Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00193
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: February 13, 2008
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00193
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text
















ON ICELLO


NEWS


140th Year No. 7 Wednesday, February 13, 2008 50 46 + 40
S S


Lloyd Racetrack: -




Is It Really Dead?
._Y,


Monticello News rnoto Dy Lazaro Aleman, jan. 17, zuue
Attorney Mark Dunbar, spokesman for the
Jefferson Downs racetrack, addresses Planning
Attorney Scott Shirley during the Jan. 17, 2008,
public hearing on the facility. Shirley, with his
back to the camera, represents the county on
planning and zoning issues.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
The issue of the Jefferson Downs racetrack
appeared to have been settled on Jan. 17, when
the County Commission voted 4-1 to reject the
controversial facility.
Or was it really settled?
For weeks, rumors have been circulating of
possible appeals and lawsuits being filed by the
individuals associated with the rejected enter-
prise. Now, a local resident has asked commis-
sioners to reconsider their decision.
On Thursday, Feb. 7, Dick Bailar approached
the County Commission and requested that the
board reconsider its Jan. 17 vote to deny the race-
track's application. In making his request, Bailar
made the point that if one or more of the com-
missioners who had voted against the facility
wished it, the issue could be revisited, presum-
ably at the board's next evening meeting on Feb.
21.
The request was unusual on several levels.
First, it came at the very conclusion of the
See HORSETRACK, Page 2A


Monticello Woman Dies In Single-Vehicle Crash


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
A Monticello woman died
in an early morning crash
Saturday in Leon County.
The Leon County Sher-
iff's Office reports that at


6:50 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 9,
Toni Deloris .JenJkins-
Flavien, 31, of 4081 Old Lloyd,
Road, was driving a 2007 Toy-
ota westbound on Buck Lake
Road, three miles east of Tal-
lahassee.
Jenkins-Flavien lost con-


trol of the vehicle on a curve
..anudthe.vehicle struck a util-
ity pole, rolled over and
came to a final rest in the
ditch.
She was pronounced
dead at the scene and she
was wearing a seat belt.


Monticello News Photo by Fran Hunt, Feb. 8, 2008
Superintendent Phil Barker, left, congratulates Johnny Jack-
son as District Employee of the Year and presents him with a
Plaque of Recognition and a basket full of snack items.


Johnny Jackson Named


District Employee Of Year


RAY CICHON
Monticello News
Managing Editor
Johnny Jackson, District
Maintenance Specialist II,
who has worked for the school
system for 20 years was named
District Employee of the Year
Friday morning, Feb. 8.
To keep his selection a sur-
prise, Jackson received an
"emergency" phone call to
come out to the District Office
to repair a broken water main.
When Jackson arrived,
dressed in rubber boots and
related gear, and ready to re-


pair the reported water prob-
lem, he was greeted by Super-
intendent Phil Barker, and
District staff who congratu-
lated Jackson on his selection
as District Employee of the
Year.
Barker presented Jackson
with a plaque of recognition,
balloons, and a "goody"
wicker basket, consisting of a
variety of snacks and related
items.
His superiors note that
Jackson is an excellent exam-
ple of an outstanding em-
See JACKSON, Page 2A


Issue of City

Charging For

Parades Still

Reverberating

LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
The issue of whether com-
munity groups that sponsor
festivals
and parades
should have
to pay the
city for the
overtime
and other
costs that it
incurs in
the moni-
toring of
such events
Mayor continues
Gerrold Austin reverberat-
ing.
Despite two previous
council discussions on the
issue, a workshop on Jan. 11
between city officials and
some of the parade principals,
and yet another council dis-
cussion on the matter Tues-
day night, Feb. 5, the issue
remains unresolved.
Mayor Gerrold Austin has
now scheduled what he says
will be a final workshop on the
issue at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb.
26, in City Hall. Invited to the
discussion will be representa-
tives of the Martin Luther
See PARADES, Page 2A


From left,
Aimee
Love,
County-
wide
Spelling
Bee win-
ner,
Timmy
Burrus,
first
runner-up,
Sarah
Boland,
second
runner-up.


Photo Submitted

Love Wins Countywide


Spelling Bee At ACA
FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Aimee Love, a sixth grader at ACA, won the Countywide
Spelling Bee hosted at the school.
Love was named the winner after correctly spelling the
word "mascara". Fifth grader Timmy Burrus was the first run-
ner up and seventh grader Sarah Boland, also of ACA, was the
second runner up.
Spelling Bee participants included ten ACA and two Jeffer-
son Elementary School students from grades four to eight.
Those spellers included fourth graders Takaya Broxie (JES),
Savannah Jenkins (ACA), Felix Serna (JES), and Tomas Swick-
ley (ACA); fifth graders, Burrus (ACA) and Hunter Handley
(ACA); sixth graders Love, and Christina Reams; seventh
graders Boland, and Kaley Love; and eighth graders Corey Bur-
rus and Tori Self.
Serving as judges for the event were County Judge Robert
Plaines and Jefferson District Schools School Board member
Shirley Washington. Debbie Stephens introduced the partici-
pants and read the rules for the competition and Carolyn
See SPELLING BEE, Page 2A


City Ready To Take


1st Step In Wastewater


Reuse Project


LAZARO ALEMAN
Monticello News
Senior Staff Writer
City officials on Feb. 20
will likely be awarding a $1
million plus contract to a Tal-
lahassee-based company for
phase 1 of the much vaunted
reuse project at the sewage
treatment plant.
Engineer Joe Miller, of
George & Associates Consult-
ing Engineers, informed the
City Council on Tuesday Feb.
5, that the city had received
six bids on the project, which
entails installing new head-
works at the sewage treatment
plant off Mamie Scott Drive.
He said the bids ranged from
$1,039,249 to $1,483,759.
Miller, who is overseeing
the project on behalf of the
city, advised that the apparent
low bidder was Allen's Exca-
vation, Inc., of Tallahassee.
Before the council awar-
ded the contract, however,
George & Associates wanted
to make sure that Allen's was
capable of doing the job,
Miller said.
"We have written a letter
to Allen's Excavation, request-
ing additional information on


their experience related to the
type of work advertised for
the project," Miller said. "We
have required them to respond
by (tomorrow)., Upon receipt
of the additional information,
George & Associates will
make a recommendation to
the City Council concerning
the award of the project."
The council scheduled a
workshop for 5:30 p.m.,
Wednesday, Feb. 20, to decide
the issue.
City Manager Steve
Wingate explained Monday
that the head-works project
will ensure that the waste-
water coming into the treat-
ment plant is not loaded with
debris and other inappropri-
ate matter. He said that
screens and other mechanical
features on the head-works are
designed to remove and sepa-
rate the incoming matter. In a
word, the project will make
the plant more efficient,
Wingate said.
He added that ultimately,
the head-works project will
serve as the first step in what
is hoped will be the construc-
See WASTEWATER,
Page 2A


2 Sections, 24 Pages
Around Jefferson Sports 9A
County 4-6A Spiritual
Classifieds 10A Pathways Section B
Legals 11A Valentine's Day 12A
School 8A Viewpoints 2-3A


golw


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"









2A Monticello News Wednesday, February, 2008






VIEWPOINTS &PINIONS


Letters to the Editor are typed word for word, comma for comma, as sent to this newspaper.


Writer Recognizes Community Partner


Dear Editor:
I would like to recognize the unselfish and caring
way that Big Bend Transit, a non-profit corporation, has
recently supported efforts to reduce infant mortality in
Jefferson County.
The Florida Department of Health and Floria A&M
University sponsored a "Summit to Reduce Black Infant
Deaths," on Feb. 2, at the FAMU College of Pharmacy.
The summit included a wide range of topics and strate-
gies for members of our community to utilize, to reduce
infant mortality.
Big Bend Transit provided a bus, at no cost, to assist


with the participation from Jefferson County, since
transportation is frequently a problem.
The event was a wonderful success, with more than
30 women attending from Jefferson Madison, and Taylor
counties. Thanks to Big Bend Transit for making atten-
dance by women from Jefferson County possible, and for
showing their support and concern for Jefferson
County.
Sincerely,
George Hinchliffe
Healhy Start
Executive Director


Opera Board Thanks All For Support


Dear Editor:
The Board of Directors and the "New Year's Eve
Committee" thank Jefferson County friends and neigh-
bors for their generous support of the Fundraiser for
the Opera House. Through their participation and
many volunteer hours, the event was successful in rais-
ing almost $8,000 for improvements in this, one of our
most valuable historic treasures.
In depending entirely on private contributions and
a few grants, large capital and major maintenance proj-
ects fall sorely behind. After years of leaking and before
the new roof was installed, the beautiful ceiling in the
auditorium had suffered considerable water damage. It
is a top priority to be repaired and work will begin soon
Special thanks for their contributions go to Jackie
and Steve Andris, Sally and Fred Beshears, John and


HORSETRACK


meeting, when the chair-
man typically asks if any-
one in the audience wants
to address the board before
its adjournment. Bailar
approached the podium
visibly uncomfortable and
expressed as much, saying
he didn't quite know how
to state his case.
He made the point that
as a member of the
Jefferson Legislative
Committee, which lobbies
the Legislature on behalf
of the county, and a mem-
ber of the Jefferson
Utilities Committee,
which is trying to bring
sewer infrastructure to the
Lloyd interchange area, he
had purposely stayed out
of the racetrack controver-
sy, not wanting to politi-
cize the issue.
But he was concerned
that by rejecting the race-
track, county officials
were sending a message to
the entrepreneurial com-
munity that commercial
activity was not wanted at
the interchange, he said.
He also couldn't help but
wonder what impact such
a message would have on
the sewer project that he
and other in the legislative
and utilities committees
were working so hard to
bring to the interchange,
he said.
Bailar was careful in
his choice of words, possi-
bly saying much between
the lines and in the pauses.
Another concern, he pro-
ceeded to state circum-


spectly, was that the race-
track application had
essentially been for con-
sideration of impervious
surfaces and other such
technical matters, yet its
rejection had been based
on unrelated issues.
"I'm fearful of litiga-
tion," Bailar said, without
elaborating.
He reiterated that if a
person who had, voted for
rejection asked for the
issue to be reconsidered, it
could be reconsidered.
Commissioner Felix
"Skeet" Joyner responded
firmly that he had no prob-
lem with his vote.
"I stand by my deci-
sion," Joyner said.
Commissioners Danny
Monroe and J. N. "Junior"
Tuten, who also voted
against the racetrack, like-
wise reaffirmed their
votes.
"I thought long and
hard about my vote,"
Monroe said. "I did what I
thought was best for the
county."
Tuten was more elabo-
rate in his response.
"I too voted my heart
and soul," Tuten said. "I
felt very strongly that I
was misled when it
became apparent during
the meeting that they
(racetrack promoters) had
not intended doing what
they had represented to
me. I told them they
shouldn't try to smoke-
screen members of this
board or of the Planning


MONTICELLO


NEWS

Pub'r, h K iN-r, |;r,,IhL,.1 I ,:-,o,, ;,l, ., n
P u b lish h r;O v .w re r r,.. ,' , L, E. ... .... ,.., ,, ;1.-.,, , r",-
RAY CICHON CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT
Managing Editor Subscription Rates:
Florida $45 per year
S :'..' ALEMAN II | .J.J
S i'ii.:.r Si.ll W riter
P.O. Box 428
1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, Florida 32345
850-997-3568
Fax: 850-997-3774

E-mail: monticellonews@embarqmail.com
Established 1964
A weekly newspaper [USPS 361-620] designed for the express reading
pleasures of the people of its circulation area, be they past, present or future res-
idents.
Published weekly by ECB Publishing, Inc., 1215 North Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL 32344. Periodicals postage PAID at the Post Office in
Monticello, Florida 32344.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to MONTICELLO NEWS, P.O.
Box 428, Monticello, FL 32345.
This newspaper reserves the right to reject any advertisement, news mat-
ter, or subscriptions that, in the opinion of the management, will not be for the
best interest of the county and/or the owners of this newspaper, and to investi-
gate any advertisement submitted.
All photos given to EC3 P',i'., i,,,, I,,. if.. i.i l iii i n this newspaper must
be picked up no later (han 6 months from the date they are dropped off. ECB
Publishing, Inc. will not be responsible for photos beyond said deadline.


Barbara Culbreath, Melanie Mays, Gretchen Avera,
Denise Vogelgesang, Carrie Ann Tellefsen and family
members, Lisa Reasoner, Merle Love, Marghuerite
Bulloch, Claudette McRae, Todd Randell, Linda and
Jack Williams, Jan and Kent Rickey, Eleanor and John
Hawkins, Ron Cichon, Kathleen Osgood, Carol and
David Bynum, Helen Love, Brad Richardson, Bob and
Melinda Copper, Bill and Lissa Moon, Jim Ward, Hines
Boyd, and Bud Wheeler. /
Plans are underway for another spectacular New
Year's Eve event. It will surely be a sellout, so purchase
tickets early! Thanks again.
Sincerely,
Monticello Opera Board
and Committee Members


cont from Page 1A


Commission. They fell
way short, not even com-
ing close, to being above-
board or totally honest. If
I'm misled and find it out,
you won't get my support."
Tellingly, Tuten men-
tioned that he too had been
contacted, presumably by
members of the rejected
party, and asked if he
would reconsider the
issue. Apparently too, pos-
sible. concessions were
mentioned in the conver-
sation.
"'If they wanted to
make concessions, they
should have done it at the
meeting," Tuten said in
allusion to the conversa-
tion.
Curiously, Comm-
issioner Eugene Hall
remained silent the only
one of the four commis-
sioners to vote against the
racetrack who did not reaf-
firm his vote.
Curious too was the
presence of the court
reporter, who had sat
throughout the meeting
without making any nota-
tions. As soon as Bailar
began speaking, however,
she rapidly began record-
ing the discussion, as if
she had been awaiting pre-
cisely such a development.
Following the meet-
ing's adjournment, she left
without speaking a word
to anyone.
Who did she represent?
Joyner said he didn't
know, even though she
had been sitting near the
head of the commission-
ers' table and next to the
chief deputy clerk
throughout the meeting.
He expressed a little sur-
prise and confusion with
Bailar's request and the
meaning of the court
reporter's presence.
It will be interesting to
see if the issue resurfaces
at the 6 p.m. meeting of the
County Commission on
Feb. 21.


Spelling Bee
cont from Page 1A

Wright served as word pro-
nouncer for the evening.
Capital City Bank of
Monticello presented tro-
phies to the top three win-
ners and Farmers and
Merchants Bank presented
Spelling Bee winners with
$100, $50, and $25 respective-
ly, so winners could open
savings accounts in their
names at the bank.
Love will go on to com-
pete in the Big Bend
Regional Spelling Bee, 1 p.m.,
Feb. 23 at the WFSU-TV stu-
dio in Tallahassee. The
Tallahassee Democrat will
send the regional winner and
one parent to Washington
DC for the National Spelling
Bee in June.


Emerald Kinsley, Publisher


Happy Valentine's Day

With Valentine's Day right around the corner, the
smell of love fills the air. Whether it's love for your
spouse, your children, or your parents everyone has
someone that they can share a small token of love with.
Even though many people feel that holidays were
invented by the retail industry of the world, we still all
go rush out and buy something special for that "special
someone."
It's amazing how even the. smallest token of
love/appreciation can make someone feel. Everyone has
the desire, deep down inside, to feel loved and appreciat-
ed. It's a "need" that God planted in us when he made
Adam and Eve.
A simple gesture, sometimes, is all it takes to bring a
smile to someone's face. A simple card or a box of candy
could truly make someone's day.
As we go around in this crazy world/life of
ours.... sometimes it's easy to forget about everyone else
but ourselves. It is so easy to get wrapped up in our own
feelings and in our own problems. Valentine's Day is
one day that is made to step back and think of someone
else.
I encourage every one of you to find someone to send
something special to. Try to think of someone that
might not get a gift from someone else.....your neighbor,
a co-worker, a friend, or the widow down the street.
What if the only thing that they get, is your gift? Imagine
the smile on their face!
Isn't that what love is all about?
Until then..... I'll see you around the town.


cont from Page 1A


Where exactly were these discre-
tionary funds to be found? Vogelgesang
asked.
Austin identified them as the funds
that the city dispersed annually to such
groups as the Economic Development
Council (EDC) and the Main Street
Program. In his view, the parades were as
much a part of economic development as
the EDC or Main Street, he said.
Vogelgesang agreed that the funds
that the city gave to organizations such as
the EDC and others were indeed discre-
tionary. But he made the point that these
would be the first expenses that he would
consider cutting in the event of a budget-
ary crunch. And a budgetary crunch was
certainly a possibility now that Florida
voters had approved Amendment One, he
said. Among other things, Amendment
One cuts property taxes and generally
reduces the ability of local governments
to generate tax revenues.
Police Chief Fred Mosley, for his part,
offered that covering special events such
as parades entailed more than simply
monitoring the procession. A lot of plan-
ning and preparations had to go into such
events before and after the actual affair,
he said.
In the end, Austin insisted that more
public input was needed, especially from
the organizers of such events.
"These events are part of our histo-
ry," Austin said. "We need to look at this
carefully and not make a hasty decision.
We need more public input."
Charles Parrish, president of the
Jefferson County Branch of the NAACP,
sparked the review of the city's policy
when he challenged its application rela-
tive to the annual Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. parade on Jan. .21. He questioned
why citizens and taxpayers should have
to pay for what was essentially a public
service.
The city started the practice of charg-
ing for parades and other special events
to cover its cost about three years ago.
Before that, the city's coverage was free.


cont from Page 1A


what needs to be done and does it. He is a
kind person and gets along with every-
one, and enjoys the respect of his col-
leagues.
Instructor Kathryn Jones said of
Jackson:
"When I bought my home, it was in
need of repair and when I asked around
for someone reliable, I was referred to
Jackson. Not only did he repair what was
needed, but when a pipe broke under the
house late at night, he came over to fix it."
There has never been a project that he
was unable to accomplish and he always
charges less than what he could get.
Anyone who knows Jackson has only
the highest praise for him and his quality
work, as well as for the pride he takes in
what he does.


cont from Page 1A


P



PARADE


King and Watermelon Festival parades,
as well as other interested parties. The
discussion will revolve around whether
the city should charge a fee, and if so,
what the amount should be.
On Feb. 5, Councilman Tom
Vogelgesang pushed for continuation of
the fee, based on the argument that cover-
ing the events represented an actual cost
to the city.
"The fees are based on actual costs,"
Vogelgesang said. "They are based, on
three years of experience."
But rather than doing it as in the past,
where the city charged parade organizers
an estimated fee upfront and then refund-
ed a part of the amount or required addi-
tional money after the fact, when 'the
actual cost of the event was known,
Vogelgesang argued that the city should
establish a set fee upfront.
He suggested that the fee should be
sufficient to recover the city's core costs
for covering the event, but not so much
that it would prove burdensome to the
events' organizers. He recommended a fee
between $300 and $700, depending on the
nature ahd length of the event. For exam-
ple, parades that required the closing of
federal highways such as US 19 and 90
were more complicated and required
greater city manpower and equipment
than parades that affected only local
streets, and the fee should reflect the dif-
ference, he said.
Mayor Gerrold Austin, however, was
of a different opinion. He argued that
events such as the Martin Luther King Jr.
and Watermelon Festival celebrations
were historic and economic development
events that gave identity to the communi-
ty, attracted visitors from near and far,
and generally generated monies for local
businesses.
Austin suggested that the city use dis-
cretionary funds to pay for the overtime
of the police officers and other city
employees who worked the extra hours to
cover the events, as "these parades are
bringing money into the community."


JACKSON


ployee, who works hard and never leaves
a job until it is completed. He always fol-
lows up to be sure things are operating
smoothly. He is energetic and committed
to getting the job done properly.
I He illustrated this when after accept-
ing his congratulations and gifts, he
quipped: "It's time for me to get back to
work."
Not only does he perform the tasks.
assigned to him, but he is always willing
to help his co-workers complete their
assigned tasks. He is not a clock watcher,
and has often sacrificed his lunch break
and other break times, in order to com-
plete a critical job.
Jackson is willing to work after hours
if need be, and does not stand around
waiting to be told what to do. He sees


WASTEWATER


tion of a new facility. That
construction, however,
will be far down the line,
he said.
More. immediate, the
head-works will facilitate


phase 2 of the reuse proj-
ect by assuring that the
effluence leaving the
plant meets the appropri-
ate environmental stan-
dards. The plan is to


pump about a million gal-
lons of effluence a day to
Simpson's Nursery,
where it will be used to
irrigate the plants and
trees.


IV









Wednesday, February 13, 2008 Monticello News 3A





IE WPO INTS & PINIONS


TEN YEARS AGO mu l'l
February 11. 1998 nance D
The recent brouhaha over the any ne\
placement of a high-density subdivi- Wit
sion near the Ebenezer Community Apalacl
may signal a growing trend in the help i
county a backlash against acceler- Jeffersc
ating development., encing
Residents of the Ebenezer mild de
Community got what they wanted Rea
on Thursday night. Sort of. After elected
more than two hours of discussion and L
and a deadlocked vote the first time announ
around, the Planning Commission Younrg,
narrowly approved the residents' dent of
request on the second go-around. affiliate
Commissioners have scheduled a of Reall
special meeting 1 p.m. Thursday in F
the library to decide a few critical
issues on the proposed new jail. The
A two-car accident on North enjoyed
Jefferson Street Saturday, Jan. 31, Creek 1l
resulted in one driver charged with San
DUI and with causing the accident Corpora
and similar charges pending for the ment E
second driver, regular
"Monticello is one of the small- director
est cities to be awarded the Main Comme
Street City designation," said Bob
Filed, architect and member of the
Maip Street research team in town Dr.
Friday. Montic
TWENTY YEARS AGO Thomas
February 10, 1988 Diplom
A school bus returning students the am
to their home in the Boland each sp
Community Friday were escorted Mis
by sheriffs deputies in the wake of Montico
threats reported to have been made of Bach
to both the bus driver and at least part of
one student who rides the bus. class ol
A city attorney has declared his Univers
candidacy for the county judge's
race. Attorney George Carswell, a
Tallahassee native who's practiced For
law for five years will attempt to Richar
:'unseat County Judge Felix ty repr<
SJohnston. to the
THIRTY YEARS AGO opposite
February 9, 1978 A.S
An appreciation for trees and his ca
S natural beauty was evident at Sheriff
Tuesday night's City Council meet- office h
ing whenicouncil members unani-


th]

]

i


u K.., o- .






Earth is

E only planet

not named

ifter a god.
: ; .. '


pa-(edl a temporary ordi-
*equining the landscaping of
v off-street parking areas.
h the opening of the
hee Mental Health Clinic,
s now available within
on County for anyone experi- !
difficulties, ranging from
pression to alcoholism.
ltor Tim Peary has been
to membership in the Farm
and Institute (FLI). The
cement was made by Blake
AFLM, Nampa, Idaho, presi-
" the Institute, which is an
e of the National Association
:ors.
FORTY YEARS AGO
February 9, 1968
Boys Scouts of Troop #803
d a camping trip on Lloyd
ast week.
n Scott, of the Florida Power
ation's Community Develop-
)ivision, was a guest at the
luncheon meeting of the
rs of the' Chamber of
rce Tuesday.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
February 9, 1958
James S. Sledge, of
ello, has been awarded the
s P. Hinman Post Graduate
a after attending sessions of
nual clinic held in Atlanta
ring.
ss Frances Neely, of
ello, was awarded toe degree
elor of Science (business) as
a mid winter graduating
f nearly 400 at Florida State
sity.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
February 9, 1948
the fifth consecutive time,
d H. Simpson, popular coun,-
esentative has been returned.
state Legislature, without
ion.
Grant this week announced
ndidacy for the office ofc
of Jefferson County: ran
e held for 10 years........


0 Subscription Renewal F New Subscription

Name:
Address:


Phone Number:
In State...........S45.00 / Jut,,1 .e 5$2

Pease 8o ad mand back ith a check
money order made out to '
Monticello News P.O. Box 428, Monticello, FL 32345
............................


Lamont Teen Avoids

Injury In Crash

FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
A Lamont teen avoided injury after being involved in
a single-vehicle crash early Friday morning, Feb. 8.
Florida Highway Patrol reported that at 6:40 a.m.,
Jessie W. Parker, 18, of Lamont, was driving a 2000
Acura four-door southbound on Powell Hammock
Grade in Taylor County, and as the vehicle, which
was traveling too fast to negotiate, entered a curve
and Parker lost control.
The vehicle began a clockwise rotation and
entered the west shoulder where it rolled onto its roof.
The vehicle came to a final rest facing north. There
were no injuries.
FHP reports that the incident was not alcohol
related and Parker was wearing a seat belt.
The Acura sustained $3,500 damage and Parker
was charged with Driving Too Fast For Conditions.


Bird Watching Tour



Planned At Dixie Plantation


Monticello News Photo by Debbie Snapp


Owls like this can be seen at Dixie Plantation.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
A Bird Watching Tour to Dixie Plantation has been
scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 16.
Participants will meet at the Courthouse Circle
parking area at 8 a.m. to carpool to the location. Arrival
time back to the parking area should be around 1 p.m.
Come prepared to catch a glimpse of the natural
habi at and wildlife on the plantation. Bring binocu-
lars, cameras, a cushion for the covered wagon ride,
and a tip for the wagon driver. Dress comfortably for
the weather.
As seating is very limited, call reservations in to
Melissa Forehand, 510-4877, by Thursday evening Feb.
14.







Everything You Need
Whatever information you're looking for, job listings,
sports highlights, school or local news, the newspaper
has got you covered. Call 850-997-3568 to have all of
this and more delivered to you bi-weekly.
Monticello News Et The Jefferson County Journal
1215 North Jefferson Street
850.997.3568


How Will Rate Cuts Affect
Your Investments?
Provided by Robert J. Davison
When the Federal Reserve cuts interest rates once, it
makes the news. But when the Fed cuts rates twice
within eight days, it's a really big story. So, when the
Fed cut a key short-term interest rate by three-quarters
of apoint- on Jan. 22-, and followed this move by a half-,_
point.aut von Jan. 30, the. world's financial markets took'.
notice. Bat as an individual investor, you probably won-'
der how these rate cuts might affect you.
Let's consider your stocks first. As a (very) general rule,
whenever the Fed cuts interest rates, stocks tend to ben--
efit. That's because low rates make it easier for busi-
nesses to borrow to expand their operations. At the
same time, lower rates make it easier for consumers to
borrow and spend.
Still, an interest rate cut or even two cuts may not
affect all types of stocks in the same way or at the same
time. For example, rate cuts may provide an immediate
boost to the stocks of financial services companies,
which depend heavily on short-term borrowing to fi-
nance their operations. And some types of consumer
stocks may also do well following a rate cut.
However, interest rate cuts are just one of many factors
that influence stock prices, so an interest rate cut alone
isn't a good reason to invest in a company or industry.
Not all stocks are appropriate for your individual needs.
Before adding any stock to your portfolio, make sure it's
suitable for your risk tolerance, your long-term goals and
your need for diversification. (Keep in mind, though,
that diversification, by itself cannot guarantee a profit or
protect against a loss in a declining market.) In the final
analysis, you will almost always be better off by owning a
mix of quality stocks and holding them for the long
term, through all interest-rate environments, until either
your needs change or the companies themselves undergo
some transformation that you may not like.
Now, let's turn to bonds. When market interest rates are.
falling, the prices on your existing bonds should rise, be-
cause investors will be willing to pay you a "premium"
for the higher rate on your bond. So, when the Fed ag-
gressively cuts interest rates, you might assume that the
value of your bonds will rise. However, some of your
bonds specifically, bonds with maturities of 10 to 30
years are probably going to be affected more strongly
by the rate cut than shorter-term bonds.
Should the Fed continue to lower interest rates, the
value of existing long-term bonds could continue to in-
crease. That said, predicting the direction of interest
rates is extremely difficult. Thus, it may be preferable to
be an "all-season" bond investor who didn't have to
worry about interest rate movements at all, building a
"bond ladder" consisting, of bonds of varying maturities.
That way, if rates are rising, you can reinvest the pro-
ceeds of your maturing short-term bonds in new issues,
but if rates are falling, you'll still have the higher rates of
your long-term bonds working for you.
Clearly, the Federal Reserve's interest-rate cuts can affect
your investments. But if you've got a good, long-term
strategy already in place, one that's tailored to your
needs and goals, you may find that it's your investment
decisions not the Fed's that are most important of all.
Robert J. Davison arl ne
Financial Advisor EdwardJones
205 E. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32344
Bus. 850-997-2572 Fax 866-462-9t84
Cell 850-933-3329
robei't.;avisoni@edwardjones.com -

Making Sense of Investing


I


; I i 1 .


F77








4A Monticello News Wednesday, February 13, 2008





AROUND EFFERSON COUNTY




Hot Chocolate Fundraiser For Cystic



Fibrosis Foundation Is A Success


By Jacob Bembry
Greene Publishing, Inc.
Kelsi Reams' annual
hot chocolate sale for the
Cystic Fibrosis Founda-
tion was once again a
huge success as she
raised $2,200 and money
is still coming in.
"We are so proud of
Kelsi and her helpers for
making it the best
fundraiser since we
started five years ago,"
Kathy Reams, Kelsi's
mother, said.
The Reams family ex-
tends a big thanks to all
of Madison and Jefferson
County for their support
and donations. They


would also like to thank
Buddy Witmer for the use
of his office for the loca-
tion again this year and
Betty Jo Burnett for mak-
ing delicious homemade
cinnamon rolls.
Kelsi came up with
the idea for the hot
chocolate sale five years
ago when her youngest
sister, Abby, was diag-
nosed with cystic fibro-
sis.
Maybe 2008 will be
the year that a cure is
found until then Madison
and Jefferson Counties
continue to pray that
Abby is blessed with good
health.


PnOtO submitted
Emma Witmer, Taylor Copeland, Kelsi Reams, Chloe Reams and Abby Reams helped make the hot chocolate sale
a success.



No Valentine's Day Deliveries At Schools


Photo submitted
Christina Reams counts the money raised at the hot
chocolate sale for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Jefferson County Mid-'
dle/High School (JCMHS)
Assistant Principal


giaj 93enft 9&Cspic

ob 9?emem^A-wce' 2007


"WE ARE ALL LIKE ONE-WINGED ANGELS. IT IS ONLY WHEN
WE HELP EACH OTHER THAT WE CAN FLY."
LUCIANO DE CRESCENDO



9&eatek tAanks to, eueiVane' t coi'iiAiuded to& tbe Wia,
Send 9{a1&p ^ee& a& o nemAauncee. COn] 9ats>
atiow wv l end 9a&oict to/poutidde caiew, cow itit,
and lAo2 to o ewei 3 50 patiewti eaci, dauy. SAu",in tAe paftb
241 yiea, WiscA end, 5 spice fas neev tttuned au a
aqanu ie wv liwncia e wa sn, utitv u,
Uifutei St smpotw, uee newue 'tv.


9 cieta 9sfiice ansedw a
WePe^&anv T-0%a^zt &4dt iaf" c&Wuncit

dman1& ov wand eft



CAPITAL CITY BANK
FARMERS & MERCHANTS BANK
MONTICELLO



-25>th1NNIVE
AP 205 N. Mulberry Street

Big Bend Monticello, Florida 32344
Hospice 850/997-2827
Yu / Hwww.bigbendhospice.org
Your Hometown Hospice
Licensed Since 1983


Ranston Chandler alerts
parents and residents
about the school policy
concerning deliveries to
the school on Valentine's
Day
"Parents, please do
not send candy, balloons,


teddy bears or flowers to
students at Jefferson Ele-
mentary School or
JCMHS during school
hours as these items can
interrupt the learning en-
vironment and cause a
safety issue for students


going home on buses in
the afternoonn" said Chain"
dler.
"Thank you for your
support in helping us
maintain a safe learning
environment in school
and on the buses."


Morgan Is A Grand Champion
DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Abigail Morgan, age 7, won the "Grand
Champion" title recently from the Wakulla
County Horseman's Association.
As the "Highest Point Earner" in her 6 9
age group, she was awarded a saddl and a belt
buckle. She was in competition with 10 others in ,. -
her class.
There were five classes in these year-end -
competitions and awards, in Crawfordville. This
was her first year in this competition. She at-
tends shows here locally.c W CHA
Morgan also won "Reserve Champion" in o
the National Barrel Horse Association 18 years CnAMP
and under competition, qualifying her for the
National Show Finals this summer in Jackson,
MS. There are 600-1200 competing entries. She
could win the use of a horse trailer, a variety of
horse related items such as saddles and tack
equipment, and money awards.
Morgan loves horses and has a horse arena
at home, where she practices her skills faith- Abigail Morgan won "Grand
fully Champion" at the recent Wakulla
She is a student at Aucilla Christian Acad- County Horseman's Association
emy, and the daughter of Susan and Mitchell Competition, earning her a saddle
Morgan of Monticello. and a belt buckle.


PERSONAL INJURY &

WRONGFUL DEATH


Jon D. Caminez
Board Certified Civil Trial Attorney

Ian Brown
Cary A. "Bo" Hardee, III



CAMINEZ, BROWN & HARDEE, P.A.

(850) 997-8181
1307 S. JEFFERSON STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon
advertisements. Before you decide, ask the lawyer to send you free written information
about their qualifications and experience.


wtee".11








Wednesday, February 8, 2008 Monticello News, 5A





AROUND EFFERSON COUNTY


.---,'---


Jerome George

Smith


Jerome George Smith
passed away on February 4,
2008 at his home in Monti-
cello, Florida.
A service of remem-
brance will be led by Rev-
erend James Sellers and
Deacon Michael Opalka on
Saturday, February 16, 2008
at, 10:00 a.m., at Beggs Fu-
neral Home Monticello
Chapel, 485 E. Dogwood
Street, Monticello, Florida.
The family will receive
friends after the service on
his farm at 2314 Hartsfield
Road, in Monticello.
Mr. Smith was a native
of Moultrie, Georgia and a
former resident of Miami.
He had live in Jefferson
County for the past 12
years. He was a retired
Fire Lieutenant proudly
serving Miami Dade
County for 25 years. He
was the owner and opera-
tor of several motels in
Miami Beach, Florida, and
also served our county in
the US Air force.
He is survived by sev-
eral very special friends
Frances Mayfield and Jack-
son Ferri, one son Jerome
"Jay" G. Smith, Jr. (Kelly);
three daughters Michelle
Fox, Sharon Hall and
Aimee 'Smith Brewer
(Kent); four grandchildren
and two great grandchil-
dren.


Airon

Thurman
Airon Thurman, age
85, a retied cabinet maker,
passed away in Monticello,
Thursday, February 7,
2008.
Funeral services grave-
side at Oak Field Cemetery,
Monday, February 11, 2008
at 2:00 p.m. The family re-
ceived friends Sunday, Feb-
ruary 10, 2008, at Beggs
Funeral Home Monticello
Chapel from 4:00 6:00 p.m.
In lieu of flowers donations
may be made to Big Bend
Hospice, 1723-1 Mahan Cen-
ter Blvd, Tallahassee,
Florida 32308-5428.
Mr. Thurman had lived
most of his life in Jefferson
County and was well
known for his cabinet mak-
ing. He was a member of
Calvary Baptist Church
and he loved hunting and
fishing.
He is survived by his
wife Violet Thurman of
Monticello; two sons
Jimmy (wife Betty) Thur-
man and Tommy Thurman
of Monticello; two daugh-
ters Charmaine Small (hus-
band Greg) of Woodville;
Rosemary (husband Ran-
dall) of Ft. Myers, FL; one
brother Bud Thurman of
Irving, Texas; one sister
Martha Cadenhead of Irv-
ing, Texas; eight grandchil-
dren Troy Thompson,
Mark Thompson, Derrick
Smith, Austin Small, Paige
Thurman, Tara Dillon, Jes-
sica Small and Christina
Small; two great grandchil-
dren Payton Dillon and
Shaun Dillon.
Mr. Thurman was pre-
ceded in death by one son
Danny Thurman.


Live Radio Theatre




Set At Opera House

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor
The Monticello Opera House presents live Radio The-
atre, 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Feb. 15, 16. On the bill
are are Abbot and Costello, a "Mad Scientist," and The
Lone Ranger.
Dinner is available 7 p.m. both nights before the show.
For reservations, call the Opera House at 997-4242.
Enjoy the recreation of the look and feel of a 1940s
radio studio, as guests become pat of the live studio au-
dience. Learn how sound effects were created in the
predigital era, and help celebrate the 75th anniversary of
the original Lone Ranger broadcast.
Tickets are $25 for dinner and the show, with reserva-
tions necessary for dinner. Doors open at 6:30 P.M., with
dinner at 7 p.m. and the show at 8 p.m..
Call the Opera House for additional information.


February 13-27
Jefferson Arts to dis-
play the works of Melinda
Copper, painter, sculptor,
children's book illustrator,
and author in the Gallery
at 575 W. Washington
Street. through March 8.
The exhibit is free and
open to the public. The
Gallery is open Wednes-
days and Saturdays 10 a.m.
- 2 p.m., or for appointment
call 997-3311,
February 14
Jefferson Soil and
Water Conservation Board
will meet 11:30 a.m. on
Thursday at the County Ex-
tension Conference Room.
Contact Dorothy P Lewis,
secretary/treasurer for
more information.
February 14
AA meetings held 8
p.m. on Thursdays at
Christ Episcopal Church
Annex, 425 North Cherry
Street. For more informa-
tion call 997-2129, 997-1955.
February 14
Founder's Garden Cir-
cle meets at noon on the
second Thursday of the
month. Contact Chairman
Suzanne Peary at 997-4043
for meeting location and
for more information.
February 14
Workforce Mobile Unit
is stationed across from
First Baptist Church, Mon-
ticello 9 a.m. 5 p.m. on the
second Thursday of each
month. For more informa-
tion contact Employment
Connection Director
Cheryl Rehberg at 673-7688,
or volunteers Paul Kovary
at 997-2313, or Mike Reich-
man at 997-5100, or SW
Ellis at 567-3800.
February 14
Jefferson County Dia-
betes Support Group meets


DEBBIE SNAPP
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Big Bend Hospice is
sponsoring a special work-
shop featuring fabric
artist Deidre Scherer and
the Big Bend Hospice
Music Therapists from 1 to
3 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 16
from 1-3 p.m., at the Bro-
gan Museum, in Tallahas-
see
Scherer, whose exhibit
entitled "Surrounded by
Friends and Family" will
be on display at the Bro-
gan Feb. 16 through March
30, uses the medium of
fabric and thread as if it
were "paint" to create her
amazingly detailed quilts.
She says, "Through the
rounds of cutting/draw-
ing, layering, and
sewing/drawing, I com-


11:45 a.m.-12:10 p.m. Thurs-.
day at the Library All at-
tending are welcome to
bring a bag lunch. Contact
Bonnie Gobar Mathis at
342-0170 x1301 for more in-
formation.
February 14
Jefferson County
Health Education Club
Lunch and Learn 12:15-12:45
p.m. Thursday at the Li-
brary All attending are wel-
come to bring a bag lunch.
Contact Bonnie Gobar
Mathis at 342-0170, ext. 1301
for more information.
February 15
Red and White Valen-
tine's Ball 8 p.m. until on
Friday at the Greenville
Madison Multipurpose Cen-
ter, 1376 SW Grand Street,
Greenville. For more infor-
mation call 556-0278 or 508-
3699.
February 15
Monticello Rotary Club
meets every Friday at noon
at the Monticello/Jeffer-
son Chamber of Com-
merce on West Washington
Street for lunch and a
meeting. Contact President
Judson Freeman at 997-
0370 for club information.
February 15-16
Big Bend Hospice is
sponsoring the exhibit of
Deidre Scherer at the Bro-
gan Museum Beginning
Friday, and a workshop in-
cluding the BBH Music
Therapist on Saturday For
more information contact
Laurie Ward at 878-5310.
February 16
Fish Fry and Cake Raf-
fle hosted by the Wacissa
Volunteer Fire Rescue,
14496 Waukeenah Highway
at Highway 59 will be en-
joyed from 5 8 p.m. on Sat-
urday Fresh caught mullet
will be served with cheese


pose an evocative tableau.
While paying homage to
our mentors and elders, I
focus on the universal is-
sues of aging, dying and
death as a natural part of
life."
The workshop on Feb.
16 will join Scherer and
the Big Bend Hospice
Music Therapists as they
discuss and demonstrate
how each respective art
form explores the emo-
tional and physical stages
of patients facing the end
of life.
"Through the care that
we provide, our music
therapists are privileged
to facilitate and witness
the comforting power of
music during a very spe-
cial time of life," says Jen-
nifer Haskins, head of the
Big Bend Hospice Music


Tax Season

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Got QuickBooks Questions?
Call Dennis Scarry ~ 850.385*1343
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grits, French fries, cole
slaw, desserts, and a soft
drink. Cost is $7 adults and
% children. The raffle will
begin at 6:30 p.m. Contact
Annie Lou Giles at 997-0631
for more information.
February 16
Buddy Liles will be in
concert 6 p.m. on Satur-
day at the Church of the
Nazarene. His bari-
tone/bass interpretation
of song will bless the
heart and encourage the
soul. There is no charge.
Contact the church at
997-3906.
February 16
Step Up, Florida event
will be held from 10 a.m. -
12 p.m. Saturday For more
information contact the
Health Department at 342-
0170 x2082, 2102 and 207.
February 16.
Solomon Lodge No. 6
will host its Inaugural
Black History Month Cele-
bration Program "The
African American Legacy
and the Challenges for the
21st Century, featuring
renowned Florida A&M
University professor Dr. Os-
ifield Anderson at Memo-
rial Missionary Baptist
Church, 780 2nd Street in
Monticello Saturday at 7:00
p.m. Admission is free. For
more information contact
Art Brown at
abrown4698@excite.com
or 284-3250.
February 16
AA meetings are held 8
p.m. Saturday at Christ
Episcopal Church Annex,
425 North Cherry Street.
For more information call
997-2129, 997-1955.
February 17
Camellia Garden Cir-
cle meets at 2 p.m. on the
third Sunday of the month


for a meeting and program
at the home of Bobbie
Golden, Contact Chairman
Carolyn Milligan at 997-
3917 for program and meet-
ing location information.
February 18
AA Women's Meeting
is held 6:45 p.m. on Mon-
days; AA and Al-Anon
meetings are held at 8 p.m.
Christ Episcopal Church
Annex, 425 North Cherry
Street. For more informa-
tion call 997-2129, 997-1955.
February 18
Boy Scout Troop 803
meets 7 p.m. every Monday
at the Eagles Nest on
South Water Street. For in-
formation contact Scout
Leader Paul Wittig at 997-
1727 or 997-3169.
February 18
Magnolia Garden Cir-
cle meets at noon on the
third Monday of the
month for a meeting and
program. Contact Chair-
man Pam Kelly at 997-5010
for more information.
February 19
Jefferson County Dem-
ocratic Party will meet at
7p.m. Tuesday, at the Jef-
ferson County Library The
program will be on Cam-
paign 2008. Committee
members, candidates, in-
terested volunteers are en-
couraged to attend. Call
Eleanor Hawkins, 997-3113
for information.


Therapy Department.
Contact Laurie Ward
at 878-5310, x752 for more
information. Normal mu-
seum entry fees apply


I!! I I! l IS ii




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Communicating With Fabric, Music

Topic Of Hospice Workshop


17


{7


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5MU-9


200UU







6A Monticello News Wednesday, February 13, 2008




PLROUND 'EFFERSON COUNTY



Buzbee To Marry Rushing
.,-l.,,nk "Tn Wal Alan Roiuae


* --' .. .. ," .:A* ._ ,







Jake Freeland is
pleased to announce the
upcoming marriage of
his mother Lucy Buzbee,
to Wes Rushing, of Tal-
lahassee.
Parents of the bride
are Ben and Carol Buzbee
of Waukeenah. Her grand-
mother is Betty Buzbee, of
Waukeenah.
\ The groom's parents are June
and Johnny Harper, of Craw-
.^. fordville, and H. Wayne Rushing and Jim-
S mie Giles, of Destin. Wes's grandmother is Edith Gainous, of
Cairo.
The wedding will take place at the home of the bride's par-
ents on Feb. 29,2008, at 7 p.m.
All friends and relatives of the couple are cordially invited.

O I&


K~ ~:~UUI 11W L EU IIUU rnIi IEUU


ip Miss Laurel Burkart,
of Monticello, is planning
to marry Alan Reyes, of
SPensacola, on March 8,
2008. An honor graduate
of Jefferson County High
School in 2003, she studied
at the University of West
O Florida, whefe she earned
her B.A. degree in Music
Education, Magna cumr
i Laude in May, 2007.
She is the daughter of


Sp

*,

e,


Drs. Arnold and Rebecca
Burkart of Monticello. Re-
becca is presently Coordi-
nator of Music at North
Florida Community Col-
lege, in Madison. and
Arnold is Professor Emer-
itus of Music Education
from Ball State University,
Muncie, IN.
Alan Reyes is the son
of Dr. Roy Reyes, General
Practitioner in Pensacola


and his wife Maria Reyes.
He also attended the Uni-
versity of' West Florida as
a music major and is an
accomplished guitarist
and singer.
The couple plan to
move to Nashville. TN,
after the wedding, where
Alan will continue studies
in voice, with a teacher of
national renown, prepara-
tory to setting up his own
teaching studio.
Since Laurel's gradua-
tion she has been working
as a substitute teacher
first in Tallahassee
schools, then in Pensacola ,
schools and plans to con-
tirtue in the Nashville.
schools prior to pursuing
a full-time public school
music teaching career in'
the fall.


Local


Busin


e


ss


Directory


Call 997-3568 To Advertise Your Business


-








Wednesday, February 13, 2008


Monticello News 7A


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J.ison's Appliance Repair



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II il II' 1.i I
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850-508-1310
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Another
Gutter Company
SEA\ I LESS G UTFERS
Free Etim ,t,-s
Phone:
85o-879-5"45

Reprltlll'S & [m'tn e.
Cleanim; S t rccninr


PLUMBING
Burnette
Plumbing
&
Well Service
I \ / i 1,1 ,,, :',l n ).-

850-973-1404
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PROPERTY ENHANCETAENT

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8A Monticello News Wednesday, February 13, 2008





SCHOOL


Snapshot Of The Week


Becoming an avid
reader can begin at
a very early age,
as it did for county
resident Alfa Hunt,
now a senior at
Aucilla Christian
Academy.


NFCC Initiates Search



For President

Board Accepting Applications From
Six-County NFCC Service Area And
Names Science Building After Retiring President Steen


12R.ead,





% ecycLe


The Jefferson County Recycling Program accepts
the following items for recycling:


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc;

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All Cardboard Products grocery bag, reall boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located
at 1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the
collection sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our
Landfill and saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go
wrong?

Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing
machines, dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle
Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals,
paint, paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to
identify contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept
medical & pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an
employee of the facility and not just dropped off.

Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.

The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Steve Wingate at 342-0154.

Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


The North Florida
Community College
Board of Trustees unani-
mnously approved the pro-
cedures for a presidential
search to fill the position
being vacated by Morris
L. Steen, Jr., who has led
the rural community col-
lege since 2001. Steen
plans to retire once a re-
placement is named.
Advertising for the
position within the six-
county district of the bol-
lege will begin Jan. 21,
2008 and NFCC will accept
applications through Feb.
22, 2008. Salary range for
the position is $95,000 -
$125,000. A candidate's
principal resident must be
within the service area of
the college, which in-
cludes Hamilton, Jeffer-
son, Lafayette, Madison,
Suwannee, Taylor coun-
ties in north Florida. The
board may expand the .
search field at any time
during the process.
The full board of
trustees will interview
qualified internal candi-
dates those who are fac-
ulty, staff or trustees. A
search committee com-
posed of faculty, staff, ad-
ministrators and
community representa-
tives will interview non-
employee or external
applicants and recom-
mend three external can-
didates to the board of
trustees for interview. The
board may also elect to in-
terview any additional
candidates. Interviews
will be conducted during
March, possibly April
2008 and a final selection
may be made as early as
April or May Election of
the successful candidate
will be by a majority vote
of the board.
Albert Thomas, re-
tired educator and vice-
chair of the board of
trustees, is co-chair of the


On Dean'

Hannah Monroe, daughter
of Lloyd and Melanie Monroe,
of Waukeenah, has been
named to the Dean's List for
the 2007 fall semester at
Maryville College, TN.
Qualifications for the
Dean's List include a grade
point average of at least 3.6 in
all work undertake, with no
grade below a "C." Only full
time students are considered
for the Dean's List.


rAn t *24Hr.UL
an M, Central Station
"".'. *,90 Day Money
Honeywell Back Guarantee


search committee. An-
other co-chair may be ap-
pointed to share
committee responsibili-
ties. Community represen-


Morris G. Steen, Jr.


tatives are Harry .
Pennington of Hamilton
County, Larry Halsey of
Jefferson County, Scot
Copeland of Madison
County, John C. Hewett of
Lafayette County, David
Fina of Suwannee County
and Joe Collins of Taylor
County. Melissa Burke,
president of the Student
Government Association,
is also a member of the
committee.
Members of the board
of trustees are John
Maultsby chairman from
Madison County; Linda
Gibson and Michaelena
Wilson of Madison
County; Albert Thomas,
vice-chair from Jefferson
County; Brantly Helven-
ston and Walter Boatright
from Suwannee County;
Debra Land of Lafayette
County, Verna M. Hodge
of Hamilton County and
Lester Padgett from Tay-
lor County.
The search guidelines
and position description
are available on the NFCC
website, www.nfcc.edu,
under Employment.


List


Hannah Monroe


In other business, the
board approved the nam-
ing of the new science lab-
oratory and classroom
building the "*l\orris G.
Steen. Jr. Science Learn-
ing Center" in honor of
President Steen. The facil-
ity is the first new build-
ing constructed on the
NFCC campus in forty
years.
Steen, the seventh
president of NFCC, is
the first president to
have been a student of
the college. A retired
Navy captain, he joined
NFCC as director of the
career and technical
center in 1997. He and
his wife,. Judy, reside in
Shady Grove, Fla.
For information con-
tact Executive Director
of Human Resources
Bill Hunter by telephone
850.973.9448 or email
hunterb@nfcc.edu.






15023 Hwy. 19 South
Thomasville, Georgia
229-226-6060
DATES MOVIE TIMES
ARE GOOD THRU
"Week of Feb 8- Feb 14"
FOOL'S GOLD
(PGI13)
Fri. 4:00-7:00-9:30
Sat. 1:15-4:00-7:00-9:30
Sun. 1: 15-4:00-7:00
Mon. -Thurs. 4:00-7:00
NO PASSES
THE EYE
(R)
Fri. 4:40-7:30-9:50
Sat. 1:40-4:40-7:30-9:50
Sun. 1:40-4:40-7:30
Mon.-Thurs. 4:40-7:30
NO PASSES
27 DRESSES
(PGI13)
Fri.4:20-7:05-9:40
Sat. 1:30-4:20-7:05-9:40
Sun. 1:30-4:20-7:05
Mon. -Thurs. 4:20-7:05
WELCOME HOME ROSCOE
JENKINS
(PG 13)
Fri. 4:10-7:15-9:55
Sat. 1:05-4:10-7:15-9:55
Sun. 1:05-4:10-7:15
Mon. -Thurs. 4:10-7:15
NO PASSES
JUNO
(PG 13)
Fri. 5:30-7:40-I10:00
Sat. 1:00-3:15-5:30-7:40-10:00
Sun. 1:00-3:15-5:30-7:40
Mon. -Thurs. 5:30-7:40
NO PASSES
RAMBO
(PG I3)
Fri. 7:20-9:35
Sat. 7:20-9:35
Sun. 7:20
Mon.- Thurs. 7:20
BUCKET LIST
(PG)
Fri. 7:45
Sat. 1:20-7:45
Sun. 1:20-7:45
Mon. -Thurs. 7:45
FIRST SUNDAY
(PG 13)
Fri. 4:30-10:05
Sat. 4:30- 10:05
Sun. 4:30
Mon.-Thurs. 4:30
PIRATES: VEGGIE TALES
(G)
Fri. 5:10
Sat. 1:10-3:05-5:10
Sun. 1:1,0-3:05-5:10
Mon.-Thurs. 5:10
NO PASSES


7 Wl


DON'T BE A VICTIM


* Closed Circuit Television ]
* Access Control Systems r
* Fire Alarms & Monitoring i
* Surveillance Equipment


(850) 942w 1400Bm
www.certifiedsecuritysystems.com I, l fI[


Hannah Monroe


..'Jj % I I- 1, I'l J -111 1 1 11 I I I . I I I I 1 111 1 .1 I I I 11 I j 1 %. J, 1 4 1 11. i 111 11 4 11 ,-11' ' 1 ' b 11 11 11 'rJ- I PH .01' 111 '-1" !, il I.:
- -1 1 .4 1 IT, I !i ., -, 11111--' NP I 'l '-l 11 "d I Iti- I - .,-I 'j, I, 1 11-111 rf ql [ '11t.l. 1,1-1 t4dl'.'w Mil. !- ,dlfr fl. Lil -f,.* Fl Ij .' -J., rh I -, I I









Wednesday, February 13, 2008 Monticello News 9A






PORTS


Super Bowl Vieti


Celebration Slati

FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
The family of Jefferson County native
son Sam Madison, Jr., is planning a Super
Bowl Victory Celebration in honor of the
New York Giants' 17-14 defeat of the New
England Patriots on Sunday, Feb. 3 in Super
Bowl XLII in Arizona at the University of
Phoenix.Stadium.
The event is slated for 10 a.m. until 1
p.m., Saturday March 8, tentatively at the old
Jefferson County High School auditorium
on Tiger Lane. Attendees are reminded not
to forget their cameras during the event.
Coordinator Mary Madison, Sam's
mom, wants the community to know this
event is being held rather than the Annual
Education Rally "Since Sam's move to the
New York Giants organization, he has not
activated his Madison Avenue For Kids
Foundation, but Sam still wanted to inter-
act with the youth, their families and the
entire community With his outstanding ac-
complishment, we felt this Super Event
would afford him the opportunity to do so,"


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer .
After splitting two
games during the District
Tournament held at John
Paul on Jan. 29, the Aucilla
Christian Academy varsity
girls' basketball team,
emerged with the second
place slot of the five teams
competing in the district.
The Lady Warriors began
playing in the Regional
Tournament, Thursday,
Feb 5, at St. Francis
Catholic High School in
Gainesville.
During the District
Tournament, Aucilla
downed Munroe, 48-44.
ACA was skimmed in the
first quarter, 8-7, came
back to take the second, 14-


8, squeaked by Munroe in
the third, 11-10, and was
slammed 11-5 in the fourth
quarter, which resulted at
a 37-37 tie at the end, send-
ing- the opponents into
overtime. During over-
time, Aucilla dunked
Munroe 11-7 to take the
win.
Leading the scoreboard
for the Lady Warriors was
Mallory Plaines with 18
points and 13 rebounds for
a double-double, three as-
sists, three steals, and six
blocked shots.
Lindsey Day followed
in a close second, bucket-
ing 15 points and snagging
nine rebounds, two assists,
two steals, and two blocked
shots.
Bethany Saunders, nine


Notice of Monticello
City Council Meetings

The Monticello City Council will conduct
a special meeting on
Wednesday, February 20, 2008
at 5:30 p.m.
to select a contractor for the City of
Monticello Reuse Project Phase I and to conduct
a workshop on the Florida Sunshine Law.
The meeting will take place at
City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Street.

The Council will also conduct a workshop
on February 26, 2008 at 5:30
to conduct a workshop on parade fees.


points, three rebounds, and
four assists; Nicole Mathis,
four points, three re-
bounds, and four assists;
Courtney Brasington, two
points, and lone blocked
shot; and Chelsey Dobson,
five rebounds.
The Lady Warriors
were defeated by FAMU 37-
19, during the district tour-
nament.
"We were winning at
the half, but FAMU came
back in the third and that's
when they made their
run," said Coach Daryl
Adams.
ACA lost the first quar-
ter, 4-2 and came,back to
take the second, 8-5, for a
10-9 lead at the half. FAMU
outscored Aucilla 15-4 in
the third, and in the
fourth, 13-5.
Plaines led the Aucilla
charge with 12 points and
14 rebounds for a double-
double, had two assists,
three steals, and two
blocked shots.
Day netted three
points, had five rebounds,
two assists, three steals,
and two blocked shots;
Dobson raked in two
points and six rebounds;
Jodie Bradford scored two
points; Mathis had four re-
bounds; Brasington, three
rebounds; and Saunders,
two assists, and two steals.


______________________ ~...r.,.. r


The Signs & Symptoms
of a Heart Attack
Chest, stomach, back, neck
or jaw pain
Shortness of breath
i-,.J,.- ii. ,- or gas-like pain
Nausea or dizziness
Unexplained anxiety,
weakness or fatigue
Discomfort or pain between
the shoulder blades
Sense of impending doom
Irregular heartbeat, cold
sweat or paleness


It' is important to learn the symptoms of yeart disease in
women and that these symptoms are often different than
in men, That's why Tallahassee Memorial has developed a
woman's heart care program designed to increase awareness
of heart disease and encourage women who experience heart
attack symptoms to seek immediate treatment.

At TMH, we're in the forefront nationally for providing rapid,
life-saving treatment of heart attacks making your chance for
survival much greater. To learn more about women and heart
disease and find out if you are at risk, visit www.tmh.org/
womensheart.

Listen to Your Heart,


Warriors Stats


she said.
"Stu-
dents in Jefferson County are cordially in-
vited, as well as Boys and Girls 'Club
members, 4-H Club members, Boys and Girl
Scout members, Teen Center members, and
any other youth, civic or church groups,"
said Madison. She reminds that children
age pre-K through eighth grade, be accom-
panied by a parent or guardian, however,
club members may attend with their lead-
ers. "We are also requesting the presence
of all city and county officials and staff, and
everyone in the community and county"
She added that for that for this joyous, victo-
rious and celebrant occasion and in the
spirit of "Giving Back To The Commu-
nity", that every participant is asked to
donate one or more canned goods or non-
perishable food items, which will in turn
be donated to the local food banks or
needy families.
"Sam and his siblings have always
been taught to give to others less fortu-
nate, and when youwdo, blessings are al-
ways returned," concluded Madison.


For Season

FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
As the Warriors wound up the basket-
ball season 2-22 when they dropped the
first round in District playoffs against
Munroe, team and individual stats for the
season are now available.
Aucilla rounded 258 buckets from the
field of 831 attempts, netted 66 of 285 from
the three-point zone, and targeted 174 of
346 from the free-throw line for a total of
888 points. Throughout the season, ACA
scraped up 189 assists, 236 offensive and
429 defensive rebounds for a total of 665 re-
bounds, 200 steals, and 431 turnovers.
Leading the Warriors on the hardwood
during the season was Reggie Walker, who
led in seven of eleven areas of play He
shouldered 83 of 272 shots from the field,
23 of 102 from the three-point zone, and 65
of 139 from the free-throw line for a total
of 300 points, giving him the highest num-
ber of field, three-point, and free-throw
shots on the team, as well as the highest
total points collected.
Walker had 33 assists, and 79 offensive
and 146 defensive rebounds for a total of
225 rebounds, the highest numbers on both
sides of the boards and in total. He also
led in steals with 41, and in turnovers,
with 104. In the final record, during the
District game against Munroe, Walker
also achieved his first slam-dunk of the
season during official game play and the
only this season for the Warriors.
Alex Dunkle dropped in 39 of 131 from
the field, 12 of 40 from the three-point
zone, and 36 of 61 from the free-throw line
for a total of 150 points. He had 27 assists,
ten offensive and 31 defensive rebounds for
a total of 41, 30 steals, and 82 turnovers.
Luke Witmer bucketed 51 of 166 from
the field, seven of 44 from the three-point
zone, and hit nine of 22 from the free-
throw line for a total of 132 points, had 34
assists, 27 offensive and 79 defensive re-
bounds for a total of 106, 36 steals, and 94
turnovers.
Stephen Dollar netted 21 of 75 from the


field, eight of 33 from the three-point zone,
and 35 of 69 from the free-throw line for a
total of 101 points. He led in assists with
62, had 14 offensive and 26 defensive re-
bounds for a total fop 40, had 38 steals, and
67 turnovers.
Michael Kinsey rounded 27 of 89 from
the field, 11 of 41 from the three-point
zone, and 12 of 19 from the free-throw line
for a total of 99 points, had 16 assists, 42 of-
fensive and 59 defensive rebounds for a
total of 101, 23 steals, and 34 turnovers.
Clark Christy, who was advanced from
the junior varsity mid-season, hit 22 of 38
from the field, and seven of 16 from the
free-throw line for a total of 51 points, had
nine assists, 42 offensive and 55 defensive
rebounds for a total of 97, 17 steals, and 29
turnovers.
John Stephens hit six of 18 from the
field, five of 25 from the three-point zone,
and five of ten from the free-throw line fort
a total of 32 points, had two assists, six of-
fensive and 16 defensive rebounds for a
total of 22, three steals, and eight
turnovers.
Hunter Greepe shouldered nine of 42
from the field, and five of ten from the free-
throw line for 23 points, had six assists, 16
offensive and 17 defensive rebounds for a.
total of 33, 12 steals, and 13 turnovers.


J


Reggie Walker


ACA Athletes Named Big Bend Leaders


FRAN HUNT
Monticello News
Staff Writer
Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy athletes were named
to the list of Big Bend Lead-
ers in basketball, Friday,
Jan. 18.
Reggie Walker repre-
sents the Warriors in scor-
ing, ranking in at #19 with
an average of 12.1 points
per game, and at #4 in re-
bounds with an average of
9.85 per game.
Representing the Lady
Warriors, Mallory Plaines
stands at #4 in scoring with
220 points, an average of
11.6 per game; and Lindsey
Day is #12 with 179 points,
an average of 11.2 per
game.
In rebounds, Plaines is
#5, having snagged 179, an
average of 9.4 per game;
Day, #7 with 127 boards, an


11 M


R- LI-I i/V.,:


1: Cl ar.,Ti~ll H.1,.-
I,...r, I.6. 3.1-r


average of 8.0 per game;
and Courtney Brasington
#25, with 94, an average of
5.0 per game.
Assisting her team-
mates on the hardwood,
Plaines is #10 with 54, an
average of 2.8; and Bethany
Saunders ties at #10 with 51
assists, an average of 2.8
per game.
In steals, Plaines led
the Lady Warriors, at #10
with 53, an average of 2.8;
Day is #14 with 28, an aver-
age of 2.3; Nicole Mathis,
#15 with 42, an average of
2.2 per game; and Saunders
tied at #15 with 39, also an
average of 2.2 per game.
Blocking the boards,
Day is #5 with 18, an aver-
age of 1.1; and Plaines, is
#5 with 19, an average of
1.0 per game.
Aucilla athletes were
also named to the list of
Big Bend Leaders, Friday,
Jan. 25.
Walker is #19 in scor-
ing with an average of 12.0
points per game; and in re-
bounds, Walker, #5 with an
average of 9.9 boards per
game.


Representing the Lady
Warriors, Plaines, #14 in
scoring with 246 points, an
average of 11.7 per game;
and Day #15 with 206, an
average of 11.4 points' per
game; Mathis, #34 with 123
points, an average of 5.9
per game.
Plaines also led the
Lady Warriors in rebound-
ing at # 4, with 200 boards,
an average of 9.5 per game;
Day, #7, with 147, an aver-
age of 8.2 per game; Bras-
ington #24 with 99
rebounds, an average of 4.7
per game.
In assists, Saunders,
#13 with 58, an average of
2.9 per game; and Plaines
also #13, with 61, an aver-
age of 2.9 per game.
Stealing the round-ball,
Plaines, #10, with 59, an av-
erage of 2.8 per game;
Mathis, #13, with 49, an av-
erage of 2.3 per game; and
Saunders, #14, with 58, an
average of 2.2 per game.
In blocking the buck-
ets, Day, #6, with 23, an av-
erage of 1.3 per game; and
Plaines, #8, with 23, an av-
erage of 1.1 per game.


PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE
Jefferson County
Board of County Commissioners
Workshop Meeting
With
The Florida Department of Environmental
Protection and Water Management District
To discuss development processes.
Wednesday, February 20, 2008
9:00 AM
Jefferson Public Library
Water Street
Monticello, FL
The public is welcome to attend .


JL

Tallahassee Memorial
Heart &,Vascular Center


1300 Miccosukee Road
Tallahassee, FL 32308


,)Z 9. m-H East Screven St.. oiuitman


850.431.2727
www.tmh.org/womensheart


Hair Cuts
Coloi
Highlights
Perms
Facial Waxing
Updo.


Lady Warriors Second In District


L Otti, ViSI,011: PECO GNI Z ED WO 1--k L 1) CLASS 1-1 EA LT 1-1 CA R E


... ..... .. ................
a" -Do'-.p CCE1.2 'V'IK3 LJ E- 41-


.. ^.M1- 1 ..


Al








Wednesday, February 13, 2008


IAutmtv I*Fr*Rnt


1990 F-350 Ford Flat Bed with
Hyd. Lift Gate. 5 Spd. Good Cond.
New Tires-Removable side bodies
$4,700. 997-1582 9/19,tfn, nc
1993 Nissan Pick-Up 5sp. Good
Condition New tires. $1700.
997-1582 or 997-3568 tfn,nc
1996 Ford F-350, crew cab,
diesel. For Sale or Trade. Call 251-
2237.
2/6,tfn,nc



NEED CASH ?
GOT JUNK ?
GOT JUNK CARS & TRUCKS
I BUY SCRAP METALS !!
CALL 850-838-JUNK (5865)
State Certified Scales
1/9 6/27,c



Scripture, Tradition and Reason
are the foundations of the
Episcopal faith. Christ Episcopal
Church, 3 blocks N of the
courthouse. Sunday services at
8:30 and 11:00. 997-4116


JACKSON'S DRUG
Have you been taken off
mone replacement? See
menopausal products.

BACKHOE SE
Driveways, roads, ditches
shrub removal, bum piles
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,


MR. STUMP
STUMP GRINDING
509-8530 Quick Responses.
6/22, tfn,c
TRACTOR WORK
ROTARY FLAIL BUSH
HOGGING Starting at $37.50/ Hr.
All Types of Tractor Work.
850-567-6715
11/16, tfn,c
I BUILD SHEDS, DECKS
Exterior Carpentry work,
window and door replacement.
Call Bob: 850-242-9342
10x12 Shed w/Porch Delivered
$1,500. 11/7,tfn,c
S.A.H. HOUSE CLEANING
Don't have time to do your house
work call Sherry
997-1989 or 363-2108
ANYTHING from
DUSTING......TO......LAUNDRY.
References Provided.
2/6,tfn,c



Free Burro To Good Home
Call 997-5972
2/8, 13, 15, nc



LOST CAT Black, bobtailed
(Alley). Lost Saturday, 2/9 on
the Jefferson County/Georia
state line. REWARD!!! 528-
7145.
2/8,1'3,15,20,22,pd



;STOCK TRAILER covered 16'
tandem tag along with center gate,
,New deck, 5 new tires, new paint,
Asking $3,000. 251-2437. 997-
0901. 4/1,tfn,nc
Bedroom Set $150., Console TV
'$25. King size bed with good mat-
tress $75. Double bed $50.,
*Sewing Machine in Cabinet $50.
:Call 997-2541 or 386-647-7471
2/8/13, pd












*:'4


SPACIOUS Newly Renovated
1/1 apartments and 2/1 Furnished,
short or long term. w/AC, Laundry,
Parking. Also office space.
Call 850-212-3142
12/07,tfn,c
PRIME Downtown OFFICE
Space Cherry Street Commons.
750 Sq. Ft. $540. Month.
500 Sq. Ft. $460. Month.
Call Katrina at 510-9512
8/31 ,tfn,c
JEFFERSON PLACE APTS.,
1468 S. Waukeenah St. Office 300,
Monticello. 1 & 2 BR/HUD
vouchers accepted. 850-997-6964
TTYL 711 Equal Housing
Opportunity.
10/12,tfn,c

Coopers Ridge New Home
Spacious 1600 sq. ft. 3 Bdr./2 Ba
with 2 car Garage Close to every-
thing. $950. Mo. Matt Robinson
942-7250 Evenings.
1l l/14,tfn,c
Modular Home on 1/2 acre, near
JCKC, 3BR/ 2Bth, 1500 Sq.Ft.,
No smokers/no pets. Call 997-0342
1/23,25,30,2/1,6,8,13,pd


Room For Rent
"Are You A Woman on Social
Security?" "Would you like to live
on a farm?" Enjoy the animals,
STORE meet people, private kitchen, fresh
your h- chicken eggs, tv, washer & dryer.
your hr- $400 a month, security
our new Clearance Required
850-342-9918 After 6 p.m.
5/12,tfn,c 2/13,15,20,22,27,29,pd
SERVICE: FOR RENT 870 sq. ft.
, tree and Office/Retail space on Busy N.
s. Contact Jefferson St. $500 month includes
933-3458. utilities. Call 997-3666.
7/4tfn,c 2/13,15,20,22,27,29,c


Mobile Home Lot- 1 Acre
Cleared and Ready to go. Close to
town. $34,900. 942-7250
1/4,tfn,c


Simply the Bestf
850-997-4340
www.TimPeary.com
Selling Real Estate Since 1972
Experience can help!
One Acre Clark Rd $25,000

Under contract Waukeenah 14
acres $9,800/ac

SOLD 0' Down
3/1 on 1 ac $135,000
Spacious near US 27 3/2 hm,
pool, 2 outbuildings 2.5 ac


SOLD Springfield Church Road
5 acres Awooded hillside $60000

Curtis Side Rd 2/1 cabin on 2+ac
asking $135,000

Thompson Valley Rd 2/2 home
733 ac mostly" cleared $195,000

SOLD Rainbow's End 3/2hse
29.7ac pool $379,000

Great Location 3/2 home 1.56
ac, big barn, mreen hse $165,000

Hay Spur Rd 6.73 or 11.73 ac
planted pines/oaks $12,000/ac

Murmuring Creek 5.2 acres.
septic tank $729W00

The Budd House 4/2 high
ceilings/great porches, $385,000

Priced to Sell! 5 hillside acres in
Aucilla Shores $50,000

Mixed Use Property 12 acres 4
houses/ac allowed $36,500/ac

Very Pretty 5 lovely acres on
paved road $15,500 per acre

Horse Farm 29 acres DW
w/fireplace, stables. $329,000

Deal! 4/3,5 ac/fenced/2car
garage/pool/guest hse, shop
pasture/100pecans $365,000

Prime Commercial Property
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acs $650,000

Waukeenah Highway 2799 ac
pasture, fenced, pond $545,000

Income Prop 3 MI on 4 acres 4
allowed $118,500

Timberland 156 ac somepines
divide by Hwy$2750/ac
RHN LLS A\ ,UILALL


The District Board of Trustees
invites applications from
innovative and visionary leaders for the


PRESIDENT OF
NORTH FLORIDA COMMUNITY


COLLEGE


The College is in its
50th year of serving six rural
counties in North Florida.
See our Web Site at
www.nfcc.edu
for details and qualifications.
EOE


FIRE CHIEF -Salary $34,819 -
$43,524 Jefferson County, Fla.
(pop 15,000) Jefferson County
Government is accepting
applications for a Fire Chief.
Jefferson County is an equal
opportunity employer, and does
not discriminate on the basis of
race, color, national origin, sex,
religion, age, or disability in
employment or the position of
service. Job Description: Job
description and applications may
be obtained at
www.co.jeffersonfl.us or at the
Jefferson County Courthouse
Room 10, Monticello, FL 32344.
Applications accepted until
position is filled.
2/i,tfn,c


BRYNWOOD CENTER
OPEN POSITIONS,

CNAs

7am 3pm n
11lpm 7am
Full-time and Part-time
Excellent Pay and Benefits

1656 S. Jefferson St.
Monticello

850-997-1800 or
Fax resume to
850-997-7269


Full-time positions open for
South Thomas County Plantation:

.$cou/Bifr DolTrainer


I Excellent pay and benefits, including
health, dental and life insurance;
S... housing or housing allowance.

Manager
P.O. Box 7476,
,Thomasville, GA 31758


You've Got It!


Somebody


Wants It!
I "I A


Medtronic has pulled its Sprint Fidelis defibrillation leads from the market
after fractures in the leads were linked to five patient deaths. Patients
with these leads may have received a warning letter from the manufacturer.
A fractured lead "can cause the defibrillator to deliver unneces-
sary shocks or not operate at all."
If you have a Sprint Fidelis lead, your Patient ID card should contain one of
the following four sets of nuribers:
6930 6931 6948 6949
(These numbers may be shown at the beginning of a longer set of numbers on your ID card.),
In addition, the St. Jude Riata defibrillator lead has been reported to
punch holes in the heart and has been linked to at least
one death,


IDenisA, L o


STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADS FOR
2/13/2008 THROUGH 2/17/2008
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Run.your ad STATEWIDE! You can run your classified ad in over
100 Florida newspapers for $475. Call this newspaper or
(866)742-1373 for more details or visit: www.florida-
classifieds.com.
APARTMENT FOR RENT
Always Renting? Buy a 3bd 2ba Home only $200/mo! 5%dn,
20yrs @ 8%apr! For Listings (800)482-9419.

$477/Mo! 4BR/2BA HUD Home! (5% down 20 years @ 8% apr)
More Homes Available from $199/Mo! For listings call (800)366-
9783 Ext 5669.
9783 Ext 5669. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

FIRE YOUR BOSS & BE YOUR OWN BOSS! Say goodbye to
your commute and long hours. Make CEO income from anywhere.
No experience necessary. Training available. 20K-80K+
(Monthly) Don't Believe, Don't Call! www.wealthwithintegrity.biz
(650)954-8031

ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE Do you earn $800 in a day? 30
Machines, Free Candy All for $9,995. (888)629-9968 B02000033.
CALL US: We will not be undersold!

AMERICA'S FAVORITE Coffee Dist. Guaranteed Accts. Multi
Billion $ Industry. Unlimited Profit Potential. Free Info. 24/7
(800)729-4212.

CARS FOR SALE
$500 POLICE IMPOUNDS Cars from $500! Tax Repos, US
Marshall and IRS sales! Cars, Trucks, SUV's, Toyota's, Honda's,
Chevy's, more! For Listings Call (800)706-1743 x2486.

Police Impounds for Sale! 93 Honda Civic $300! 95 Toyota
Camry $900! For listings call (800)366-9813 Ext 9271.
EMPLOYMENT SERVICES
Get Crane Trained! Crane/Heavy Equip Training. National
Certification. Placement Assistance. Financial Assistance. Georgia
School of Construction. www.Heavy5.com Use code "FLCNH" or
call (866)218-2763.

.Post Office Now Hiring! Avg. Pay ..,, l,-u t_.15._' Incl. Fed,
Ben, OT. Offer placed by Exam Services, not aff t w'USPS which
does hiring. Call (866)713-4492. Fee Req.
EQUIPMENT FOR SALE
SAWMILLS from only $2,990.00--Convert your. LOGS TO
VALUABLE LUMBER with your own Norwood portable band
s. minull. Log skidders also atalilable.
www.norwoodsawmills.com/300N FREE Information: (800)578-
,1363-Ext: 300-N.
HELP WANTED
Drivers: LOVE YOUR JOB! Bonus & Paid Orientation 36-43cpm
Earn over $1000 weekly Excellent Benefits Class A and 3 mos
recent OTR required (800)635-8669.

Driver: DON'T JUST START YOUR CAREER, START IT
RIGHT! Company Sponsored CDL training in 3 weeks. Must be
21. Have CDL? Tuition reimbursement! CRST. (866)917-2778, ..'

Our top regional driver made $68,975 in 2007! How much did
YOU earn? $.45 per mile? Make more in 2008! Home most
weekends! HEARTLAND EXPRESS (800)441-4c953
www.heartlandexpress.com.

ROAD RULES TRAVEL USA Tired of watching road rules?
Make 2008 Great! Create your own adventure? Now hiring 1-0
Sharp Guys and Gals to travel to major US cities to represent
sports, fashion & news publications. $500.00 sign on bonus. Hotel
& Transportation provided. For interview, Beth Monday-Friday
(800)537-7256 http://www.MyTravelJob.coni Call Today! Travel
Today!
HOMES FOR RENT
5bd 2ba Home only $425/mo! 3bd 2ba Home only $199/mo! More
1-4bd Homes Available! For Listings (800)482-9419.

Foreclosure! 3BR/2BA $23,300! Only $199/Mo! 5% down 20
years @ 8% apr. Buy, 4/BR $477/Mo! For listings (800)366-9783
Ext 5798.

HUD HOMES! 7BR $199/mo! 2/BR Foreclosure! $246/mo! Stop
Renting! 5% dw, 20 yrs @ 8% apr For Listings (800)366-9783 Ext
5853.
HOMES FOR SALE
Greenville, SC Own a Beautiful, New 3BD/2BA Home for only
5% down & Owner Will. Finance. Monthly pmts., From $695.00
Call (888)579-0275.
BANK FORECLOSURES! Homes from $10.000! 1-3 bedroom
available! Repos, REOs, HUD, FHA, etc. These homes must sell.
For listings call (800)706-1746 Ext 4731.

Foreclosures! Buy l-4bd Homes from $199/mo Financing Refs
Available! 5%dn, 20yrs @ '. .ipi' For Listings & info (800)482-
9419.

Bank Repos! 3bd 2ba Home only $35k! 4bd 2.5ba Home only
$50k! Payments from $199/mo! 5%dn, 20yrs @ 8%apr! Fqor
Listings & info (800)482-9419.

A Bank Repo! 7/BR $12,900! 3/BR $11,000! Homes from
$199/Mo! 5% down 20 years @ 8% apr For listings (800)366-
9783 Ext 5796.
LAND FQR SALE
NC MOUNTAINS 2 acres with great view, very private, big trees,
waterfalls & large public lake nearby., $69,500. Call neow
(Si6 789-8535.

COASTAL GA 1/2 acre+ $89,900. Incredible community, water
& marsh views, Year-round temperate weather in the Golden Isles.
Enjoy boating, fishing, walking, flamily/retirement living. Great
fini.cimm available. CALL (888)513-9958 Visit www.pleninsula-
goldenisles.com. M
MISCELLANEOUS


DIVORCE$275-$350*COVERS children, etc. Only one signature
required! "Excludes govt. fees! Call weekdays (800)4(2-2000,
ext.600. (8am-6pm) Alta Divorce, LLC. Established 1977.


FREE 4-NIGHT VACATION!
Donate Car Boat RV Motorcycle
1-800-227-2643

www.boatangel.com


10 Monticello News









Wednesday, February 13, 2008 Monticello News 11A






LEGALS


NOTICE OF INTENTION TO ADOPT ORDINANCE


UliPCOMIN(; JSCC BO %RDlOF DIRECTORS MEETING
The Jefl'er-on Citizen Ceiinter. Inc. ill Ih i,, ii B,.jd I Direcl,,r m,'il-
I-n- on Thurda). February) 21.200)8 at 4:tUU pi.m 'he nictin:II '% I beh
held .t thl-e JeTferson Senior Citizen Center. Inc. 1155 N..Jefferson St.
Monticello. FL 32344.


NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
Noenie it herebh, i'r. en tIh ptr~tiint [ .in Amcrded \\r nt of Ew\cIuniin I-.-
'ocd in the Counr', C uriH .,t H -ilI-h r.'.ugh C urInt,. Flori idj...n the 3rd ,.i,
ot ianu.rf\. _'i in llhe c.iu.e RINKER MATERIALS CORPORA-
TION is Plaintiff and CENTRAL CONSTRUCTION SERVE ICES.
INC and (CIAR\ AKINS .re Delend.int bheingl C.iae Numiibei ih-24136
Irln s.d C uiri, 1 D;.id C H._.bhb ..i. SherifflT r leffermc n CountL\. Fl,...d.i.
ha\e le ,icd up...n .ill ihe 1 igh Uitle And inleie. ot f ile .,bo'.e nauied De-
tendani G \R' -KINS [*. he t..il.!!,-.' fin de crihed proper t .. ii

Lot 31 Ner Hopc SLuhdiimion ORB 412 P429

And on the lili d.n% .1 Febhi ir'. 1i iS. > t ie 1ui1 !.i n o1 tUli .Itler-
o..p Counti, Sherilt ti, Oth .e L.cated .il I I Indutltr.l P.irk in Mo..niicell.'.
Floridj :.t the n.. n h.ut r. .' r ., <,>..n .d-lL .1 i p... bible I ill oirti t lor aile
ll :. tLhe -i1d Dctenid.nt G 1 R_ \KIN's rclit. tnlc. nmeree t in tle .ilore-
.iId prop r t, aI public .. uLcr\ .Lnd I ill cel I e l.I '. IhleCIC ti 1. .ill p tl11
lien. en. unrlu brancc. .id ludg enie i'. itl .i lto he higheil bidder lrl
C.ASH IN HAND -ic pru.ceedJ .:. be appliedd :.1 tor he\ in. b .e I the
pa. nient ,1 i tlnd ihe ,..it taei i el o h' jhe .bu e.-nen ii.net d \etiiinri

1-2 3 -O a l- 11, l ".-i r.,i 2- 1 .- l1


Thomas County Active
History Timeline

Presented by Thomas University Saturday March
1st 10-6 pm Hosted by Coalson Inn and Plantation
(formerly Melhana/Melrose) on 319S, 4 miles
south of Thomasville. In cooperation with Thomas
County historical organizations.
Active learning for all ages! Please join us for demonstrations and for-
mal presentations of Georgia history focusing on the eras illustrated in
Thomas County, Georgia. For more information, contact Misty
Penton at mpenton@thomasu.edu or April Penton at
apenton@thomasu.edu or call 229-226-1621.


S Education that

STRAINS w S rs.
U TRANSF@DS


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: after a continuation of the February 7,
2008 County Commission meeting, the Board of County Commissioners
of Jefferson County, Florida, on February 21, 2008 at 6:00 P.M., or soon
thereafter, in the court room of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1 Court-
house Circle, Monticello, Florida, will consider adopting an ordinance the
title and substance of said proposed ordinance being:
ORDINANCE NO. 2008 -_

AN ORDINANCE TO BE KNOWN AS THE JEFFERSON COUNTY
COMPREHENSIVE IMPACT FEE ORDINANCE; AMENDING AND
RESTATING IN ITS ENTIRETY ORDINANCE NO. 05-01, THE JEF-
FERSON COUNTY FIRE RESCUE AND EMERGENCY MEDICAL
SYSTEM IMPACT FEE ORDINANCE; PROVIDING FOR GENERAL
DEFINITIONS, GENERAL LEGISLATIVE FINDINGS AND RULES OF
CONSTRUCTION APPLICABLE TO ALL IMPACT FEES; PROVIDING
FOR MUNICIPAL PARTICIPATION; IMPOSING FIRE RESCUE IM-
PACT FEES; PROVIDING DEFINITIONS AND FINDINGS APPLICA-
BLE TO FIRE RESCUE IMPACT FEES; ADOPTING THE FIRE
RESCUE IMPACT FEE STUDY; PROVIDING FOR THE USE OF FIRE
RESCUE IMPACT FEES; PROVIDING FOR AN ALTERNATIVE FIRE
RESCUE IMPACT FEE CALCULATION; IMPOSING EMERGENCY
MEDICAL SYSTEM IMPACT FEES; PROVIDING DEFINITIONS AND
FINDINGS APPLICABLE TO EMERGENCY MEDICAL SYSTEM IM-
PACT FEES; PROVIDING FOR THE USE OF EMERGENCY MEDICAL
SYSTEM IMPACT FEES; ADOPTING THE EMERGENCY MEDICAL
SYSTEM IMPACT FEE STUDY; PROVIDING FOR AN ALTERNATIVE
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SYSTEM IMPACT FEE CALCULATION;
IMPOSING ROAD IMPACT FEES; PROVIDING DEFINITIONS AND
FINDINGS APPLICABLE TO ROAD IMPACT FEES; ADOPTING THE
ROAD IMPACT FEE STUDY; PROVIDING FOR THE USE OF ROAD
IMPACT FEES: PROVIDING FOR AN ALTERNATIVE ROAD IMPACT
FEE CALCULATION; IMPOSING LAW ENFORCEMENT IMPACT
FEES; PROVIDING DEFINITIONS AND FINDINGS APPLICABLE TO
LAW ENFORCEMENT IMPACT FEES: ADOPTING THE LAW EN-
FORCEMENT IMPACT FEE STUDY; PROVIDING FOR THE USE OF


il -
~*


WE TAKE THE
DR14TS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


LAW ENFORCEMENT IMPACT FEES; PROVIDING FOR AN ALTER-
NATIVE LAW ENFORCEMENT IMPACT FEE CALCULATION; PRO-
VIDING FOR EXEMPTIONS; PROVIDING FOR AN ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT IMPACT FEE INCENTIVE PROGRAM; PROVIDING
FOR CHANGES IN SIZE AND USE; PROVIDING FOR DEVELOPER
CONTRIBUTION CREDITS; PROVIDING FOR REVIEW HEARINGS;
PROVIDING FOR APPLICABILITY; REQUIRING REVIEW OF THE
IMPACT FEE STUDIES AND THE IMPACT FEE ORDINANCE; PRO-
VIDING FOR DECLARATION OF EXCLUSION FROM THE ADMIN-
ISTRATIVE PROCEDURES ACT; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY;
PROVIDING FOR NOTICE OF IMPACT FEE RATES AND REVI-
SIONS; PROVIDING FOR ACCOUNTING AND REPORTING OF IM-
PACT FEES; PROVIDING FOR INCLUSION IN THE JEFFERSON
COUNTY CODE AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

The proposed ordinance may be inspected by the public at the Of-
fice of the Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners located in the Jef-
ferson County Courthouse during regular business hours.
All persons wishing to speak upon the adoption of this ordinance are
invited to attend the meeting-and they shall be heard.
Should any person decide to appeal any decision made by the Board at
this meeting, such person will need a record of the proceeding and may need
to ensure that a verbatim record of these proceedings is made.
DATED THIS 8th day of February, 2008.


ATTEST:
KIRK REAMS, CLERK


By: Kirk Reams. Clerk


BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA

By: Felix "Skeet" Toyner, Chairman


02-13-08


100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work Frame Straightening
FREE ESTIMATES INSURANCE WORK WELCOME

1630 E. Jackson St. Thomasville, GA
(located behind Langdale Auto Mall)
229-226-2077


Stk#T8059


0% APR 60 mos. @ s339/mos.


or A Low Price of 14 997


Stk#R8005


0% APR 60 mos. @ 499/mos.


or A Low Price of 9 1


l sWe Want Your News!

Call Us At 991-3568






Wednesday, February 13, 2008


a ALENTINES

as ,.,FEBRUARY


AY


14TI


LOO1104W gFOR 9 ROW tWMIC gETgWMY?
Take your Cove to new places with our romantic getaway.
Live in the moment ... remember forever.


,1 Escape! Romance Packa e
An evening with your Valentine in one of our luxurious rooms. Complete
Switch roseypetals onyour bed, a romantic dinner from our Valentine's menu
for twos. Endl your stay with a cookeato order breakfast in the morning.
..n ou r TEltegantly simple. Simply elegant ~
$99.95
Or
Champagne! 'Romance Package
k'j 'Romantic night in our Jacuzzi Suite wit/i rose petals, champagne in the Suite,
a specialcdinner from our Valentine's 'Menu. Your enchantedevening willend
with a cookedto orcer breakfast. A night ofyampering anddreams for two
$149.95
Quality Inn Monticello
2616 Gamble Road Monticello, Florida 32344
(850) 997-0020 Fax (850) 997-1568
Please call (850) 997-0020 to reserve your package. All packages must be reserved in advance of arrival. There is a 24 hour cancellation policy.


,Oyster Jiouse
Under New Management
Fresh Seafood & Oyster Bar
2571 U.S. Hwy 98, Perry, FL
850-584-4966
-T Monday 11:00 am 8:00 pm
Tues Thurs Fri Sat
11:00 am 9:60 pm 11:00 am 10:00 pm
Sun 11:00 am 4:00 pm
"The Finest People in the World Walk Through Our Doors"
Owners Tonia & Duran Wright


Monticello's Full Service Bakery
T This Valentines Day ,
Small Cakes for Two
S* Fresh Baked Breads
220 West Washington St. Cookies & Pies
Moticello, FL 32344 Birthday & Wedding Cakes
850-997-2127 Free Wireless Internet Access
Tuesday Saturday 7am 2pm


prefect party
scene


Birthday Parties Graduations
Weddings Proms Corporate Functions
School and Church Functions
www.actionattractionpartyrental.com
850-575-7368


AND UP $6500 IN REITATES ON SELECT 2008
SUPERDUTY'S IN STOCK! GOOD TILL
FEBRUARY 13TH ONLY
DISCLAIMER: TAXES ACCESSED BEFORE REBATES, ALL
\ PRICES PLUS TAX TITLE TAQ AND $299.00 ADMIN FEE.
SA SUPERDUTY REBATES INCLUDE $2000.00 SUPERDUTY
A 6A OWNER LOYALTY 0% APR WA.C
X TIER I AND TIER 0 THROU(I-1 FMCC.


Bring Your Special Valentin
to Wiregrass this Valentine's Day
for Live M-usic & Candlelight'Dinn
Special menu
St c & Seafood
S ul ... Fu ba'r cial drinks
at special prices
Red Champagne available at
$515. per bottle
103 S .Washington St. Quitman, GA
229-263-5550


e

er


APPLY


QA&koI


V


t-c'i-


Monticello News 12A


4.-







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'csfl. ~4 ~ ~~:- ~ I
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PATH WAY
"BBBS~i ^S~ss^SSSS~si ^^^* ^^^^ i^^^ yi |r ^^^_ ^^^*_ ^^fi~r ^fV y^ ^'4


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4 1 10-91 i 1:1M d r.






2B Monticello News


9~~4&&W alawY


Wednesday, February 13, 2008


Pat's Jewelry
<& Gifts


150 W. Washington


Street


Monticello, FL.
997-5912

Near Jake's across from Courthouse
Tuesday thru Friday 10:00 4:00
Saturday 10:00 6:00
Closed Sunday &S Monday

Layaway Available

Comne in and register for a beautiful
necklace to be given away on
February 19th.


HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING
850-973-8543 Hert

qBill




The average home spends about $2500 annually on energy bills. Your local
Aire Serv specialist can show you fact saving ways to increase your home's comfort
while avoiding high energy costs.
Have your system inspected and cleaned by a professional for
safety and performance.
Have your air distribution ducts checked for leaks and cleaned
every 5-years.
Install a programmable, digital thermostat.
Change your filter(s) every 30-days.
Call Aire Serv today, and discover ways to improve efficiency and comfort at the
same time. $20.00 OFF a Service Call
Aire Serv is offering you $20.00 OFF your next
service call of $100 or more.
Not Valid with any other offer.
Valid through 2/29/08


Wets lsf Salvation

Isaiah 12:3 says, Therefore with joy shall ye draw water out
of the wells of salvation. God intends for us to have joy. He
also expects us to actively access the wells of salvation, to
draw, to experience depth in our Christian life.
What are wells of salvation? The Holy Spirit, the word of
God, the church of God, the heart and mind of God are all
wells of salvation.
We gain joy as we return to these wells to draw. The well
of God's grace by the blood of Christ washes away sin and
springs life eternal and abundant.
Jesus says in John 4 that His love becomes a well in us,
springing out of us unto everlasting life. This happens when
we share God's love so that others receive it and drink. God
proves in Numbers 20 that He can turn even a rock hard
heart into a well of life.
How deep are the wells in us? Genesis 26 speaks of wells
called oath (our word), contention (our fight), hatred, strife,
and enlargement (our hope). What is offered as our wells
overflow? Peter speaks of empty wells. Have we nothing to
offer? We have hope, love, forgiveness, joy, peace, and ever-
lasting life by Jesus Christ to refresh us and to offer others
who are thirsting.


(j"i6majamm kArq







Wednesday, February 13, 2008


Meet Tim And Beverly Buchh oltz,


Pastors Of Transforming Life Church


DEBBIE SNAPP
Spiritual Pathways
Staff Writer
A new church, Transforming Life
Church Assembly of God, has come to
the community.
Pastors are the Revs. Tim and
Beverly Buchholtz, who felt called by
God to come to this area in 1999 and have
since fallen in love with the community.
They have been in full time ministry
with the Assemblies of God for more
than 10 years.
Tim had spent 20 years in a success-
ful career when God called him to. a
higher purpose. As a senior manager at
one of the industry's leading computer
and electronic firms, he pursued suc-
cess and what he felt to be God's
ordained balance between career, family
and serving the local church.
Beverly, a teacher, mom, and suc-
cessful writer for a newspaper in the
Chicago area, also felt life was going
along as planned. When a revival came
to their home church in suburbafi
Chicago, however, Tim and Beverly
quickly found God's plan for success
had nothing to do with their plans or
careers.


In May of 1995,
while praying
together at the altar,
God spoke to Tim
and Beverly saying,
"My hand is upon
you. I am calling you .
forth as full-time MOO
ministers for me."
They made a com-
mitment that no
matter what the-cost,
they would go wher-
ever, and do whatev-
er God had destined
for them.
They began to
prepare for this min-
istry by completing
their ministerial
studies with Berean
University and
receiving their min-
isterial credentials Tim and Beve
with the Assemblies
of God.
In June of 1997 they launched into a
full time itinerant ministry, spreading
revival fire as evangelists and equipping
others for the work of the Lord through


workshops and semi-
nars all over the
United States.
Tim and Beverly
felt called, however,
to the West Florida
area. In response to
this calling, in 1999
they moved here as
nationally appointed
Assemblies of God
US Missionaries.
They established
the Urban Bible
Training Center pro-
gram for the south-
east region as well as
the West Florida
District School of
Ministry They con-
tinue to direct both
of these training pro-
grams, which are
ly BuchholtZ helping men and
women, prepare to
answer the call of God.
God impressed upon Tim and
Beverly to plant a new church in their
community in 2007. The church was
born in August, with 12 launch team


members determined to touch their
community with the love of Christ.
It is this new church named
Transforming Life Church that has
come to touch our community "TLC is a
place where lives are being transformed
by God through engaging worship, gen-
uine relationships and serving others",
says the TLC vision statement.
This exciting new church will be
launched on March 2, 2008. It is located
at 7337A Old Lloyd Road (Hwy 158), 1.1
mile east of the flashing light on
Highway 59 in Lloyd. Service times are
10:30 am on Sunday mornings and 7:00
pm on Wednesday nights.
Prior to the official launch on
March 2, Pastors Tim and Beverly want
to extend an invitation to anyone who
has an interest in volunteering to be a
part of this new church in the areas of
children's ministry, youth ministry,
nursery care, sound/video/multimedia,
etc.
Contact the church for more infor-
mation on these exciting opportunities
to be a part of TLC at 997-TLC7 (997-
8527). You can also visit the TLC web-
site:
www.TransformingLifeChurch.com


WAINRIGHT'S LAND CLEARING

&


PROPERTY ENHANCEMENTS, LLC


Z Site Clearing

Z Heavy Brush Cutting

Z Debris Removal

Z Excavating


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Monticello News 3B






Wednesday, February 13, 2008


Central Baptist Church


Celebrates


Emerald Greene Kinsley
Publisher
Spiritual Pathways
The Central Baptist Church
celebrated its 100th Anniversary
Homecoming on Sunday, February
3, 2008.
Approximately 200 people
gathered at the church for the
special celebration, beginning at
10:30 a.m. Members and visitors
filled the pews and chairs had to
be brought in for the overflow.
Interim Pastor Kevin Harvin
welcomed everyone and spoke
briefly of the homecoming day.
Special music was enjoyed
throughout the morning by
Rebekah Aman (singing "Three
Wooden Crosses" and "Amazing
Grace,") and by the Couver
Sisters (Sondra Joyner,
Shaughnessy Shannon, and Cindy
Shannon), singing "I Saw The
Light" and "We Are Standing On
Holy Ground."


100th


Dee Counts presented a
Power-Point presentation with
pictures of past members and
current members, pictures of var-
ious celebrations throughout the
years, softball team pictures,
musicals and Christmas plays pic-
tures. A special touch was the
pictures showing the church dur-
ing its building process through
the years.
The guest speaker of the
morning was Jerry Windsor of
the Florida Baptist Historical
Society. He gave a history of the
Central Baptist Church, that was
complemented by the booklet that
was made available after the serv-
ice. He also gave an inspiring
message centered on Matthew
16:13.
After church services, all
members and guests enjoyed a
delicious covered dish dinner,
prepared by the church mem-
bers.


Anniversary


Jerry Windsor presented Interim Pastor Kevin Harvin a plaque honor-
ing the 100th anniversary of the Central Baptist Church.


Dorothy Lewis (left) is recognized as the longest continuous member
of Central Baptist Church. She became a member in 1964 and has been
the church clerk since 1974. Standing with her are Elaine and Joe Holden.

Spiritual Pathways Photos By Emerald Greene Kinsley


The "oldest" member of the church (having a membership card dating
back to 1952) is Delma Ward.
Delma graduated from Jefferson County High School in 1960, and is
retired from the Air Force, and now resides in Crestview. Pictured with
him is his wife, Rosina.


e


413 Monticello News






Wednesday, February 13, 2008


Central Baptist Church


100th


Celebrates


Anniversary


No homecoming can be a success without the "behind the scenes" help. Pictured left to right, while helping
in the kitchen, are: Lucy McKown, Donna Smith, Lavonne Wynn, Carol Kisamore, and Dorothy Lewis.


The Central Baptist Church's congregation enjoyed the special music
that was given by (left to right): Sondra Joyner, Shaughnessy Shannon,
and Cindy Shannon.


Rebekah Aman graced the con-
gregation with her special music,
during the Central Baptist Church's
100th Anniversary Homecoming
celebration. She sang "Three
Wooden Crosses" and "Amazing
Grace."


Jennifer Pitts (left) and Dorothy Holden were on hand during the
Homecoming celebration and helped out by serving tea to all the guests.


Monticello News 513








6B Monticello News


First Baptist Church
325 West Washington Street
Monticello. 997-2349
Pastor Thermon E. Moore

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Morning Worship ................11:00 AM
Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 PM
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 PM
Children's Church Ages 4-6 ...........11:30 AM
Nursery for all services

Christ Episcopal Church
425 Cherry St. Monticello 997-4116
Father Mal Jopling

Sunday Holy Eucharist. 8:30 AM
Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 AM
Tuesday Bible Study.... 8:30 AM
Wednesday Evening Prayer.................... 6:00 PM

First Presbyterian Church
290 E. Dogwood St. *997-2252
www.monticellopresbyterianchurch.org
Rev Sharon Schiler

Sunday School 9:45 A4M
Worship 11:00 AM
Wednesday Fellowship 5:30 PM

Casa Bianca Missionary
Baptist Church
Highway 259 Monticello 997-5018
Min. Tobbie Berrian IH, Pastor

Sunday School 9:30 AM
Morning Worship 11:00 AM
Thursday Bible Study 7:30 PM


To add your church services to this directory,
please contact at Monticello News, 997-3568.


Codv Pentecostal
Holiness Church
3862 Tram Rd. Monticello 997-6774
Pastors Donnie and Nancy Thomas

Sunday School .. .....................10:00 AM
Sunday Morning Worship ........... 11:00 ANM
Sunday Evening Worship ..............6:00 PM
Wednesday Worship ................. 7:00 PMI
Wednesday Youth Worship ............6:30 PM



First Baptist Church
of Lloyd
124 St. Louis St. Lloyd 997-5309
www.fbclloyd.comn
Pastor George L. Smith

Sunday
Praise & Worship......................... 8:30 AM
Bible Study .................................. 9:45 AM
Praise & Worship .......................11:00 AM
AWANA (3yrs 6th Grade)...........5:00 PM
Praise & Worship ......................... 6:00 PMI
Adult Choir Practice....................7:00 PM
Wednesday
Rock Solid Youth (Grades 7-12)
Praise & Worship, Bible Study,
Xtrenme Games
(K-6th Grade)
Joyful Sounds Children's Choir....6:30 PMi
Prayer Meeting Bible Study .........7:00 PMI
2nd Thursday
Lloyd Silver Saints .................... 11:00 AM



Restored Glory
Christian Center
1287 S. Jefferson St. Monticello.- 997-0253
Pastors Eddie and Veronica Yon
www.restoredglory.org
*
Sunday ....................................1... 0:00 AM
Monday ForRealVille (Teen Mins) .... 7-8 PM
Thursday....................................... 7:00 PM


Wednesday, February 13, 2008


First United Methodist ChL
325 W Walnut St. Monticello 997-57
Interim Pastor Tom Price
Sunday Praise & Worship. ..................... 8:30
Sunday SchooL... .9:45
Traditional Worship ......11:00
Youth Group ........5:30
Wednesday
Adult Bible Stu:dy .....4:30
Childr-en's husic Academy 5:00
Prayer Group.... 5:30
Fellowship Meal 6:00


Harvest Christian Cente
1599 Springhollow Rd. Monticello
Pastor Marvin Graham

Sunday Discipleship Class..................... 9::30
Sunday Worship. .....................................10:30
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00
Wed. Young People Bible Study .........7....:00
Wednesday Counselling ...............5:30-8:30
New Life Ministry
Tuesday Bible Study. 7:00
Sunday Worship 9-.4
Thursday Jail Ministry 7-9
AA Tuesday 8:00

Wacissa Pentecostal
Holiness Church
152 Tram Rd. Wacissa, FL 997-463
Rex. Jehn Wesley Cain

Sunday School 10:00
Morning Worship 11:00
Evening Worship 6:00
Wednesday Evening Worship & Messiahs
Messengers Youths 7:00


A little girl was talking to her teacher about whales.
The teacher said it was physically impossible for a whale to
swallow a human because even though they were a very large
mammal, their throat was very small.
The little girl stated, "Jonah was swallowed by a whale."
The teacher reiterated, '"A whale could not swallow a
human; it was impossible.
The little girl said, "When I get to Heaven I will ask Jonah."
The teacher asked, "What if Jonah went to Hell?"
The little girl replied, "Then you ask him."








Wednesday, February 13, 2008


Ongoing DEBBIESNAPP
Staff Writer
SH o i cSpiritual Pathways
Keep the on-going missions at
the First United Methodist Church
A t F first in your hearts and prayers, as so
many are affected by these gener-
ous contributions.
M etnhodist Some of the on-going missions
include the Jefferson County
Refuge House, the collection of alu-
minum can tabs, the food pantry,
the collection of Ensure and


Depends, school supplies for the
area schools, toiletry and other per-
sonal items for our military person-
nel, and supplies for the TMH emer-
gency room clothing closet.
Grey containers are provided
and marked, for the collection of
donations in the back area of the
Family Ministry Center. 325 West
Walnut Street.
Contact the church at 997-5545
for questions about this and other
ministries offered at FUMC.


rch St. Margaret Catholic Church
1565 E. Washington Monticello 973-2428
(One mile east of the Court House on US 90)
Fr. John Gordon
Sunday M ass........... ...............................11:00 AMI
Wednesday followed by Novena............. 7:00 PMl
Saturday followed by Adoration &
Sacrament of Reconciliation ........ 9:00 AMI
M Spanish Mass Sec. Sat. of the rmth ........ 7:00 PM

)M

Capital Heights Baptist Church
7150 Apalachee Pkx\y Tallahassee
Chbaptistchurch.org
Pastor Derrick BLUTUS
850-345-0425
Youth Pastor Ron Thrash
850-459-6190
Sunday School................1..........................0:00 .AlM
Sunday Worship.................................. 11:00 AM
Children's Chapel ..........11:00 AM
Sunday Evening .................. 6:00 PN I
Wednesday Evening.. 7:00 PM I
Prayer Meeting and Bible Study
Classes for Students


New Hope Ministries Church
of God
415 E Palmer Mill Rd. Monticello 997-1119
newhope415@yahoo
M Pastors David & Paige Rapson
M Sunday School 10:00 AM
M Sunday Worship.. 11:00 AM-
Sunday Prayer 6:00 PM
M Wednesday Family Training Hr ........... 7:00 PM


Waukeenah United Methodist
81 Methodist Church Rd
Waukeenah 997-2171
Pastor Ralph L. Wrightstone

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Worship......... 11:00 AM
Youth Group 7:00 PM
Wednesday
Choir Practice 7:00 PM
Youth Group 7:00 PM
Family Fellowship 2nd Thursday of each month


St. Phillip AME Church
Hwy 27 S (1 mile south of Hwy 59)
Monticello 997-4226
Reverend J.W Tisdale
Sunday School 9:30 AM
Sunday Worship 11:00 AM
Wednesday
Prayer & Bible 7:00 PM

Calvary Baptist Church
285 Magnolia St. Monticello 997-2165
www.cbcflorida.org
Dr David E. Walker, Pastor

Sunday School........................................ 9:45 AM
Sunday Morning ................................1.... 1:00 .AM
Sunday Evening. 6:30 PM
Wednesday Evening ............................. 7:00 PM
TRAC Club for teens...(Wednesday .... 7:00 PM)

Wacissa United Methodist
Church
14492 Waukeenah Hw' PO. Box 411
Wacissa 997-2179 / 997-1769
Rev Howard R. Grimmnenga

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Morning... 11:00 AM
Wednesday
Prayer Meeting 6:00 PM
Youth Group 6:00 PM
Choir Practice 7:30 PM


Indian Springs Baptist Church
5593 Veterans Memorial Drive (Hwy 59)
Tallahassee 850-893-5296
www.indianspringsbaptistchurch.com
Rev Greg Roberts

Sunday School 9:45 AM
Sunday Worship 11:00 AM
Children's Worship.. 11:00 AM
Wednesday
Fellowship Meal 7:00 PM
Prayer Meeting 7:45 PM


Elizabeth Baptist Church
4124 Bassett Dairy Road Monticello 997-8444
www.ebcmonticello@hcs.com
Pastor, J.L. McNeal
Student Pastor, Don Self

Sunday: Bible Study 9:45 AM
Worship Service 11:00 AM
Choir Practice 6:00 PM
Worship Service 7:00 PM
Wednesday
Children/Student Ministry 3:30 PM
Senior Adult Choir Practice................6:00 PM
RA's, GA's, Mission Friends & Youth.. 6:30 PM
Bible Study/Prayer Meeting...............7:00 PM

St. Rilla Missionary
Baptist Church
13 Barrington Road Lloyd 997-1951
Pastor James E Mack

Sunday School 10:00 AM
Morning Worship 11:00 AM
(1st & 3" Sundays)
Bible Study 7:30 PM
(ls1& 3rd Thursdays)
Special Programs (2nd & 4th Sundays)


(*Mwafut waugl


Monticello News 7B








,- 8B Monticello News


9#intaa/ &at gaWg


Wednesday, February 13, 2008


Dr. Wes Scoles Speaks At Community Prayer Breakfast


Spiritual Pathway Photo By Debbi Snapp
Max Bilinski entertains at the Business
Community Prayer Breakfast on Thursday
morning, Feb. 7, with his singing talents, and
story telling.
Debbie Snapp
Spiritual Pa ways
Staff Writer
The Business Community Prayer
Breakfast was hosted this month by Rev
J.B. Duval and the Memorial Missionary
Baptist Church on Rhodes Street in the
Fellowship Hall.
Dr Wesley Scoles, M.D. presented a


power point program about his past med-
ical missionary trips to Guatemala. He told
the group of his passion for making these
trips, and enlightened them with a story of
how Lloyd Monroe got him hooked on
these trips by inviting him on a "vacation."
This was his fourth medical mission trip to
Guatemala.
'These people have absolutely noth-
ing," he states. "They drink dirty watei and
theyfry leaves to a crisp to eat like potato
chips," he adds. He shared pictures and sto-
ries of these people, and their plight in their
environment
His passions include the building of
clinics for medical care and clean drinking
water projects. He will depart for Brazil
in May 2008 with a team of MD's and PHD
Pharmacy doctors, dentists, optometrists,
nurses, and other missionary volunteers.
They will visit with the River People
dwelling on, and around, the Amazon
River They will meet up with other mis-
sionaries in the field before servicing some
20 small communities along the way They
will be pulling teeth, giving meds and glass-
es, and teaching Bible School to the chil-
dren.
He says that you can't imagine the
emotions of joy you feel when a person
looks through a pair of glasses, and sees
for the first time.
Medicines are purchased from
Blessings International. They offer drasti-


cally low costs for purchases in bulk.
Each of these communities has a
church building. The plan is to drill and set
a well, for drinking water, in front of each
church. This is so as to encourage the peo-
ple to drink good, clean water
They plan to travel by riverboat and
canoe type boats; sleep in hammocks and
on the ground; and they will eat what the
River People eat, with the River People.
He credits Katrina Guerry for her
speedy work in setting up the 501c3 for 'A
Doctors Heart." He noted that they even -
have a logo, two hands surrounding a
heart.
Funds for these trips are raised
through fundraisers like the Robert Olen
Butler event held at the Opera House, and
through the generous donations of indi-
viduals, groups, and organizations.
A second trip is in the planning stages
already for 2009, for construction and med-
ical purposes.
Max Bilinski begam the community
breakfast off with those in attendance
singing 'Amazing Grace." He followed with
his own "Hello Mr Sunshine," acappello.
He also delighted the group with a few
"short" stories.
Carl Hanks was invited to end the
gathering this day with a word of prayer,
after Coordinator Gary Wright announced
the names of those on the prayer list
Community Prayer Breakfast is held 7


aFjllLUdil rdiLway rIIULo "y tj'cuuI Onapj
Dr. Wesley Scoles was the speaker at the
Business Community prayer Breakfast
Thursday, Feb. 7 at the Memorial Missionary
Baptist Church. He shared with the group
stories and pictures of his medical mission
trips to Guatemala, and his upcoming med-
ical trip to Brazil. To the right is Coordinator
L. Gary Wright.

-8 a.nt on the first Thursday of each month
for breakfast and a meeting. For informa-
tion about this or upcoming speakers and
locations contact coordinator Wright at
lgwright39@embarqmaiLcom or 997-5705.
The March 6 meeting will be held at
the First United Methodist Church in
Monticello.


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NAOMI AND THE SEGOS IN CONCERT


WACISSA PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS CHURCH


DEBBIE SNAPP
Spiritual Pathways
Staff Writer
Naomi and The Segos were in con-
cert at Wacissa Pentecostal Holiness
Church in Wacissa on Sunday, Feb. 10.
What began in the early 1950's is
still going strong today, and Naomi and
the Segos have been singing more than
50 years and have the richest history
in Southern Gospel Music. The Sego
Brothers and Naomi, which began in
the early 1950's was the first group in
Gospel Music to sell over one million


copies of the song "Sorry, I Never
Knew You."
Down through the years, Naomi
has recorded many signature songs
such as "This Is Just What Heaven
Means To Me," "Satisfied With Me,"
"Silver And Gold," "Until Then,"
"Hallelujah Square."
Naomi is considered to be one of
the first five ladies of Gospel Music. In
the early years of Gospel Music, it was
not common to have a female vocalist
in a Gospel quartet. It
all started with a sick member in the


line-up of the Sego Brothers. James,
who was Naomi's husband, called on
Naomi to fill the vacancy in the line-up
for the television broadcast. As the
saying goes "the rest is history"
The quartet changed their name to
the Sego Brothers and Naomi. After
the passing of her husband, the group
changed their name to Naomi and The
Segos.
Still today, Naomi and The Segos
travel 200 plus dates per year proclaim-,
ing the Gospel across the country.
Naomi recently celebrated another


Come home to


Southern Pines

Join us each Thursday at 2:45 p.m. for
Spiritual Connections with Rev. Harvey Walters,
retired minister and Southern Pines resident

This special devotional series is held in our beautiful
Wade Chapel on the Southern Pines campus.
Located at 423 Covington Avenue in Thomasville -
just across from the Rose Garden.

At Southern Pines, when you're here, you're home.
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milestone with the recording of her
75th project.
Admission was free, however a
love offering was received during the
concert.

Former Monticello

Resident Publishes

New Christian

Book
Jacob Bembry, editor of The
Madison County Carrier and
The Madison Enterprise-
Recorder has just published a
new book.
Entitled My Life on
Rollercoasters, the book is
available for purchase on
Amazon.com, the world's lead-
ing online retailer of books.
Jacob Bembry has lived a
life with curves in the road.
Like a rollercoaster, it has been
filled with ups and downs, but
he still has faith because he
trusts in the Lord Jesus Christ.
With humor and wit, as well as
heartfelt and tender emotion
he shares some of his joys and
sorrows with the readers.
Many of the stories have been
culled from his "Jacob's
Ladder" newspaper column,
which runs weekly in the
Bembry, was chosen in 2006
his hometown of Lee's Citizen
of the Year. He was named the
Florida Press Association's
Shining Star for 2007.
To order a copy of My Life
on Rollercoasters, visit
www.amazon.com and type in
either "Jacob Bembry" or "My
Life on Rollercoasters."


Naomi and The Segos


01h,&& al gat a 0 W


Wednesday, February 13, 2008


Monticello News 9B









Latest News From Porch de Salomon


Coffeehouse Renovation Underway
Ray Cichon
Managing Editor
Lloyd Monroe provides an update of activities of the Porch de Salomon
Ministries, in his February newsletter. He notes that the sale of their present
Solomon's Proch coffeehouse ministry building,
will cause them to vacate soon, and a new lease
has been signed on a nearby commercial space.
The space is centrally located and affordable,
but a bit rundown and closed in. Plans call for
removing a portion of the roof and installing an
upper terrace, which will open up the area.
Renovations began Feb. 4, and the opening date
is planned for May 1. Scheduled activities
include: coffeehouse/live music venue, weekly
worship gatherings, cinema, community confer-
ence room, and youth activities. Lloyd notes that
his wife Melanie wants a pool table for patrons.
Among the ways to help in this ministry are:
*Be a "Pray-er." Join us in praying for this
endeavor.
*Be a "Go-er." Come on down to help. Skills in
construction, electrical work, plumbing, carpen-
try are much needed. Helpers or goferss," as well
This portion of the the as people to paint and help finish the interior
ceiling in the Porch de designs are also needed. To date at least one team
Salomon Coffeehouse under- and several individuals have pledged to go.
going renovations, will be *Be a "Send-er." Our donor have provided $9500
opened up and a terrace creat- of the $15,000 we expect the venture to cost.
ed to let in more light and pro- Contact Llovd(wporchdesalomon.org, or Rex
vide additional space. Ware at 850-933-0344 with your ideas or questions.


Two Sisters Awarded Becas


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor
Among the activities of the Porch de Salomon Ministry, Becas or
scholarships, help break the cycle of poverty which grips Guatemala.
Many Guatemalan children are
unable to attend school because of
lack of money
Lloyd Monroe relates that as a
result of a recent appeal, $6,660
was received in donations to help
provide the Becas.
Two of the recent recipients are
Gaby, who is eight and in the third
grade, and Clarita, who is six, and
in the first grade. After their
father died, their mother aban-
doned them and moved away with 4
another man.
Their aging grandfather took
them in and does his best to support Clarita, left, 6 years old and in the
the family by hauling firewood on first grade, and her sister Gary, 8
this back. years old, and in the third grade are
SBoth children like school and years old, and in the third grade are
enjoy coloring pictures of pink rab- among recent recipients of Bacas
bits, reminiscent of a rabbit they from the Porch se Salomon Ministry.
once owned.
The ministry continues to accept and welcome Beca donations of
$220 for the next year's term.
For more information about the program, or to donate, contact
Monroe at: Llovd(,porchdesalomon.org, or Rex Ware, at 850 933-0344.


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10B Monticello News







Wednesday, February 13, 2008 ( / t 4 Monticello News 11B


Buddy Liles In Concert

DEBBIE SNAPP IN k
Spiritual Pathways
Staff Writer
Monticello Church of the Nazarene is hosting Buddy Liles in concert
at 6 p.m. on Saturday Feb. 16.
Liles' baritone/bass interpretation of a song has thrilled and .
warmed hearts across America. .
He has been a member of the Orrell Quartet, the Landmark Quartet, U ,- U -
and for 25 years was a member of the Florida Boys Quartet.
He has ministered through music on numerous cruises, via the Bill
Gaither videos, and at the Congressional Breakfast in Washington.
His national media attention includes appearing on "Nashville Now,"
"Nashville Prime Time," and the Today Show."
His musical accomplishments are many and varied. But, at the heart
of his ministry, Liles seeks to honor the Lord in all things and to encour-
age God's people through the talent with which God has blessed him.
Liles has now moved from group ministry into solo ministry to bless
the hearts and encourage the souls of those who come to hear him.
He comes highly recommended from the likes of Bill Gaither, Jake
* Hess, Dr. Jack Stone, former general secretary of the. Church of the
Nazarene, and Dr. John Rawlings, Landmark Baptist Temple, Cincinnati,
OH.
An open invitation is extended to the community to join in this con-
cert of praise and worship.
You won't want to miss his music. You
won't be able to miss his heart.
A love offering will be received to sup-
port Liles' continuing ministry. .( .s-..
For more information, contact the
church office at 997-3906.


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12B Monticello News




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