivision
proposed for the Ebenezer Community.
Two school buses collided about
2:20 pm Wednesday resulting in one
driver seeking treatment and five stu-
dents all receiving minor injuries.
A man stopped by city police for
DUI earned additional charges of pos-
session of less than 20 grams of mari-
juana, a misdemeanor, and possession
of crack cocaine, a felony.
The county has decided to submit
several changes it proposes to make to
its personnel policy.to its insurance
carrier for review before proceeding
with implementation of the changes.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
March 9, 1988
The county's average daily jail pop-
ulation increased 400 percent from 1985
to 1986, the largest percentage increase
in the state, according to Sheriff Ken
Fortune.
The county's Correctional
Planning Committee had its first meet-
ing Thursday night to talk about the
county jail's overcrowding problem.
Marijuana, now more expensive
than cocaine, produces multi-million
dollar profits and has taken second
place to the "in" drug not only in
Jefferson County but throughout
Florida.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
March 9, 1978
Plans are underway to obtain a
monument honoring Boots Thomas, the
i'>young Marine from Monticello who
-'planted the first American flag ever to
'fly over Japanese held territory during
World War II.
At last week's meeting, county
commissioners authorized a letter to be


I A*lL 4k"IA. L ]i
written to the Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission stating their recom-
mendation that no motors be permitted'
on Lake Miccosukee during duck hunt-
ing season.
The newly organized Jefferson
Humane Society came a step closer
toward having an animal shelter after
City Council members unanimously
agreed to permit the group to use
approximately two acres of land near
the sewage treatment plant.
FORTY YEARS AGO
March 9, 1968
R.E. (Bill) Bryan, of Tallahassee,
general chairman of the area for the
Easter Seal Fund Drive for crippled
children, said Friday that Mrs. John
Kelly had agreed to be county chair-
man for the drive in Jefferson County.
Mike Etter, Katie Harp, Ricky Assad,
Eddie Assad Jr., and Donna
Weingarden all showed their animals
at the State Fair in Tampa.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
March 9, 1958
Pauline Clarke, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs.. T.L. Clarke, of Monticello,
was among the new pledges last week
to Kappa Delta sorority at Florida State
University.
Sheriff J.B. Thomas returned to
Monticello this morning, after a trip to
Everglades City, for the purpose of tak-
ing custody of and returning a prisoner
for whom a warrant was outstanding in
Jefferson County. Mrs. Thomas accom-
panied the sheriff on the trip.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
March 9, 1948
The Navy Recruiting Station,
Tallahassee, announced today that
Robert L. Chick, of Monticello, has
reenlisted in the Navy as a Fireman ,
First Class and has been transferred to
Charleston, S.C. for assignment to duty -..
Wayne L. Harrell, of Lloyd, has enlisted'
as an apprentice seaman and has been.'
transferred to San Diego, California .
for recruit training.


k i
*'^ /


Lazaro Aleman


As Senior Staff Writer, he is a sea- Aleman enjoys writing, pure and
soned reporter with more than 30 years simple. He enjoys learning new things,
of writing experience. He studied jour- no matter how mundane or in what
nalism at the University of Houston, in field, and communicating that new-
Texas, and subsequently worked for found knowledge to readers.
KPFT Radio, the Houston News Presently, he mostly covers politics
Service, and co-published and edited and government affairs but enjoys
two magazines in Houston, TX. doing features on a variety of topics,
He moved to Jefferson County in including people profiles, outdoor
1986, wanting to live a rural lifestyle. events, and historical subjects.
He has worked at the Monticello News In his spare time, he freelances for
since 1988, with a brief stint at the magazines and works on his 10-acre
Thomasville Tribune in Georgia. He is "toy" farm, where he gets plenty of
married and has one son. exercise.



liit l l *'l !llllt li tIlf 11


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Andrew Williams, 69,
of 316 Groverville Rd., was
arrested March 5 and
charged with violation of
probation/driving under
the influence, violation of
probation/driving while
license suspended. He
was released on his own
reconnaissance the same
day.
Gregory Lamar, 20, of
659 Lamar Rd., was arrest-
ed by police March 5, and
charged with grand theft
motor vehicle, ($10,000
bond), criminal mischief
($500) bond, and simple
battery ($500 bond). He
remained housed in the
county jail Monday after-
noon, March 10.
Jarvis Proctor, 19, of
315 E. Green St., was
arrested March 5, and
charged with criminal
mischief. Bond was set at
$500 and he bonded out of
jail then same day.
Police arrested Sally
Lamar, 45, March 6 at
approximately 8:42 p.m.
when officer Jessica
Schwartz was on patrol
and noticed her vehicle
traveling with loud music
playing. Schwartz fol-
lowed the vehicle and
observed the vehicle being
driven erratically. She
conducted a traffic stop
and noticed a strong odor
of an alcoholic beverage
emitting from Lamar.
That, coupled with
Lamar's actions led
Schwartz to believe that
Lamar was under the
influence of alcohol.
Schwartz, assisted by
Officer Brandon Abbott,


gave Lamar some field
sobriety tests, which she
failed. Lamar was arrest-
ed and transported to the
county jail where she was
given a breathalyzer test
and blew a .181 and .183,
which are over the legal
limit. Lamar was charged
with DUI and bond was
set at $500. She bonded
out of jail the following
day.
Larry Michael Hall,
18, of 5773 N. Salt Rd.
turned himself in to the
county jail March 6 on a
warrant for his arrest.
Hall was charged with
criminal mischief and
petit theft motor vehicle
parts. Bond was set at
$250 and he bonded out
the same day.
Derek Lee Griffin, 18,
of 1693 Waukeenah
Highway, was arrested
March 6 and charged with
writ of attachment. Bond
was set at $100 and he
bonded out of jail the fol-
lowing day.
Leroy Carlton Ferrell,
53, of 8515 Forest Wood
Drive, Tallahassee, was
arrested March 6 and
charged with possession
of cocaine ($5,000 bond),
possession of cannabis
less than 20 grams ($2,500
bond), possession of drug
paraphernalia ($1,000
bond), and driving while
license suspended ($2,500
bond). He remained in
the county jail Monday
afternoon, March 10.
Brad Cameron
Whitfield, 18, was arrested
by police March 7 at
approximately 6:50 p.m.,
and charged with failure
to use due care, no driver
license and arrested for


an outstanding warrant.
MPD Cpl. Joel
Oquendo was monitoring
traffic along King Street
when he observed the
vehicle Whitfield was
driving, speeding through
a residential area.
Oquendo discovered that
Whitfield had an out-
standing arrest warrant
for battery., Whitfield was
cited for the driving
charges, and transported
to the county jail for book-
ing on the warrant.
Luches Seymore, 38, of
Ft. Myers, was stopped by
Cpl. Joel Oquendo, March
8 shortly after midnight,
when he observed a vehi-
cle speeding on South
Jefferson St., at 75 miles
per hour in a 55 mile per
hour zone. Oquendo initi-
ated a traffic stop and he
detected the odor of mari-
juana emitting from the
stopped vehicle. A search
was conducted in which a
misdemeanor amount of
marijuana was found.
Seymore was issued a
speeding citation and
given a court date to
answer to the misde-
meanor marijuana
charge.
Wayne Eugene Speare,
45, of 1185 E. Clark Rd.,
was arrested by deputies
March 9, and charged
with trespass on property
after warning ($250 bond),
possession of cannabis
less than 20 grams ($500
bond), possession of a con-
trolled substance ($2,500
bond) and possession of
contraband at the county
jail ($2,500 bond). He
remained housed at the
county jail Monday after-
noon, March 10.


S0 trt r T, T "









4A Monticello News


Wednesday, March 12, 2008


FOUND


EFFERSON


COUNTY


Revival Meeting At


I f i s'7


Calvary Baptist Church
Pastor David Walker
285 Magnolia St. Monticello
997-2165


Calvary Baptist Church
DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Calvary Baptist Church will present a
Revival meeting Friday, March 14, through
Sunday, March 16, at the church location
285 Magnolia Street in downtown Monti-
cello.
Guest preacher will be Pastor Michael
Wheeler with Bridgeport Baptist Church in
Valdese, NC.
Friday and Saturday dinner will be
served at 5:45 p.m. with service at 7 p.m.
Sunday services will be held at 11 a.m.
and at 6:30 p.m., with dinner on the
grounds Sunday.
Contact David Walker, church pastor,
at 997-2165 for more information.







gecycLe


Kiwanis Club Learns About


Youth Hunting Program


Kenneth Barker, state co-
ordinator for the Youth Hunting
Program, was the guest
speaker at the March 5 Kiwanis
meeting. He is assigned to the
Beau Turner Center here in Jef-
ferson County.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Guest speaker
at the March 5 meeting
of the Monticello Ki-
wanis Club was Ken-
neth Barker, state
coordinator for the
Youth Hunting Pro-
gram.
Barker is assigned
to the Beau Turner
Center here in Jeffer-
son County He over-
sees the training
programs for youths
primarily from the ages
of 12 17, and can serve
ages as young as 5.
The training pro-
gram is required for
anyone who wishes to
obtain a hunting li-
cense.
The facility features


two rifle ranges,
archery course, stocked
fishpond, two nature
walks, and wildlife
viewing blinds.
There was a special
Open House for kids,
and their parents, Sat-
urday, March 8 from 10
a.m. until 3 p.m.
Demonstrations and
door prizes were avail-
able.
More information
about this program can
be obtained by calling
the office at 251-0638.
Kiwani's Club
meets at noon on
Wednesday at the Jef-
ferson Country Club on
the Boston Highway.
Contact President Rob
Mazur at 907-5138 for
Kiwanis Club informa-
tion.


The Jefferson County Recycling Program accepts
the following items for recycling:

All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magaines, etc.

All Cardboard Products grocery bag, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located
at 1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the
collection sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our
Landfill and saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go
wrong?

Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing
machines, dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle
Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals,
paint, paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to
identify contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept
medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an
employee of the facility and not just dropped off.

Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.

The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Steve Wingate at 342-0154.

Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


March National Social Work Month


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Covenant Hospice, along with the Na-
tional Association of Social Workers, an-
nounce that March is National Social
Work Month.
This year's theme "Building on
Strengths: Help Starts Here" focuses on
the important strengths inherent in each
individual, family and community
Understanding and utilizing these
strengths are essential to improving the
emotional health and well being of society
Strengthening people and providing
support are priorities of the social work
profession.
Social workers look for the inherent
strengths in a problem that can be used as
a starting point for further growth.
"The strengths perspective approach
fosters hope by focusing on the positive,
rather than on feelings of helplessness,"
says Janet Wilkie, LCSW, director of Spe-
cial Programs for Covenant Hospice. "In-
dividuals, families and communities can
feel empowered by looking and working,


with their strengths."
Social Work Month also provides an
opportunity for social workers to high-
light the essential role they play in allevi-
ating some of America's most difficult
problems, such as health, aging, mental
health, child welfare, cancer, end of life,
adolescent health, HIV/AIDS and family
violence.
Celebrating 25 years of keeping the
promise, Covenant Hospice is a not-for-
profit organization dedicated to providing
comprehensive, compassionate services to
patients and loved ones during times of
life-limiting illnesses.
The focus of Covenant Hospice is to
enable its patients to live as fully and com-
fortably as possible, to provide dignified
palliative care, to assist patients' loved
ones in coping with end-of-life issues and
the eventual death of the patient, and to
improve care for all patients at the end of
their lives by example and education.
For more information contact Devel-
opment and Public Relation Manager
Rachel Layerd at 509-0861 or Rachel.lay-
ered@covenanthospice.org


Capital City Bank

Holds Fundraiser
DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Capital City Bank Relay For Life team is having
a chance drawing for an Outdoor Propane Cooker made
and donated by Rudy Scheese.
The cooker is on display at the bank, and all bank as-
sociates have tickets to sell. Tickets are $5 each or 5 for
$20.
The drawing will be held Friday, April 25 during the
Jefferson County Relay For Life weekend event.
Contact Tonia Baxter at 671-0589 for more informa-
tion about this fundraiser.


4.1 t -1; 11HI^ -lms



S;":'.." "





Make a career of l The Clessifeds
are packed with possibilities Check out
the job listings loday and give others
a helping hand
Monticello News & |
Jefferson county Jounal
8in 007 3a


,tll 1


I'


- L.17


Be our guest at our exclusive travel show and discover
how you can turn your vacation dreams into reality.
thursday, March 13, 2008
AAA Travel Agency
2910 Kerry Forest Pkwy, D-l Tallahassee


3:00 pm 7:00 pm


R S.V.P at 850-907-1000
Re iteshmlni ;, pt i-c- s ttd ltorc!


Don't miss this opportunity to plan and book a truly unforgettable vacation.
AAA Members and Nonmembers Welcome!
Ask about AAA Member Benefits like exclusive discounts, shipboard credits and special gifts.
Ask about Proposed Changes in U.S. Passport Requirements
For more information:
Please call us at 850-907-1000 or
visit us at 2910 Kerry Forest Parkway, D-1
Tallahassee, Florida 32309
Travel


V T S R M E.R S..X L E A N


Meet representatives from the
following travel companies:
Carnival Cruise Line
Celebrity Cruises
Disney Cruise Line
Holland America Line
Regent Seven Seas
Royal Caribbean International
Uniworld Grand River Cruises
Crystal Cruises
Insight Holidays
Pleasant Holidays
Tauck Tours
Trafalgar Tours


- ...-:


.i:;~.: -~








Wednesday, March 12, 2008


Monticello News 5A


FOUND


EFFERSON


COUNTY


Nancy Stripling Luke, 90, of Camilla,
Ga. died Friday/February 29, 2008 at-
Camilla Retirement Village.
Funeral services were held 11:00 a.m.
Monday, March 3rd at Camilla First Bap-
tist Church with interment in Oakview
Cemetery Rev Rick Williams and Rev.
Danny Thomas officiated. The grandsons
served as pallbearers.
Born February 10, 1918 in Camilla,
Mrs. Luke was married to the late David
Pickett Luke, Jr. and was the daughter of
Roy and Nell Baggs Stripling. She was a
member of Camilla First Baptist Church
where she was a Sunday School Director
for the children's department for over 31
years. Mrs. Luke was one of the founders
of the Gray Ladies during her children's
education and active in the Westwood
Grandparents Club where she served as
past president.


William Albert Becker, Sr., age 80, 310
Crosswhite Lane., Erwin, died Sunday,
March 2, 2008, at his residence of an ap-
parent heart attack.
Mr. Becker was a native of the Bronx
Borough, New York, New York, and had
moved to Erwin two years ago from Mon-
ticello, FL. He was the son of the late Al-
bert William and Katherine Heck Becker.
Mr. Becker retired in 1986 after
twenty-five years of service as a Civil En-
gineer with the Public Service Commis-
sion for the State of Florida. He served in
the U.S. Marine Corp from 1944 1953, dur-
ing World War II in Okinawa, Japan and
during the Korean War. Mr. Becker was a
member of the National Rifle Association.
He is survived by his wife of forty-
seven years, Lillian A. Becker, of the
home; four sons and three daughters-in-
law, Fred and Diane Bevins of Lantana,


Newton Jasper Rohrer 95, died Satur-
day, March 8, 2008. Services will be held
at a future date in Tampa. In lieu of flow-
ers, memorial contributions may be
made to Miracle Hill Nursing and Conva-
lescent Home, Inc., 1829 Abraham Street,
Tallahassee, Fl 32304.
A native of Millersburg, Indiana and
a longtime resident of Tampa, Mr, Rohrer
has been a resident of the Havana area
since 2004. He was a retired television
service repairman. While a resident of


Survivors include a daughter, Mary
Lynn Bateman and husband Fred of
Camilla, two sons, David P. Luke III and
wife JoAnn of Dahlonaga and Roy
Stripling Luke, Sr. & wife Susan of
Camilla; seven grandchildren David P.
Luke IV, Brayn Joseph Luke, Bert
Crosson and wife Haley, Luke Crosson,
Lynn Crosson, Roy Stripling Luke, Jr.
and wife Melissa, and Lark Davis Luke;
four great grandchildren, Jasmine Skyler
Luke, Logan Kirkland Crosson, Landon
Gray Crosson, and Callie Hope Crosson.
Visitation was from 6 8 p.m. Sunday
March 2nd at the Morgan Building lo-
cated directly behind the Camilla Retire-
ment Village on E. Broad Street.
Parker-Bramlett Funeral Home was
in charge of arrangements; 229-336-5111.
To sign online guest registry, visit our
website at www.parkerbramlett.com


Florida, Michael Bevins of Los Angeles,
California, Billy and Sue Becker of Erwin,
Tennessee and Bobby and Patti Becker,
Warner Robbins, Georgia; two daughters
and one son-in-law, Kathy and Bert Ward
of Atlanta, Georgia and Jenny Peterson of
Farmington, New Mexico one sister and
brother-in-law, Dorothy and Bob Lahaie of
Mesa, Arizona; eleven grandchildren; four
great-grandchildren.
A private memorial service for the
family will be held at a later date. In-lieu-
of flowers, the family requests memorial
contributions may be made to the Ameri-
can Heart Association, 208 Sunset Dr. STE
113, Johnson City TN 37604. Condolences
for the family may be sent to
rfledford@earthlink.net.
Robert Ledford Funeral Home, 720
Ohio Ave. Erwin, TN 37650, is in charge of
arrangements. (423)743-1380.


Tampa he was a very active member of
Westshore Christian Church, where he
served as an elder.
Mr. Rohrer is survived by three
daughters, Marilyn Altomaro of Havana,
Carol Brown of Tampa, and Delores Brat-
ton of Plant City; seven grandchildren,
including Antonia Sweeney(Paul) of Tal-
lahassee, Michelle Nix (Donald) of Ha-
vana and Matthew Altomaro, III of
Monticello; 9 great grandchildren and 2
great-great grandchildren.


4-H Share Your Talent


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The annual 4-H Share-the-Fun talent
show will be held at 6 p.m. Thursday,
March 20 at the Monticello Opera House,
All interested persons need to contact
the Extension Office as soon as possible.
There can be no more than five youth


in each talent act. The time limit is three -
to five minutes.
4-H members must register their act'
at the Extension Office by 5 p.m. on Fri-
day, March 14.
If you need assistance in getting your
act together, you can call the 4-H Office
and set up an appointment with Gladys
Neely at 342-0187.


Nancy Stripling Luke


March 12
Social Dancing will be
held through March on
Wednesday evenings at the
Monticello Opera House
with beginning dance
classes at 7 p.m. and open
dancing at 7:45 p.m. There
will be complementary re-
freshments with the $5 ad-
mission fee, $3 for students
13 and up. Contact the
Opera House at 997-4242 for
more information.
March 12
Monticello Kiwanis
Club meets every Wednes-
day at noon at the Jeffer-
son Country Club on
Boston Highway for lunch
and a meeting. Contact
President Rob Mazur at
907-5138 for club informa-
tion.
March 12
Mignonette Garden
Circle meets at noon on the
second Wednesday of the
month for a meeting and
program. Contact Chair-
man Jan Wadsworth at 997-
4440 for meeting location
and for more information.
March 13
The Jefferson Soil and
Water Conservation Board
will meet 11:30 a.m. Thurs-
day, in the County Exten-
sion Office Conference
Room, as per Dorothy
Lewis, secretary/trea--
surer.
March 13
Founder's Garden Cir-
cle meets at noon on the
second Thursday of the
month. Contact Chairman
Suzanne Peary at 997-4043
for meeting location and
for more information.

March 13
AA meetings held 8
p.m. on Thursdays at
Christ Episcopal Church
Annex, 425 North Cherry
Street. For more informa-
tion call 997-2129, 997-1955.


March 13
Workforce Mobile Unit
is stationed across from
First Baptist Church, Mon-
ticello 9 a.m. 5 p.m. on the
second Thursday of each
month. For more informa-
tion contact Employment
Connection Director
Cheryl Rehberg at 673-7688,
or volunteers Paul Kovary
at 997-2313, or Mike Reich-
man at 997-5100, or SW
Ellis at 567-3800.
March 13
Jefferson County Dia-
betes Support Group meets
11:45 a.m.-12:10 p.m. Thurs-
day at the Library. All at-
tending are welcome to
bring a bag lunch. Contact
Bonnie Gobar Mathis at
342-0170 x1301 for more in-
formation.
March 13
Jefferson County
Health Education Club
Lunch and Learn 12:15-
12:45 p.m. Thursday at the
Library. All attending are
welcome to bring a bag
lunch. Contact Bonnie
Gobar Mathis at 342-0170,
ext. 1301 for more informa-
tion.
March 14
Monticello Rotary
Club meets every Friday at
noon at the Monticello/Jef-
ferson Chamber of Com-
merce on West Washington
Street for lunch and a
meeting. Contact Presi-
dent Judson Freeman at
997-0370 for club informa-
tion.
March 14
Monticello Christian
Academy will host a din-
ner and concert, featuring
Music Evangelist Jim
Kerr, beginning at 6 p.m.
on Friday, in an effort to
raise funds for the school
and school activities. Con-
tact Fundraising Coordi-
nator Sarah Baker at
997-6048 for ticket informa-
tion.


March 15
AA meetings are held 8
p.m. Saturday at Christ
Episcopal Church Annex,
425 North Cherry Street.
For more information call
997-2129, 997-1955.
March 15
Country Dinner Relay
For Life fundraiser .5 7
p.m. Saturday at First Bap-
tist Church Monticello in
the fellowship hall. The
cost of this pork loin meal
is $10. Contact the church
at 997-2349 for more infor-
mation
March 15
Solomon Lodge No. 6
will host a One Day Biloxi
Casino Trip on Saturday.
Registration is $55. Partic-
ipants will receive $25 in
tokens upon arrival to the
casino. For more informa-
tion contact Art Brown at
abrown4698(daexcite.com or
284-3250. Proceeds to bene-
fit the Lodge College Schol-
arship Program.
March 15
Celebrate National
Crochet Month Saturday
at the Jefferson Arts
Gallery, 575 West Washing-
ton Street. There will be a
show in the gallery (in-
cluding refreshments), and
Monticello will host its
Tour of Homes. If the
weather is nice, bring a
yard chair to sit under the
shade trees in the front
yard. Participants 'will
"crochet in public" to cele-
brate National Crochet
Month. Diva Crochet Web
site: http://www. divacro-
chet.com
March 15
SHARE- registration
will be held 10 a.m. 12
p.m. Saturday at the Li-
brary and at Central Bap-
tist Church in Aucilla. The
Basic Food package costs
$18 Contact Martha Creel
at 445-9061 for more info.


William Becker


Newton-Jasper Rohrer


S^ Lincoln Logs Internationafl.L.C.
Manufacturer of
AMERICA'S FINEST LOG HOME
$8,000 $12,000 PROFIT PER SALE


'. WE WANT TO TALK

TO YOU ABOUT A

DEALERSHIP

OPPORTUNITY

Lincoln Logs International will
www.lincolnlogsinternational.com be conducting a seminar in your
1Cal -008 310 area very soon.
Calitl-800-848-3310 Location to be anr unced
for more information
Ask for Bob Tripp
Billion Dollar Industry Complete Dealer Support *
No Franchise or Royalty Fees Guarantee: No Money Ever Lost *
Financing Available *


-' f



Ornamental Iron W Painted Glass
Handcrafted Furniture W Clothing Jewelry
Folk Art I. Ceramics SW Sesonal Decorations
Wood Crafts W Pottery Floral Arrangements
Artists' Prints Antiques W Food Court


March 15 & 16,2008

Saturday 9:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m.

Sunday 10:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m.
Spence Field Moultrie, Ga.
(Sunbelt Expo Site) www.callcocrafts.com
4 miles SE of Hwy.319 info@calcocrafts.com
on Hwy. 133 lnfo callcocraft.com


~i&~ ~?~/









6A Monticello News


Wednesday, March 12, 2008


FOUND


EFFERSON


COUNTY


Climate-Controlled Storage Units



Offer Users Definite Advantages


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
For residents with
more possessions than
their homes can reason-
ably accommodate, self-
storage rental units
have long been an an-
swer to their dilemma.
But what to do about
important papers, pre-
cious family heirlooms,
antiques, musical in-
struments and other
valuable items that
would accumulate dust
and mildew and gener-
ally deteriorate if
stored long-term in reg-
ular storage units?
The answer is cli-
mate-controlled storage
units, of which Green
Acres Mini Storage on
North Jeffer-
son Street
boasts eight.
The first cli-
mate-con-
trolled
storage facil-
ity in the
county,
Green Acres
Mini Storage
is owned by
Ray Kercher
and dates
from late
2005.
SAdmit-
tedly a little
more expen-
sive than
regular stor-
age, climate-
controlled
storage of-
fers definite Ray Ke
advantages, Dowdy, wh
especially if controlled


one is storing posses-
sions that one wants
preserved. First and
foremost, climate-con-
trolled storage assures
a constant temperature,
so that stored items
don't suffer damage
from humidity or ex-
tremes in temperature.
Another advantage
is protection from the
elements, as the units
are inside a building
and so protected from
rain and sunshine, as
well as from dirt and
dust. Finally, the cli-
mate-controlled enclo-
sures ensure a reduced
risk of penetration
from damaging pests
and insects such as
bees, wasps, termites,
roaches and mice.


As well as the cli-
mate-controlled units,
which are available in
sizes 10 by 15 feet and 10
by 10 feet, Green Acres
has nine regular stor-
age units that are 10 by
15 feet. Monthly charges
for the climate-con-
trolled units are $80, in-
cluding tax, and $64 for
the regular units, in-
cluding tax.
Kerri Dowdy, owner
and operator of Mor-
gan's Bows-n-Toes on
1065 Jefferson Street,
manages the storage fa-
cility. For more infor-
mation on storage
rental, see Dowdy at her
business or call her at
(850) 997-8599 or (850)
294-9104 (alternate
phone).


Monticello News Photo by Lazaro Aleman March 10,2008
archer, owner of Green Acres Mini Storage, and daughter Kerri
oI manages the business, stand outside one of the climate-
storage units.


2008 Home and Heritage



Tour Planned


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The biennial Tour of
Homes is given for the ben-
efit of the Jefferson
County Historical Associa-
tion, which sponsors proj-
ects and events
highlighting the rich ar-
chitectural and historical
heritage of Jefferson
County
The Tour will be held
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sat-
urday, March 15, and 1 to 5
p.m. on Sunday, March 16.
Tickets are available at
the Wirick-Simmons
House on North Jefferson
and Pearl Streets at $25 for
adults, $5 for children 12
and under, and $10 (sepa-
rate tickets) for lunch on
Saturday in the Opera
House Garden.
For more information
call 850-997-2465.
Some facts about Jef-
ferson County include that
this county was named for
Thomas Jefferson, and
was officially established
in 1827. Monticello was
the name given to the
county seat while Florida
was still a territory of the
United States.
Jefferson County is the
Keystone County, extend-
ing from the Florida-Geor-
gia line to the Gulf of
Mexico.'"
Monticello stands at
the crossroads of US High-
ways 19 and 90.
Many antebellum
homes and buildings are
still in good repair and in
use at the present time.
The high school,
erected in 1852, was, until
its closing, one of the ten


Festival Committee Names



Art Contest Winners


Ray Cichon
Monticello News
Managing Editor
The Watermelon Fes-
tival Committee named
the winners of the Art
Contest, at its monthly
meeting Monday, March 3.
The 58t" Watermelon F'7,s-
tival is scheduled June 6 -
28.
First Place winner,
whose entry will be fea-


tured on the Festival
Booklet cover, is Aimee
Love, a sixth grade stu-
dent at Aucilla Christian
Academy
Second place winner
is Turion Jackson, a stu-
dent at Jefferson Elemen-
tary School.
Third place winner is
Carly Joiner, a student at
Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy


Winners will be in-
formed by telephone, and
will be introduced at the
Kickoff Dinner, set for
Friday, June 6. Love will
receive a $50 savings bond
and a Festival T-shirt.
Jackson and Joiner will
receive Festival T-shirts.
Event entry deadlines
were reported for the
Queen Pageant, Princess
Pageant, Little King and


Queen Contest. The entry
deadline is March 28.
The Baby Contest
entry deadline is May 30.
. The Parade entry
deadline is June 2. Parade
theme is "American Tra-
ditions." Chair Lisa Rea-
soner reported that the
Marine Band was ex-
pected to be on hand for
the event.
New business, during
the meeting, concerned
the American Legion
holding an Ugly Truck
Contest, with a prize for
the ugliest truck. Entries
plan to take part in the
parade.
The Children's Play at
the Opera House will take
place at 7 p.m., Friday,
June 20, and again after
the Parade, Saturday,
June 21.
Entry applications for
events, or information
about where to pick them
up, can be obtained by
calling the Chamber of
Commerce at 997-5552.
It was decided to limit
the food booths to 20 this
year, to help avoid dupli-
cation of items. The in-
tention of the committee
is for food vend, 's to
offer a variety o; items,
in order to help each ven-
dor increase sales.
The Festival Commit-
tee meets again at 5:15
p.m., Monday, April 7.


oldest brick schools in
continuous use in the
United States.
Much of downtown
Monticello is listed in the
National Register of His-
toric Places as a Historic
District.
The Tour will include
the following structures
and sites.
*The Wirick-Simmons
House
*The Bishop-Collins House
*The First Presbyterian
Church
*The Budd-Carswell House
*The Dilworth-Barnhill
House
*The Simkins-Kirkpatrick
House
*The Palmer House
*Jefferson Arts, Inc.
*The Avera-Clarke Bed
and Breakfast
*The Monticello Opera
House
*The Monticello Woman's


Club
*The Randle House
*The Cypress Cabin On
Silver Lake




U'185SIZE

SLifetime Wairanty
Double-Pane Insulating GlasE
S. E:xcepllonal Energy Savings
SEasy to Clean Tilt-In Design
Factory Direcl Pricing
ner Winaoo Slyles and
Patiio Doors Also AU3,lable



U !


Be Prepared for Tax Filing Day

Provided by Robert J. Davison


April 15, 2008, the tax-filing deadline, may seem like a long
way off. But you don't want it to sneak up on you. So, you
might want to borrow a page from the Boy Scout Handbook
and "Be PrepareM' "
And one of the best ways you can prepare yourself is to
become familiar with "what's new." Some elements of the
tax laws change almost every year and 2007 was no ex-
ception. So, as you start thinking about your taxes, you'll
want to stay current on those changes that may affect you,
such as the rules governing the "kiddie tax."
As you may know, the kiddie tax is a set of rules governing
the tax treatment of children's investment income. In 2007,
the first $850 of a child's unearned investment income is
tax-free and the next $850 is taxed at the child's rate,
which is typically 10 percent. Any unearned investment
income in excess of $1,700 will be taxed at your rate. (This
figure will be indexed for inflation in upcoming years.)
Previously, these rules applied only to children younger
than 14. This year, the kiddie tax affects children younger
than 18 and starting in 2008, it applies to dependents
younger than 19 and dependent full-time students younger
than 24. Consequently, if your children are between 18 and
23, you might want to sell some of the assets held in their
names before the year ends, thereby allowing you to take
advantage of the lowest capital gains rate which is 5 per-
cent, assuming your children are in the 10 percent tax
bracket applied to the sale of investments held more than
one year. If you wait until 2008 before selling these assets,
some of your children's investment income could be taxed
at your capital gains rate of 15 percent. Before selling
these assets, though, see your tax advisor.
Another tax law change one that expires this year -is re-
lated to charitable giving. If you are 70-1/2, you are re-
quired to take distributions from your traditional IRA. But
for 2007, you can transfer up to $100,000 per year directly
from your IRA to a charity, without paying income taxes on
the money. However, if you take advantage of this provi-
sion, you can't get a "double" tax break by writing off the
contribution as a charitable deduction. Consult with your
tax advisor before making this transfer.
Apart from familiarizing yourself with recent tax law chang-
es, what other moves you might want to make before the
tax season comes to a close? Here are a couple of ideas to
consider:
Contribute to an IRA. You can put money in to your IRA for
the 2007 tax year right up until the tax-filing deadline. If
you don't already have a traditional or Roth IRA, you've
also got until the filing deadline to open one for the 2007
tax year.
Check for all available deductions and credits. Meet with
your tax advisor to make sure you're taking advantage of
all the deductions and credits you can claim.
Finally, don't wait until the last second before filing taxes.
You can help achieve a more favorable outcome if you give
yourself adequate time to prepare, plan and avoid mis-
takes.


Robert J. Davison EdwardJones
Financial Advisor
205 E. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32344
Bus. 850-997-2572 Fax 866-462-9184
Cell 850-933-3329
robert.davison@edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com
Making Sense of Investing


C-PERSOAL INJURY &

WRONGFUL DEATH



Jon D. Caminez
Board Certified Civil Trial Attorney

Ian Brown
Cary A. "Bo" Hardee, III




CAMINEZ, BROWN & HARDEE, P.A.

(850) 997-8181
1307 S. JEFFERSON STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon
advertisements. Before you decide, ask the lawyer to send you free written information
about their qualifications and experience.


II -e











Girl Scouts of America Celebrate 96th Anniversary


About Girl Scouts of the USA


Girl Scouts of the
USA is the world's pre-
eminent organization
dedicated solely to
girls-all girls-where,
in an accepting and
nurturing environ-
ment, girls build char-
acter and skills for
success in the real
world. In partnership
with committed adult
volunteers, girls de-
velop qualities that will
serve them all their
lives, like leadership,


strong values, social
conscience, and convic-
tion about their own po-
tential and self-worth.
Founded in 1912 by
Juliette Gordon Low,
Girl Scouts' member-
ship has grown from.18
members in Savannah,
Georgia, to 3.7 million
members throughout
the United States, in-
cluding U.S. territories,
and in more than 90
countries through USA
Girl Scouts Overseas.


Girl Scouts
Where Girls Grow Strongw


Girl Scouts To Stay


Overnight In Tallahassee

DEBBIENAPP museum
Monticello News
Staff Writer ..... I
Jefferson County volunteers and local Girl Scout
Juniors and Brownie have been invited to participate
in an overnight stay at the Tallahassee Museum.
Juniors will have a great time spending the night
with other girls their age and will have the opportunity
to earn their Wildlife badge from 6 p.m. 9 a.m. on Fri-
day, April 18 Saturday, April 19. Registration began on
March 3. The cost is $15 per girl and $5 per adult.
Brownies will have fun spending the night at the
Tallahassee Museum while earning their Animal Try-It
from 6 p.m. 9 a.m. on Friday, May 2 and Saturday, May
3. Registration opens March 17.


Girl Scouts.



Volunteers Needed For

4th Annual Cruisin

The Night Away
DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Girl Scouts, volunteers and sponsors are needed for
the 4th annual Cruisin' the Night Away Girl Scout bene-
fit.
The event will be held 6:30 p.m. 10 p.m. on Saturday,
April 12 at The Moon and will feature the sounds of
Crooked Shooz.
The cost is $20 per individual or $35 per couple. To
purchase tickets by phone, contact the Council Office at
386-2131.
Committees are at work now and there will also be
opportunities to help the weeks leading up to the event.
For more information on volunteer opportunities or
sponsorship levels contact Ardell McGavin
ardellmc(@)comcast.net
Sponsorship opportunities are available. Volunteers
are needed.


Beggs Funeral Home
Monticello Chapel.
P.O. Box 485
485 E. Dogwood Street
Monticello, Florida 32345
Phone: 850-997-5612


Proud
Supporter
of
Qirl Scouts


Beggs Funeral Home
Apalachee Chapel
3322 Apalachee Parkway
Tallahassee, Florida 32311
Phone: 850-942-2929


* Full Service Bookkeeping
& Accounting
* State & Federal Electronic
Tax Filing
* Individual & Business
Tax Returns
* Payroll Services


264 NORTHCHERRYS TE


Girl Scout

Program Ages

Girl Scouts are divided into:

Daisy Girl Scouts (Ages 5-6)
Brownie Girl Scouts (Ages 6-8)
Junior Girl Scouts (Ages 8-11)
STUDIO 2B For Girls Ages 11-17


orI stout


T11e Q scout program
is girl-driven. rePlecii
Uie ever-ckoing ne@4
Ad interns oP o oda
girs. C r0O diSCor OlorI
Punowertondsltipand
power op 9ir1: togetJ~r?


SOUTHEASTERN
S LFENCE-. AsTD DECKN
90 DAYS SAME AS CASH 100% FINANCING AVAILABLE

--f| uic'rl I ick
MCC1--4o ) 11-1 U k-
OVA "iti. 1'cizIgk '


TIe ITorld i




www.flhuntingdogs.org

FDH&SA
915 Bloxham Cutoff Rd. Crawfordville, FL
850-575-3333




HORSE SHOEING
E ( m e iVye 1 &xpe-ietwe
Cowiectiae Shieeg & suAmin,
'E 2109 Waukeenah Hwy .
Monticello, FL 32344
(850) 210-8630
I Proudly Support The Girl Scouts
^_^ ^,- ^-. ^^ .^^


U8ou Brinkle.y
Xt-Ceavy TAcowing &' '-Muuching, c



* 'Mlowing 'vFueC oad reduction WFirebreaks
* ~Mulching '-erricidfe pplicarion *'Foiodf'PCots
* awn taintenaince Sire -Preararion Traifs
-. Land/Lot Clearing '* Pasture Mowinig grading
* 'Underbrushi'RemovaC muichliq qn -Ciw ,g Dris Fil'rTrI
as 850-556-8903
dbrinkleytll @ earthlink.net
Free Estimates ~ Licensed & Insured '*6'
Supporting Our Local Qirl Scouts
In Jefferson County


Steve C. Walker
Realty, LLC
250 S. Jefferson St. ~ Monticello, FL
(850) 997-4061 Office
(850) 997-4075 Fax

Come Visit Us on the Web
www.SteveWalkerRealty.com


:EU "
1277 S. Jefferson Sq.
Monticello, FL

997-4410

Proudly Supporting Our
Jefferson Qirl Scouts


Morrow Insurance
Agency
s8(0 S. Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL 2344

(850) 997-3912


Supporting Qirl Scouts
in Jefferson


Beggs Funeral Homes, Inc.


JProudSufporters of
GirfScouts
fEverywlere!


IBRlBBDAl SORENSE
^^^^^^^^^ax &* AcclluriSStS T'iccS^^S^^^^^^^^^^^


ber~ec


Monticello News 7A


Wednesday, March 12, 2008


FP~;


'I


ILI








8A Monticello News


Wednesday, March 12, 2008


SPORTS


NFCC MAKES TOP 10 LIST IN BASEBALL

RANKING COMES ON THE HEELS OF 9 STRAIGHT WINS


The news came late in
the day March 4 but it was
good enough to shout
about North Florida
Community College's Sen-
tinel baseball team made
the Florida Community
Colleges Athletic Associa-
tion (FCCAA) Top 10 list
this week!
"This is great news for
our baseball team!
Coaches Givens and
Dorsey and the team have
worked hard to arrive at
this point and they de-
serve our hearty congratu-
lations!" said President
Morris G. Steen, Jr. on
hearing the news.
NFCC was ranked
number 9 by baseball
coaches across the state of
Florida for the week of
March 4.
The well-deserved ranking
comes on the heels of nine
straight wins by the Sen-
tinels. NFCC defeated
Grand Rapids Community
College March 3 to make
the Sentinels 18-4 for the
season, leading to the

SeeUs st.corri
INTERNET BUSINESS DIRECTORY
Monticello, Florida Jefferson County
services-contact@secuslst.com(preferrld)
S850-997-4856 (shop, when available)


statewide community col-
lege coaches selecting
NFCC to.the top 10 as num-
ber 9 in the state.
The NFCC Sentinels
baseball team is coached
by Athletic Director/Head
Coach Dr. Steve Givens. Dr.
Givens is a former Atlanta
Braves' scout. Assistant
coach is Adrian Dorsey
Dorsey is a former assis-
tant coach at Georgia State
University
Team members are #23
Benjamin J. Adleburg/
Lawton Chiles HS/Talla-
hassee, Fl; #11 Aziel S.
Shea/Summit Christian
HS/West Palm Beach, Fl;
#21 Matthew J.
Jamieson/Campbell
HS/Smyrna, Ga; #2 Ryan
L. Danbury/Valdosta
HS/Valdosta, Ga; #8 Bran-
don L.
Zimmerman/Forsyth Cen-
tral HS/Cummings, Ga; #6
Walter L. Myers/Prattville
HS/Prattville, Al; #26 Rod-
ney D.
Williamson/Ridgeview
HS/Orange Park, FL; #5
Steven M. Rosado/Alan C.
Pope HS/Marietta, Ga; #20
Jeremy E.
Slutzky/Wheeler HS/Ma-
rietta, Ga; #25 Robert D.
Nettles/Northside


S e g eg;

I A A' I A



***Up to $10,000 recruitment i
(based on iears of experience


drhlobcr Memorial Ho -nital in Thnmrssn'illp GA isn


HS/Warner Robins, Ga;
#19 Michael W
Meschke/Alan C. Pope
HS/Marietta, Ga; #24
Chad M. Ritch/Haines
City Senior HS/Haines
City, Fl; #13 Brian D. Cran-
gle/University HS/Or-
lando, Fl; #10 A.
Scully/North Marion
HS/Citra, Fl; #22 Mark E.
Bernhardt/Immaculata
HS/Somerville, NJ; #12
William S. Waller/Baldwin
Middle-Senior HS/Bald-
win, Fl; #15 Juan A.
Perez/University HS/Or-
lando, Fl; #16 Jordan M.
Davis/Eau Gallie HS/Mel-
bourne, Fl; #7 Antonio S.
Clark/Mandarin HS/Jack-
sonville, Fl; #18 Chad C.
Burns/Charlotte
HS/Punta Gorda, Fl; #4


2008. The Florida Commu-
nity College Athletic Asso-
ciation (FCCAA) Baseball
Coaches' Poll, with num-
ber of first-place votes in
parentheses, 2008 record,
previous ranking and total
points in voting by FCCAA
baseball coaches.

Rank Team Record
Pts Pvs
1. Miami Dade (16) 21-1


187 1
2. Pensacola (3)
169 2
3. Chipola (16)
136 3
4. Manatee
112 4
5. Gulf Coast
101 7
6.Palm Beach
71 9


21-3

5-1

15-6

21-6

14-6


Brant D. Hamilton/Glen- 7. Daytona Beach 12-4
wood School/Phenix, AL; 67 6
and #1 Anthony R. 8. St. Petersburg 17-10
Green/North Cobb 63 8
HS/Kennesaw, Ga. 9. North Florida 18-4
To learn more about 52 -
NFCC athletics, including 10. Okaloosa-Walton 16-7
baseball, or to download 46 10
the baseball schedule, go Also receiving votes:
to www.NFCC.edu/athlet- Santa Fe 21, Seminole 6,
ics. Broward 4, South Florida
FCCAA Baseball 4, Central Florida 3, Lake-
Coaches' Poll March 4, Sumter 2, Polk 1'


Lady Warriors JV',


i


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer .
JV Lady Warriors split most recefit games, to stand 3-
3 on the season.
Melody Christian Academy defeated the ladies 7-5,
Feb. 29.
Coach Frank Brown said the two teams were pretty
evenly matched, and both had good, fast pitchers. Though
Aucilla had more hits during the game, they gave up
more walks. "We made some critical defensive errors on
critical plays," said Brown. "We were making bad
catches, throws, and plays. If we had played like we nor-
mally do, we would have won it, but it was one of those
games where we beat ourselves."
At the plate, Pamela Swat had four at-bat with three
singles, one putout, one stolen base and two runs.
Michaela Metcalfe made three trips to the plate with
one single, one putout, and one fly-out.
Lisa Kisamore had four at-bat, one strikeout, one
putout, and one fly-out.
Skyler Hanna had three at-bat, two singles, one
putout, two stolen bases, and
two runs.
-nhoue foBrooke Kinsey had three
at-bat, two put-outs, and one-
A tN Sfly-out; Sarah Sorensen took
three trips to the rubber re-
sulting in one single, and
i e e ** two put-outs; Ashley Schofill
incentives had three at-bat with one
double, and two fly-outs; and
Keli Dollar had two at-bat,
both were strike-outs.
Hadley Revell went to bat
nn,o, hiring Pprionred twice and had one single, one


kitL LI f IU I flE I fI JU L Id nItIUar)L LI II I JU LUJ I R0 nL.tj g.61 N3IIUJ I pIgnit .YJIMIL U
ICU, IMCU, CPU, CCU, and Outpatient Dialysis registered nurses.
Positions are also available in other units and departments.


In. ..


s "ttLri.. -y


TUESDAY, MARCH 18
4:00 P.M. 7:00 P.M. (DROP-
IN, D. ARCHBOLD MEMORIAL F
THOMASVILLE, GEORGIA


EAST TO\VER L(




Join us and find out about our:

o -
, ;"u'-. .. ... . i


*?" '^ Relocation


BOBBY


nbursement
Assistance


For more information, call 22-228-2713 or 229-228-274,....


Sunshine Express Holds First Practice


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Sunshine Express
softball team held it's first
practice session Sunday in
preparation for the upcom-
ing season opener, set for
April 6 in Lake City.
The young men were
split into two teams for the
practice and team one
squeaked by team two, 12-
11.
On team one, Frankie
Steen went four for four
with two RBIs; Eldred Jen-
nings went four for five; Joe
Andrews went three for
four with two RBIs; Wallace
Jones went three for five
with three RBIs; Reynard
Thompson went two for
five; Derrick Hills went two
for five with two RBIs; and
Shericka Parrish went two
for five with one RBI.
On team #2, Ricky Allen


went four for four with
three RBIs; Kelvin Jones,
last year's MVP, went four
for five with four RBIs; Nick
Russell went three for four;
Wilbo Ellis, Jr. went three
for four with two RBIs; Tee
Gilley went three for four;
Mario Thompson went one
for five with one RBI; and
Ronda Silpin went 0 for four.
Coach Roosevelt Jones
said he expects a good sea-
son this year and he will re-
lease the names of
Sunshine Express starters
later this week.
In related news, the
Lady Diamonds softball
team will begin practices
Sunday at the Recreation
Park. Jones said he hopes
to have all of last year's
starters returning to the
team this year.
Anyone wishing to play
on the team can contact
Jones at 342-1209.


ady Tigers Drop 2 To Stand 1-5 On The Season


Fran Hunt
-Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Lady Tigers
dropped their two most re-
cent games to stand 1-5 on
the season. Jefferson fell to
Franklin County, 13-1,
Wednesday March 5. Coach
Regina Crews said the
game was originally sched-
uled to be played on Tues-
day March 4, but was
postponed due to weather.
The Lady Tigers were
defeated by Taylor County,
20-0, Thursday March 6.


Crews said Jefferson
started out with a strong
defense until the third in-
ning. "With dark approach-
ing and rain, careless
errors an some walks put
Taylor County over the top
in scoring points.
Eight games remain in
the season, with the next
games against North
Florida Christian, 4 p.m.,
Tuesday, March 11, there;
John Paul, 4:30 p.m.,
Wednesday, March 12, here;
and Maclay, 4 p.m., Thurs-
day, March 13, here.


Split 2, Stand 3-3

putout, and one stolen baser
Stacie Brock had one at-bat and struck out; Kelli
Evans had one at-bat and was hit-by-pitch; and Vicki
Perry had one at-bat and one strikeout.
Schofill pitched the entire game anid gave up seven
hits, six walks, and struck out nine batters.
In the Monday, March 3 game against Maclay, the
Lady Warriors won, 14-1.
"We were definitely the dominant team on the field,"
said Brown. "We were hitting a lot better and our pitcher
was faster and more accurate than Maclay's pitcher was.
It was definitely our day for hits and getting around the
bases. We played some heads-up ball."
Watt went to bat on three occasions and had two sin-
gles and one run; Metcalfe had two at-bat with two walks
and two runs; and Kisamore had two at-bat, two walks,
and two runs.
Hanna had three-at-bat and one single, one triple, one
putout, two runs, and four RBI..
Kinsey had three at-bat with two singles, one sacri-
fice bunt, two runs, and one RBI.
Sorensen had three at-bat, one double, one triple, one
fly-out, and two runs.
Schofill had three at-bat with one single, one triple,
one fly-out, one RBI, and one run.
Dollar had one at-bat with one single and one run;
Revell had one at-bat and one single, one RBI, and one
run; Perry had one at-bat and one fly-out; Evans had one
at-bat and had one single on a fielder's choice; and Whit-
ney McKnight had one at-bat with a single.
Schofill pitched two-thirds of the game, tossing to ten
batters, and gave up three hits, one walk, and struck out
four batters.
Watt pitched the remainder of the game, tossing to
five batters, and giving up one walkand one hit while
striking out one at the plate.


FUND YOUR 2007 IRA WrITH

ENVISION CREDIT UNION

12 month CD
# $2,000 minimum deposit

O9 s Rollovers and transfers from
A p r* other financial institutions are
NAPY *welcome
ONAN
IRA CD Available thru April 15, 2008

j envision
c r e d i t u n i o n
ENVISIONCU.COM 942-9000

DON'T FORGET OUR NEW EXTENDED SATURDAY HOURS AT
WAL-MART SUPER CENTER LOCATIONS: 10AM-7PM
4400 W. Tennessee St 5500 Thomasville Rd 35 Mike Stewart Dr, Crawfordville
*The APR is 4.88% APY is Annual Percentage Yield and assumes daily reinvestment of principal and interest at the same rate for one year. Substantial
penalty for early withdrawal. New money only. (Funds which are current not on deposit with Envision Credit Union (ECU). After one year, this IRA CD
rolls over to become a regular IRA CD, at then current rate. A current ECU member, with IRA's at Envision Credit Union, cannot rollover their current
IRA funds into this IRA, but can make a $2000 contribution (whether a transfer from a savings or checking account with ECU) to open up this ILA.
IRA deposits are separately insured up to $250,000 per member.








Wednesday, March 12, 2008 Monticello News 9A





ARM & AGRICULTURE





Jefferson County 4-H Members Win Big t North Florida Livestock Show and Sale


Photo Submitted
Amanda Cone won the Heifer Grand Champion and the Senior Grooming Award during the
recent North Florida Livestock Show and Sale. She is being presented her award by Donny and
Mickie Salter, of Salter Livestock and Osceola Land and Title.


Photo Submitted
Allison Cone won the Reserve Grand Champion Steer, and the Junior Steer Showmanship
Award, during the North Florida Livestock Show and Sale, held last month. Allison is being pre-
sented the trophy by Donnie and Mickie Salter, of Salter Livestock and Osceola Land and Title.


Florida Livestock




Market Report


For the week ended March 06, 2008:

Feeder Steers: Medium & Large Frame No. -
200-300 lbs 123.00 175.00
300-400 lbs 119.00 152.50
400-500 lbs 108.00 135.00

Feeder Heifers: Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
200-300 Ibs 105.00 145.00
300-400 lbs 102.00 118.00
400-500 Ibs 94.00 111.00


Slaughter Cows: Lean 750-1200 lbs
85-90 percent 50.00-56.00

Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade No. 1-2
1000-21 00 Ibs 65.00-73.00


Debbie Snapp
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The North Florida
Livestock Show and Sale
was held during the week
of February 18-21, in
Madison, with more than
100 youth proudly show-
ing their pigs and steers.
Jefferson, Madison,
Hamilton, Suwannee,
and Taylor counties are
part of the North Florida
Livestock Show and Sale.
Jefferson County
winners and their cate-
gories were:
Ag Adventure 4-H
Club member Amanda
Cone won in the Grand
Champion Heifer other
registered Breeds Divi-
sion; Fourth Place 10th
Grade Showmanship;
First Place Class V
Steers; and Sixth Place
Angus Heifer.
Ag Adventure 4-H
Club member Allison
Cone won First Place -
6th Grade Showmanship;
First Place Class I
Steers; and Second Place
- Angus Heifer Class
VIIII.
Ag Adventure 4-H


Club member Josh Ro-
driguez won Angus
Heifer Third In Class
11th Grade Showmanship;
and Fifth place -
Prospect Steers Seventh
In Class.
This year's 54th An-
nual North Florida Live-
stock Show and Sale was
one of the most success-
ful events ever. Growers
and buyers are looking
forward to an even
brighter show and sale in
2009.
Alacia and Jeffery
Cone are the Adult Lead-
ers for this newly formed
Ag Adventure 4-H Club.
The club is for any youth
from the ages of five 18,
and will focus on agricul-
ture.
There are many dif-
ferent educational activi-
ties planned for this club
and its 4-H members. Ac-
tivities will promote the
understanding of how
agriculture plays a role
in every day life.
For club information
contact the club leaders
at 948-3173, or 4-H Coordi-
nator John.Lilly at 342-
0187.


TRUCKLOAD WIRE AND POSTS PRICES


2 1/2 TO 3" 6.5'
3 TO 3 1/2" 6.5'


3 1/2 TO 4" 6.5'
4 TO 5" 8'
5TO 6" 8'
6 TO 7" 8'
7 TO 8" 8'
6 1/2' STEEL POST WITH CLIPS


$ 2.55
$ 2.99
$ 3.70
$ 6.20
$ 9.50
$13.30
$17.90
$ 3.69


1047 HITENSIL 14 GAUGE FIELD FENCE 330'
5" GUACHO BARBWIRE
1x6x16 RT LUMBER


EACH
EACH
EACH
EACH
EACH GReaT suTHeRl
EACH WOOD PReRviGm
EACH
EACH
$ 99.00
$ 39.95
$ 7.89


SALES TAX NEEDS TO BE ADDED TO ALL THE ABOVE PRICES

B SOUTHERN STATES FEED


SOUTHERN STATES 12% SWEET FEED


$ 5.99 50# BAG


FERTILIZER


10-10-10 SUPER RAINBOW


$ 10.99 50# BAG


PRICES GOOD TILL MARCH 31, 2008
WHILE SUPPLY LAST

CALL FOR DELIVERY RATES

FARMERS COOPERATIVE, INC.
P.O. BOX 390 MADISON, FL 32341
PHONE: (850) 973-2269 FAX: (850) 973-3478


Di i R IECTORY





UNINSUREDD?
We have a sliding-fee program for those who
qualify at Tri-County Family Health Care.
,', 850-948-2840
TRI-COUNTY FAMILY HEALTH CARE
193 NW US 221 Greenville, FL 32331
Mon., Wed., Fri. 8am-5pm; Tues. 10am-5pm; Thurs. 10am-7pm
North Florida Medical Centers, Inc.
.. rat.


THE PRESCRIPTION FOR


Free Delivery For
Prescriptions
Q Jackson's Drug Store
166 E. Dogwood Monticello
850-997-3553 j
"i -:, -,,i ;' 'o r'^ g)' .-, *^^ii


Home
Health
Care
,Free Blood
Pressure
Check


Are You In Need Of
Chiropractic Services?

Dr. Michael A. Miller


180 S. Cherry St., Suite D
Monticello, FL 32344
OQ9n(Y 1 /Af1n


3116 Capital Circle NE, Ste.2
Tallahassee,FL 32308
0 QVIff Q Alrflf


1y/1WU ^g^VISA OJ1JOOO-
Vow excepting Blue Cross Blue Shield and most other insurances-668-
Now excepting Blue Cross Blue Shield and most other insurances


L2UU


OJU-I







1 OA M News W nd March 12, 2008---~-------~'' -


i~;


ft ft
1~I
*1~

7


N oti


SGR- EAT 2


y Here!


DEAl\, S


From boats to lures to line, reel in
everything you need to start the
season off right at these businesses,
and save big to boot!


* ~ ~ ~ a I. 4Its .


35-98303-Darl
35- H ,,23 arllIel
85-6413 u h


\ l-...- i "'-- 7
Waco 1836-12 Jon Boat w/ Mercury 9.9HP 4-Stroke engine, Side Mount
Live Well, Galvanized Trailer MSRP $5,303. Our Low Price $3,999


Highest Quality At


ST. MARKS

MARINE


Visit Our W1


463 Port LL
St. Mhrks, I
i 850-9:
I Lo(all Owi
Open: Tuesd


rhe Lowest Price!
site To See Our Complete Inventory
Sww.stmarine.com
Service Department NOW OPEN
Dr. We Service All Makes
I'Ir r & Models


;-1100


SSaturday 10AM- 6PM


Instant Credit Approval
Financing
With Very Low
Interest Rates


:1


Charters


INSHORE &
1F r qur'(rnR


,1v' Cobia & Dolphin
OFF n. IN SHORE
ith thi SPECIAL

Brand New Penn &
Shimano Fishing Equipment
Kids Welcome Fish


Cleaning Always Included
Lodging Available With or
Without Meal Preparation


MERCURYY
oA- u^ '--


Capt. John Lee Ingram
229.560.1111 Cell
www.Keaton BeachCharters.com


Polarized
Sunglasses
Tackle Boxes
Bait Buckets u} )
Life Vests J
Fishing
Tackle


c. .~ 82b


t~as~~- ~ .~I-:-- -;~aP -~II. II.r- -------------


Wednesday, March 12, 2008


10A Monticello News









Wednesday, March 12, 2008 Monticello News *11A





O OUTDOORS




Open House At Beau Turner Center On Saturday Draws Sizeable Crowd


A young girl, one of the 460 kids who participated in Satur-
day's event, tries her skill at archery.


Maxwell Carter, 10, of Tallahassee, got to sit in the FWC hel-
icopter at the open house on Saturday at the Beau Turner Youth
Conservation Center off US 19 South.

STORE HAS CLOSED

The good news is that
Gateway Furniture Specialties will continue
their Dealership in Amish Handcrafed Furniture!
Product information can be seen by visiting:

www.gatewayfurniturespecialties.com


Email to: gfswillie@afo.net
Or call: Willie Knepp at: 386-984-6250
Catalogs sent to you upon request.


Picture a future in Technical & Industrial.
With over 80 programs of study offering associate degrees, diplomas,
and technical certificates of credit, Southwest Georgia Technical
College is here to help you make your future picture-perfect.
Spring Quarter Classes Begin April 1st REGISTER TODAYI


Joslyn Dix, 12, of Jefferson County, shoots a .22 rifle under
the guidance of FWC volunteer instructor Bob Livingston.


Children got to test their casting and fishing skills at one of
the several ponds on the property. Each child received a free
fishing rod and tackle box at the end of the day, compliments of
the nonprofit group, Fish Florida.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer ..
The response to the open
house that the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) spon-
sored at the Beau Turner
Youth Conservation Center
on US 19 South on Saturday
was overwhelming, in terms
of the community turnout.
Ken Barker, FWC
statewide coordinator for the
Youth Hunting Program of
Florida, which oversaw the
event, reported Monday a
total of 728 registrants, with
460 kids participating in the
various hunting-related activ-
ities.
"We were hoping we'd
have 500 people," Barker said.
"We weren't disappointed by
any means. It was definitely a
little more than what we
thought."
He said the plan is to
make the open house an an-
nual event each spring.
The registration roster
showed that families came
from as far away as Cairo in
Georgia and Live Oaks in
Florida. The majority how-
ever, were families from Jef-
ferson County, with a fair
representation from Leon,
Madison, Taylor and other
surrounding counties.
Following the registra-
tion, the kids and their par-
ents were transported by


tractor-pulled wagons to vari-
ous locations on the 160-acre
property, where they got to
participate in archery, fishing
and shotgun, rifle and muz-
zleloading shooting. Some 75
volunteers from the FWC and
the community instructed the
kids on safety shooting prac-
tices and monitored the kids'
use of the weapons. Addition-
ally the event included dis-
plays of a helicopter and
other FWC law enforcement
equipment, as well as canine
demonstrations. Each youth
also received a free fishing
rod and tackle box as part of
the activities, compliments of
the nonprofit group, Fish
Florida.
Other groups that con-
tributed volunteers or serv-
ices to the event were the
National Wild Turkey Feder-
ation, the Future of Hunting
in Florida, Safari Club Inter-
national, and Homestead
Ministries. Additionally Den-
nis Atkinson, of Powerhouse
Plantation in Leon County,
donated a .50-caliber muzzle-
load rifle that was raffled off;
and Raymond Bass, manager
of the greater property that
encompasses the Beau
Turner Youth Conservation
Center, had his people help
with the day's preparations.
"Without their help, we
couldn't have done it," Barker
said.
Last, but certainly not
least, of course, are the con-
tributions of Beau Turner,
who donated the 160-acre
property that makes up the
youth conservation center.
Absent Turner, in fact, the
center would not be. Turner,
for example, is also donating
the materials and equipment
that are necessary for the dif-
ferent activities. His aim, it is
said, is to provide kids with
an alternative to today's neg-
ative influences, thereby
hopefully instilling in them
an appreciation of the natu-
ral world and outdoors activi-
ties. Given the opportunity,
kids will choose the right
path, appears to be the cen-
ter's governing philosophy
Although future pro-
grams at the center will
mostly focus on youths be-
tween the ages of 12 and 17,
the younger set won't be com-


Volunteer instructor Cary Clark offers 12-year-old Noah
Hampton, of Wacissa, some points on how to score a hit in the
skeet-shooting activity at Saturday's event.


Jacob Nichols Napoli, 12, of Tallahassee, takes aim with a
long rifle at the muzzleloading shooting under the watchful eye
of volunteer instructor Duane Ashe, a member of the Jefferson
Long Rifles.
Monticello News Photos by Lazaro Aleman
March 8, 2008.


pletely ignored. Barker said
the idea is to open the center
to the younger kids at least
two days a month. These,
however, will be downscaled
events what he calls "mini
open houses" at most con-
sisting of one or two activities
and a limited number of kids.
"Nothing on the scale of
Saturday's open house,"
Barker said. "These mini
open houses will require pre-
registration online. And they
will be limited to 50 or 60
kids." .
Separate and apart from
the mini open houses, mean-
while, will be the classes that
the center will begin offering
as soon as mid April. Geared
for 12 to 17-year-olds, these
classes will focus on such out-
doors skills as Olympic
archery, advanced wing
shooting and rifle shooting.
In preparation, the FWC
has already scheduled two
three-hour classes for would-
be adult volunteer instructors
on April 1 and 3. The six-hour
course, Barker explained, is a
prerequisite for NRA instruc-


tor certification, which is re-
quired for teaching shotgun,
rifle and muzzleloading
shooting. He said the two
classes will be followed by an
eight-hour class on April 5
that will lead directly to the
certification.
"We're trying to build up
the volunteer base," Barker
said, adding that this base
will serve as the foundation
for the youth teaching pro-
gram.
"We already have the
archery and fishing instruc-
tors," he said.
He added that the expec-
tation was that the website for
the program would be posted
in the coming days. Youths
and parents must go online to
register for the classes, he
said.
Returning to Saturday's
open house, Barker called it a
veritable success.
"The feedback from the
kids and the parents was pos-
itive," he said. "Of course,
you can't please everyone. But
99 percent of those who were
there had a great time."


ak N' 1) I

Performa nee Tested Bull Sale
9? PRB i (i n tlB ll1iiC


.LL
21
,20
66


Friday. A.fa-ch 21, 2008
I p.m. (EST)
Pine Ridge Simmtentals Sale Facility
Valdosta, GA
Call 912-237-0608 or 912-654-3814
VIEW THE ENTIRE CATALOG ON OUR WEISITE AT:
www.optimumbeefbul ts.com


Selling:


r oimmentai Duis
PB Black Angus Bulls
SimAngus Hybrid Bulls
Bred Heifers


www.simplyamish.com
www.vallevviewoak.com


ww.millcraft.biz


Jefferson County Seminole Club invites you to attend an


EMERITUS LUNCHEON
To Honor 50 year graduates of FSU

Thursday, March 27, 2008
11:30 am- 1:00 pm
Monticello Opera House

Speaker will be Eddie Woodward, Archivist for Heritage Protocol
Memorabilia from throughout the years of student life
at Florida State University will be on display

Public is invited ~ Tickets $15
Limited Seating ~ Call 997-3112 for tickets


S










12A Monticello News


~mm



r'~1


Wednesday, March 12, 2008


I' I 1,ii~J, *. ii --u I


FLOORING
Seller's Tile...
has got you covered
.,lj rt.l.: '. ,- . .n ,. i .I .. ri I. "
.. .. i r ..r ill 1.1

il b ,.i i.ri i ", .I


SI . .. I .
850-656-8--53


.SERVICESAND-
CO)IMPANY INC.



R"skntial

-
RE R[iGERJPVI ON
Du)lt \V l I,

Sales Service "4
Installation
Fin,,ncing A', .,ii.,iLl
MNaIterCdri'Ld & V

S 24 HOI-' i-rvice. .
514-2201
L<.(.C (i h71 io
L a i .. .C


JD Enterprises
Hionicm Re.pair and Rumodel
QuJaliti Guiaranteud!

Militar1n Police &
Fireltihtcr Di'count.!

L ..,..i i'd I-r.urJ
850-510-9681


METAL ROOFING


PRESSURE CLEANING

BURCHI-
PRESSURE
CLEANING *
SOFT WASHING
Since 1977 Free Estimates
SMART Home Sellers and
Realtors know that a CLEAN
House Sells FASTER!!
www.danburch.us
850-997-4100

APPLIANCE REPAIR
Jason's Appliance Repair
All M ',loi ppl l r c11,
Sp 850-508-li'11 O'3 1 n0
Av'lil'll e:
< .ill l .K k- ,L ul.].l nte,.-,.l


850-508-1310
Il i' .I.,ir, i:..I M ,,r n ._l. h iL


Another
Gutter Company
SEAMI LESS GUTTERS
Free Estinimate
Phone:
850-879-5745

Repairs k Malintenance,.
Cleaning & creeping

PLUMBING
Burnette
Plumbing
&

Well Service
I \ Lc i'Ill 7 1 ,n 1 t l ' ll '/ /

850-973-1404
'i1., ..... t I. _


8604*V6US 221
Greenille. FL 32331
Phone 350-948-7891 .., .,.,,,,.
Cell 850-973-7135 .. ,,, .' ,.,,. ..
Fa> 850-948-2482
e-mail
oeballreams 4msn comr



PROPERTY ENHANCEMENT


thil,. -_'l,. Iiir'. I _'t di' u l l
,' I '. T .' l ', I \l L.,_
LHi,..h i- ,. ,i:i,..
Hl IIii [


I I . i I I .
,4


*







Wednesday, March 12, 2008 Monticello News 13A



.BRIDAL UIDE


Blank and Bi


Patricia Blank and Mr. James Caleb Burnette


irnette To Marry
Miss Lauren Patricia Blank and Mr. James Cateb Burnette
are pleased to announce their engagement. o
Miss Blank is the daughter of Leslie BCank of MonticeCCo
and-MeCvin BCank of iTaCahassee. She is the granddaughter
Mr. and.Mrs. Water G. Rather of Taffahassee, Mr. and Mrs.
Thomas M. Crawford of Belf, florida, and the late Mr. andC
Mrs. C.I. Blank of TaCCahassee.
Mr. Burnette is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Randy Eflkins of
MonticeCCo and Mr. and Mrs. Biffy Burnette of Madison. He is
the grandson of Mrs. Jane -Harp and the late Mr. Thomas M.
Harp Jr. of MonticeCCo, the late Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Burnette o
Madison, and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Elkins of MonticeCCo. He
is also the great grandson of the late Mrs. Gladys 'Ward of
Monticeffo.
Lauren is a 1999 graduate of Jefferson County High School.
She is afufftime student at North florida Community College
pursuing her degree in Elementary Education.
Caleb is 1998 graduate of Aucifla Christian Academy. He
a Senior Project Manager for Burnette Construction andDe-
ve opment.
The couple's wedding wiff take place Saturday, March 15,
2008, at Dixie Plantation in Greenville, florida.


- w- -w -w i - nw- w w- -w-----


Loca


Business Directory


Call 997-3568 To Advertise Your Business


WEDDINGS PICNICS
SB-DAY PARTIES
HMAYRIDES
Misty Edge
Carriage Rides
Phone: ,352-514-7729
Insured


Quality Cleaners
"Your Custom Dry Cleaners" A
L
We Specialize in the Cleaning &
Heirlooming of Bridal Gowns ..,
28 y ea f Sewice
Monday-Friday 7:30 a.m. 8:00 p.m. Saturday 7:30 Noon
229-263-4149
101 Webster St. Quitman, GA


Lisa's
Bartenders, LLC


Call 850-321-7398
www.LisasBartenders.com
. -.. -"- ..- -_'


99










14A Monticello News


Wednesday, March 12, 2008


LASSIFIEDS &


LEGALS


SPACIOUS Newly Renovated
1/1 apartments and 2/1 Furnished,
Long & Short term available. w/AC,
Laundry, & Parking. Also have
office spaces for rent.
Call 850-212-3142
12/07,tfn,c

PRIME Downtown OFFICE
Space Cherry Street Commons.
750 Sq. Ft. $540. Month.
500 Sq. Ft. $460. Month.
Call Katrina at 510-9512
8/31,tfn,c


JEFFERSON PLACE
APTS., 1468 S. Waukee
Office 300, Monticello. 1
BR/HUD vouchers accep
997-6964 TTYL 711 Equ
Housing Opportunity.


CE
enah St.
&2
ted. 850-
aal

10/12,tfn,c


Coopers Ridge New Home Spa-
cious 1600 sq. ft. 3 Bdr./2 Ba with 2
car Garage Close to everything.
$950. Mo. Matt Robinson 942-
7250 Evenings. 1 1/14,tfn,c

Modular Home on 1/2 acre, near
JCKC, 3BR/ 2Bth, 1500 Sq.Ft.,
No smokers/no pets. Call 997-0342
2/20,22,27,29,3/5,7,12,14pd
Room For Rent
"Are You A Woman on Social
Security?" "Would you like to live
on a farm?" Enjoy the animals,
meet people, private kitchen, fresh
chicken eggs, Tv, washer & dryer.
$400 a month, security
Clearance Required
850-342-9918 After.6 p.m.
2/29, 3/5,7,12,pd
1- Room efficiency Apartment
Available March 3rd $350. mo.
Deposit and lease required.
997-6492 Leave message.
2/29,tfn,c
House on 1235 E. Pearl St. 4/br/3
BA. Central Heat and Air- Carport,
Laundry Rm. Call James Pafford at
997-2383
2/29, 3/5,7,12,14,19,21

1300+ Sq.Ft. 3 Bdr/ 2 Bth Home
located in Monticello City limits.
Sits on 1 Acre, fenced yard,
carport, work shed and tons of
storage. City utilities. No
smokers, please. Pet friendly.
$650/Month 850-933-4055.
3/7,12,14,c
(1) 3 Bdr/1-1/2 Bth. and (1) 2
Bdr/1 Bth. with Central Heat &
Air and (1) 3 Bdr/1 Bth House in
country. Phone 509-8745 Day or
997-2988 Nights.

3/7,12,c


850-997-4340
www.TimPeary.com
Selling Real Estate Since 1972
Experience can help!
Noble Subdivision bedroom 3 b3th
DW, carport and big shed 8o,900oo
Intown 2 bedroom i bath home
wood floors, high ceilings $129,900
OneAreClark Rd $2i.ooo
AncillaForest & Meadows 2.5 acres
mostly open $25,ooo
Christans Acres t.'2 MHN fireplace.
deck $73,500
Waunkeenah 14 acres $9,8oo/ac
SOLD'o'Down it c.n i ac $13q.000
Spacious near US 27 3/2 hm, pool, 2
outbuildings 2.5 ac $375,006
SOLD Springfield Church Road 5
acres wooded hillde 0,0.oo00
Curtis Side lRd 2/1 cabin on 2+acs
asking $135,ooo
Thompson Valley Rd 2.12 home -".
ac most cleared $',; .o.:o
SOLD Rainbow'sEnd 3/2hse 29.7ac
pool $379,000
Hillside Big Oaks 2.0i ac on Counrt
Road 53.460o
Great Location 3/2 home 1.56 ac, big
barn, green hse $165,ooo
Hay Spur Rd 6 -3 or 1 -3 acs planted
pines/oaks S,2.oooi'ac
MurmuringCreek 5.z2 acres, septic
tank $72,900oo
The Budd House +,1i high ceilings
great porches, $55,oo.,
Pricedto Sell! 5 hillside acres in
Aucilla Shores $50o,000
Mixed Use Property 12 acres 4
houses/ac allowed 536 s--. :/ ac
VeryPretty 5 lovely acres on paved
roa $i5,5oo per acre
Horse Fhrm 29acrs DWw/
fireplace. stables, $329,.o.o
Deal! 4/3,5 ac/fenced/2car garage/
pool/guest hse, shop pasture/ oo
pecans $365,000
Prime Connercial Property near
Pizza Hut 6.5 acs $6.:..-oo
Waukeenah Highway 27.99 ac
pasture, fenced, pond $545,000
Income Prop 3 MH-I or,4 acr.aT 4
allowed $8,5oo
'lmberland 156 ac some pines divide
by Hwy $2750/ac


Mobile Home Lot- 1 Acre Cleared
and Ready to go. Close to town.
$34,900. 942-7250
1/4,tfn,c
Credit Score 620 and up, 100% fi-
nancing avail, no PMI, no bad credit
payoff, call Pam Bowling
w/Re/Max today. @ 997-4647
3/12,tfn,c





NEED CASH ?
GOT JUNK?
GOT JUNK CARS & TRUCKS
I BUY SCRAP METALS !!
CALL 850-838-JUNK (5865)
State Certified Scales
1/9 3/28,c
HIGH QUALITY WOOD CON-
STRUCTED. Storage SHEDS
and MINI BARNS: Custom De-
signed to fit your NEEDS. Call
Josiah today at 877-597-4337.
2/20,22,27,29,3/5,7,12,14,19,21,c





FOUND Kitten with flea collar
on Clark Rd. Mostly white w/ grey-
black/spots. Loving & Sweet.
Found last week Call 997-3258
3/5,7,12,14,nc

LOST Jack Russel w/ Black col-
lar "Rowdy"all white w/ brown
head & tail. 11 pounds, REWARD
Missing since 3/2/08 997-2784 or
510-6273
3/5,tfn
FREE PUPPIES
CALL PAM @ 997-4647
3/12,tfn,c





JACKSON'S DRUG STORE -
Have you been taken off your hor-
mone replacement? See our new
menopausal products.
5/12,tfn,c
BACKHOE SERVICE:
Driveways, roads, ditches, tree and
shrub removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116, 933-
3458. 7/4tfi,c

MR. STUMP
STUMP GRINDING
509-8530 Quick Responses.
6/22, tfn,c
TRACTOR WORK
ROTARY FLAIL- BUSH
HOGGING Starting at $37.50/
Hr.
All Types of Tractor Work.
850-567-6715
11/16, tfn,c

I BUILD SHEDS, DECKS
Exterior Carpentry work,
window and door replacement.
Call Bob: 850-242-9342
10x12 Shed w/Porch Delivered
$1,500. 11/7,tfn,c
HORSEBACK RIDING
LESSONS & HORSE
BOARDING
Call for more information
850-585-1781
2/20,tfn



STOCK TRAILER covered
16' tandem tag along with center
gate, New deck, 5 new tires, new
paint, Asking $3,000. 251-2437.
997-0901.
4/1l,tfn,nc
CUSTOM DESIGN SHEDS
FOR YOUR NEEDS, YOUR
CHOICE OF DOORS, ELECTRIC
WIRING, WINDOWS, COLORS
& CONFIGURATION. CALL
JOSIAH AT 877-597-4337
2/20 thru3/21,c

Emerald Green 82" COUCH &
CHAIR, in excellent shape. $500.
Call 997-1514
3/12,14,pd
Mobile Home 1995 General
14x 52 2 Bdr/l Bth
Fair Condition. $8,500. Call 850-
879-7095 or 850-973-2353
3/7,12,14,c





BOBBIN TRACE 3842 Miller's
Bridge Rd. off Maclay Gardens Dr.
Women's and men's finer clothes &
shoes incl. Armani, Barbera, Hil-
figer, Gucci, Polo, &Tod's; Plus
Thomasville furniture;, Loomis &
Penn rods & reels; Lenox crystal;
Limoges china; Karastan rugs;
Proff. Canon equip., cameras &
lenses; TV's & More. Rain or


Shine March 15th 8 am 1 (no
early birds)
Cash, Visa, MC, NO checks
Americana Depot 562-0960

3/12,14,c


ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Apply in person at the
Monticello News at 1215 N. Jefferson St. Monticello, or fax resume to
997-3774. 2/22,rtn

Director of Government Relations and Special Projects
This part-time position serves as the North Florida Community College's
liaison to the Florida Legislature and works closely with the President to
develop NFCC's annual legislative agenda. Qualifications: Advanced de-
gree preferred plus current working knowledge of Florida Legislature pro-
cedure. For more details see our website at www.nfcc.edu.
3/5,7,12,c

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY The Jefferson County Tourist De-
velopment Council is seeking a part-time coordinator. The successful ap-
plicant will represent Jefferson County at local, regional and State
conferences. We are seeking a person with good writing, computer and
communication skills. Experience with tourism, marketing and public re-
lations is desirable. Applicants may send resume to: Gretchen Avera @
PO Box 980 Monticello, FL 32345 850-997-5007 An equal opportu-
nity employer. A drug free workplace. 3/12,17,nc

SUBWAY Now Hiring, SANDWICH MAKER ARTIST'S, Dependable
persons, part-time & full-time apply within at Subway- Hwy. 59 Lloyd.
3/12,14,c
KENNEL STAFF Kalan Kennels experience helpful but will train
right person. Must love animals, be good with public, be dependable, and
have transportation. Call 241-4073 any time. 3/12,tfn,c


1990 Ford Industrial F
with Hyd. Lift Gate. Goc
New Tires, Removable sic
$4,500. OBO 997-1582

1986 Chevy Van Automatic
Good Condition. Handicap ace
Wheel chair Lift. $2,800. Cal
1717. 3/12,14


Flat Bed We think women should hold lead-
od Cond.
de bodies ership positions in our church, and
they do. Christ Episcopal Church,
1/2,tfn, nc three blocks N of the courthouse.
Sunday Services at 8:30 and 11:00
72,000 mi. 997-4116 3/12,c
cessible w/
1 850-556-
*,19,21,pd


Legal


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 08-05-PR
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALEX R. RITTER,
Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate of ALEX R, RITTER, deceased, File
Number 08-05-PR is pending in the Circuit Court for Jefferson County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 1 Courthouse Circle,
Monticello, Florida 32344. The name and address of the personal repre-
sentative and of the personal representative's attorney are set forth
below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this notice is served who have objections that
challenge the validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal rep-
resentative, venue, or jurisdiction of this Court are required to file their
objections with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or de-
mands against decedefit's estate on whom a copy of this notice is served
within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice
must file their claims with this Court WTIHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or de-
mands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this notice is March 12, 2008.
Attorney For Personal Representative:
T. BUCKINGHAM BIRD BILL HOLLAND
P.O. Box 247 6255 53RD STREET
Monticello, FL 32345 VERO BEACH, FL 32967
850-997-3503
FL Bar ID #0006176
3/12/08, 3/19/08,C

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number: 08-05-PR
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALEX R. RITTER,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of ALEX R. RITTER, deceased, whose
date of death was December 18, 2007, is pending in the Circuit Court
for Jefferson County, Florida, Probate Division under probate file # 08-
05-PR, the address of which is 1 Courthouse Circle, Monticello, Florida
32344. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
J NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of this notice is March 12, 2008.
Attorney for Personal Representative Personal Representative
T. Buckingham Bird, Attorney at Law Bill Holland
P.O. Box 247 Monticello, Florida 32345 6255 53rd Street
| (850) 997-3503 Vero Beach, FL 32967

3/12/08, 3/19/08,c


SIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION

CITIBANK N.A. AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERV-
SICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF NOVEMBER 30, 2001 SERIES
2001-1,
Plaintiff, CASE NO.: 08-13-CA
vs. DIVISION:
SARAH MAE DEAN A/K/A SARAH M. DEAN A/K/A SARA MAE
DEAN A/K/A SARAH MAE HALL A/K/A SARAH DEAN HALL
A/K/A SARA DEAN HALL A/K/A SARA MAE DEAN HALL, et al,
Defendant(s).
/ NOTICE OF ACTION

LORETHA JACKSON
Last Known Address: 187 Tin Top Rd.
Monticello, FL 32344


Current Address:


Unknown


ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DE-
FENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST
AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS
Last Known Address: Unknown
Current Address: Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property in Jefferson County, Florida:
BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THAT CERTAIN
PARCEL OF LAND IN THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NW L/4
OR SW 1/4 OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 4 EAST,
AS DESCRIBED IN DEED BOOK "AA", PAGE 349 OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN
THENCE EAST 210 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 210 FEET,
THENCE RUN WEST 210, THENCE RUN SOUTH 210 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING ONE ACRE, MORE OR
LESS, AND BEING A PORTION OF THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF
LAND THAT WAS CONVEYED UNTO WILLIE POPPELL FROM
THE TRUSTEE I. I. FUND OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA BY DEED
DATED AUGUST 15, 1956 AND RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA, IN TRUSTEE I. I.
FUND DEED BOOK 1, PAGE 447, AND TO WHICH REFERENCE IS
HEREBY MADE.
THIS BEING THE SAME PROPERTY DEEDED TO JOE JONES AND
LAURA MAE JONES, HUSBAND AND WIFE, BY SARAH MAE
DEAN BY DEED. DATED THE 28TH DAY OF APRIL, 1964, AND OF
RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF JEFFERSON, COUNTY FLORIDA, IN OFFICIAL
RECORD BOOK 20, PAGE 9, AND TO WHICH REFERENCE IS
HEREBY MADE A/K/A 187 TIN TOP RD. MONTICELLO, FL 32344-
9435
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Al-
bertelli Law, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 777 South Harbour Is-
land Blvd., Suite 940, Tampa, FL 33602, and file the original with this
Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately there-
after; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 3 day of
March, 2008.
Clerk of the Circuit court By: Tyler Sherrod, Deputy Clerk
3/12/08. 3/19/08,c



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 08-06-CA
WELLS FARGO BANK N.A., AS TRUSTEE
FOR SASCO 2007-BCI,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CYNTHIA CLARKE A/K/A CYNTHIA LEIGH TULLY, et al,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: CYNTHIA CLARKE A/K/A CYNTHIA LEIGH TULLY
Last Known Address: 35 Azalea Avenue, Monticello, FL 32344
Also Attempted at: 3470 Bear Creek Road, Tallahassee, FL 32308
Current Residence Unknown
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CYNTHIA CLARKE A/K/A CYNTHIA
LEIGH TULLY
Last Known Address: 35 Azalea Avenue, Monticello, FL 32344
Also Attempted at: 3470 Bear Creek Road, Tallahassee, FL 32308
Current Residence Unknown

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the
following described property:

LOT 30, 31, AND 32, LONGVIEW SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK B,
PAGE 22, PUBLIC RECORDS OF JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE. 120, FT.
LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or before April 7, 2008, a date which is
within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice and file the
original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs at-
torney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the complaint.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990
(ADA), because of their disabilities, disabled persons who, need the ADA
Coordinator at Room 10, Monticello, FL 32344 or Telephone (904) 342-
0218 prior to such proceeding special accommodation to participate in
this proceeding should contact

WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 27th day of
February, 2008.


Kirk B. Reams
As Clerk of the Court


By Tyler Sherrod
As Deputy Clerk
3/5/08. 3/12/08. c.


NOTICE
Pur uant to Ch. 373., F.S., The Northwest Florida Water Management
District gives notice of receipt of an application ( 44-2008-0009G) sub-
,minied by Riley Palmer, 2678 Old Lloyd Rd., Monticello, FL 32344 to
consiruct an agricultural impoundment located in S4/TIN/R4E, Jefferson
Co For more information, comments or objections, please write to the Di-
% ition of Resource Regulation, NWFWMD, 152 Water Management Dr.,
Hjaana, FL 32333. Any objections or comments must be filed with the
Di-,m-ri by 5:00 p.m., March 28,2008.
3/12/08,c


I Atomo


I hcS ve


IPYllsl~Yf~t~PIS~!~









Wednesday, March 12, 2008



'Legals


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AN D FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORID A
CASE NO.: 08-30-CA
DIVISION:
VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., etc.
Plaintiffs,
VS.
FRED BLACKWELL, et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
,TO: Fred Blackwell Unknown Spouse of Fred Blackwell
Last Known Address Last Known Address
2992 Fred George Lane 2992 Fred George Lane
Tallahasse.e, FL Tallahassee, FL
or or
390 South Marvin St. 390 South Marvin St.
Monticello, FL 32344 Monticello, FL 32344
Travis Degrees Michael Jones Unknown Spouse of Travis D. Michael
Jones Last Known Address Last Known Address
2992 Fred George Lane 2992 Fred George Lane
Tallahassee, FL Tallahassee, FL
or or
390 South Marvin St. 390 South Marvin St.
Monticello, FL 32344 Monticello, FL 32344
Ernestine Broxie aka/Ernestine Hampton Unknown Spouse of Eineemiie
Broxie
Last Known Address Last Known Address
2992 Fred George Lane 2992 Fred George Lane
Tallahassee, FL Tallahassee, FL
or or
390 South Marvin St. 390 South Marvin St.
Monticello, FL 32344 Monticello, FL 32344
Estate of Lewis Hampton Unknown Spouse, Heirs, Children ol
Lewis Hampton
Last Known Address Last Known Address
2992 Fred George Lane 2992 Fred George Lane
Tallahassee, FL Tallahassee, FL


or
390 South Marvin St.
Monticello, FL 32344


390 South Marvin St.
Monticello, FL 32344


Montgomery Ward Credit Corporation
Last Known Address
1600 Summer Street Stamford, CT 06927
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the fol-
lowing property in Jefferson County, Florida:
Exhibit A
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a cops of ,our
written defenses, if any, to it on Lance Paul Cohen, the Plaintiffs attorney .
whose address is Cohen & Thurston, P.A., 1723 Blanding Boulevard. Suiie
102, Jacksonville, Florida 32210, within thirty (30) days from the first date
of publication of this notice, on or before April 12, 2008, and file the onrg-
inal with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plainritl'i at-
torney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition.
Dated on this 3rd day of March, 2008.


Lance Paul Cohen, Esquire
COHEN & THURSTON, P.A.
1723 Blanding Boulevard, Suite 102
Jacksonville, FL 32210
904/388-6500
Attorney for Plaintiff


Kirk B. Reams
CLERK OF THE COURT
JEFFERSON COUNTY.
By: Tyler Sherrod
Deputy Clerk


Exhibit A: Abstract of Title
Fund File Number: 46-2007-65
To all that certain real property situate, lying and being in the c.uni. or0
Jefferson, State of Florida, described as follows:
PARCEL NO. 1: THAT PORTION OF LOT NO. 16, IN THE PALMER
EASTERN ADDITION OF SAID TOWN OF MONTICELLO AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAN OF SAID ADDITION AS LAID OFF B)'
BEN DILWORTHS, ALSO KNOWN AS LOT 16 OF DILWORTH S A.D-
DITION AND DILWORTH ADDITION, WHICH IS DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS, TO-WIT: THE NORTH 3/8 OF THE EAST H AL F
OF LOT 16 OF DILWORTH'S ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF MONTI-
CELLO, FLORIDA, MEASURING APPROXIMATELY 11- FEET
.EAST AND WEST AND 75 FEET NORTH AND SOUTH.

PARCEL NO. 2: LOT 24 AND THE NORTH 20 FEET OF LOT 25 OF
BOWMAN'S ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF MONTICELLO.
FLORIDA AND ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT OF SAID A D-
DITION AS THE SAME APPEARS IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA IN DEED BOOK HH, PAGE 4-15.
AND TO WHICH REFERENCE IS HEREBY EXPRESSLY MADE
SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN JEFFERSON COUNTY, FL OR I DA

PARCEL NO. 3: 1/2 UNDIVIDED INTEREST IN THE SOUTH s.I
FEET OF LOT NO. 25 OF BOWMAN'S ADDITION TO THE TOWN
OF MONTICELLO, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT
OF SAID ADDITION AS RECORDED IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA IN DEED BOOK HH, PAGE 4S5
AND TO WHICH REFERENCE IS HEREBY EXPRESSLY MA DE
TOGETHER WITH 2005 CLAYTON MOBILE HOME, 72 X 32 manu-
factured home, Serial No.: WHC014178GAAB
3/12/08, 3/19,200.S.c




The Public is invited to
Jefferson Democratic Party
4th Annual

ST. PATRICK'S DAY DINNER
Gerry Hall at Christ Episcopal Church
425 N. Cherry St., Monticello
7:00 P.M., Thursday, March 13, 2008

Special Guest: Hon. Dave Aronberg
State Senator, Senate Minority Whip
Meet Local and State Candidates

Dress: CASUAL Menu: TRADITIONAL IRISH DISHES
Suggested Donation: $10 per person
Call 997-2863 for information.

HOST COMMITTEE: Max Bilinski, Cissy Boyd,
Gladys Roann, Jan Simmons, Ron Cichon, Denise
Vogelgesang, Julie Conley, Eleanor Hawkins
DON'T FORGET TO WEAR GREEN
AND BRING A BOOK!
The Jefferson County Democratic Party is sponsoring a book
sale to Benefit the County Library on Saturday, April 26.
Paid for by the Jefferson Co. Dem. Exec. Comm.
Not authorized by any candidate or candidate's committee


A - 1 NT-1r-A


IVonticello iNews 13A


Recent ARC Art Activities


Photo Submitted
Photo Subm~itted Composite, designs with craypas and paint during the month
ARC group painting at the center, under the instruction of Alice of February at the ARC center, with ARC consumers. Projects are
Cappa. From left to right are Douglas Miner, Barbara Moore, Derrick taught by local fiber artist Alice Cappa, the creative ideas and tal-
Sneed, Karen Lane, and Shirley Williams. ents are those of the consumers.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Jefferson County ARC
consumers receive art
ideas from the creative
talents of Fiber Artist
Alice Cappa at the ARC
center, in Monticello.
Art activities provide
a wealth of creative expe-
rience with color, texture,
and imagery, and a sense
of personal success for
the clients of the ARC
center.
Her goals focus on
several aspects of the pro-
gram: increasing the per-
ception and awareness of
color, physical hand-eye


coordination and dexter-
ity, and the people-skills
of cooperation and com-
munication about their
work.
Activities included ex-
periencing the loom with
colorful yarns, tie-dying
scarves and batik pillow-
cases, and creating bright'
table centerpieces with
paint and craypas.
Some of the activities are
group displays and some
are individual take-home
projects, such as the
scarves and pillowcases
that provide an ongoing
memento of creative
achievement.
In the three weeks of


each program several
media are used, from the
colorful blending of cool-
ades, to the complex
wax/dye process of batik.
Subject matter is also
coordinated to help ad-
vance other aspects of
work outside of the art
sessions.
Imagination and visu-
alization skills are en-
couraged, a valuable
stretch for minds to reach
beyond the room where
the regulars spend so
much of their time.
Remembering a visit
to a lake, the sea, or see-
ing an aquarium led to
the focus on the designs


17th Annual Tallahassee Jazz & Blues Festival


Tallahassee, FL --
Swing on in to the Talla-
hassee Museum with your
dancing shoes and boogie
to the blues on March 15
and 16 at the 17th Annual
Tallahassee Jazz & Blues
Festival, presented by En-
vision Credit Union!
From 11 a'.m. to'5 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday
enjoy the best live jazz,
blues, Dixieland, Zydeco
and more from the area's
finest local musicians.
Bring your chairs, blan-
kets and children for this
fun-filled, family day on
the beautiful grounds of
the Tallahassee Museum.
The 2008 Tallahassee
Jazz & Blues Festival
lineup:
Saturday, March 15
11 a.m.
Isom at the Organ
12 Noon Royal Gar-
den Dixieland Band
1 p.m. Thursday
Night Music Club
2 p.m. Quanta
3 p.m. Brett Well-
man & Mike Palecki
4 p.m. Bogazedi
Sunday, March 16
12 Noon Tallahas-
see Swing
1 p.m. Roadhouse
2 p.m. The Con-
tenders
3p.m. Zydeco
Zoo
4 p.m. A C M E
Rhythm & Blues
Tallahassee Jazz &
Blues Festival admission
is only $9 adults, $8.50 sen-
iors (65+) and college stu-
dents (with valid ID) and
$6.00 children (4-15). Festi-
val admission is free for
Museum members and
children 3 and under.
Everyone gets in for HALF
PRICE on Sunday, March
16 from 11 a.m. until noon!
Activities for the
whole family abound
throughout the grounds
all weekend long. Catch in-
terpreters on the farm and
Bellevue, and be sure to
create a make-and-take
craft at the Saturday Dis-
covery Table. And as al-
ways, our new playground
offers the best hang out for
children of all ages!


Also, enjoy a truly spe-
cial treat with the opportu-
nity to see museum
curatorial activities with
our new exhibit Curators
in Action! Stop by and
view these "backstage"
museum activities usually
conducted out of sight be-
hind locked doors.
Get your Saturday
morning started off right
before the Jazz & Blues be-
gins! The early bird gets
the eggs...and sausage,
grits, pancakes, coffee and
juice! Saturday, March 15
from 7 to 11 a.m. the Talla-
hassee Museum presents
the annual 'all you can eat'
Pioneer Breakfast. Each
year the Museum's Board
of Trustees prepares and
cooks more than 1800 eggs,
300 pounds of sausage, 70
pounds of grits, 120
pounds of pancakes, 40 gal-
lons of orange juice and
more for your eating pleas-
ure. Tickets are $7 for
adults and $5 for children
(14 and under).
Sponsors for the 17th
Annual Tallahassee Jazz &
Blues Festival presented
by Envision Credit Union
are the Leon County
Tourist Development
Council, Budget Printing,
Comcast, Lamar Outdoor
Advertising, RuppShirts,
Jim Gray Designs, Smooth
Jazz 97.9 and Tri-Eagle
Sales.
Sponsors for Pioneer
Breakfast are Community
Coffee "The Official Coffee
of Pioneer Breakfast",
Register's "The Official
Sausage of Pioneer Break-
fast", Gramling's, Peter
Brown Construction,
Rippee Construction,
Talquin Electric Coopera-
tive and Westwood Animal
Hospital.
As a not-for-profit, fi-
nancial cooperative, Envi-
sion Credit Union is owned
by its 33,000 members who
enjoy the convenience of
eight financial centers and
24-hour, online access to
their accounts. With its
roots in the educational
community, Envision
Credit Union is proud to
support local teachers and
administrators who daily
accept the responsibility
of teaching the next gener-


WE TAKE THE
DJt14rS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


ation.
The Tallahassee Mu-
seum, celebrating 50 years
of creating memories and
enriching lives.
The Tallahassee Mu-
seum is a 52-acre Museum
located in SW Tallahassee
on beautiful Lake Bradford
(3945 Museum Drive) where
history, nature, and wildlife
are intertwined to tell an
intriguing story about
Florida's natural and cul-
tural history. This unique
Museum, 1880s farmstead,
historical buildings, natu-
ral habitat zoo and scenic
grounds provides hands-on
learning and entertainment
for all ages. The Museum is
open Monday through Sat-
urday from 9:00 AM until
5:00 PM and Sundays from
12:30 PM until 5:00 PM. Ad-
missiQn Fees: $9/Adults,
$8.50/Seniors (65+) & Col-
lege Students (with valid
ID); $6.00/Children (4-15);
and free for children 3 and
under. ADMISSION IS
FREE FOR MEMBERS. For
more information: (850) 575-
8684 or www.tallahasseemu-
seum.org


of brilliantly hued fish.
Clients experimented
with blending colors and
also the "mood" that col-
ors bring to their rooms,
their clothes, and the ob-
jects around them.
Response to this pro-
gram is enthusiastic and
clients appreciate having
the chance to create some-
thing personal for them-
selves.
Cappa offers her tal-
ents, and a selection of
art activities, to other
groups, all ages, and
also field trips to see the
lambs. Contact her at
www.acappa.com or 997-
5505.


4-H Fashion


Revue

DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The Jefferson County
4-H Fashion Revue will be
held 6 p.m. on Thursday,
March, 20 at the Monti-.
cello Opera House.
4-H members must be
at the location at 5:35 p.m.
4-H members are wel-
come to model a garment
in the Fashion Revue if
the garment has been
made by the 4-Her within
this last year.
Garments, including
shorts, slacks, pajamas,
vests, skirts, dresses, and
the like, will be judged for
construction as well as fit
and suitability, and must
be made by the 4-H mem-
ber herself/himself..
Garments must be at
the Extension Office by 5
p.m. Friday, March 14.
Five Juniors, five In-
termediates, and five Sen-
iors will be representing
the county at the upcom-
ing District Events.


Sponsored By:


Oramling',, Inc.
Npter Brown
Conmtucrion, Inc
Ripped Comitnmcion, Inc.


.. ,, I
Community Cofe Company
Fig'tetr's Meat Company


Talquin Electric Cooperatiw, Inc.
ce"^vy


Sponsored By:

1.EON COUNTY

Budget Printing RuppShir
Comc-at Tn-Eagle Sales


LL aaha3ee
5g T Museum
CREATING MEMORIES & ENRICHING LIVES
Located in SW Tallahassee on Lake Bradford
at 3945 Museum Drive
(850) 575-8684 *www.tallahasseemuseum.org


One Weekend-
Two Grea Events


IDUHAM BODY ~Sl'
100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work Frame Straightening
FREE ESTIMATES INSURANCE WORK WELCOME

1630 E. Jackson St. Thomasville, GA
(located behind Langdale Auto Mall)
229-226-2077


All You Can Eat! '
Eggs, Sausage, Grits,
Puncakes, Coffee& Juice
$7Adultsss cIlh-irn(14and lundei-








16A Mont-icllo News


Wednesday, March 12, 2008


JES Holds Black History Program






DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
-\ ~Fourth grade Social Studies students at Jefferson \j
SElementary School held a Famous People in History \
and related programs in recognition of Black History -
The programs were held in the school media cen- i
ter and library during the week of Feb. 25.
Parents, family members, and friends were invited
to the school to attend one or more of the perform-
ances, and to walk down the "Hall of History" to view
Monticello News Photo by Debbie Snapp February 26, 20- 8 the life-sized art projects the children created. Monticello News Photo by Debbie Snapp February 26,200
Monticell s Photo by Debbi Fchers includedebruary 26, in the programs Hillary Clinton campaigned during the Famous People i
JES 4-th grade students Lashawn Ghee and Shamia Ford wel- Fourth grade teachers included the programs tory program at JES during Black History Month. When 4
come all to view the Hall of History during Black History Month. and projects were Linda Butler, Nancy Whitty, Nikki grade student Carlie Barber was asked if she thought she would
The walls were decorated with life-sized portraits of important Bradley, and Gerri Clark. win the 2009 Presidency her comment to the audience question


8
n
h
d


was "I sure hope so."

71 :'FiKTT',1't


IlUIIIIllUIIU IiUW5 rilUlU uy UeL uUl illapp lJ I uuailly u. .uuU .: ..
JES 4th grade student John Scott Norris acts Monticello News Photo by Debbie Snapp February 26, 2008
out the part of Thomas Jefferson, the third pres-
ident of the United States of America, during a Fourth grade students portray Ray Charles, Tina Turner, and Malcolm X during their
Famous People in History performance in recog- Famous People in History program a part of Black History Month at the JES. From left
nition of Black History Month. to right: Michael Mathis, Delondra Nealy, and Norman Mack.


Capital Health Plan Proudly Presents


THE




SENIOR
A monthly outreach program for seniors who want to learn more about
creating and maintaining healthy, happy, and active lifestyles.
Join us Thursday, March 20, at 10:30 a.m.
at the Monticello Opera House
(185 W. Washington Street, Monticello, FL)
Featuring

Wellness Works
Practice Good Health Habits -
Presented by: Tequila Hagan, BSES, MSM
Hosted by: Anna Johnson-Riedel
Exhibitors will be present before and after the program & lunch.


Tequila Hagan is the Capital Health Plan
Wellness Program Coordinator.


Anna is one of the most familiar faces in
Tallahassee as the former morning host
for WCTV's "Good Morning Show."


Monticello News Photo by Debbie Snapp February 26, 2008
Fourth grade student Althea Gibson poses
as tennis great D'Neja Williams, in the Hall of His-
tory at the JES.


It's Medicare Made Easy by the local
health plan you have known and trusted
for more than 25 years.
Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage plans offer
Part A, Part B, and Part D (prescription drug) coverage,
PLUS more benefits than original Medicare, including:
* Routine checkups and preventive care
* Fitness center reimbursement*
* Routine eye exams
* Eyeglasses*
* Health education programs and classes
* Hearing exams
* 24 hour health care professional hotline
* Option for unlimited generic prescription drug
coverage (no coverage gap for generics)


Call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512
to RSVP or for more information.
(TTY/TDD: 850-383-3534 or 1-800-955-8771)
8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week
or visit us at: www.capitalhealth.com/medicare


Come out and join our group, meet new friends,
participate, and become a Savvy Senior.
Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to 850-523-7333.


Capital Health
P L A N


Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare
contract. If you have questions, please call
Member Services seven days a week, 8:00 a.m. to
8:00 p.m., at 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512
(TTY/TTD 850-383-3534 or 1-800-955-8771).


Capital Health
P L A N

S a Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association
Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For
accommodations of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call the
numbers above. A sales representative will be present with information and
applications. *Limitations and restrictions apply.
Benefits may change on January 1,2009 H5938 2008 0907 024 100107.


historical figures, painted by the students.
I-- ________, ,1~




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs