Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00186
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: March 14, 2007
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00186
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text








"Hall Of Fame"
Winners
Sought

Editorial, Page 4


Poison
Prevention
Week Set

Story, Page 7


Sandbagger's
Classic Raises
$1,500

Story, Photo, Page 10


ACA
Academic
Honor Roll

Story, Page 14


Wednesday Morning )


Monticello


139TH YEAR NO. 20, 50 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14.2007


Legislative Group



SReadies Plan To



SFight Tax Reform


Goal Is To Mitigate

Impact Of Changes


MEMBERS of the Jefferson County Legislative Committee discuss the tax reform pro-
posals that the Legislature is presently considering and brainstorm how best to com-
bat some of these proposals. The committee members want the lawmakers to
understand the potential impact that the various proposals will have on small coun-
ties such as this. (News Photo)



League Gives Counter


Arguments To Reform


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Local city officials last week
were given a list of facts that
the Florida League of Cities
(FLC) presumably prepared to
help local officials argue
against the proposed tax re-
form.
The FLC attributes the pre-
sent property tax crisis to a va-
riety, of causes. These causes
include the shift of school
funding from the state to the
school boards; the numerous
unfunded mandates that the
state has placed on cities,
counties and school districts;
and the Save Our Homes pro-
vision that voters approved in
the early 90s and that puts an
annual three-percent cap on
residential homes.
In a poll the FLC conducted
last month, it reports finding
that voters do not want the
state meddling in local affairs;
that the public feels a sales tax
is fairer than a property tax;
and that the public does not
want to see cuts in local gov-
ernment provided services,


among other findings.
The FLC makes the point
that the state's own budget is
$70 billion, "70 percent more
than eight years ago."


Group Puts _
Blame On -
State For
Present
Tax Crisis


The FLC reports that of the
412 cities that levy property
tax in Florida, "Their com-
bined levy generates $4 billion
of the total $30 billion in prop-
erty tax revenue."

The FLC figures show that
for Fiscal Year 2003-04,
which ran Oct. 1 through Sept.
30, property tax comprised 18
percent of cities', total revenue
and 56 percent of their tax
revenue; 31 percent of coun-
ties' total revenue and 74 per-
cent of their tax revenue; and
38 percent of school districts'


total revenue and 95 percent of
their tax revenue.
"A one penny increase in the
state sales tax raises $4
billion," the FLC argues. "A
one penny increase could re-
place all municipal property
taxes ... Two and a half pen-
nies statewide would replace
property tax on all homestead
property ($10 billion)."
"Cities spend money on two
kinds of services," the FLC
fact sheet continues,"...services
demanded by local taxpayers
and services mandated by the
state Legislature.
"Almost half of the property
tax dollars you pay go to your
county school board to fund
K-12 education.
"Eight years ago, the state
paid 60 percent of education
from state sales tax. Today, the
state pays only.47 percent and
mandates that 53 percent of the
funding for K-12 be funded by
a mandated school board prop-
erty tax.
"Last year alone, the state
mandated that the school
boards increase their property
tax revenues by over 17 per-
(See League, Page 2)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The Jefferson Legislative
Committee met last week to
develop a strategy in response
to the several tax reform pro-
posals being considered by the
Legislature.
Among the various proposals
being floated are ones to dou-
ble the homestead exemption,
cap all properties taxes at three
percent, and roll back local
property taxes to 2001 rates.
Like other city and county
officials across the state, com-
munity leaders here are con-
cerned. They agree that some
form of tax reform is needed,
given the inequities in the pre-
sent system. But they don't
want the new system to be a
"one-size-fits-all" solution that
creates inequities of its own.


Believing that accurate infor-
mation is the best way to com-
bat the prevailing misconcep-
tions of local government mis-
management, local officials
have prepared cost estimates
showing the potential impact
that each of the various pro-
posals would have locally.

According to these statistics,
compiled by committee secre-
tary Dick Bailar, doubling the
homestead exemption from the
present $25,000 to $50,000
would remove an additional
$14,500,000 from the tax rolls.
Added to the $84,141,000
that the $25,000 homestead ex-
emption already removes, that
would equate to a total of
$100,000 being removed from
the tax rolls.
Which translates into an esti-
mated loss of $145,000 in ac-
tual revenues, a much lower
figure than officials originally


predicted. For the city, the re-
duction would be an estimated
$25,000, again lower than
originally expected.
One reason for the much
lower than expected revenue
losses may be that property
values are anticipated to in-
crease $500,000 for the com-
ing fiscal year.
Still, the $145,000 and
$25,000 represent significant
losses in terms of the city and
county's already constrained
budgets, officials say.
The vagueness of the port-
ability proposal does not allow
for an accurate assessment of
its potential impact, local offi-
cials say.
They question the very con-
stitutionality of the measure,
which would allow the transfer
of taxable credits from one ju-
risdiction to another, pointing
out that taxing entities and
property values vary' greatly
from one county to the next.
But it's estimated that the ag-
gregate value of portability
(See Legislative, Page 2)


NO new word yet on the fate of the shuttle, the life of which is being prolonged tem-
porarily via a donation from the county. Supporters meanwhile continue trying to find
alternative sources of funding. (News Report)


City Is Given Good Chance

Of Getting State Funding


CITY officials are preparing their arguments for when they meet with legislators. City
Clerk Emily Anderson recently distributed a fact sheet from the Florida League of
Cities that cues city officials what points they should make. Here Anderson talks with
State Representative Will Kendrick during an earlier meeting. (News Photo)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Indications are that the city
stands a good chance of get-
ting the $600,000 to $700,000
Community Development
Block Grant (CDBG) that it is
seeking.
That was the word last week
from Summit Professional
Services, Inc., the consultant
firm that is handling the city's
application.
A representative of the com-
pany told the council that the
city so far had a score of 693,
which he said was good.
He said his company would


be conducting a door-to-door
survey over the coming weeks
that should give a better idea
of the city's needs and hope-
fully improve the score also.
The survey entails asking
residents of four targeted areas
a series of questions about the
number of people in their
households, their income lev-
els, and other socioeconomic
related information required by
the Department of Community
Affairs.
Award of the money is based
on a scoring system that takes
into account a multiplicity of
factors. Among these consid-
erations are whether the appli-
cant has received past grants,


whether the proposed project
will benefit low-and-moderate
income families and prevent
urban blight, and whether the
applicant is bringing other mo-
nies to the table.
"If the score holds up, the
city is in good shape," the rep-
resentative said. "We feel
pretty good about the score...
The city is doing all the right
things to get funded."
He said the application for
the grant was April 20, with
the awards expected to be
made sometime in the fall. He
said the second public hearing
on the grant application is ten-
(See State Funding, Page 2)


I


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I I I I I ,









PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 14, 2007


JES Students Recognized


In Odyssey Of Mind Event


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


KIWANIANS recently provided 101 dictionaries to students in grade three, at Jeffer-
son Elementary. The group plans to do the same for ACA next week. From left, Bill
Hopkins; Phil Barker, superintendent; Kay Collins, principal; and Bob Davison. Ki-
wanians hope to make this an annual event.


Legislative Group Readies Plan


(Continued From Page 1)
within the county -- which lo-
cal officials support to a de-
gree -- would be $57,250,000.
Local officials could not esti-
mate the loss to the county if
all assessments -- including
commercial, rental, and second
homes were capped at three
percent, as one proposal calls
for.

But they estimate that the
loss to the county would be
$5,500,000 if the homestead
property tax is eliminated, as
another proposal calls for.


Meanwhile, unfunded state
mandates cost the city
$500,000 for law enforcement
and the county $3,716,400, for
the Sheriffs Department, the
jail and the landfill closing, of-
ficials say.
By the same token, they pint
out that sales tax generated
$229,000 for the county and
$97,000 for the city during the
2005-06 fiscal year, the latest
year for which figures are
available. This is in response
to another of the proposals,
which calls for increasing the


sales tax in lieu of property
taxes.
"Nobody knows at this time
which proposal is going to
fly," Commission Chairman
Junior Tuten said at the meet-
ing. "It's all up in the air. There
will definitely be fallout and
adjustments to be made, but
nobody really knows where it's
going right now, even in the
Legislature.
"In the end, it will probably
all wash out and not be so bad.
But we need to look out and
make sure that we're protected.


League Gives Counter Arguments


(Continued From Page 1)
cent."
The FLC is particularly con-
cerned with the House of Rep-
resentatives' proposal calling
for a cap on local government
spending.
The plan would, in effect,
roll back local property taxes


to 2001 levels, with possible
allowances for inflation.
"A rollback rate of this mag-
nitude will require significant
budget cuts for your city this
year," the FLC warns.
The plan would Stlso elimi-
nate property taxes on home-
stead property and replace this


with a 2.5 cents increase in the
state sales tax, according to the
FLC.

"(The plan) does not speak to
how the increase in sales taxes
would be distributed if ap-
proved by voters," the. FLC
warns.


The diligence of Jefferson
County Elementary School
students was recognized by
the Manatee Region Odyssey
of the Mind judges who
awarded them with the "Spirit
of Competition" award, and
nominated the students "For
Meeting and Exceeding the
Goals of the Odyssey of the
Mind Creative Problem Solv-
ing" competition.
Coordinator and gifted JES
teacher Megan O'Donnell
said the JES students stood
out from more than 200 com-
petitors to be the only ones
recognized for their outstand-
ing teamwork and exceptional
talent with this special honor.
She added that it was a
long ride last weekend from
Monticello to Jacksonville,
but in the end, it was wotth it.
Taylor Clemens, Carson
Gibbs, Nikolaos Graham,
Lasheba Greene, Breawnna
Haugen, Mikey Haugen,


Telemarketers
Now May Call
Cell Phone
Family and Consumer Sci-
ences Extension Agent Heidi
Copeland informs residents
that as of March 5, residents
will begin receiving phone
calls from telemarketers on
their cell phones.
"All cell phone numbers are
being released to telemarket-
ing companies and residents
will start receiving telephone
calls that they will be charged
for," said Copeland.
She said that in order for
residents to prevent receiving
these calls, they need to con-
tact the National Do Not Call
List, which blocks any tele-
jarketing calls for five years.
That number is 1-888-382-
1222.


Ta'Jiria Howard, Phidell
Lewis, Allaura Pierce, Dan-
ella Potter, Dusty Shiver,
Ja'Lexia Sloan, and Yasmire
Whigham, were the 13 JES
gifted and talented students to
compete in the internationally'
acclaimed Odyssey of the
Mind Creative Thinking tour-
nament.
The students were coached
by O'Donnell and the trip
funded by a donation from
Progress Energy.
O'Donnell reported that the
students spent hundreds of
hours working on their prob-
lems over the past four
months, even volunteering to
put in time during lunch and
after school.
The Odyssey of the Mind
corporation creates problems
with multiple solutions for
students around the globe to
solve.
JES students worked on the
dramatic problem "Around
the World in Eight Minutes",
and the building problem,
"Out of the Box Balsa".
O'Donnell said the chal-
lenges required students to
work together in creating sets,
scripts, costumes, props, and
a Balsa wood structure.


She added that the bus to
Jacksonville was filled with
everything from a six-foot tall
set, to a magical moving dog,
to cardboard trees, and an ig-
loo big enough to house a
fourth grader.
"This was the best day of my
life," exclaimed fifth grader
Allaura Pierce, as she hugged
teammate Taylor Clemens
following the awards cere-
mony, reported O'Donnell.
"And even though the com-
petition is over for now, stu-
dents had only one thing on
their minds during the trek
home, coming back next
year," she concluded.


State Funding
(Continued From Page 1)
tatively scheduled for April 3.
If the city is awarded the
funding, it plans to use the
money to undertake additional
repairs and improvements to
the citywide expansion and up-
grade of the sanitary sewer
system.

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16-18 March, 2007

Monticello church of Christ

475 South Jefferson Road Monticello FL
For further information call 850-997-3466



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News Without


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... Pull Out Those Leg Warmers

... Fish Net Stockings

... Rock Concert T-Shirts

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Saturday, March 24, 2007

Monticello Opera House

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music and videos too!


"A Taste of Our Town"featuring
Local Restaurants and Chefs



Costumes are not required, but you are totally

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All proceeds will be donated to Main Street and the
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 14, 2007 PAGE 3


- County Mapping Project

Proceeding On Schedule


.. .. : "..-,-' ..

.. w. '"

. .. .. .






SKYLER HANNA AND Sunnie Sorensen, students at ACA, collect donations on the
Courthouse Circle for the recent Progress Energy Relay for Life Team.



Committee Plans Dates


Of Watermelon Festival


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The 57th Watermelon Festi-
val takes place May 31
through June 16, with Nicole
Honcell as Committee Chair-
person.
Opening the Festival is the
Kickoff Dinner Thursday, May
31, sponsored by the Chamber
of Commerce.


At the monthly meeting of
the Festival Committee, Mon-
day, it was decided that the
Little King and Queen, Little
Princess, and Queen Pageants
will all take place on the same
day, Saturday, June 9.
The Little King and Queen
Pageant is set for 1 p.m., with
the combined Little Princess
and Queen Pageants at 7 p.m..
2006 Queen Joanna Cobb and
2006 Little Princess Dana Jane


Watt will emcee the Little
Princess Pageant.
It was announced that pag-
eant applications have been
distributed and are also avail-
able at the Chamber.
Honcell reported that a Plat-
form Events Chairperson was
still needed. Call the Chamber
to offer your services for this
event.
The hours of the Street
Dance were set from 7 to 10
p.m., with 19 South as the
band.
The nomination process for
the Parade Grand Marshal was
discussed but no decision was
made.
Honcell said she planned to
appear before the City Council
concerning a change in the pa-
rade route and related issues.
The art work will be chosen
for the Festival Booklet cover
at the April 2 meeting of the
committee.
Honcell reported that draw-
ings from Aucilla Christian
Academy have been
submitted, but none have yet
been received from district
schools.
Because Monticello Printers
cannot print the Festival book-
let this year, it will be printed
by Rivergraphics, the same lo-
cal firm which printed the
country maps for the Chamber.
A Drive In Car Show is
planned again this year, with
owners exhibiting their vehi-
cles in the FMB parking lot.
The search is on for,a spon-
sor or sponsors to help meet
the cost of the Festival insur-
ance, which was $3,000 last
year.
Additional information will
be reported as it becomes fi-
nalized,. and a detailed sched-
ule of events will be printed ,
as usual, in the Monticello
News, when the Festival
opens.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

A Monticello teen sustained
serious injuries March 4, in a
irni-l vehicle crash here.
FHP reports that Sasha R.
Griffin, 18 was driving a
2004 Hyundai four-door,
traveling south on US-19, in
the inside lane, near the state
line with passenger Brittany
N. Gilley, 17, also of Monti-
cello.
Griffin drifted into the me-
dian and overcorrected to the
right and lost control of the
vehicle.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Dorothy Gabriel is the 36th
graduate of the Adult School.
to earn her GED.


GABRIEL


The vehicle rotated clock-
wise as it skidded across the
southbound lanes into a ditch
on the west side of the road-
way.
The vehicle struck a culvert
and overturned, coming to a
final rest on its wheels, facing
south, next to a vacant build-
ing (former Southern Package
Store).
Griffin sustained serious in-
jures and was transported to
Archbold Hospital for treat-
ment. Gilley was unharmed.
The vehicle sustained
$10,000 damage.
The crash was not deemed
alcohol related and charges
are pending.


She said that in 1962, she
entered into the seventh grade
and was forced to withdraw
from school because of her
parents' poor health.
"Being one of the eldest sib-
lings of nine, I had to with-
draw from school to help
support the family," said Gab-
riel.
She said that in 2003, with
the determination to receive a
high school diploma, she en-
tered into,the Adult School.
"With hard work, I received
my diploma," she said. "There
were times when I felt like
giving up, but I was encour-
aged to go on."
Gabriel said she plans to
continue her education, going
on to college and making a
better future for herself.


une possible negative impact
is that many residences that
presently are not identified as
being in a flood plain may be
reclassified. That means that
these residences would hence-
forth be required to carry flood
plain insurance.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

County officials are in the
process of reviewing the state-
ment of work for a c6mpre-
hensive mapping project that is
slated to be undertaken here
soon.
Extension Office Director
Larry Halsey informed com-
missioners of the matter last
week.
Halsey told commissioners
that he, Property Appraiser
David Ward and others were
presently reviewing the state-
ment of work document with
an eye to sporting oversights
and making suggestions.
Two water management dis-
tricts -- the Suwannee and the
North West Florida -- are
jointly funding the two-year
project, which is expected to
cost about $300,000.
The study aims to update'the
county's topographical maps,
thus allowing for better protec-
tion of waterways and wet-
lands.
The study also will allow lo-
cal officials to make informed
property development deci-
sions.
The elevation data that local
officials currently use is based
on information that was com-
piled in 1946 and is now con-
sidered inaccurate.
The project is not without a
potential downside, however.


NOTICE OF VACANCY ON
MONTICELLO LOCAL
PLANNING AGENCY
The Monticello City Council is seeking to fill a vacancy on
the Local Planning Agency. The voluntary position is open
for city residents. Experience or knowledge in community
planning, construction or architecture would be helpful.
The Board Member must be available for monthly evening
meetings. A letter of interest, outlining experience and
knowledge, should be submitted to
City Clerk Emily Anderson,
245 S. Mulberry Street, Monticello,Florida 32344
by Tuesday, March 27, 2006


By me same toKen, however,
some residences presently
identified as being in a flood
plain may no longer be so clas-
sified.
Whatever the results, the
study is sure to change the
status quo, officials say.


was harmed," said Bullock.
No additional information
was available at press time.


IT'S YOUR NAME.
IT'S YOUR MONEY.
PROTECT THEM.
Identity theft and financial
scams are on the rise.
Protect your good name and
hard-earned money.
Investigative correspondent
Chuck Whitlock provides
practical tips on how to avoid
becoming a victim and what
to do if you think you've
been scammed.
To reserve your seat for this
free video presentation, How to
Protect Yourself from Scam
Artists, call or visit today.
Date: 3-20-07
Time: 12:00 Noon
Place: EdwardJones Office

Robert J. Davison
Financial Advisor
205 E. Washington St.
Monticello, FL 32344
850-997-2572
www.edwardjones.com/protect
Member SIPC






If It Happens In
Jefferson County,
You'll Read It In The
Monticello News


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Officials Seek Man Who

Robbed Huddle House


Local Teen Injured


In Accident Here


Dorothy Gabriel Earns

GED At Adult School


LET THE JOURNEY BEGIN


Greeogeter
eL'n together!


-------


_.... . 1


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Deputies are seeking a .man
responsible for the armed rob-
bery of the Huddle House
early Monday morning.
Major Bill Bullock reports
that sometime between mid-
night and 12:30 a.m., a
masked black male entered
with a small caliber handgun,
taking what small amount of
cash was available in the es-
tablishment.
"There was no resistance by
the employees and no one
no -C

00.

NOT

ENTER

IGreat pioneers don't hesitate.
MDA research pursues
every possiblle-avenue.









PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 14, 2007





Monticello News
(ISSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

O- LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer



Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly Ex-
cept for the weeks of July 4th, Thanksgiying, Christmas,
& New Years. Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post
Office. Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net


. . . . ...-.-.-.-.-.....-...-f;r~r
.****....****... . . . . . ..rr
T ~ ~ 22' .... . .:f::~:;.r. . ..r>~ . . . . . . . . . . ..5Lsss ~ t~tz
. .-- --.- . . . . . .22


'Hall of Fame'


Winners
Cal Ripken, Jr. will soon
take his place next to baseball
legends when he is formally
inducted into the National
Baseball Hall of Fame this
summer. It's a great honor for
Ripken.
He is also the first inductee
and spokesman for another
Hall of Fame. In the Energizer
Keep Going Hall of Fame,
Ripken stands shoulder to
shoulder with everyday people
who are honored for their un-
stoppable energy, determina-
tion and never-quit attitude.
Now the search is on to find
the 2007 winner.
Ripken is' announcing a na-
tionwide search for everyday
people whose attributes and
actions best exemplify the
same perseverance, determina-
tion and a never-quit attitude
as the Energizer Bunny.

"I am honored to be in a Hall
of Fame that recognizes every-
day people for their outstand-
ing accomplishments," said
Ripken. "We-all know and are
inspired by people with a can-
do, never quit spirit. And, I'm
excited to help celebrate others
throughout the U.S. who ap-
proach life this way.'
If you know someone who
continually goes above and be-
yond, and keeps going through
life's everyday challenges, en-
ter him or her today in the
search for the Keep Going Hall
of Fame. The winner will re-
ceive a $10,000 cash award
and a $5,000 donation to his or


Sought
her charity of choice.
Since the Energizer Bunny
first appeared more than 17
years ago, its unique spirit and
endless energy have inspired
people to identify with the
ability to deep going. Accord-
ing to a national survey:
83 percent say they have a
never-quit attitude, a keep go-
ing spirit;
75 percent of people say
it's their determination that
motivates them;
Mom's, firefighters and
teachers topped the survey for
people who are most like the
Energizer Bunny.
The 2006 winner was 29-
year-old John O'Leary of St.
Louis, Missouri. A near-fatal
burn accident when he was 9-
years-old meant monthshs of
hospitalization and countless
surgeries.
Despite the challenges, John
has persevered; in fact, he
never slows down.
Today he is married and has
a 1-year-old son, he is a chap-
lain at a children's hospital, a
volunteer Big Brother and
works as a motivational
speaker to encourage others to
keep going, too.
John split his charity dona-
tion between Big Bothers Big
Sisters of St. Louis and Parkin-
son's disease research.
Enter by telling in 300 words
or less how and why your can-
didate deserves to be in the
Keep Going Hall of Fame at
www.energizer.com/halloffam
e/mr.


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
March 12, 1997
Commission Chairman
:Clifford Brown will not be re-
ceiving his monthly travel al-
lowance of $125 for the re-
mainder of the fiscal year,
which ends Sept. 30. He will
begin receiving the allowance
again on Oct. 1. And will con-
tinue until a new chairman is
selected in November.
It's high time the Jefferson
County selects a female com-
missioner. It's time too that
commissioners become more
proactive, that they be elected
at large, and that the city and
county governments be con-
solidated.
In a Drug Task Force Opera-
tion about a year in the plan-
ning, some 20 local residents
were arrested on charges of
possession of a controlled sub-
stance and sale of a controlled
substance in a roundup Friday
afternoon.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
March 11, 1987
In the past year, Monticello
Fire Chief Wesley Howell says
there have been 10 fires in the
county that he believes are
cases of arson. But while arson
is not difficult to detect, the
chief reports getting a convic-


tion is not an easy task.
The organization that devel-
ops data on which fire insur-
ance rates are based reports it
will be late this summer before
the Monticello area will be re-
viewed. When the review is
completed, fire chiefs expect
lowered fire insurance bills for
residents.
In a recent report compiled
by the Florida Department of
Corrections (DOC), Jefferson
County showed an increase in
jail population over the year of
400 percent, the highest in the
state.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
March 10, 1977
An audit of the Tax Collec-
tor's office conducted last
month by the State Auditor
General's office found the re-
cords of the office well kept
with the exception of a dis-
crepancy in the handling of
payroll withholding taxes.
Jefferson Elementary School
students will be treated to two
performances of the Asolo
State Theater Company of
Florida on Tuesday, March 16.
Employees and some board
members of 'the Jefferson
County Daycare Center re-
ceived training in the use of
(See From Our, Page 5)


Opinion & Comment



Some 'Enjoy' Poor Health


Some folks get sick and get
well. Some folks get sick and
never get well. They just move
from one ailment to the next.
The latter group always
seems eager to tell you just
how sick they are. Just ask 'em
how they feel and get ready for
a medical bulletin that can take
up to 30 minutes.
Hey, I'm not poking fun at
anybody who's really sick, I'm
poking fun at the people who
think they're always sick!
I'm sure you've met these
people on occasion.
Headaches? They've got the
mother of headaches! Upset
stomach? If you only knew!
Sinus problems? They don't
'make enough stuff to cure her
problem! You get the idea.
Sometimes I don't ask cer-
tain people how they are for
fear they will tell me.
Years ago I asked the mother
of my pastor how she was do-
ing. Her response went like
this.
"I got up this morning and
had some tea. Then I laid back
down to rest for a while.
"When I woke up I took a
hot bath. After that I went into


Publisher's


Notebook


Ron Cichon


the kitchen for a bite of break-
fast.
"I washed my cup and saucer
and was really feeling pretty
.tired so I laid down for a nap."
It went on like this for an-
other 15 minutes.
You can imagine I was sorry
I ever asked her how she was
doing! In future encounters I
would simply say "It's nice to
see you."
I've had co-workers who
"enjoyed" being sick.
They had a list of"can'ts and
couldn'ts"
"I just can't exercise."
"I just can't seem to wake up
in the morning."


"I can't pass up chocolate
cake."
"I couldn't possibly make the
9 a.m. meeting."
"I can't work more'than 6
hours a day 'cause I tire so
easily."
"My health won't permit me
to do that."
This would often prompt one
of my blunter colleagues to
thunder, "just what is wrong
with you?"
The answer?
"My doctor just can't figure
it out. They're still testing?"
Blunt Colleague: "They've
been testing for the past year!"'
Sickee: I know, my condi-


tion is really complicated."
Blunt Colleague: "I'm sick
of all this whining."
Sickee: "I'm not whining,
I'm just telling you how I
feel."
Blunt Colleague: "Don't tell
me any more!"
Sickee: "I have to tell some-
one."
Blunt Colleague: "Tell some-
body else!"
Sickee: "They don't want to
hear it."
Blunt Colleague: "I'm not
surprised."
Sickee: "Just wait 'till you
get sick and see if I care."
S Blint C..1ie iic:ii "If I get
sick I won't tell you."
Sickee: "Sniff, I just hope
you never get my condition."
Blunt Colleague: "Me too!"
Ah, have you noticed our
sick person has now labeled.
her sickness a "condition.'
You see, a condition is dif-
ferent than being sick. When
you have a condition, you are
talking about something quite
different.
At least that's how I under-
stand it from people who told
me about their "conditions."


War Flip Flopper Confesses
(and our current and potential When our fears were allevi- continued American divisive-
By DENNIS FOGGY adversaries), that we lack the ated after no weapons of mass ness to gain a political advan-
Columnist will and backbone to remain destruction were found and tage.


Unlike the majority of the
world's people, Americans are
an impatient lot. We quickly-
tire of repetitive and stagnant
things whether it is something
of extreme importance like the
war in Iraq or nonsensical
blanket coverage of the Anna
Nicole Smith saga.
Becoming restless to "move
on" regarding tabloid news
events is quite understandable.
Applying the same impatient
mentality to a war is extremely
dangerous for the troops we
have put in harms way.
Additionally, such national
restlessness sends a dangerous
signal to the rest of the world,


loyal to our fundamental prin-
ciples.
I, like the vast majority of
:*Americans, supported the deci-
sion to invade Iraq. We were
all scared at the time following
9/11 and the anthrax scare and
feared weapons of mass de-
struction could fall into the
hands of those willing to use
them on American soil.
Common sense told us that
Saddam Hussein not only had
the means of producing such
weapons, but actually killed
his own people with them.
Certainly he would not be
timid about handing off such
weapons to any group of indi-
viduals willing to do us harm.


following Saddam's capture,
my first "knee jerk" reaction
was to believe that we were
done now and it was time for
our troops to come home.
The "pregnant pause" be-
tween Saddam's capture and
the Bush Administrations fum-
bling of "what do we do next",
opened the door for outside in-
surgents to gain a foothold to
attack our troops and throw the
country into chaos.
This situation signaled the
divide in the American peoples
feelings about our continued
involvement in Iraq. More sig-
nificantly, it offered up a ma-
jor political issue for the
Democratic party to foster


After careful consideration,
I came down on the side to
continue supporting our mili-
tary in their new efforts to kick
out the insurgents and give the
Iraq people an opportunity to
establish a free democracy.
Simply leaving and creating a
vacuum to be filled by another
dictator supported by regional
anti-American countries would
be stupid.
Demonstrating a "flip-flop"
mentality that would be the
envy of any politician, my
feeling about the war began to
wither once again with the up-
surge of secular violence be-
tween the Iraqi Shiites and
(See Flip Flopper, Page 5)


Tragedy Helps Others


Each year in America, more
than 90,000 children are
treated for burn injuries. From
scalding water to a candle fire,
burns can occur at any time,
which is why it's important to
be prepared.
"Bums are real, and they can
happen to you," said Ann
Duckworth of Michigan. "We
were the best-planned family
-- changing the batteries in our
smoke alarms and practicing
our fire escape plan. You must
continue to plan and make
your family safe, but it's im-
portant to know that things do


happen."
In December 1997. Duck-
worth's 6-year-old daughter,
Lane, had on her dad's T-shirt
as a nightgown and brushed
against a candle. The shirt
quickly caught fire. Lane pan-
icked and ran. Her brother,
Latham, threw her outside in
the snow and rolled her around
until'the fire was out.
"Lane just looked like she
had gotten smoky and needed
to be cleaned off, but she was
shaking, so we called 911,"
said Duckworth.
Paramedics airlifted Lane to


Bronson Methodist Hospital in
Kalamazoo. She had third-
degree burns on 85 percent of
her body and spent the next
three months in a drug-induced
coma, undergoing countless
skin grafts.
"She literally had no skin
left," said Duckworth. "At first
they used cadaver skin. Then
they used skin on her ankle to
grow more of her skin cells.
"We didn't learn until much
later that Lane had a 5 to 10
percent chance of survival."
After leaving the hospital,
Lane's parents took her to an


inpatient rehab facility, but
Duckworth said the experts
had trouble helping Lane be-
cause of her severe injuries.
"At the time, we didn't know
where to find support," said
Duckworth. "Our hospital had
a school re-entry program but
we had to figure out the rest on
our own.
Then, another survivor told
Lane about the Phoenix Soci-
ety for Burn Survivors, a na-
tional nonprofit organization
dedicated to empowering any-
one affected by a burn injury.
(See Tragedy, Page 5)


From Our Photo File


CUB PACK 808 entertained and sang for residents at the then Meadowbrook Manor
(Byrnwood), nursing home, in Nov., 1991. (News File Photo)









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 14, 2007 PAGE 5


Tragedy Helps Others


McCORMICK ELECTRIC raised $171 at its recent car wash to benefit Relay for Life.
From left, Rusty McCormick, Justin Spears, Keith Johns, Hannah McCormick, Shauna
McCormick. (News Photo)




Flip Flopper Confesses


(Continued From Page 4)
Sunni religious and political
factions.
Like most Americans, I felt
it was irresponsible of our
leadership to allow our troops
to be killed trying to police
what resembled a civil war. I
figured if the people of Iraq
and their armed forces were
not willing to stand up for
themselves, then we need to
stop using our military forces
to continue propping them up.
If you have been keeping
track of my "flip-flops', that is
two "for" and two "against"
our war in Iraq tihus lit.
Now enter Iran into the Iraq
equation. Here is a county
headed by a certifiable lunatic
and firmly governed by relig-
ious Mullahs having a 9th cen-
tury mentality.
Those of us with a sliver of
intelligence have always
known in our hearts that Iran's
Shiite government is supplying
the Iraq Shiite militia with
weapons and intelligence in-
formation. It hasn't been until
recently, however, that our
leadership is openly starting to
acknowledge this deadly link-
age.
Even more devastating is
Iran's willingness to also sup-
ply Al-Quaide in Afghanistan.'
Why is this so significant? Iran
is Shiite nation and Al-Quaide
is a Sunni Islamic
organization, the very religious
factions that are fighting each
other in Iraq! Similar unity
moves are also becoming evi-
dent in Lebanon.
The potential unity of the re-
gional terrorist organizations
should be an alarming circum-
stance to all free nations. Tem-
porarily setting aside their
individual differences in order
to foster a world terrorist unifi-
cation of effort against all
western interests, could be as



From Ou
(Continued From Page 4)
fire extinguishers and in fire
drill procedures from the Fire
Department last week.

FORTY YEARS AGO
March 10, 1967
The Business Women's
Club of the First Presbyterian
Church met Monday evening
at the home of Mrs. J.P. Ward
in Nobles Subdivision.

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Hamilton
of Fernandina Beach spent the
weekend with his parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Don Hamilton.
Mr. and Mrs. W.W. Bassett
spent the weekend at DuBose
Academy in Zellwoood visit-
ing with Mrs. Victor Greene.


devastating as WWII.
The very thought of Al-
Quaide, Hezbollah and Hamas
joining forces with the wealthy
support of Iranian (and poten-
tially all of Iraq) oil
production. should scare the
pants off of all of us.
By comparisons, they could
make 9/11 look like a Sunday
school picnic when consider-
ing the potential devastation
they could inflict on this coun-
try if left unchecked.
You can debate how we got
there from here until the cows
come home, but the fact that
we are now knee deep in head-
ing off world terrorist activity
requires that we have a foot-
hold somewhere. By circum-
stance, that currently happens
to be in Iraq.
The first essential step is to
stopping the infighting be-
tween the Shiite and Sunni fac-
tions in only two area of Iraq,
Baghdad and the Sunni Trian-
gle. What will it take? More
U.S. forces, which has been
mistakenly referred to as a
"troop surge".
Without the forces to go into
the contested neighborhoods
and quell the infighting, thus
giving the Iraqi forces time to
become a stable national force
in the region, all is lost.
Speaking from experience as
a combat wounded soldier, I
would like nothing better than
to get our brave troops out of
harms way as fast as possible.
We can do that, but we can't
bury our heads in the sand at
the same time regarding the
potential devastation such re-
flex actions can have on us,
our children and all of the free
world.
If we impatiently turn our
back on Iraq right now, we
must seriously consider the
real possibility of Iran taking
over Iraq and becoming the



ir Files
Mrs. Curry Bassett of Bir-
mingham spent ten days re-
cently with Mrs. Wilmer Bas-
sett.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
March 10, 1957
Mrs. W.J. Bullock of Monti-
cello was elected the vice-
president of District 3 PTA at a
meeting held in Tallahassee on
March 4th. District 3 is made
up of Taylor, Jefferson, Wa-
kulla, Leon and Gadsden
Counties.

SIXTY YEARS AGO
March 10, 1947
Mr. and Mrs. Wesley
Gramling have moved to the
Welaunee Plantation.


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powerhouse of hatred toward
American and the free world.
SAccordingly, they would
also openly become the train-
ing ground for world wide ter-
rorism.
This combination along with
their seemingly unstoppable
charge to develop their own
atomic weapons should make
it clear to anyone with a brain
that serious world trouble lies
ahead.


American Stroke
Association,.
A Division of American
Heart Association ,

Time MArKcrhes On
For people over age 55, the incidence of
stroke more than doubles in each
successive decade.
Stroke Warning Signs:
Sudden numbness or weakness in
the face, arm, or leg, especially on
one side of the body.
Sudden confusion or trouble
speaking or understanding.
Sudden trouble seeing in one or
both eyes.
Sudden trouble walking, dizziness,
loss of balance or coordination.


Ha 0o


(Continued From Page 4)
The Duckworths soon attended
a Society-sponsored kid's
camp, where Lane met chil-
dren with similar injuries.
"The Phoenix Society works
to connect peers with similar
experiences and that's, what I
try to do, too," said
Duckworth, who now works as
a pediatric patient services co-
ordinator at Bronson Hospital,
educating families about the
Phoenix Society and other re-
sources. "When you're a mom,
you want a mom to help you
through this."
Now, 33 surgeries later, 15-
year-old Lane is excited about
beginning high school.
"Lane has always been very
confident and outgoing and
that didn't change after the in-
jury," said Duckworth. "She
wears shorts and short sleeves
and talks freely about her
burns. Lane's always been a
teacher."
The Duckworths have spent
the past nine years educating
families about burn. injury and
prevention.
"Lane has taught kindergart-
ners 'Stop, Drop and Roll,'
and we emphasize having
working smoke alarms and a
fire escape plan, and using
candles wisely," said Duck-
worth. "We decided to try and
help keep others from experi-




1-800-USA-NAVY
www.navyjobs.com


encing what your family went
through."
Families can help prevent
burn injuries by following
these fire safety steps:
Install UL-listed smoke
alarms in every room, includ-
ing bedrooms.
Test smoke alarms
monthly and replace batteries
as needed.
Buy a multipurpose fire
extinguisher. Keep it within
easy reach and know how to
use it before a fire breaks out.
Use an extinguisher only when


the fire is small and contained,
or to create a path to safety.
Develop and practice an
escape plan with the whole
family. Plan two exists for
each room, and practice .at
night and during the day. Des-
ignate a meeting place outside
and never re-enter a burning
building.
Put out all candles before
leaving a room or going to
sleep.
Place space heaters at least
three feet away from beds and
curtains.
Lock matches and lighters
in a cabinet out of a child's
reach.


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Attention Hunter/Jumpers ,


Drifton Farms in Monticello is

pleased to announce that we are

hosting a St. Patrick's Day

Hunter/Jumper Show on March 17'".

This event is open to all hunter jumpers

and is sanctioned by Southern Hunter

Jumper Association in Tallahossee, i



Please visit us at www.driftonfarms.com

to download the entry form for your i

registration. -
If you have any questions, Drifton Farms

please call 2665 Aucilla Hwy.

(850) 997-1462 Monticello, FL 32344


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PAGE 6. MONTICELLO. (FL). NEWS. WED., MARCH 14, 2007


Lifestyle


S"'www"""w""' Leslie Swann Will


lip e 6cvr~wt Marry Chad Perdue
as a commercial account mai
SOMc 7Ml#- l DEBBIE SNAPP ager for Floyd Mays Insu
SStaff Writer ance Agency in Sandston
iSendu4or= favrter w toshare VA.
Sead < r f a te ae W dW 9 VA.. The groom-elect is a 20(
Tp Earl Swann of Perry, FL. graduate of Strayt
'l, 4, a2 i'te, i', QC ?c iand Susan Waters of Monti- University, and is an IT Sul


ANTIPASTA SALAD

2 qts. mixed salad greens
1 10 oz jar marinated artichoke
hearts, drained.
1 8 oz pkg. mozzarella cheese
cut into strips
4 oz salami or pepperoni cut
into strips
1 cup pitted ripe olives
I medium tomato cut into
wedges
1/3 cup roasted red peppers,
cut into strips
1 cup Wishbone Balsamic
Vinaigrette Dressing

In a large salad bowl, com-
bine all ingredients except
dressing. Cover and chill. Just
before serving. Toss with
dressing and serve with Italian
bread.

Jeanette Johnson
Library Cookbook

N'AWLINS SHRIMP
AND PASTA SALAD

2 lbs. small shrimp peeled and
deveined (precooked)
1 16 ox pkg. small pasta shells
1 tsp. Zataran's liquid shrimp
boil
1/2 bell pepper, chopped finely
2 ribs celery chopped finely
2 bunches green onions
chopped finely
1 tbs. parsley, chopped
1 tbs. apple cider vinegar
3 tsp. Tony Chachere's Creole
seasoning
1 cup mayonnaise.

Bring 2 cups of water to
rapid boil and add shrimp boil.
Add shrimp and heat until
thawed well. Set aside. Cook
pasta in 4 qts. of salted water.
Rinse well.
In a large mixing bowl, com-
bine all remaining ingredients
and keep some green onions


".*.- +."t d, ,

S. .*-;.








... .. '

MELVIN

FIRST BIRTHDAY
Matthew Allen James Mel-
vin celebrates his first birth-
day March 15, 2006
He is the son of Jessica Al-
guire and Patrick Melvin, and
the grandson of Linda and
Mark Gray; and Marie and the
late Rick Alguire.


for garnish.
Refrigerate overnight so all
ingredients can marinate.

Mary Snelgrove
Library Cookbook

HUMMINGBIRD
CAKE

3 cups plain flour
2 cups granulated sugar
1 tsp. baking soda
pinch salt
pinch ground cinnamon
3 eggs beaten
1 cup vegetable oil
1 1/2 tsp. vanilla extract
1 8 oz crushed pineapple,
undrained
1 cup pecans, chopped
2 cups bananas, mashed

Cream Cheese frosting:

1 8 oz. cream cheese softened
1/2 cup butter softened
1 16 oz confectioners sugar,
sifted
1 tsp. vanilla extract.

Combine first 5 ingredients
in a large bowl. Add eggs and
stir until dry ingredients are
moistened. Do not beat.
Stir in vanilla, pineapple, pe-
cans and bananas. Bake in 3 9"
pans at 350 for 25 to 30 min-
utes, or until cake tests done.
Cool in pan for 10 minutes;
remove and cool cdn(liletely.
Frosting: Combine cream
cheese and butter and cream
well. Add half the sugar and
blend. Stir in' vanilla ahd rest
of the sugar and stir until
smooth.
Frost layers, top and side of
cake and top with pecans, if
desired.
Savannah Bellamy
Linda Hamedani
Library Cookbook




"Familiar Faces
And Quiet Places"


A Pictorial And Nar-
rative
History Of
Jefferson County

By Derelyne Delp
Counts

Available At The
Chamber Office And
Leading
Merchants


0 *THO0 ISEASE?


If you, a deceased spouse or parent suffered from any of the fol-
lowing ailments on or before November 21, 1996 and
were advised by a treating doctor that the condition was
a result of cigarette smoking, you may be eligible to file a lawsuit
against big tobacco.
Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer
Kidney Cancer Laryngeal Cancer
Bladder Cancer Pancreatic Cancer
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
Oral Cavity/Tongue Cancer
Call Fleming & Associates toll free at 1-800-940-3365 for more information.


Andres Pereiro with Fleming & Assoc. L.L.P. is
licensed to practice in FL and has his principle
office located in Houston, TX.


Fleming &Associates,L.L.P.
1330 Post Oak Blvd., Suite 3030
Houston. TX 77056-3019


The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience.


cello, rL. announce me en-
gagement of their daughter,
Leslie Swann to Chad Perdue
of Richmond, VA., the son of
SErnie Perdue of Richmond
and Janet Roberts of
Lebanon, IN.
The bride-elect is a 1998
graduate of Aucilla Christian
Academy, and is employed


n-
r-
n,

0
er
p-


port Specialist at Lansing
Building Products.
The wedding is planned for
4 p.m. Saturday, March 24,
2007 at Malloy's in Monti-
cello.
' Formal invitations are being
issued, and all family and
friends of the couple are in-
vited to attend.


Power Wheelchairs

Available If Qualified


The Senior Wheels USA
Program makes available
power wheelchairs to senior
citizens and the permanently
disabled at no cost to the re-
cipient, if they qualify.
The power wheelchairs are
provided to those who can no
longer walk safely, nor propel
a manual wheelchair, and who
meet the additional guidelines
of the program.
If the patient's need is for
use in the home, call toll free
1-800-246-6010 to determine
if the patient qualifies for the
free chair.
The Senior Wheels USA
Program's main purpose and


goal is to develop public
awareness that there are assis-
tance options that allow senior
citizens, as well as the perma-
nently disabled, to remain in-
dependent in their own homes.
Without this awareness and
assistance, the family may pre-
maturely choose a nursing
home, or make an unnecessary
retail purchase on power mo-
bility equipment.
If the patient does not meet
all the requirements of the pro-
gram, help may be available
through a donation program,
which is made available when
people donate power wheel-
chairs no longer needed.


Shopping Day Planned

At Nursing Center


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Shopping Day for resi-
dents, and their families, is
planned 2-4 p.m. Thursday at
Jefferson Nursing Center.
"WeCare Fashions carries
an extensive selection of la-
dies and men's clothing, spe-
cializing in healthcare
apparel.
This select uniform sale has
brand names' at huge dis-
counts. Names like Barco,


Cherokee, Cottonality, Dick-
ies, GALS, Landau, Peaches,
Rockers and Top Line. Tops
sell for $9.99 and up, and Sets
sell for $21.99 and up, with a
wide selection to choose
from.
The clothing displayed will
be available for immediate
purchase at the time of the
showing.
The community is encour-
aged to attend regardless of
whether or not they plan to
make any purchases.
Volunteers to help residents
with their purchases are ap-
preciated.


HIertage The donation is tax deductible.
or fheBlini d : Pick-up is free.
v" orthi We take care of all the paperwork.





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Tnple Calcium
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SHINE VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!
(SERVING HEALTH INSURANCE NEEDS OF ELDERS)

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Programs for Which They May be Eligible.

COMPREHENSIVE
TRAINING
I PROVIDED AT NO COST
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NSURNCENEEDS 1-800-962-5337
OF ELDERS


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If you are uninsured, you may
qualify for our sliding fee program.
Serving Madison, Jefferson & Taylor
Counties since 1984
We accept Medicare, Medicaid &
most insurance plans
Open Mon. Fri. 8-5 walkins welcome, 24hr telephone coverage
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Sleep Studies, C Pap, BiPap i1m.i1on,,' & Pulmonary Functions

Bishop L. McMiller, B.S., RRT
We have a Registered Polysomnographist
(Rc isL,;-i .I l Sleep Technician) on Staff
850-973-8116 Cell 850-464-4849
fax 850-973-8118
289 SW Range Ave. Madison, FL 32340
(net door o Oplionl('irc)

FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF

HEALTH
Welcomes
Jerry Boland M.D.
Office Hours 8:00am 5:00pm
Thursday's ONLY.

Call for an appointment
342-0170

www. HealthyJefferson.com


I.


e,











MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 14, 2007 PAGE 7


March 19-25 Designated

Poison Prevention Week


PA
P9iV ?


THREE SISTERS Restaurant sports this "private party" sign, and a red hat on t
door to indicate the local Red Hat Ladies are ensconced in their monthly meetings.


Sr. Center
Board
To Meet
The Jefferson Citizen Cen-
ter, Inc. will hold its Board of
Directors meeting 4 p.m.
Thursday, March 15, at the
Senior Center.
The meeting is open to the
public.
For additional information,
contact Bobbie Krebs, or
Robin Brinson at 342-0242.

Nightly Services
Begin Wed. At
St. Phillip's
St. Phillip AME Church will
hold nightly services 7
p.m.March 14-16.
Speakers are: Wednesday,
-Presiding Elder O. C.
Williams; Thursday, Rev. Jo-
seph Love; Friday, Rev. Issac
Manning.


DR. JIM SLEDGE was the guest speaker at the Masonic
Lodge. He spoke about Boots Thomas and provided
photographs for the audience to view.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Florida Poison Infor-
mation Center promotes Na-
tional Poison Prevention
Week, March 19-25.
"Poison Proof Your Home,"
is the theme of the week. Of-
ficials encourage citizens to
take an active role in safe-
guarding children from poten-
tial dangers that involve prod-
ucts commonly found in
every home.
This focus on poison-
proofing the home is part of
the campaign to educate the
h public on the dangers and pre-
vention of accidental poison-
ings.
The following groups are
most common sources of poi-
soning for children:
*Acetaminophen is used as
an aspirin substitute, pain re-
liever and fever reducer. Of-
ten found in children's medi-
cation. Toxic symptoms are
delayed and can cause pro-
found effects, particularly
ry liver damage.
*Ethanol-containing prod-
ucts including mouthwashes,
perfumes, colognes, hand
Ssanitizers and adult cold
medicines. Toxic symptoms
S include sleepiness, drop -in
blood sugar and shallow
breathing.
*Common hand soaps and
detergents may cause upset


St. Patrick's

Day

Saturday

March 17


stomach and may cause per-
sistent vomiting, diarrhea and
even dehydration if ingested.
Automatic dishwasher deter-
gent may be caustic.
*Hypochlorites, which may
include bleach, pool chemi-
cals and supplies and cleaning
products. Toxic symptoms
can include irritation to the
mouth and stomach, and po-
tential burns to the mouth,
throat and esophagus.
*Hydrocarbon containing
products, which include gaso-
line, kerosene, charcoal
lighter fluid, automobile prod-
ucts and lamp oil. Toxic
































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ture's Cly sewing class.
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FRANCISTA STEEN sews
ture's Clu^^:ewing class.


symptoms may include vom-
iting and if the product enters
the ;lungs, fever, coughing,
shortness of breath, wheezing
or chemical pneumonia can
occur.
For poisoning emergencies,
call the Poison Information
Center, toll, free 24 hours a
day, at 1-800-222-1222
The health care profession-
als at the center will immedi-
ately respond to poison
emergencies and answer poi-
son related questions about
medications, household prod-
ucts and other potentially dan-
gerous substances.


a purse in the


4-H Adven-


St. Patrick's Day Events

Set At Jefferson Nursing


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Jefferson Nursing Center
administration and staff invite
the community to attend a St.
Patrick's Day celebration Sat-
urday, March 17 in the dining
hall.
Curtis Morgan and the
Monticello Country Band will
entertain beginning at 1 p.m.
at the front entrance.


Refreshments of green will
be served and fellowship en-
joyed.
A Family Council Meeting
will follow the festivities.
The Center staff look for-
ward to meeting with resi-
dents and their family
members.
For additional information,
contact Mae Kyler at 997-
0321.


BJARI'S

LIQUORS

S Fine Spirits

Wine & Beer

Jefferson Square
Shopping Center
Monticello, Florida
Phone:997-4410
"Personal Service & Reasonable Prices"


IT'S YOUR BLESSED DAY
f at
Tammies Sweets & Deli

Saturday, March 17th
Spend $10.00 & get a free
St. Patrick's Day Iced Cookie

Join Us Thurs. at 5:30 for a
Pampered Chef Cooking Show
(850) 997-1181
221 N. Cherry St.
Monticello, Florida


The
Festival At
Sunbelt
,sjence tihel: rnt LIltrie L'c



Calico Spring Arts & Crafts Show
o% ci 400 bc l I,. :r h.ih d Jn.-in h irt{ 1. c ratf
Saturday l- \iach 1 7'-' 9 5
Sunday March 18'" 9 4

Sunbelt Expo BBQ Cook-Off
Mernphis in .. G :ck',,jid Di. r-ion
Friday March 16"' 5 1 1
Saturday March 17" 9 6

$5 per person
children. 12 & under Free with Adult
Sorry No Pots Allo\ ced

229-085-1968
info-'calicocraftts.coml

arts & crafts bbq cook-of .
S enter tainmerit blood
'. "


,
CONSTRUCTION
AHEAD
Wi.idBIR w


With your help,
MDA is building
a tomorrow without
neuromuscular diseases.

1-800-572-1717
Muscular Dystrophy Association
www mdausa.org


It Works Wonders.


a ow All concerfs and4 EVenfs
American .REE w ad idion
Heart i Ion
Association


CELEBRATE
ST. PATRICK'S DAY
AT.

Jake's Subs & Grill
Saturday, March 17
FOR

Breakfast, Lunch or
(Prime Rib /Ribeye Steak)
Dinner
Specials!
&

All Day BBQ Buffet
Also:
"Friends of Green Industries"
GIGANTIC Plant Sale
9:00am til 2:00pm
180 W. Washington St. Monticello FL 850*997-0388

Now you don't need one
S of these to get your
Federal payment.

Call 1-888-382-3311 to learn where ____
you can open an ETAs". Or visit our .
Web site at www.eta-find.gov. ectronic Tansfer Account
yO oa


SUPPORT







PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 14, 2007


Senior Living



Support These Firms That

Take Care of Our Seniors


ADVENT CHRISTIANVILIAGE
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3012 Hwy. 41 S.
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229-559-4700


We're pleased to serve the people of
Taylor and surrounding counties
Lake Park of Madison is a modern 120 bed skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation (' -ir,.i
that accepts Medicare, Medicaid, Private Pay, and Managed Care. We are cL.or.
to Madison, Perry, Monticello, Jasper, Live Oak, Lake Park, Valdosta and Tallahi-. .-.
Come see what makes us different. We welcome your visits.


Services We Provide:
* Physical Therapy
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* Skilled Nursing
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For Information, or to Schedule a Tour. Please Contaci Ashlev Sevor or Tesha Larl-in:, in :... .
Services Department, Director of Nursing Donna Pulnal or Adminisr..ilor J,-v.:e Dn rtI,


EMERGENCY HOME ENERGY

ASSISTANCE

FOR THE ELDERLY

The Area ,\gene.\ 'on .lAin fo North Floiida aniinonices the j',ailabillit, of
Emergence Home Energ '. Ass.ist.nce toi lihe Elderl\ Proigrm (n[l- E.AP)l filds ,1ki
eligible ho iseholds in .lJelTer-son i O tliii1'. o be eligible. n ind.li~ idual \\ho is at least
sixty years of age must reside in the applicarni i household. a hill that mIicates an
immediate disconnection date i' pj\ rmenit i niot 1ecel.I ed b\ the tLilt\ c0.1iipan'. thi.i,
includes propane and electric), and the household income must be at or below 150%
of the Federal Poverty Income Guidelines.

Please contact Terrie Mihan (850-342-0271) to schedule an appointment or to
request more specific information about the Emergency Home Energy Assistance
Program.

The Emergency Home Energy Assistance for the Elderly Program is funded by the
State of Florida Department of Elder Affairs and is administered by the Area
Agency on Aging for North Florida, Inc.


A 4t














Sports


Aucilla Blanks


Apalachicola 15-0


BILL BROWN


Tuesday, March 6, saw the
Aucilla Warriors traveling to
Apalachicola for their second
District contest of the year.
The result was a 15-0 victory
and a 1-1 record in district
play.
Four Warriors pitchers went
to the mound and gave up a
Total of two hits, no runs, two
walks and struck out nine.
Defensively, no errors were
recorded.
Stephen Dollar pitched the
first inning, gave up one hit,
struck out one, and was re-
placed after injuring his leg
while rounding first base on a
double to right field in the top
of the second.
Trent Roberts pitched in-
nings two and three, allowing
no runs, no hits, and struck
out four.
Chad cannon worked inning


number four, another hitless
and scoreless effort.
Casey wheeler finished,
giving up one hit, and striking
out two in the fifth.
Roberts is credited with the
win to raise his record to 1-1.
The Aucilla runs came as a
result of ten hits, five errors,
and eight bases on balls is-
sued by the hometown pitch-
ers.
Rob Searcy led the Warrior
batters with two hits in two
at-bats and two stolen bases.
Stephen Dollar and Trent
Roberts each hit a double, the
only extra base hits of the
game.
Josh Carswell sandwiched a
single around three walks.
Others hitting safely were;
Matt Bishop, one for two; Ca-
sey Wheeler, one for one;
Dustin Roberts, one for five;
Elliot Lewis, one for three;
and A. J. Connell, one for
three.


ACA Tennis Team

Defeats NFC 5-2


ELLIOT LEWIS tags third and throws home at a recent
Aucilla Christian Academy practice session. (News
Photo)


John Paul Blanks ACA

7-0 In Tennis Action


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy varsity tennis team was
blanked 7-0, at the hands of
John Paul, Tuesday.

Coach Cathy Jackson re-
ports that player Kaitlin Jack-
son was injured and as a
result, regular doubles teams
had to be rearranged.


In singles action, Courtney
Connell lost to Kelly Conroy,
08-0; Rebekah Aman fell to
Shannon Wagner, 8-6; Sarah
Sorensen lost to Andrea Cas-
pary, 8-0; Nikki Hamrick lost
to Stephanie King, 8-3; and
Whitney Scarberry fell to
Cayce Hook, 8-2.
In doubles action, Connell
and Sorensen fell to Conroy
and Wagner, 8-2; and Aman
and Hamrick lost to Caspary
and King, 8-3.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 14, 2007 PAGE 9


FAMU Edges JCHS


FAMU edged JCHS 6-5 in
recent baseball action.
"It was a really good, com-
petitive game," said Assistant
Coach Jim Norton. -"We were
tied 5-5 in the seventh and at
the bottom of the inning,
FAMU scored the winning
run."
Curtis Hightower went two


for three, two runs.
Cecil Hill went two for four
one run, one double.
Lamarcus Bennett and Mar-
quis Dobson, both went one
for four.
Shayne Broxie went one for
four, one run.
And Telvin Norton scored
one run as the result of a pre-
vious walk.


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FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy tennis team played in a
JV match-up against NFC last
week, and won 5-2.
In singles action, Rebekah
Aman downed Melody
Kitchen, 8-0.
Nikki Hamrick slammed
Gracie Hemphill, 8-0.
Sarah Soren-en beat Mi-
chelle Saur, 8-0.
Whitney Scarberry fell to


Rachel Stafford, 1-8.
Kalyn Brown lost to Nicole
Maclanore, 0-8.
In doubles action, Aman
and Hamrick downed Kitchen
and Hemphill, 8-4.
Sorensen and Scarberry beat
Saur and Stephanie Miles,
9-7.
ACA now stands 5-3 on the
season.
The Lady Warriors will face
Munroe, 3:30 p.m., Tuesday,
here. Aucilla suffered the
first loss of the season at the
hands of Munroe.


Warriors Shut Out


R. F. Munroe 9-0


BILL BROWN
The Warriors raised their
district record to 2-1 with a
9-0 win over R. F. Munroe at
Finlayson Field on Thursday,
March 8.
Dustin Roberts pitched the
complete game allowing five
hits, only one out of the in-
field. He gave up no walks
and struck out three. His re-
cord is one win, one loss;
Aucilla hit safely six times
with no batter getting more
Than one hit, all singles.
Hits came off of the bats of


Elliot Lewis, one for four one
RBI; Josh Carswell, one for
three, one RBI; Dustin Rob-
erts, one for two, one RBI; A.
J. Connell, one for three;
Luke Whitmer, one for three;
and Rob Searcy, one for two,
two RBI.
The team stands at .500 for
the year with three wins and
three losses, and the district
record is 2-1.
Aucilla returns to Finlayson
Field Thursday and Friday,
March 15 and 16 to confront
Maclay and FAMU High. Al
games start at 4 p.m.


JCHS Boys, Girls

Track Team Rosters


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County High
School has released the roster
for the track teams.
There are 11 Tigers on the
boys team this year.
They include: Kevin
Bowers, Jon Dady, Jordan
Blair, DeAndre Fagan, Lucius
Wade, William Wade, Deon-
tre Jones, Kelly Hill, Tim
Crumity, Kendrick Huggins,
and Marcus Benjamin.
There are 10 Lady Tigers on
the girls team.,
They include: Shaumese


q


Massey, Shanice Brooks,
Chanta Brooks, Keneshia
Coates, Chelsie Clinton, La-
toya Waldrop, Chandra
Tucker, Jazmaun Hall,
Keiona Lawrence, and Donna
Ransom.
Assisting the team are stat
girls, Angela Scurry and La-
toya Footman; boys team wa-
ter girl Courtney Holmes;;and
girls team water girls, Quart-
ney Dean and LaToya Robert-
son. *
Coaching the Tigers and
Lady Tigers is Dwayne Jef-
ferson. Assistant coach is
Derrick Martin, Jr.


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 14, 2007

Sandbaggers' Classic Raises

$1,500 For Youth Camp


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

More than 30 golfers tur-
noed out for the annual Ro-
tary Sandbaggers Classic golf
tournament, Monday, which
raised more than $1,500.
Past president James
Muchovej said it was a gor-
geous spring day of a balmy
65 degrees, with the touch of
a gentle breeze.
"It was one of the clearest
days for this time of year," he
remarked.
The coveted Last Place tro-
phy went to the team of Fred
Golden and Ken Foster (who
were on the team which won
the award last year), Bruce
Sandel and Tom Hogle.
The Low Gross trophy was
won by the team of John
Dodson, Chuck Sarkisian,
Van Collins and Clee Collins.
The Low Net trophy went to
the team from North Florida
Abstract, John Gebhard (who


was on the team last year
which won the trophy), De-
mott Anderson, Kennon
Buzbee,and Elbert Hartsfield.
Following the tournament,
golfers enjoyed the Rotary's
famous rib-eye steak dinner
with all of the trimmings.
The Club thanks everyone
who made this event special,
especially sponsors Capital
City Bank, Kirk Reams, clerk
of court, Bobby Plaines,
Farmers and Merchants Bank,
Jefferson County Kennel


Club, Jefferson Builders
Mart, Monticello Family
Medicine, Monticello News,
Morris Petroleum, David
Ward, property appraiser,
Royal Mini Storage, Marty
Bishop, supervisor of elec-
tions, Quality Crane, Progress
Energy, and VMS Mainte-
nance Services.
All proceeds raised will go
toward the Rotary's Youth
Camp, which serves severely
challenged youths.


ACA, JCHS Big Bend Leaders


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Local athletes were named
Big Bend Leaders in baseball
and track last week.
In baseball, Elliot Lewis,
ACA is #11 in batting with
five hits of 11 times at bat, his
average is .455.


In track, Jon Dady, JCHS,
is in the top position in the
100 hurdles with 14.51.
The Tigers stand in fifth in
the 4 X 100, and Dady is #3
in the long jump with 21' 6 "

Monticello News
Keeps You
Informed!!


THESE golfers were among those participating in the Rotary Sandbagger's Classic.
From left, Rosemary Turner, Tom Turner, JoAnn Dunham, Dennis Dunham.


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Lady Warriors Split Six


Softball Games Recently


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Lady Warrriors split six
games in three days, when ac-
tion began on the diamond
Friday, when the Lady Warri-
ors faced off against Carra-
belle, and won the first
district game of the season,
14-2.
Coach Roslyn Bass said the
girls were putting up a super
defense and they were hitting
well, in the five inning game
called due to the ten-run rule.
She added that Aucilla col-
lected six hits and the Carra-
belle pitcher gave up eight
walks and two hit-by-pitch.
Bethany Saunders pitched
the game, striking out five
and giving up four hits and
three walks.
Lisa Bailey went two for
three, two runs, one RBI.
Hannah Sorensen, went two
for two, two runs, four RBI.
Nicole Mathis went two for
two, one RBI, one run.
Chelsey Kinsey went one
for three; and Lindsey day
and Olivia Sorensen both
went one for two.
The Lady Warriors played in
the Godby Tournament, and
defeated Sneads 17-7 in the
Godby Toumament.Friday.
Brittany Hobbs pitched the
first six innings, giving up six
hits, striking out one and
walking three.
Paige Thurman pitched the
final inning, walking one, giv-
ing out no hits and striking
out no batters.


ACA collected a total of 13
hits against Sneads.
Bailey went two for five,
two runs, two RBI.
Saunders went three for
five, two runs, three RBI.
And Joanna Cobb went two
for five, three runs, two RBI.
The Lady warriors faced
Godby Saturday morning and
were routed 6-0 by the 4-A
team.
"We did a good job being
able to hang with them and
keeping their scoring down,"
said Bass.
No individual statistics were
kept for pitchers Hobbs and
Saunders, but collectively,
they gave up eight hits and
struck out one.
"It was not one of our better
games," said Bass. "Appar-
ently, we're not a morning
team. We're able to play much
better in the afternoons and
evenings," she quipped.
In the second game of the
day Saturday, Aucilla downed
Madison, 4-1, making them
eligible for the Tournament
Championship game.
The Lady Warriors collected
a total of six hits.
Hobbs pitched the first five
and a half innings, giving up
four hits, striking out one and
walking none.
Thurman pitched the final
inning and a half, giving up
one hit, one walk and striking
out no batters.
Day went two for three with
one run.
Hobs, Kinsey, Mallory
Plaines and Olivia Sorensen
all went one for three.


Aucilla then went into the
Championship game to face
Godby for the second time.
The Lady Warriors were
downed 5-2.
"We were ahead 2-3
through the fourth, but Godby
scored one in the fifth and
two in the sixth," said Bass.
"We scored our runs in the
first."
Olivia Sorensen went two
for three, one run.
Plaines went two for three;
and day went one for three,
one run.
Aucilla faced Florida High
Tuesday and were drilled
10-6 for a loss.


PAIGE THURMAN under
the pop fly in center field
at a recent ACA practice
session. (News Photo)


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 14, 2007 PAGE 11

I JCHS Tigers Down

Lake City Christian


The Jefferson County High
School varsity baseball team
now stand 2-4 on the season
after downing Lake City
Christian 11-8 last week.
Arnez Ammons was the
winning pitcher for the
Tigers. He gave four runs,
four hits, struck out four and
gave up three walks.
Curtis Hightower came to
the mound in.the sixth, walk-
ing three, striking out none,
giving up four runs and one
hit.
Marquis Dobson was cred-
ited with the save when he
came to the mound in the sev-
enth.


He struck out two, gave up
one walk and no hits.
At the plate, Dobson went
one for three, one run.
Hightower went two for
five, one run.
Telvin Norton went three
for three, four runs, one triple.
Shayne Broxie went three
for three, two runs.
Nick Parker went two for
five.
Lamarcus Bennett went two
for five, one run.
Ammons went one for four,
one run.
And Tony Roberts con-
verted four walks into a run.


Lady Tigers Track Team In Invitationals
The Jefferson County High tional, the Lady Tigers col- shot-put with 34' 2". hurdles in 58.77
School girlstrack team com- elected ten points to finish 12th In the Jessee Frobes Invita- Chandra T
peted in two invitationals re- of 14. tional the Lady Tigers accu- first in the long
cently, some of the girls Keneshia Coates ran the mulated two points to finish 6"; tenth in t
100 meter in 13.95. 14 of 14. with 14.73; an
taking first in their individual 200 meter with
events. Shaumese Massey took first Shanice Brooks ran the 100 meerwi
During the Lincoln Invita- in the long jump with 14' 3". meter in 14.58; the 100 hur- Brooks, Tuck
During the LincolnInvita- T____ 1. Al...n.n. Chelise Clinto


Jazmaun Hall tOOK fIrst in


uses in 20.63; and th3e 0u


100 in 57.59 to


4.
ucker finished
Jump with 13'
:he 100 meter
id 12th in the
33.73.
ker, Coates and
n ran the 4 x
Finish seventh.


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Phone: 850-948-7891
Cell: 850-973-7135
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Pond* Land Clearing* Demoli-
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Free Estimates and Consultation
Joe Reams, Jr.
Owner


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Tallahassee, FL 32305
850-656-8633
FAX 850-656-6150


Quality Service
Family Owned & Operated


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Portable Toilet Rentals
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ALLEN JENKINS
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Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled Fixtures-
Faucets Pumps Replaced Sewer & Water
Connections Tanks Replaced Water heater
Repairs All Repairs
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Bell Mobile Home
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Relevel ~ Tie-downs ~ Permits
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Kitchen Cabinets, Counter Tops,
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Built to last, quality guaranteed.
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Pam Wessels Mark Rebin Larry Nichols
Realtor/Broker Realtor Associate Realtor Associate


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Comfort Specialist Commercial &
cor Residential Service FLINT RIVER
i TRANE Sales Tl
Installation TIMBER COMPANY H
TIM HTUNTl BUYERS OF PINE AND
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L 'CM-Ler'sB SPECIALIZING IN PINE Help us fight amyotrophic Truck Rental Custom Hauling
FIRST IN SERVICE PULPWOOD THINNING lateral sclerosis, better known Sand Gravel Refuse
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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 14, 2007


JCHS Girls Compete In


Lion Invitational Meet


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School girls track team mem-
bers are continuing to hold
their own after competing in
the past two invitational.
In the Lion Invitational the
Lady Tiger collected six
points to finish 11th.
Coach Dwayne Jefferson
said not many girls competed
during the Tuesday meets be-
cause the majority of the team
also play softball.
In the 110 hurdles, Kene-
shia Coates finished sixth
with 20.63.


In the 400 meter, Chelsie
Clinton finished 20th with
1:14.03.
Coates also finished sixth of
13 in the 300 meter hurdles
with 1:68.
During the Hamilton Invita-
tional, the Lady Tigers
stepped up to take the third
place win.
In the long jump, Donna
Ransom took third place with
14' 8 3/4".
Chandra Tucker took fifth
place with 14' 7 3/4".
Coates took second place in
the 100 meter hurdles with
18.64.
Shanice Brooks took fifth
with 20.63.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Tigers boys compete in in-
vitationals.
During the Lincoln Invita-
tional, the Tigers accumulated
a total of 30 points to finished
in fifth place of the 13 teams
competing.
Kevin Bowers ran the 100
meters in 12.06 seconds.
Jon Dady took first in the
110 hurdles with 14.51.
Lucius Wade, Deondre
Jones, Tim Crumity and Dady
took first place in the 4 x 100
with 43.53.
Kelly Hill ran the 400 in
1:01.45.


Tim Crumity took first place
in the long jump with 21' 6".
Jordan Blair tossed the shot-
put 39' 10"; as did Marcus
Benjamin.
In discus, Blair took first
place with 118' 4"; Benjamin
threw the discus 68' 2"; and
Deandre Fagan threw the dis-
cus 75' 11".
During the Jessee Forbes
Invitational at Godby High,
the Tigers again made an im-
pressive showing in their indi-
vidual events.
The Tigers accumulated a
total of 26 points to finish in
the eighth slot of the 16 teams
competing.
Bowers finished the 100 me-
ters in 12.23; and the 300 hur-
dles in 47.77.


In the 100 meter, Ransom
took second place with 13.69.
Chanta brooks took fourth
placer with 14.07
In the 300 hurdles, Coates
took first place with 55.10.
Shanice Brooks took fourth
with 1:00.
Tucker took third in the 200
meter with 31.55.

Courtney Holmes took sixth
with 32.08.
in the 4 x 100, the Lady Ti-
gers, consisting of Tucker,
Coates, Shanice Brooks and
Ransom, took second place
with 56.33; and they took sec-
ond place in the 4 x 100 with
4.38.




I Fifth,


ionals
Dady took first in the 100
meter with 11.33; he took first
in the 110 hurdles with 15:00;
and he took first in the long
jump with 21' 0".
Wade took first in the 200
meter with 23.66.
Jones finished the 100 me-
ter with 11.56; and the 200
meter with 24.70.
Hill ran the 400 meter in
59.64.
Crumity finished the 100
meter in 11.65; and the long
jump with 19' 10.75".
The team of Dady, Wade,
Jones and Crumity too first in
the 4 x 100 with 43.66.
In field events, Blair took
first place in the discus throw
with 115' 5"; and he took first
in the shot-put with 33' 5".



Questions,
Anyone?
Get the answers you can
trust about government
programs, benefits, and
services from the Federal
Consumer Information
Center.
Just call toll-free:
1-800-FED-INFO
(That's 1-800-333-4636)
Mon-Fri 8am-8pm ET
Or visit
www.pueblo.gsa.govlcall
U.S. General Services Administration


LEGAL
IN fill (CIr(CI C(OI.URT 01
THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT IN AND FOR JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 07-63-CA IN RE: The
Marriage of AISHA STEWART,
Petitioner/Wife, and
CHRISTOPHER STEWART,
Respondent/Husband NOTICE OF
ACTION To: 'CHRISTOPHER
STEWART, Address Upknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on
MICHEAL, A. REICHMAN,
petitioner's attorney, whose address
if P.O. Box 41, Monticello, FL
32345, on or before April 20, 2007,
and file the original with the clerk
of this said court either before
service on petitioner's attorney or
immediately thereafter, otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition. Dated on
02/28/07. KIRK REAMS Clerk of
Court AS Clenk of the Court Jeri b.
Pearson Deputy Clerk
R/D 3/7.14,21,28/07,c


Got A Cute Photo?

Send It To Us And
We'll Share It With
Our Readers!

Kids Dogs *
Strange stuff, etc.

Monticello News
P.O. Box 430
Monticello, FL
32345

"You Can't Be Without It"



NEED CHILDCARE?
ENROLL TODAY
The Little University Co.,
is now accepting Infants.
Open enrollment for all ages and
sibling discounts. Limited Spaces
for Arbor School Readiness.
Call 997-2970


The City of
is accepting
for a laborer in the


NOTICE
AA: lon., Thurs., Sat.; Al-Anon:
Mon. 8 p.m.; Christ Episcopal
Church Annex, 425 North Cherry
Street 997-21239, 997-1955 for info.
R/D 3/2,7,9,14,,16,21,23,28,30,pd
HELP WANTED
NOTICE The City of
Monticello has an opening in the
Water Department. Experience
is required in maintenance of
Water System Components,
including valves, hydrants,
repairing water main breaks,
replacement of valves and
hydrants, and experience in
backhoe operations. Applicants.
must present a valid Florida
Drivers License, Social Security
Card, and. a High School
Diploma. Applications and
complete job descriptions are
available at City Hall, 245 South
Mulberry Street, Monticello,
Florida, Monday Friday, 8 AM
to 4 PM.. Applications will be
accepted until 3 PM, Monday,
March 19, 2007. The City of
Monticello is an equal
opportunity employer and does
not discriminate against race,
color, religion, sex, ancestry,
place of birth, handicap, or
national origin. The *City of
Monticello is a drug free
workplace, and new employees
must pass a pre-employment
drug and alcohol test. DON
ANDERSON, CITY SUPT.
3/14,16,c


In Case Of Emergency Dial 911
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Toll Free: (866) 496-3442
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(352) 498-0041
cell: (352) 356-1001


I 4


Tiger Boys Finish


Eighth In Invitat


Coming soon - -
"The Sellin' O' the Green"
FOGII Plant Sale


AGREE -SA S
I U T E

For Professional Devulupment
Saturday, March 17, 9 a.m. til 2 p.m.
Jake's Parking Lot
For more information call Kim Kennedy at
997.4088 ext 28
or e-mail kim@greenindustries.org


Dr


~


-~r Ir I Imes


HELP WANTED
Street Department. This
position assists the Street
Foreman with all work
associated with the maintenance
of city streets and right-of-ways.
Applicants must present a valid
Florida Drivers License (CDL's
preferred), Social Security Card
and High School Diploma.
Applications and complete job
descriptions are available at
City Hall, 245 South Mulberry
Street, Monticello, Florida, and
will be accepted until 2 PM
Monday 19, 2007. The City of
Monticello is an equal
opportunity employer and does
not discriminate against race,
color, religion, sex, ancestry,
place of birth, handicap, or
national origin. The City of
Monticello is a drug free
workplace, and new employees
must .pass a pre-employment
drug and alcohol test. DON
ANDERSON, CITY SUPT.
3/14,16,c
NORTH FLORIDA
COMMUNITY COLLEGE,
Full-time Faculty Position
commencing August 2007.
Mathematics Instructor
Applicants must have a
Master's degree in Mathematics
from an accredited institution,
or a Master's in a related field
with a minimum of eighteen
graduate hours in mathematics.
Experience teaching Calculus
preferred. Ability to teach a
wide range of math courses
along with Community College
teaching experience desired.


NOTICE
Monticello
applications









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 14, 2007 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED

Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$9.00
Each Additional Line....$1.25
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568
i


HELP WANTED
Duties include teaching 15 hours
per semester through the
sophomore-level. Candidates
chosen for interviews will be
required to give a sample
presentation utilizing
instructional technology/
graphing calculator. In addition
to teaching, duties include:
established office hours; serving
on College committees;
participating in Department and
College activities. Send
applications to: Director HR,
North Florida Community
College, 325 NW Turner Davis
Drive, Madison, Florida 32340.
Only complete application
packets will be considered.
Complete application packet
requires letter; resume and
application; copy of Transcripts
(Unofficial okay). Application
and Resume must be received
by March 28, 2007. EOE.
3/14,16,21,23,c
Part-time Receptionist Needed
for busy CPA office. Please fax
Resume to 342-9899 or Call for
appointment 342-9898
S/D2/28 tfn,c
Come join our growing
newspaper. Good opportunity
for stable person with good
people skills for telemarketing
position. No drama gueens,
dopers, or dunderheads, please.
If interested call Ron Cichon at
997-3568.
3/14,tfn,nc
Need cleaning assistant to clean
offices in the evening, in
Monticello. Please call
850-894-6254 or Fax
850-894-6224
R/D 2/23tfn,c
Kennel Worker To learn all
phases of animal care.
Qualifications: Must love
animals, be honest, dependable,
and have reliable
transportation. Alcoholics and
drug abusers do not apply. Call
for interview, 877-5050.
3/9,tfn, c
The Jefferson County Road
Dept. is accepting applications
for the following positions: (1) a
Mechanics position. Must have
experience in gas and diesel
engines and/or have high school
diploma or GED and will train.
A class A CDL license would be
a plus. (2) A Truck driver with a
class A CDL license. Must have
a high school diploma or GED.
(3) An Equipment Operator/
class A-CDL driver. Must have
a high school diploma or GED.
Closing date for all positions
will be March 9, 2007.


HELP WANTED
2/23,28,3/2,7,9,14,16,c
Area Coordinators needed for
High School Exchange
Program. Part-time on a
contract basis. Call
(888)446-5437 for additional
information or fax resume to
(405)810-8714.
3/14,16,fc

BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
Billboard Connection Exciting
"home based" franchise
opportunity in the outdoor
advertising industry. Low
investment with unlimited
potential. For further
information please contact
Anthony Foley at (866)
257-6025
3/14,16,fc
Cash for you American Coin
Collection., Gold Jewelry,
Military Items & Old Paintings.
Traveling throughout Florida &
Paying premium prices. For
appointment call Ralph (800)
210-2606.
3/14,16,fc

SERVICES
We honor tradition but do not
fossilize it. Christ Episcopal
Church, three blocks N. of the
courthouse. Sunday services at
8:30 and 11:00 AM. 997-4116
R/1' 3/14,c
I build sheds, decks, handicap
ramps, exterior carpentry work,
window/door replacement. Call
Bob 242-9342
R/D1/10,12,17,19,24,26,31,2/2,7,
9,14.16,21,23,28,3/2,7,9,14,16

Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
new menopausal products.
Jackson's Drug Store.
5/12 tfn, c
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
,509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, S/D, tfn
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
Tfn
LOST
Cat Black w/white feet & white
chest, on Main Ave. Last seen
Friday. 997-0925
R/D 3/14,16,nc


INOW1HIRING

RNs & LPNs

FTPT & PRN


CNAs
S ALL SHIFTS

Weekend Treatment Nurse
RN or LPN


Social Service Director


Attention

Jefferson County Residents

Are you 55+ and having
difficulty finding ajob)?

If you qualify, Experience Works will

pay your training costs
AND

pay your wages while you learn to be a
Certified Nurse Aide (CNA).

For more information call Lana at
850-922-0023 cxl 242

A national nonprofit i organization. lI'()/AA
TIlhis ..S. Small Busiines A.(lin Iiisration III (S 1A) Gimil Awaid,. .S All. U-02-1- I I0 is
nI .ndcd1 3y teSBA. S. Vs B undin. is not an endosmecnilo ofar n ondo lis, opimons,"or s e-
vi(cs. All SBA limllldeLd pogramii. s ;.ic c ell dcd t ho eI C |I I- oi : I IlII (lo a iscliliilmlol)' Imisis."
---tL,' 10w + 'mii


AUTOMOTIVE
$500 POLICE IMPOUNDS
Cars from $500! Tax Repos, US
Marshall and IRS sales! Cars,
Trucks, SUV's, Toyota's,
Honda's, Chevy's & more! For
Listings Call (800) 425-1730 x
2384.
3/14,16,fc

FOR SALE
Dining Room table w/4-chairs &
a sideboard. Asking $400.00
997-2344.
3/16,pd
GOATS asking $100 each. Call
Debbie at 997-0901, leave
message.
3/9,tfn,nc
FOR SALE you move 93
Merritt 54x24 DW 3 BR, 2 -
BA w/fireplace, 12x10 metal
shed and more included. No
calls after 9:00 pm please
850-997-3318 or 850-251-0865.
2/16,tfn,nc
Queen pillow-Top Mattress set.
Brand new in plastic with
warranty. $150. 850-222-9879
12/6,TFN,c
SOLID WOOD Cherry sleigh
bed BRAND NEW in box,,
$275. (850) 545-7112
12/6,Tfn,c
SOFA & LOVESEAT. Brand
NEW LEATHER, still wrapped,
lifetime warranty, sacrifice
$795. (delivery available). (850)
425-8374
12/6,Tfn,c
NEW QUEEN POSTER
bedroom set bed, dresser,
mirror, chest, 2 night stands.
$4000 value, must sell $1500.
850-545-7112.
12/6,tfn,c
DINING ROOM Beautiful
cherry table, 2 arm & 4 side
chairs, lighted china cabinet.
Brand new in boxes, can deliver.
Must move, $799. 850-545-7112.
12/6,tfn,c


FOR RENT
Mobile Home for Rent 3 Bed
rooms 2 Bath located in
Wacissa Call after 5:00 P
850-997-8421
3/9,14,pd
Spacious 2/1 and 1/1 apts, also
office space, near Monticello
center. Section 8 OK. Call
850-491-8447
1/24,tfn,c

REAL ESTATE
New energy efficient 3 Bedroom
2 Bath house on approximately
1 2A acres with extra large
double car garage, front porch,
paved driveway, and sidewalk.
240 Green Meadows Dr.
$207,000 997-1093.
3/7,9,14,16,21,23,28,30,pd
Cute, well maintained 3 br
home in growing Tallahassee.
Enclosed family room for
growing family or home office.
Great for first time home buyer
or investor. Seller providing one
year warranty at closing.
$82,000. Premier Properties,
850-421 01020.
R/D3/9,tfn.c

20.20 acres in Gadsden County
near Nicholson Farmhouse. No
road frontage/easement off
Hwy..12. Possible hunting
camp, subdivision, homesite or
investment. $10,000 per acre/
$202,000.00 Total. Premier
Properties. 850-421-0020
R/D 2/28tfn,c
Business opportunity on
westside business zoned mixed
use by Leon County. All
concrete construction makes
this current restaurant sturdy
and fire resistant; 2400 ft on .78
acres about State Road Hwy. 20
and Jackson Bluff Road.
$385,000. Premier Properties.
850-421-0020
R/D 3/9,tfn,c


Near many National & State Forests where you can hunt, fish, camp
or canoe. Horses OK. Ideal for permanent, vacation or retirement.

From89,9o From $4,995 Down

Flexible Owner Financing I NO CLOSING COSTS I First Come, First Served





HOME FOR SALE

YOU MOVE

Approximately 1800 sq. feet
3br/ 2 bath. Located in Jefferson County
Hwy 19, South of I-10
Sale Price $25,000.00

(850) 544-2458


BRYNWOOD CENTER
_t Housekeeping Supervisor
Full-time

If you are interested in this GREAT opportunity,
Contact us at:
BRYNWOOD CENTER
1656 SOUTH JEFFERSON STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
PHONE: 850-997-1800, FAX: 850-997-7269
www.deltahealthgroup.com
Drug Free Workplace EOE/m/f/d/v


For Sale by First United Methodist Church 2400 sq.
ft. home at 895 West Washington Street. This former
Methodist Parsonage with split floor plan has 4 bed-
rooms and 3 1/2 baths, refinished hardwood floors.
New tile floors in kitchen, laundry and baths, carpet
in the family room and master bedroom. Bathrooms
newly renovated. Wood stove insert in fireplace.
Large lot landscaped with magnolias, camellias, crepe
myrtles and azaleas. Large deck and screened porch.
$259,500. For more information
call 997-5545


lr-rtaInIE_ : Er E .Ula E mm U'E a Em

Housing Vouchers

i CWe accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 $50 dep.

S PPool & Youth Activities

575-6571
-AMIlWl i ll lrl [M ] H W mI m 0 lW 1 -1


. - - W '1PW


(850) 997-4340
m no o._ %


'Link is back in town'
Wooded Tract 2.09 hillside acres east of town
on graded County Road $30,400

Country Retreat nestled in a corner of Ted
Turner's Avalon Plantation 29.7 acres and a de-
lightful roomy lodge with extras to include pool
and hot tub, wrap around porches $480,000

Loq Cabin 3 bed 2 bath with screened front and
back porches, board fenced pasture, double car-
port, out building on 4.07 acres $385;000

Lloyd Acres on a wooded hillside a 3 bedroom
2 bath home with oak floors, fireplace and lots of
very nice extras including shop for $87,500

Historic Budd House built ca 1882 by commu-
nity leader of the day for his family. Lovely wood
work, high ceilings, spacious rooms, grand'fire-
places, marvelous porches, currently 4 bedrooms
and 2 baths $355,000

Lake front Home!! 3 bedroom 2 bath home
with spacious family room, big carport, terrific
screened porch nice barn with 5 hillside acres on
very nice lake near 1-10 and US 19 $385,000

Amazing Buy!!! Mixed Use Property 12
acres on US 19 south land use designation per-
mits 4 houses per acre near Dennis' Trading post
only $36,500 per acre

Cherry Tree Lane Price Slashed!!! 3 bed / 2
bath doublewide, fireplace, big porch, garage,
shed, above ground pool, big trees, fenced, on
paved road now $110,000

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly


wooded acres Only $36,500


Pasture and Pecans 5-10 lovely acres on
paved road $15,500 per acre Very nice property,
good deed restrictions

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Comfortable 4 bedroom 3 bath home on five
fenced acres with guest cottage w/bath, 2 car
garage, big shop, pasture 100 pecan trees and a
nice pool Only $365,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Wooded Acreaqe 5.35 acres on private road
off Paul Thompson Road $128,500

Waukeenah Hiqhway 27.99 acres good home
site fenced pasture $545,000

Aucilla Shores 5 level wooded acres $75,000

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath double-
wide with nice deck, fenced yard on 1 acre
$73,500

Investment Properties
-Choice lot on the Ecofina River 20 min to
the Gulf, State property on 3 sides, septic
tank on property, paved road only $195,000
-3 mobile homes on 4 acres 4 allowed


$118,000


Realtor Tim Peary

850-997-4340
See all our listings at
www.TimPeary.com

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


Is

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PAC.F 14. MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 14, 2007

Aucilla Christian Reports


4th Six Weeks Honor Roll


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy
Principal Richard Finlayson
reports the academic honor
roll for the fourth six weeks
period.
In K-3, receiving all S+'s:
Aidan Cribbs, Lindsey Davis,
Keira Evans, Caroline Flynt,
Dean Forehand, Riley Ham-
rick, McKenzie Hurley, Kris-
han Patel, Jordan Swickley,
Megan Vann, Olivia Walton,
Travis Wheeler, and Ashlyn
Williams.
In K-4, receiving all S+'s
were: Jacob Barker, Joshua
Clark, Jocelyn Davis, Carter
Derome, Joshua Eades, Ans-
ley English, Nicholas Flynt,
Anna Halbert, Jason
Hamilton, Alex Haselden,
Christa Hayes, Austin High-
tower, Hanngh Holton, Gant
Lee, Grant Merschman, Abby
Reams, Wyatt Reese, Mylie
Rogers, Elizabeth Scheese,
Grayson Sircy, Austin
Wheeler, and Benjamin Wur-
gler.


In K-5, receiving all S+'s
were: Alexis Alexandrou,
Grace Beshers, Andrew Bur-
rus, Emily Forehand, Beth-
any Hayes, Amber Knowles,
Gabbie Smith, Nicholas
Swickley, Cody Whiddon,
and Mackenzie Wirick.
All S, S+; Marissa Cooley,
Evan Courtney, Taylor Davis,
Matthew Greene, Hayley
Lewis, Lynelle Loveless,
Maggie Mall, Chloe Reams,
Levi Stafford, Dilyn Stowers,
and Cole Tuten.
In first grade, receiving all
A's were: Emily Adams,
Timothy Finlayson, Jessica
Giddens, Cameryn -Grant,
Elizabeth Hightower, T. J.
Hightower, Noah Hulbert, D.
J. Key, Ryals Lee, Jenna
Merchman, Abigail Morgan,
Cannon Randle, Quinton Tho-
mas, Joe Walton, Ria
Wheeler, Tedo Wilcox, and
Daniel Wurgler.
Receiving all A's and B's
were: David Bailey, Walker
Davis, Andrew Hall, Kenlie
Harvey, Evan Hocking, Katie
James, Carlie Joiner, Haley

;*~p7 "pe~N;


Jones, Nour Khodr, Jenna
Merschman, Jake Pridgeon,.
Abigail Ratliff, and Brandon
Slaughter.
In second grade, receiving
all A's were: Traynor Barker,
Stephanie English, Gaitlin
Nennstiel, Kirsten Reagan,
Ramsey Sullivan, and Kate
Whiddon.
Receiving all A's and B's
were: Dena Bishop, Cali Bur-
kett, Rebecca Carson, Faith
Demott, Sarah Hall, Katie
Fulford, Chaz Hamilton, Joe
Hannon, J. T. Harp, Brittany
Hughes, Jenny Jackson, Erica
Keeler, Donnie Kinsey,
Emily Knowles, Lindsey
Lawson, Hannah Lewis, Cole
McNeill, Summerlyn Marsh,
Will Sircy, Natalie Sorensen,
Larrett Terrell, Kirsten Whi-
don, Jackie Walker and Hank
Wirick.
In third grade, earning all
A's were: Taylor Copeland,
Erin Lee, Thomas Swickley,
T. J. Swords, Sarah Tharpe,
Justin Welch, and Emma
Whitmer.
All A's and B's were: Jake
Edwards, Megan Giddons,
S/


Ian Haselden, Sam Hogg,
Ally Mall, Taylor McKnight,
Rean Montesclaros, Court-
ney Watts, D. J. Wilkinson,
and Mattison Gaige Winches-
ter.
In the fourth grade, earning
all A's were: Julie High, Lind-
sey Mincey, and Bryce
Sanderson.
Earning all A's and B's
were: Austin Bishop, Ty,
Chancey, Jaden Clark, Mor-
gan Cline, Ricky Finlayson,
Cheyenne Floyd, Haleigh Gil-
bert, Doug Gulledge, Sarah
James, Winston Lee, Brook-
lyn McGlamory, Carson
Nennstiel, and Kelsie Reams.
In fifth grade, earning all
A's were: Rachel Lark, and
Aimee Love.
Earning all A's and B's
were: Tanner Aman, Victoria
Brock, Lauren Demott, Jacob
Dunbar, Kayla Fulford, Mat-
thew Hutcheson, Jessica
Welch, and Annie Yang..
In sixth grade, earning all


A's were: Ashli Cline, Jay
Finlayson, Kaley Love, Whit-
ney McKnight, Ashley
Schofill, and Wendy Yang.
Earning all A's and B's
were: Alexis Burkett, Nick
Buzbee, Russell Fraleigh, Ja-
red Jackson, Hadley Revell,
Pamela Watt, and Audrey
Wynn.
In the seventh grade, earn-
ing all A's was Tyler Jackson.
Earning all A's and B's were;
Levi Cobb, Matt Dobson, and
Shelby Whitmer.
In the eighth grade, earning
all A's was Kaitlin Jackson.
Earning all A's and B's
were: Tiffany Brasington,
Clark Christy, Anna Finlay-
son, Jessica Hagan, Kent
Jones, and Elizabeth Riley.
In the ninth grade, earning
all A's was Dana Watt.
Earning all A's and B's
were: Tiffany Brasington, Jes-
sica Hunt, Wilson Lewis,
John Stephens and Brooke
Stewart.


In the tenth grade, earning
all A's were: Chelsea Dobson,
Byron Love, and Michaela
Roccanti.
Earning all A's and B's
were: Ashley Echols, An-
gela McCune, Mallory
Plaines, and Savannah Wil-
liams.
In the eleventh grade, earn-
ing all A's were: Rebekah
Aman, Ben Buzbee, Court-
ney Connell, Lindsey Day,
Stephanie Dobson, Prateen
Patel, Ramsey Revell, Tristan
Sorensen and Woody Vollert-
sen.
Earning all A's and B's were:
Courtney Brasington, A. J.
Connell, Will Hartsfield,
Alfa Hunt, Claire Knight, and
Hannah Sorensen.
In the twelfth grade, earning
all A's were: Will Knight,
Melissa Martin, Caitlin Mur-
phy, Rikki Roccanti, and Tay-
lor Rykard.
Earning all A's and B's was
Holly Jones.


-; ti~nEqrtf
4 ; ~ c
J"* N~ .


x.U.


SNOOPY, left male, and Sally female, are a Basset Hound mix which must be
adopted together at a discount. They have all their shots and are altered. Wouldn't
you like to take the cuties home? (News Photo)


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Though County Fire Rescue
received approximately 70
calls between Thursday night
and Friday morning's early
storm, most calls were not
storm related,, but pertained to
medical problem, a couple of
vehicle accidents, and one
case of tree removal.
Firefighter/EMT Debbert
Bell, who was on duty at the
time, reports the major inci-
dents.
"We had a car hit a guard rail
on 1-10 near mile marker 225.
There were no major injuries,
but the woman remembered
that her purse was in her vehi-
cle while in the process of be-
ing transported," said Bell.
"The three men who had
stopped to help her had appar-
ently taken off with her
purse."
He said there was also an
incident on Nash Rd. of a


The parking lot at Jake's
restaurant will be the site of
"The Sellin' o' the Green,"
the latest plant sale fundraiser
for the Friends of Green In-
dustries Institute (FOGII,) 9
a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday.
Volunteers will be on hand
to provide information and
advice on the best ways to
plant and use the plants pur-
chased, all of which have
been grown by volunteers at
Green Industries Institute
(GII.)
Community Outreach Coor-
dinator Judi Persons will be
available at the GII plant sale
on Saturday to answer ques-
tions about GII activities and


possible DUI, where the
driver of the vehicle swerved
to miss a downed tree and
went off into the ditch.
"In a pouring rain, he re-
ported that he had to also cut
and remove a small tree from
an areas road," said Bell.
"We also had a report and
there were downed power
lines that had set a large sec-
tion of grass on fire just a few
feet from a structure, but that
fire had pretty much con-
tained itself due to the rain."
He added that there was the
report of a brush fire off Dills
Rd. that Fire Rescue extin-
guished with the assistance of
Ashville volunteers.

'We don't know if it was an
unintentional fire or a con-
trolled burn, but we were get-
ting complaints, particularly
from a couple suffering from
asthma saying they couldn't
breathe," said Bell. "The AC
was sucking the smoke in the
house."


goals.
Funds raised by volunteers
are used for projects chosen
by the volunteers, and include
educational outreach and spe-
cial events for the
community.
On Friday, March 9 GII
hosted an on-site workshop
entitled "Blueprint for a
Green Future," which drew
more than 30 individuals from
the surrounding area and pro-
vided information on environ-
mentally sound landscaping
practices.
GII staff have already been
working with Trisha and
Mark Wirick on plans for the
new Garden Center at Eden-
field's.


300
(R)
Fri. 4:10-7:00-9:50 Sat. 1:25-
4:10-7:00-9:50 Sun. 1:25-4:10-
7:00 Mon. Thurs. 4:10-7:00
NO PASSES
DADDY'S LITTLE
GIRL
(PG13)
Fri. 5:30-10:00 Sat. 12:55-5:30-
10:00 Sun. 12:55-5:30 Mon. -
Thurs. 5:30
BRIDGE TO
TERABITHIA
(PG13)
Fri. 5:20 -7:25-9:40 Sat. 1:00-
3:05 -5:20-7:25-9:40 Sun. 1:00-
3:05 -5:20-7:25 Mon. Thurs.
5:20 -7:25
NORBIT
(PG13)
Fri. 4:35-7:05-9:35 Sat. 1:40-
4:35-7:05-9:35 Sun. 1:40-4:35-
7:05 Mon.-Thurs. 4:35-7:05
WILD HOGS
(PG13)
Fri. 4:20-7:35-10:05 Sat. 1:05-
4:20-7:35-10:05 Sun. 1:05-4:20-
7:35 Mon.-Thurs. 4:20-7:33
NO PASSES
GHOST RIDER
(PGr13)
Fri. 4:30-7:15-9:55 Sat. 1:20-
4:30-7:15-9:55 Sun. 1:20-4:30-
7:15 Mon. -.Thurs. 4:30-7:15
THE ULTIMATE GIFT
(PG)
Fri. 510-7:20-9:30 Sat. 12:50-
3:00-5:10-7:20-9:30 Sun. 12:50-
3:00-5:10-7:20 Mon. Thurs.
5:10-7:200 PASSES
THE NUMBER 23
(R)
Fri. 7:45 Sat. 3:10-7:45 Sun.
3:10-7:45 Mon. Thurs. 7:45


All new high
Back seats and
More renova-
tions on the
way.


The Jefferson County Recyclinq Program accepts
the following items for recycling


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?






Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.




Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please cail
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


Fire Rescue Reports


Weekend Activities


Plant Sale Planned

Saturday At Jake's




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