Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00185
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: March 9, 2007
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00185
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text








Surveying
Aftermath Of
Storm Here

Story, Page 3


Eating Out
Can Hurt
Diet Effort

Editorial, Page 4


Melon Festival
Queen Pageant
Requirements

Story, Page 6
II


Church Forms

Health Ministry
Program

Story, Page 14

I N


r^^Friday Morning)






Monticello


139TH YEAR NO. 19, 50 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews


FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 2007


SNew Subdivision



STriggers Review



SOf County Policy


Officials' Decision

Will Set Precedent


AMONG the many nearby property owners who spoke out against the proposed rezon-
ing of the 160-acre parcel off Old Tung Grove Road a year ago were Mila and Milton
Ignatz. Here the couple speaks with, from left, then planner and now Planning Offi-
cial Bill Tellefsen and former Planning Official Bob Arredondo following the March,
2006, public hearing. (News Photo)


Police Nab Three Men


In Winn Dixie Bur gilaryf


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Through the combined ef-
forts of area Law Enforce-
ment agencies, three suspects
were arrested Tuesday morn-
ing and charged with burglary
of a structure at the Winn
Dixie Store.
At 4:12 a.m., the burglar
alarm of Winn Dixie indi-
cated motion inside the ma-
chine room.
City Police initiated a call-
out, and within 15 minutes,
officers established a perime-
ter around the Winn Dixie
and the adjacent businesses in
the shopping' center.


At 4:43 a.m., Lt. Fred Mos-
ley spotted the driver/look-
out waiting for the burglars,
and made the arrest.
A short time later, officers
reported a disturbance by the
horses in a nearby field, indi-
cating a possible breach of the
.perimeter.
As the morning progressed,
units from the Sheriffs de-
partment assisted with
searches and the enhancement
of perimeter positions.
The Leon County Sheriffs
Office assisted with a heli-
copter search, and Madison
County CI responded with a
K-9 team to track the fugi-
tives.
The Florida Department of


Law Enforcement responded
to work the crime scene, col-
lecting all possible forensic
evidence in the case.
Meanwhile, the suspects
had crawled back through
Winn Dixie hedges and en-
tered. Burger King, to blend
in, and await the cab they had
called to pick them up, have
some coffee, and make a
quick getaway.
After the pair raised some
suspicions, employees alerted
law enforcement of two suspi-
cious characters inside the
establishment and they were
detained by officers at 6 a.m.
The trio, ranging in ages be-
tween 21 and 29, are Alfred
(See Police Nab, Page 2)




^y^


THE crime lab from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement was on the scene
Tuesday at the Winn Dixie, gathering forensic evidence in the case. (News Photo)

Grant Aims At Economic Development


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

County officials last week
gave the go-ahead for the pur-
suit of a federal grant that is
specifically intended for the
promotion of economic devel-
opment.
Commissioners agreed to ac-
cept the free services of Brad
Day, a Tallahassee-based eco-
nomic development consultant
who normally charges between


$5,000 and $7,000 for his ex-
pertise.
If successful in the applica-
tion process, the county could
receive up to $55,000 from the
US Department of Agriculture
(USDA). The money would be
used to seek outside help for
the economic development ef-
fort (Day or another profes-
sional such as him would
conceivably vie for the job),
inventoried the county's assets
for attracting businesses, and


develop economic develop-
ment strategies.
"Mr. Day is an economic de-
velopment professional,"
Grants Director Roy Schlei-
cher clarified for commission-
ers. "He can take what we
have and move it forward. It
may end up being Day that we
hire if we get the grant, but it
may not be."

The deadline for submission
of the application is March 30.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

A proposed residential de-
velopment that planners re-
jected exactly a year ago is
making its way back up the
pike, if in altered form.
Planners last March re-
jected a request for the rezon-
ing of a 160-acre parcel off
Old Tung Grove Road near US
90 and the Leon County line
from ag-5 (one house per five
acres) to ag-3 (one house per
three acres).
Among the planners' cited
reasons for the rejection: the
property lies in a flood plain
and highly sensitive recharge
area for the aquifer; the devel-
opment would have a signifi-
cant negative impact on State
Road 59 and Old Tung Grove
Road; and the county had bet-
ter suited land for ag-3 devel-
opments.


At the time, the proposal
also drew strong opposition
from surrounding property
owners concerned about the
project's potential impact on
the natural environment and
the area's rural quality of life.
Now the developers are back
with a revised proposal to de-
velop the property under its
existing ag-5 zoning, which
would allow 32 instead of 53
houses on the 160 acres,..
A potential sticking point,
however, is whether the county
will require the developer to
pave Old Tung Grove Road, a
.9-mile long county-
maintained dirt road.
Planning Official Bill Tellef-
sen approached the commis-
sion last week at the devel-
oper's behest, seeking board
direction.
Tellefsen explained his di-
lemma this way: Frank Darabi,
the county's consultant engi-


neer, had instructed him to re-
quire that the developer pave
the road; but Scott Shirley, the
county's consultant planning
attorney, had advised him that
developers can't be made to
pave county maintained roads.
"I have two conflicting
views," Tellefsen said.
He pointed out that the De-
velopment Code, the book that
guides his decision-making on
such issues, was silent on the
question.
What's more, the proportion-
ate fair share ordinance, which
the commission recently
adopted and which would as-
sign a proportionate share of
the upgrade cost of a
development-impacted road to
the developer, had yet to be
converted into applicable poli-
cies, he said.
Under the circumstances,
Tellefsen said, he was at a loss
what to tell the developers,
who wanted a response on the
question so they could decide
how to proceed,
"They don't want to go for-
ward with the application until
(See New, Page 2)


Officials To 'Agendicize'


All issues For Discussion


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Dictionary writers, take
heed: Commissioners here
have coined a new word.
Or better yet, they are popu-
larizing the word. It appears
that Dick Bailar may be the ac-
tual author.
The word is "agendicize" --
meaning to put an item on the
agenda.
The word cropped up numer-
ous times during commission-
ers' various discussions last
week. The word, in fact, sur-
faced no fewer than 10 times
during the span of a few min-
utes.
It started with County Attor-
ney Buck Bird cautioning
commissioners to be less cava-
lier with the taking up of items
for discussion and sometimes
for action that weren't specifi-
cally listed on the agenda.
"It's getting to be a habit,
where request payments and
change orders and other things
are coming up at the last min-
ute," Bird said.
It's not clear if Bird first used
the word "agendicize", but
soon the word was being ban-
died about indiscriminately.
Indeed, commissioners took to
the word like ducks to water.
Commission Chairman Jun-
ior Tuten numerous times em-
phasized to his colleagues of
the need to "agendicize" items.


Then Commissioners Jerry
Sutphin, Gene Hall and Skeet
Joyner took up the word.
Soon, items and issues were
being "agendicized" left and
right.
Agendicize? this reporter fi-
nally asked, turning to Bailar,
a regular attendee and partici-
pant at commission meetings.


"Actually, I coined the
word," Bailar said. "Pretty
nifty, isn't it?"
A search of several diction-
aries failed to turn up anything
even remotely close. Googling
the word did turn up a couple
of hits, however, in the sense
of 'agendicizing" or "politiciz-
(See Officials, Page 2)


Commission OKs Final

Phase Of Subdivision


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Commissioners last week ap-
proved phase three of the final
plat of the Parkway Pines sub-
division, a project 12 years in
the making.
County officials initially ap-
proved the development in
1995, along with a land-use
change to accommodate the 52
mobile home that were to be
placed on half acre lots.
At the time, the developer
indicated that he would com-
plete the subdivision in stages,
as the money allowed.
The developer completed
phase one in 1998 and phase
two in 2000, according to
Planning Official Bill Tellef-
sen. He said this last phase
would complete the project.
Commissioner Jerry Sutphin
alone questioned the arrange-


ment. He wondered why the
board was being asked to ap-
prove the final plat to a project
that was 12 years old.
Wasn't there a rule in place
that required the completion of
a project within a certain time
limit, he wanted to know.
In fact, the rule was that con-
struction had to begin on a
project within a year of ap-
proval, Tellefsen explained.
But in this case, the commis-
sion had approved the project
with the understanding that it
would be done in stages, he
said.
What's more, the developer
had shown due diligence in
pursuing the project through
the ensuing years. And phases
one and two had already been
completed and recorded, he
added.
Commissioners approved the
measure 4-1, with Sutphin
casting the lone vote.


I I










PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 9, 2007

_.* - ---
^ ''. ^.


jl Th--^ -': *ac l -^ ^ ^r .


Police Nab Three Men In Winn Dixie Burglary


(Continued From Page 1)
they know what the county
will require," Tellefsen said.
"I'm asking for direction from
this board."
He cautioned commissioners
to be mindful that their deci-
sion would be precedent set-
ting. How they decided the is-
sue, in other words, would
haunt them in the future, he
said.
Commissioner Skeet Joyner
offered that laws and legal in-
terpretations were to be re-
spected, but in this instance, he
disagreed with the attorney's
recommendation. No way was
he going to vote to put addi-
tional traffic on Old Tung
Grove Road in its present con-
dition, he said.

"We, as commissioners,
everyday see the costs that it
takes to maintain the county's
dirt roads for public use," Joy-
ner said.
He cited a similar situation in
the past, where the developer,
presented with the county's
concerns, had opted to pave-
the road.


(Continued From Page 1)
Eugene Jones, John Daniel
Parnell, and Joseph Allgainer.
MPD Investigator Sgt. Chip
said all are believed to be
from the central Florida area,
but that had not yet been con-
firmed as of Wednesday
morning.

He added that there were
similarities to the Nov. 29
burglary of Winn Dixie and
Tuesday night's burglary.

Forensic evidence from the
two cases will be compared
and possible future charges
filed.
"Based on the previous
case, we suspect they were


"I think we need to leave the
choice to this developer," Joy-
ner said.
Commission Chairman Jun-
ior Tuten was more emphatic.
"My position is that if a de-
veloper develops in Jefferson
County, he needs to take care
of the infrastructure," Tuten
said. "I don't think it's fair to
ask the taxpayers to subsidize
a road that benefits a develop-
ment."
Commissioners Jerry Sut-
phin and Eugene Hall echoed
the sentiment.

Tellefsen ventured that the
board's stated sentiment might
well represent the county's pol-
icy, but it was not so written in
the .Development Code, the
document that ruled his
actions. Nor was the mecha-
nism to apply the proportion-
ate fair share ordinance in
place at the present, he added.
At which point Tuten put
the issue on the agenda for the
March 15 meeting, specifically
to formulate a formal policy on
the matter and re ond to the
developer's question.


there for drugs," said
Springer.


The trio are currently being
held at the Jefferson County


Jail, under $75,000 bond
each.


The Jefferson
County Utility
Coordinating
Committee

Will meet
at 9:00 a.m.
March 14, 2007,

at the
Jefferson County
Extension Office,
275 North
Mulberry
Street


NOTICE OF MONTICELLO CITY TommySurles nsAgcy nc
Tommy Surles, Agent
COUNCIL WORKSHOPBus: 50997-8282
The Monticello City Council will conduct
a workshop on
Tuesday, March 20, 2007 LIKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR STATE FARM IS THERE.M

at 4:00 p.m. at City Hall.
Contact your Stale Farm agenl for details on coverage, costs, restrictions and renewability
Items for discussion include general operation of all city P064008 Sta lefarm Mutual Automoble insurance Compan*Bloomngton.L 10/06
departments, personnel and budget issues.


Phone: 850-997-1081

Cell: 850-528-3892

Monticello, Florida


Time Juggler Concierge


Keeping all the balls in the air!


Lisa J. Reasoner, Owner



Errands Grocery & Personal Shopping

Deliveries Party Planning Bill Pay

Catering Service Virtual House Sitting

Auto & Pet Services & Much More ....


TimeJugglerConcierge@surfmk.com


County Foregoes Offer

Of Property With Lake


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

County commissioners last
week decided to forego the do-
nation of a 40-acre parcel con-
taining a 30-acre lake in the
Lloyd Acres subdivision.
Or better yet, the Lloyd
Homeowners Association --
the entity offering the donation
-- withdrew its offer once com-
missioners made it clear that
county ownership of the prop-
erty would entail public
access.
The association wanted as-
surance from officials that the
public would be prohibited
from accessing the property,
which is surrounded by resi-
dences.
Commissioners, however,
made it clear that if the county
accepted the property, the pub-
lic would have the right of ac-
cess.


"If tax dollars support it,
the public will have access,"
Commission Chairman Junior
Tuten repeated several times.
Donna Dowler, the associa-
tion's representative, never
made clear why the association
was offering the property. But
it appeared that the parcel had
been the object of past litiga-
tion and that the group had
previously offered it to other
organizations, including the
Boy Scouts.
\ Dowler described the lake as
being manmade, but said it
was spring fed and that its only
access was via a driveway that
crossed a football field long
dam. She said the legal situa-
tion surrounding the property
had been resolved.
Once commissioners, made
clear the public's accessibility
to the property if the county
acquired it, Dowler withdrew
her offer, saying the group
would pursue other options.


Officials 'Agendicize'


(Continued From Page 1)
ing" an issue.
One blogger, who simply
identified himself as 2 Slick,
even took credit for coining
the word.
"My word, I invented it," this
individual boasted on his post-
ing.
On the Internet were even


some other derivations of the
word, such as "agendaless",
without an agenda, and "agen-
dacide" -- presumably to kill
an agenda item.
Don't be surprise then, if
commissioners next start hold-
ing 'agendaless' meetings and
even 'agendaciding' some
items.


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SHERIFF DAVID HOBBS and Cricket Edwards were
among those serving sausage dogs at the department
sponsored Relay For Life event last week. (News Photo)



New Subdivision


HOME PHONE + WIRELESS.










MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 9, 2007 PAGE 3

Official Decries State


Of 58 County Houses


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


oNEIGHBORS helped others clean up after Friday's storm, as evidenced by this scene
;at Camper's World as a neighbor helps cut up this fallen tree. (News Photo)


CRYSTAL MOBLEY, Gaye Hanna, Cheryl Terry set up their Progress Energy Yard Sale
[Booth as a fundraiser for Relay for Life. (News Photo)




Surveying The County In


The Aftermath Of Storm


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer 7


In the aftermath of Friday's
storm, offiicals and citizens
joined forces to survey dam-
age and help out where possi-
ble.
Law enforcement officials
were out in both the city and
the county, removing trees,
checking on the welfare of
residents, reporting needed
services, and diverting traffic
around impassable areas.
Emergency Management
personnel manned the office
for two days straight, taking
phone calls from officials ad-
vising of area conditions, and
delivering latest updates on
weather conditions.
Driving through areas with
greatest damage, residents
could plainly spot residents
assisting one another, how-
ever possible.
At Camper World, several
tress were downed by a fun-
nel cloud, two of which fell
on top of vehicles, one caus-
ing minimal damage to a
camper trailer.
Oddly enough, just a few
feet away, a tent remained
staked out and intact. Camp-
ers were out in force with
chainsaws assisting neigh-
bors in removal of the trees
and debris.
One camper reported that
winds were so fierce, the rain
was blowing in sideways
through closed windows and
window panes
In other areas of the county,
the storm passed over
Drifton/Aucilla Rd., snapping
off many trees at least ten feet
in the air, and uprooting many
larger tress.
High wind caused two to
three tress to fall over Big Joe
Rd., blocking the entrance to
the prison, with the evidence
of where they had fallen, and
sawdust plainly visible.
Not far away on US-19
south, power and telephone
crews worked feverishly to
restore services throughout
the county. Approximately
100 or more trees had been
sheered off about ten feet
from the ground, many falling
on power lines.
Large live oaks had been to-


tally uprooted along Frank
Lacy Rd.

.Many residents were out in
the area assisting their neigh-
bors with whatever equipment
they had, small tractors for re-
moval of trees that could
safely be moved to unblock
area roads, and chain saws,
cutting and removing debris
from the neighbor's drive-
ways.

Property Appraisers Office
personnel were out early Fri-
day morning traveling
throughout the county assist-
ing -Emergency Management
with accessing local damages
from the storm.

Property Appraiser David
Ward said that from the dam-
age he witnessed, he would
estimate approximately $50-
100 thousand in damages
from both the minimal struc-
tural damage and countywide
cleanup efforts to follow.


"There looks to be much
more damage than the media
picked up on," said Ward.
"Looking at the line it took,
the first target was Campers
World on S. 19, where a lot of
trees were down, some across
vehicles, causing minor struc-
tural damages to trailers and
campers.
"The storm appears to have
been on a line from the south-
west to northeast, cutting over
to Drifton/Aucilla Rd., then
Big Joe Rd.. It totally demol-
ished a shed on the property
of Jimmy Owen on Frank
Lacy Rd., traveled northeast
and dropped a tree on a single
wide on Hartsfield road, cut-
ting it in half."
Ward explained that they
were mainly surveying areas
in the county so emergency
crews could be guided to,
where they most needed to be.
"We'll try to access any fur-
ther storm damage this morn-
ing," he concluded Monday.


Johnnie Morris Wins Honors


County resident Johnnie
Morris III continues garnering
the academic honors.


MORRIS


PopeMitchell 1,CountysGeorgia 1 1 7362 Are. ABC~eRES D ide


Property 101 1315 Aae,, Poper
GA V. 3/ Dbde H". *1031
* rxo~imt elation Poten, W 89t*
Gone? Rod cttage .Eeoko
* Beeoft Honon-ct, & Mae Feem
i. hl, i Prop.
4 t ..1.. SELW
"In
II..I 111 II I I-
FTot Ijeny A Tctta 0 to AOAott Coo it nato-,
Rowell Auctions, Inc.
1IO Buyers Ptemium GAL AU-C002594


Morris, a student at Latma
Christian Academy (LCA), a
private school in Madison
County, recently won first
place in fourth grade district
spelling bee.
Morris, who went against 13
other students, won with the
word "denim".
Morris also placed fourth in
the 4-H Tropicana public
speaking competition at LCA.
His speech was titled "I'm A
Young Black Boy"
Morris is the son of Erma
and Johnnie Morris Jr., of
Monticello.
His paternal grandparents
are Susie Scurry and the late
Johnnie Morris Sr.
His maternal grandparents
are Oleatha Harris and the late
Joe Harris Jr. of Lake City, FL.


y 102 402i Acres, Big Creek Rood
Cultivldble Acr-a
Acres Planted Pines
Lent Hduling Trcts
erty 103 Complete Peanut Buying Point
Acres, Meigs, GA
ING AS GOING CONCERN
n The Heart of Southwest Georgia
Peanut Country"
Property 102 Auction Site for All 3 Properties
For Complete Auction Details Call
800-323-8388


"Not even third worl4" is the-
way that Commissioner Jerry
Sutphin described the condi-
tion of some dwellings in the
county.
Sutphin was referring to a
list of 58 houses that he said
were without indoor plumbing
or any other moder-day
amenities. He wondered if the
SHIP and other housing pro-
grams couldn't somehow ad-
dress the situation.
Grants Director Roy Schlei-
cher, who works closely with
the several housing programs,
said the county helped out
whenever and as much as it
could. But there were situa-
tions that couldn't be resolved
as easily as it might appear, he
said.
Schleicher cited as an exam-
ple the case of a county
woman who lives in a house
that he described as being ter-
ribly inadequate.
Because the house is heir
property without a clear title,
Schleicher said, the county is
prevented from offering any
assistance. That's because gov-
ernment rules require a clear
title as a condition of assis-
tance, he said.
Then there were the cases
where people simply rejected
the offered help, no matter
how lacking their living condi-
tions might appear to
outsiders, Schleicher said.
"It's not a standard that we
would accept," he said. "But
these people do and they don't
want the help."
Dick Bailar is chairman of
the SHIP Citizens Advisory
Board, which also works
closely with the housing pro-
grams.
It was Bailar's observation
that the list that Sutphin was
-,referring to once contained 79
houses. So the 58 was actually
an indication of the progress
that had been made in the last
couple of years, he said.


Costumes


What's more, the rules at-
tached to federal funding re-
quired that structures be
brought up to code, he said. In
many instances, Bailar said,
the cost of bringing the houses
up to code was simply prohibi-
tive.
Then too, he said, the hous-
ing programs required a seven-
year lien, or the equivalent of a
second mortgage, on houses


that were rehabilitated. This
was to ensure that the owners
didn't turn around and sell the
house, potentially making a
profit on it, he said.
"You won't believe how
many people won't sign a sec-
ond mortgage," Bailar said.
But when and where the dif-
ferent housing programs could
help out, they would continue
to do so, Schleicher and Bailar
insisted.


Driver In Fiery Crash

Feb. 25 Identified


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

FHP has identified the
driver who was killed in a
fiery single vehicle crash Sun-
day, Feb. 25, at mile marker
230, on I-10, as Yasinny Gar-
cia, 28 of Miami.
Dental records were used
by the Medical Examiner's
Office to identify the badly
burned body, and the next of
kin were notified Wednesday
Feb. 28.
Garcia was driving a 1999
Honda Accord eastbound on
I-10 in the inside lane.
The vehicle traveled off the
roadway onto the center me-
dian.
Garcia overcorrected to the
right, causing the vehicle to
reenter the roadway in a
clockwise rotation.
The vehicle traveled across
both eastbound lanes, onto the

MVFD Sets

Yard Sale
The Monticello Volunteer
Fire Department will be host-
ing a fundraising yard sale, 8
a.m. until 1 p.m., Saturday, at
the fire station, located at
1255 N. Jefferson Street.
Available items will include
furniture, household and
kitchen items, collectibles,
toys, and various other items.


south shoulder of the
roadway.
After leaving the roadway,
the vehicle's left side collided
with a tree, bursting into
flames after the impact.











Now that the years of saving
and investing are behind
you, you need to consider a
change in strategy. At
Edward Jones, we can help
create a plan so you may look
forward to a steady, stable
income for years to come.
To see why talking with
Edward Jones about your
retirement savings makes
sense, call today.
Robert J. Davison
Investment Representatrivbe
205 E. Washington St
Monticello, FLL 32344.
850-997-2572
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC


Edwar* oneI
^ *MAKNGSESEOFINVETIN


1


are not required, but you are totally

sUAREJ if you don't!


1 I


Pull Out Those Leg Warmers

... Fish Net Stockings

... Rock Concert T-Shirts

... Tight Rolled Jeans

...Oh! Don't Forget the Aquanet



...and join Main Street for

a GNARLY 80's party!



Saturday, March 24, 2007

Monticello Opera House

8:00 p.m Midnight

$15.00 per person


Includes:
Capital City DJs will be playing all your favorite
music and videos too!


"A Taste of Our Town" featuring
Local Restaurants and Chefs


WM- 1numsnwWT!.UlwiuI~nc m -'e'RIu'M ~iI F Mtr.I TI gi l


All proceeds will be donated to Main Street and the
Monticello Opera House to help with a little face lift!










PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 9, 2007




Monticello News
(ISSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
k Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer



Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly Ex-
cept for the weeks of July 4th, Thanksgiving, Christmas,
& New Years. Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post
Office. Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net





Eating Out Can


Hurt Diet Effort


Opinion & Comment


.If you're on a diet, you have
lots of company. According to
a recent poll, one in four
Americans (24 percent) is cur-
rently on a diet.
A higher percentage of
women (29 percent) were
watching their weight com-
pared to men (18 percent).
According to the poll con-
ducted by Maritz Research, a
leader in marketing research,
male and female dieters were
equally likely to maintain die-
tary discipline.
Two-thirds (66 percent) of
dieters indicated that they will
stick to their diets, making
healthy choices when eating
out, compared to "overindulg-
ing" because dining out is a
special occasion.
Furthermore, nearly six out
of 10 (57 percent) of those sur-
veyed indicated that offering
low-carb or other healthy din-
ing options was at least "some-
what important" in their
decision when choosing a res-
taurant.
That's good, as health pro-
fessiohals continue to sound
the alarm that obesity is the
biggest health threat to Ameri-
cans.
"As all of the publicity
around the need to develop'
better eating habits continues


to resonate with a large seg-
ment of the population, I
would expect that restaurant
concepts built around healthy
eating will be a large part of
the future landscape of casual
dining," said Rick Garlick, di-
rector of consulting and Strate-
gic Implementation for the
Maritz Research Hospitality
Group.
The online survey of nearly
1,900 Americans who recently
ate at a casual dining restau-
rant also showed that when
given a choice between food
that is grilled or fried, an over-
whelming majority (87
percent) said they preferred
their food grilled.
"When dining out, you no-
tice that many restaurants do
not offer a grilled option to
their customers. For example
how many menus offer fried
wings as an appetizer, com-
pared to those that offer a
grilled wing option with a
reduced-fat hot sauce?" said
Garlick. "Unless you want
fried, you often are left out."
The survey also revealed that
more Americans are eschew-
ing red meat.
Thirty-six percent said they
were eating less red meat com-
pared to five years ago. Only
eight percent said that they
were eating more red meat.


Lessons From Nature


Motivate Humans


By BRYAN GOLDEN
Columnist

There are many phenomena
in nature that embody the prin-
ciples, utilized to live without
limits. While humans are
unique, we can still be moti-
vated by the incredible lessons
from nature.
Determination- The migra-
tion of various species is noth-
ing short of amazing. The vast
distance covered illustrate the
awesome power of determina-
tion. Although the exact meth-
ods used for navigation aren't
completely understood, with-
out determination there would
be no success.
Each winter, monarch but-
terflies migrate thousands of
miles from the northeastern
U.S. to Mexico. They fly at an
average speed of 12 mph as
they head for Mexico's Sierra
Madre mountains. The arctic
tern travels farther than any of
the other migratory birds.
Twice a year, the terns fly be-
tween the Arctic and Antarctic,
a journey of about 12,000
miles each way.
You can harness the power
of determination. Set your
sights on a goal and resolve to
attain it. Do what it takes. The
only way to reach the top of a
mountain is to climb up the
side. If a butterfly can fly thou-


sands of miles, what is it that
you can't do?
Persistence- Events appear-
ing to be inconsequential in the
short term, yield extraordinary
results when given enough
time. Consider raindrops fal-
ling on a rocky mountainside.
Surely the rock, which took
thousand of years to form,
would be unaffected by rain.
Yet, the rock of the Grand
Canyon was eroded into the
magnificent formation we see
today by the relentless action
of water. Ancient mountain
ranges have been leveled over
time by rain. Virtually every
topographic feature of the
earth has been shaped by the
persistent action of water and
wind.
Many people give up on
their dreams due to
impatience. Anything worth
while takes effort and persis-
tence. The larger the task; the
greater the effort and persis-
tence requires.
Flexibility- During a storm,
what's the difference between
the trees that get blown over
and those that survive? The
surviving trees are often the
ones that bend and move in re-
sponse to the wind. After the
storm, the ground is littered
with broken tress that were
rigid and brittle.
(See Nature's, Page 5)


Short Takes & Other Notions


By RON CICHON
Publisher


Rockers in front of Edenfield
Hardware are popular with re-
tirees who watch the passing
scene. I think Jack Bulloch has
seniority... With their genera-
tor running, McDonald's was
jumping Friday morning when
Our Town. was without
power... Home invasion story
in our Wednesday edition re-'
minds us to be security con-
scious. I hope the perps are en-
sconced in the Hobbs Hilton
shortly!
"Familiar Faces and Quiet
Places," a history of Jefferson
County is a wonderful read.
Author Derylene Counts did a
superb job in capturing the fla-
vor 'of the county. Books are
available at the Chamber office
and several stores around


town. They make great gifts
and I'm told some folks sent
them to out of town friends
and relatives.
More quotes from federal
government employees evalua-
tions: "This employee is really
not so much of a has been, but
more of a definite won't be"
"He sets low personal stan-
dards and then consistently
fails to achieve them." "Gates
are down, the lights are flash-
ing, but the train isn't
coming." "Some drink from
the foundation of knowledge,
he only gargled."
Heart disease, which in-
cludes heart failure, high blood
pressure and stroke, now ac-
counts for more than one of
every three deaths in America,
according to the American
Heart Association.
Didja know enough energy is
saved by recycling one alumi-


num can to run a TV set for
three hours or to light one 100-
watt bulb for 20 hours? In ad-
dition, recycling a soda can
saves 96 percent of the energy
used to make a new can from
ore. We have a well run recy-
cling department and every-
body is encouraged to
participate.
Each year, more than 90,000
children are treated for burn
injures... This is National Fro-
zen Food Month. I'm not ex-
actly sure how one goes about
celebrating... Bob Greene,
Oprah's personal trainer, rec-
ommends soup in his book,
"The Best Life Diet."
More than 3 million Ameri-
cans quit smoking each year.
Many use nicotine replacement
therapies... Survey show 91
percent of new car purchasers
were satisfied with their pur-
chase experience. In most


cases, consumers visited multi-
ple dealerships to compare
prices.
The fiasco over care for
wounded veterans at Walter
Reed is a national disgrace The
Bush Administration has been
cutting VA funding over the
years while professing great
concern for our servicemen.
It's good that Congress is tak-
ing a hard look at this issue.
The duplicity of this Admin-
istration is simply astounding.
No wonder a majority of
Americans want the Bush
Presidency to be over.
I would not be at all sur-
prised if a second or even third
tier candidate might win the
Presidential nomination in ei-
ther party. We're a long way
from any votes being cast in
primaries so polls right now
favor the better known candi-
dates.


Ethics Training Needed


By DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

One of the advantages of ag-
ing is that one has a wealth of
past experiences and perspec-
tives to draw upon in compar-
ing and evaluating circum-
stances as they exist today.
One of the strong character-
istics of Americans in bygone
years was not only their ability
to identify right from wrong,
but their fortitude to say so
based upon an acceptable and
established social order.
The clear knowledge of what
was right kept most people and
their children honest and law
abiding citizens, for which
they were rewarded with an or-
derly and progressive society.


Over the past 40 years of so,
however, the clear distinction
between right and wrong has
become blurred. Under the
general heading of "common
sense modernization", the
secular progressive movement
has steadily eroded the value
systems that provided the basis
for our social stability.
In doing so, they have actu-
ally managed to obscure the
very boundary between what
we previously believed was
right and wrong. The healthy
social body that our forefathers
had built up through laws, eth-
ics and social conscience has
disappeared.
Today, only the most serious
of wrong doings rise to the
level of outrage and even then
there are those among us who


would diminish their signifi-
cance by casting blame any-
thing and everything except
the perpetrator.
Today no one is really to
blame for what they do. Its
Society's fault. It is the envi-
ronment, a broken home, being
underprivileged, abused by
one's parents, picked on by
classmates, and even being "it"
in a game of tag is now
grounds for justifying latent
adult misbehavior.
I even heard today on the
news that a disgruntled IBM
employee is suing the com-
pany for millions of dollars af-
ter he was fired for viewing
pornographic sites on his com-
pany computer. Reason? He
claims to be hopelessly "ad-
dicted" to pornography as a


"disability" and deserves pro-
tection under the national Per-
sons with Disabilities Act.
This social breakdown of
fundamental values is not re-
stricted just to juvenile delin-
quents and those we routinely
place at the lower levels of our
society.
High school and college stu-
dents who cheat on their ex-
ams because, "every one does
it".
Greedy captains of industry .
who steal millions of dollars
from their share holders, (like
Enron), congressmen who
knowingly accept illegal gra-
tuities from lobbyists, judges
and city officials who accept
bribes in return for favors, the
business owner who "pads" his
(See Ethics, Page 5)


Financial Goal Needs Plan


If you breathed a sigh of re-
lief when you put away the al-
gebra or geometry textbook for
the last time, you might not be
eager to take up the subject of
math again. However, by do-
ing some number crunching,
you can put a "price tag" on
your long-term financial goals-
and that's the first step toward
achieving them.
To quantify the costs of your
objectives, you must be spe-
cific about what you're trying
to accomplish.
So you want to retire as soon
as you possibly can and then
spend your time traveling the
world? Or are you planning to


work until 65 and then open
your own small business?
Obviously, these are vastly
different goals- with vastly dif-
ferent costs to you.
Once you know what you
really want to do when you re-
tire, you should be able to pro-
ject your annual yearly ex-
penses. Then, you can ask
yourself theses questions:
How many years will I
spend in retirement? None of
us can predict exactly how
long we will live. But if you
consider your overall health,
your lifestyle habits and your
family's history of longevity,
you can come up with a rea-


sonable estimate of how many
years you might have to pay
for in retirement.
Where will my income
come from? To pay for your
retirement goals, you'll likely
need to draw on all types of in-
come available to you, includ-
ing Social Security and your
.investments, such as your IRA,
401(k) and whatever individ-
ual stocks and other securities
you may own.
To help reach the level of in-
come you'll require, you will
need to monitor all these in-
vestments over the years, and
make changes as needed.
Achieving the "ideal" retire-


ment might be your biggest fi-
nancial goal, but it's almost
certainly not the only one. But
no matter what goals you have,
you'll still riced to "do the
math" necessary to calculate
costs and arrive at solutions.
So, for example, if you'd
like to help pay for college for
your children (or grandchil-
dren), you'll need to look at
what college costs today, how
much it's likely to cost in the
future and how much money
you can devote to paying those
costs.
To illustrate: For the 2006-
2007 school year, it costs, on
(See Financial, Page 5)


From Our Photo File
a
\, ,.:, ":.r 4aru

. .: -'. ,
,L 4'
112r


Ilk.





A PHOTO taken May 16, 1945 shows the seventh and eighth grades at Wacissa
Junior High School. Front row, left, Helen Hightower, Onez Spratt, Hardy Brumbley,
Miriam Reid, teacher, Natalia Bramlett and Mae Brumbley. Back row, left, Anna Jane
Chancy, Sally Pearl Youngblood, Lena Bert Lane, Hilda June Boland, Edna Cigo,
Nelda Moore. Not present when photo was taken were Alfred Youngblood, Alton
Youngblood, and Gwen Boland. (Photo submitted by Lillie Mae BLumbley)











Li







Dear
Dic
ing tl
Summ
ery,
March
cello
and "ri

Citiz
and FI
should
tive Bo


ette


rs...


Reader Praises


Boyd's Efforts

Editor: half of this area of Florida, and
the nation as a whole.
k Bailar's letter concern-
he recent Agricultural My wife, Marion, and I re-
it held at Simpson Nurs- tired to Monticello more than
and published in the 17 years ago because we like
3 edition of the Monti- the area, the people, and have
News was interesting, strong family ties here.
ght on."
My corporate background is
:ens of Jefferson County, quite different from the back-
lorida's Second District grounds of Allen Boyd, Dick
appreciate Representa- Bailar, or Fred Beshears, but
oyd for his efforts on be- our objectives in life are simi-


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 9, 2007 PAGE 5


lar, that is to accept responsi-
bility and take appropriate
action. Monticello is much
better off because of these
three citizens.
In my opinion, Congressman
Boyd is one of the rising stars
in the US House of Represen-
tatives. His leadership in the
Congressional Blue Dog Coa-
lition will temper the actions
of both the radical left and
radical right.
His centrist approach to fis-
cal matters is necessary. His
impact on agricultural issues is
important, and like me, he is a
combat veteran who believes
in a strong armed force to de-
fend our country.
Monticello is indeed fortu-
nate to have citizens like my
friends, Allen, Dick, and Fred.
Cordially,
Randy Pierson


Ethics, Training Needed


(Continued From Page 4)
or her expense account in or-
der to cheat on their taxes and,
yes, the clerk who takes a little
extra from the cash register be-
cause they are only paid mini-
mum wage anyway and the
person who walks away in si-
lence after getting change for a
twenty dollar bill when they
only gave the cashier a ten.
Granted, many of these


folks may represent only a por-
tion of our society, but it is the
rest of us who willingly over-
look such wrong doings as
normal because, "They all do
it".
Maybe rather than carrying
on a national argument over
prayer in school, we should
mandate instead daily lessons
on ethics, law and responsibil-
ity. Then maybe our future


generation will begin to grasp
the significance of stopping
our moral decay before our so-
ciety plunges into irreversible
chaos.
A preacher once told me that
without God, anything and
everything is allowed. I can
only assume that such is the
gleeful motto of our un-
checked 'national secular pro-
gressive movement.


JUDGING by her broad smile Jamie Moore, is about to be good friends with Pepper,
the family's three month old donkey. (News Photo).


Financial Goal Needs Plan


(Continued From Page 4)
average, $16,357 for students
attending four-year public col-
leges and universities, accord-
ing to the College Board. If
college costs were to rise five
percent every year, today's
newborns can expect to pay
abut $162,000 for four years at
a public school.
With the presence of scholar-
ships, loans and work-study ar-


rangements, you might not
have to foot the entire
$162,000 bill. But at least
you'll know what you might
need and you can start plan-
Sning the appropriate savings
and investment strategies.

And you can take this same
approach to other long-term
goals, such as buying a second
home or a new business.


Keep in mind, though, that
"doing the math" can involve a
lot of variables, so you may
well want to consult with a fi-
nancial advisor- someone with
the tools and experience to
help you chart your course to-
ward your goals.
But don't wait too long the
sooner you start planning, the
more pleasant "the math" will


Nature's Lessons Move Men


(Continued From Page 4)
flexibility is a key element
orfsurvival. Flexibility enables
you to adapt and change strat-
egy as conditions warrant. If
you find your path at a dead
end, you must be flexible
enough to change direction
and map a new route to your
destination.

Planning- Without planning
ahead, animals won't survive.
Squirrels start gathering and
storing food well before the
*winter sets in. Animals that hi-
bernate begin eating extra food
to build up fat reserves while
food is plentiful and prior to
the arrival of cold, severe
weather. Birds start construct-
ing nests before they have to
lay their eggs.


District Water
Board Will
Meet Tuesday
The Suwannee River Water
Management District Govern-
ing Board meets 9 a.m. Tues-
day at District Headquarters,
Highway 49 and US 90 East,
in Live Oak, FL.
The purpose of the meeting
is to consider District business,
and to conduct public hearings
on regulatory and land acquisi-
tion matters.
A workshop will follow the
Governing Board meeting.


Childbirth
Classes At
Health Dept.

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Free Childbirth Classes are
set to begin 2 4 p.m. Tues-
day, March 13 through April
3 at the County Health De-
partment.
Healthy Start Care Coordi-
nator Joyce Steele, LPN may
be contacted at 342-0170 ext.
107 to register, or for more
information.


Planning allows you to pre-
pare for future needs. The op-
posite of planning is crisis
management, where you do
whatever is necessary just to
make it to tomorrow. Taking
action before the need is criti-
cal is the essence of planning.
Change- Everything in na-
ture changes. The weather var-
ies daily. Landscapes change
over time. Rivers and streams
alter their courses. Floods
come and go. Everyday some-
thing is different. Nature


thrives on change. Each
change brings new opportuni-
ties. When a tree falls during a
storm, it provides a new habi-
tat for plants and animals.
Change is constant, It's noth-
ing to fear and there isn't any-
thing you can do about it
anyway. Change is a perpetual
source of new opportunities.
Nature is replete with exam-
ples of the qualities needed to
live without limits. Observe,
learn, and apply nature's prin-
ciples to enrich your own life.


(1 -IHeritage The donation is tax deductible.
fr theBli Pick-up is free.
or t iWe take care of all the paperwork.

: Ii Sl T EfA0 180-6-82


The
Festival At
Sunbelt
rpen: e field r-In ulI i.-k _a



Calico Spring Arts & Crafts Show
,-, ar J-i'' I.l\ .1 ..r h -Ir, lr rt. .': crafts
Slunda) March 18' '* 9 4
?uncla\ -March 18th 9-4,

Sunbelt Expo BBQ Cook-Off
inl:'l.i: ri i MAay & Backyard Division
Friday\ March 16' 5 11
Saturday\ Mal:ch 17' 9 -6

$5 per person
children 12 & underfree with Adult
Sorry No Pets Allowed

229-985-1968
infoc licicraffts.com

arts. & crafts ,l.lcq cook-off'
e.nt- tarin '-.nl .food


The Jefferson County Recyclinq Proqram


accepts


the following items for recycling:


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brdWn & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?






Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist f) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.




Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.

















rAC E M TNTir F .ln (1FI7. NEWS. FRI., MARCH 9,2007


Lifestyle


Mackinsey Wirick is thrilled
to have her cat, Rosie, back
after a three month hiatus
from Edenfield Hardware.
Sallie and Sam Worley
drove Rosie home from
Madison, when they spotted
her there.
I've missed seeing Rosie in
the sore front window where
she and brother cat Fireball
spend relaxing moments
basking in the day light, and
moon light.
I heard there has been a
movement to change the
name of Chase Park to Clif-
ford Brown Park. Brown was
a County Commissioner in-
strumental in getting side-
walks, and the streets paved,
in the black communities out
and around Monticello.
The Jefferson/Monticello
Boys and Girls Club is seek-
ing sponsors to help with the
cost of Karate uniforms for
class participants in the after
school program.
Club Director Gerrold Aus-
tin may be contacted at 997-
1180 for more information.
Thursday, 5 to 9 p.m.
March 15 is Pizza Hut Night
for the Aucilla Christian
Academy Relay for Life
team.
Get a dining voucher from
any team member, turn it in
with your order, and the team
will receive 20 percent of the
order at the end of the eve-
ning. Call 997-3597 for more
details.
,The Progress Energy Relay
for Life team collected a total
of $950 from their fundrais-
ing efforts Saturday.
Members hosted a yard sale,
a hamburger/hot dog lunch,
and collected donations
around the courthouse circle.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

March is Colorectal Cancer
Awareness Month.
The American Cancer So-
ciety reports that colorectal
cancer which includes the co-
lon and rectum, is the second
deadliest cancer in the US, af-
ter lung cancer.
Colorectal cancers are
highly treatable if found
early, in which case the pa-
tient survival rate is more
than 90 percent.
"Everyone at average risk
for developing colorectal can-
cer should start screening for


Also on Saturday, the
McCormick Electric Relay for
Life team raised $171 from
their carwash held in town on
East Washington Street.
I woke up early Friday
morning in the dark, due to
the passing storm earlier in
the A.M. The fact that I could
not make a fresh pot of coffee
did not deter me though as the
Kwiky Food Mart was open,
and Warren Kinsey was keep-
ing the coffee flowing.
I especially enjoyed visit-
ing with other locals gathered
there for the same reason. I
enjoyed some good fellow-
ship as my neighbors filled
me in on their. storm related
morning experiences.
American Legion Post 49
and Ladies Auxiliary will
have a meal of fresh, fried
grouper 6 p.m. Tuesday prior
to their regular meeting. Seat-
ing is limited and the cost is
$7.50.
Jefferson County SHARE
will have sign-up for food
distribution 10 a.m. 12 p.m.
Saturday, March 10 at the Li-
brary. The cost for the March
Basic Package is $18.
Churches, groups, and other
organizations, as well as indi-
vidual households are encour-
aged to purchase food
packages to distribute to those
in need of a bit of help toward
the end of the month.
The Red Hat ladies will
meet noon Saturday at the
First 'Baptist Church of Lloyd.
My guess is that they will
have their hats decked out in
green and celebrating the St.
Patty's holiday. Barbara
Sheats is one of the hostesses
and may be contacted for
more information.
Chamber of Commerce
meets noon Tuesday.


the disease when they reach
50 years of age," said Joshua
Ellenhorn, MD, physician,
Division of Surgery at the
City of Hope Cancer center in
Los Angeles.
"Those at high risk for co-
lorectal cancer should talk to
their doctor about starting
screening earlier or more of-
ten."
Risk factors associated with
colorectal cancer include:
*Personal history of colorec-
tal cancer, bowel disease or
polyps
*Family history of colorec-
tal cancer
*Being older than 50 years
of age


"DOWN HOME" by Eluster Richardson

Richardson To Exhibit Works


Artist Eluster Richardson is
scheduled to appear.at the Jef-
ferson Arts 2 4 p.m. Sunday,
at a reception in his honor.

His works will be on exhibit
in the Gallery for the public to
view during operating hours
10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Wednesday
and Saturday or by private
tour arranged by calling 997-
3311 or 997-2358.


Festival Queen Pageant


Application Requirements


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Qualifications for Water-
melon Festival Queen appli-
cants are due at noon, Friday,
March 23, at the Chamber of
Commerce.
The Queen's Pageant is set 7
p.m., Saturday, June 9.
Among the requirements
are:


*Entrants must by 15' years
old, but not more than 19, by
June 1, 2007.
*Entrants cannot have been
married, be married, nor have
any children.
*Entrant chosen as queen
cannot marry during her year
of reign, nor become pregnant,
and doing so will result in for-
feiture of her title. The First
Runner-Up will then be named
queen.


*No former Watermelon
Queen is eligible.
*All entrants must be full
time residents of Jefferson
County.
*Entrants will be required to
perform in an opening group
number, talent competition,
evening gown competition,
question and answer session,
personal interview with
judges, and a photo competi-
tion.


Lisa Reasoner has opened a
new business here, Time Jug-
gler Concierge, to serve the
Jefferson and Leon county ar-
eas.
Time Juggler offers indi-
viduals a premium service
typically only experienced in
luxury hotels or resort areas.
Reasoner explains her pur-
pose in offering services, is to
assist her clients by affording
them more of the precious
commodity of time.
A concierge is like a per-
sonal assistant, handling those
time consuming, often mun-
dane details of daily life that
rob people of their time.
The business offers grocery
and personal shopping, dry
cleaning pick up and delivery,
bill paying, bank reconcilia-
tion, and mobile notary to
name only a few of the Time
Juggler services.
Reasoner says, "Everyone
has something that's got to be
done and steals time from
their work or family; whether
it's taking the animal to the
vet or the car for an oil
change.
"An invaluable service I of-
fer is waiting at the house for


*A diet of mostly high-fat
foods
Ellenhorn suggests reducing
the risk of developing colo-
rectal cancer by exercising
regularly, eating a diet rich in
fruits, vegetables and whole
grains and limiting the con-
sumption of high-fat foods.
Some studies also suggest
that taking substance contain-
ing folic acid, foliate or cal-
cium might reduce colorectal
cancer risk.
Screening and knowing risk
factors of colorectal cancer
are important, since symp-
toms of the disease do not ap-
pear until after the disease has
advanced.
Although colorectal cancer
may not necessarily be the
case, contact your physician if
a change in bowel habits last
for more than a few days,
bleeding from the rectum,
blood in the stool and cramp-
ing or knowing stomach pains
occur.
For more information about
colorectal cancer screening,
treatment and research, con-
tact the City of Hope Cancer
center at 1-800-82 6-HOPE or
visit www.cityofhope.org.


STOP LEG CRAMPS gmps
BEFORE THEY STOP YOU. Calcet
Tripte Calcium
Calcet'sltriple calcium formula is designed to help p tite Calcium
stop low calcium leg cramps. Just ask your pharmacist.


K'~"


~:VVC)


LISA REASONER


the repairman or cable guy
who only gives a two to four
hour window for an arrival
time.
Who can afford to take that
much time off work?
These services are the tip of
the iceberg when it comes to
clients' needs."
Time Juggler Concierge is
also perfect for families car-
ing for the elderly or those
who are home bound; by
transporting them to
doctor/hair appointments or
shopping or picking up pre-
scriptions for them.
Businesses could benefit if
they need something picked
up or delivered.
The possibilities are
endless.
"I don't do floors or win-
dows, Reasoner jokes, "but
I'll do just about anything
else, provided it's legal."
The Time Juggler Concierge
motto is "keeping all the balls
in the air" and Reasoner has
many talents to support that
motto.
Her background includes
car rental management, bank-
ing, administrative assistant
duties, and State Farm Insur-
ance.
Many readers may recall
her performances at the Mon-
ticello Opera House.
Reasoner is very involved
in the community through Al-
trusa, Relay for Life as past


Public Relations Chair, and
this is her second year to chair
the Watermelon Festival Pa-
rade.
All her experience make
this business a perfect fit.
"I love helping people and I
wanted to start a business that
would truly fill needs; I be-
lieve this fits the bill."
For more information or to
discover how Time Juggler
Concierge can assist you and
your family in creating a bet-
ter life by adding time to your
day call 997-1081 or 528-
3892.

Monticello News
Keeps You
Informed!!


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*Missing more than one re-
hearsal results in disqualifica-
tion from the pageant and for-
feiture of the registration fee.
Just cause absences may be
cleared through the chairper-
sons.
*The queen must participate
in certain activities, including
all scheduled events of the fes-
tival, the Perry Forest Festival
Parade, Springtime Tallahas-
see Parade and the subsequent
year's Festival parade. Failure
to do so forfeits the title of
queen.

*An entry fee of $25 is to be
submitted with the application,
payable to the Jefferson
County Watermelon Festival.
*A recent photo must be
submitted with the application.
*Each contestant will have a
sponsor. Sponsorship is $100
per contestant. Checks are pay-
able to the Watermelon Festi-
val.

*The group number will be
in coordination with the theme
of the pageant. All contestants
will be required to provide
costumes which meet specifi-
cations specified by chairper-
sons.
More detailed information is
available on the application
packets.


Clothing

Giveaway

Saturday
Harvest Center will host a
free Clothing Giveaway 8
a.m. 2 p.m. Saturday, at the
Center's location on the cor-
ner of Waukeenah Highway
259 at Springhollow Road, in
the back parking lot area.
A large assortment of
men's, women's, children,
and infants clothing will be
available.
There will also be an assort-
ment of shoes, purses, belts,
and an array of odds and ends
to complement any outfit..


IS I


Lisa Reasonbr Opens New


Time Saving Business Here

DEBBIE SNAPP .-.,.
Staff Writer '


March Colorectal Cancer


Awareness Month


Central
Church of
Christ

You're
Always
Our
Welcomed
Guest!

US 19 South at
Coopers Pond Rd


Sunday:
10 AM Bible
School
11AM Worship
Hour
6 PM Evening
Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible
Study


rAlLiL 0, IVIVIN I It-rUL,%J,


O,,,rC3







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 9, 2007 PAGE 7


lHomes Of Mourning Recent Activities At

eiiM+ fe4 lan ha ie4 rhiirkh


r11E LIVIUIIII*IL %I IbE oI


MARY CAMBRIC
Mary Lee Cambric, age 66,
died Thursday, March 1, 2007
in Tallahassee.
A native and lifelong resi-
dent of Greenville, Ms. Cam-
bric was a longtime member of
Young Reaper Missionary
Baptist Church. She was a de-
voted homemaker.
Funeral services will be held
on Sunday, March 11, 2007 at
Young Reaper Missionary
Baptist Church in Greenville at
3:00 p.m. with burial at Bel-
lamy Cemetery. Viewing will
be from 3:00 7:00 p.m. on
Friday, March 9, 2007 and on
Saturday, March 10, 2007
from 1:00 until 6:00 p.m. at
.Tillman Funeral Home of
Monticello.
Left to love and cherish her
memory are her sisters, Janie
Cambric and Maybelline Cam-
bric; brothers, Curtis Cambric
and Willie James Cambric and
a special nephew, whom she
helped raise, Timothy
Bellamy, Jr. all are residents of
Greenville, FL.
Preceding Mary Lee in death
were her parents, George and
Ethel McCray Cambric and her
siblings, George L. Joseph,
Flora L., Ethel L. Cambric and
Josephine C. Thompson.


The group thanks all who
have made financial contribu-
tions to help pay for the quilt-
ing materials, as well as those
who have worked on the


IN MEMORY

I dedicate this to my loved
one, my fiance. my friend,
and my confidant:
Terry Hawkins.
I'm wishing you a Happy
Birthday on this special re-
membered day that we've
shared for seven years now:
March 9.
And, I'm letting you know
that you will always be
missed, especially by me, and
your children.


WADE


Help us cure
neuromuscular diseases.


Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717 www.mdausa.org


You will never be forgotten
as long as we shall live, on
such a special occasion like
this one.
Remember, we will always
love you and we will .never
forget you.
Please remember, you will
always be with us, and you
will stay in our hearts forever.
Yours Truly
Shericka, Nakota
and Lil' Terry

We love you always.
IN MEMORY
Lil' Danielle Shanay Wade
Mar. 9, 2005 Mar 12, 2005
Happy Birthday!
Suffer the little children to
come unto me, and forbid
them not: for of such is the
Kingdom of God.
St. Luke 18:16
If tears could build a stair-
way, and memories a lane, we
would walk right up to
Heaven and bring you Home
once again!
But, we know this is not
possible, so we send this spe-
cial message to the Heaven up
above.
Please take care of our An-
gel Lil' Danielle, and give her
all of our love.
Let her know she will al-
ways be in our hearts.

Carolyn, James, Fawntisha,
Jazzlyn, Karisha, Jalan Wade


DANIEL DARITY
Daniel Darity, age 55, died
Monday, March 5, 2007 in
TMRMC.
Mr. Darity was a native of
Leon County and lived in Mic-
cosukee for 50 years. He was a
Laborer/Maintenanceman and
a member of United Sons and
Daughters of Joshua. Also a
member of Ford Chapel AME
Church.
Funeral services will be Sat-
urday, March 10, 2007 at 1:00
p.m. at Saint Paul Primitive
Baptist Church of
Miccosukee, Rev. Bernard E.
Hudson officiating. Interment
will follow at Ford Chapel
Cemetery.
Daniel is survived by his
wife Willie M. Darity; three
children, Sylvia D. Scott of
Tallahassee, Alonzo Darity
(Samantha) of Monticello,
Cinica Baity of Tallahassee;
one sister, Elizabeth Darity of
Havana, FL; three brothers, Ju-
lius Darity (Angela) of Talla-
hassee, Johnny and Archie
Darity of Miccosukee, and a
host of other relatives and sor-
rowing friends.
THELMA KINSEY
Mr. Thelma "Tim" Kinsey,
age 75 went Home to be with
the Lord on Thursday, March
(See Homes Of, Page 11)


County Democrats will hold
the third annual St. Patrick's
Day Dinner, 7 p.m. Thursday
SMarch 15, at Gerry Fellowship
Hall of Christ Episcopal Hall,
425 North Cherry Street.
Speaker for the event is Alex
4 Sink, Chief Financial Officer.
A donation of $10 is sug-
gested. Call 997-3113, or 997-
2863 for tickets and
information.
Music by local fiddlers as
well as traditional Irish dishes,
such as Shepherd's Pie, and
Irish Stew, prepared by local
chefs, will be featured.
Guests are encouraged to
wear green, and to bring a
book for the upcoming Library
Book Sale to benefit the li-
brary. County officials have
been invited.
In related news of the
County Democratic Party,
regular meetings will be held
April 10, August 14, and Oct.
9.


Church News

Refuge Mouse of God Out-
reach Community Revival 8
p.m. nightly, March 12
through April 1

Harvest Center presents a
Spiritual Warfare Seminar, 9
a.m.. to 3 p.m., Saturday,
March 17.
Lloyd and Ann Cope of
Covenant Church, Thomasville
will teach the seminar.
Refreshments and lunch will
be served.
***
Memorial MB Church will
observe its Youth Choir an-
nual anniversary, 11 a.m. Sun-
day.
Elder Wilbert Hobbs and St.
Paul MB Church, Capitola will
be the guest church.

Philadelphia MB Church
will celebrate its pastor's sev-
enth anniversary 11 a.m. Sun-
day. Rev. Terrell Prestly is
guest speaker.
***
New Bethel AME Church
will celebrate its ushers 1 and
2 anniversary 11 a.m. Sunday.
SSpeaker is Rev. Rudolph
Neely. Hickory Hill MB Choir
will provide the music.

Mt. Pleasant AME Church in
Dills Communinty will cele-
brate its 132+ Church Anni-
versary 3 p.m. Sunday, along
with Rev. Carl Hill & Union
Chapel AME Church Family
of Quincy, FL. Dinner will be
served.


Awareness Month.
The Auxiliary has voted to
honor Gladys Roann for the
many ways in which she
serves the people of Jefferson
County.

Dinner will be a fresh fish
dinner served with 'the usual


Local Democrats Plan


Meetings will be in the li-
brary conference room, unless
otherwise advertised.
Between regular meetings,
the group plans to have din-
ners and other events to sup-
port the goals of the local
party.
The April 10 regular meeting
-will be held at the Fellowship
Hall of Memorial MB Church.

All Precinct 5 voters are in-
vited to attend Guest speaker
will be Leonard Joseph, execu-
tive director of the Florida
Democratic Party.


Classes set At

Health Dept.

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Newborn Care Classes are
scheduled 2-5 p.m. Tuesday,
April 10, atthe County Health
Department.
There will be door prizes,
raffles, free samples, and
something for everyone.
For more information about
these classes, and to register,
contact Healthy Start Coordi-
nator Joyce .Steele, LPN,
CPCE at 342-0170, ext. 107.


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quilts.
Prayers & Squares Ministry
meets 6 p.m. on the third
Thursday of each month in
the Family Ministry Center.
Previous sewing or quilting
experience is not required to
join in this group.
The emphasis of this minis-
try is on prayer, rather than on
the quilts.


Southeastern Community
Blood Center.
Ed Vollertsen is organizing
a committee to begin clearing
the cemetery on Old Boston
Highway.
Margaret Calhoun and Sally
Cole are coordinating a mis-
sion trip to Lake County, to
help with the tornado cleanup
and rebuilding efforts.
The Prayers & Squares
Ministry has presented 10
quilts, and everyone seems
touched by the fact that so
many people have been pray-
ing for them.

Prayers & Squares is an out-
reach ministry that combines
the gift of a hand-tied quilt
with the gift of prayer for one
who is in physical, emotional,
or spiritual crisis, and who
could benefit from being
"covered in prayer."


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

At First United Mehodist
Church, more than 50 stu-'
dents are served in its Music
Academy.
Children attend three dif-
ferent classes where they
learn about singing, the auto-
harp, chimes, bells, guitar,
and rhythm.
The students will perform at'
the 11 a.m. Service, Sunday,
March 18.
In other news at First Meth-
odist, Bettie Hogle and Alice
Stadin report that 14 blankets
and one walker have been
collected and distributed
through the Jefferson Senior
Center during the recent Blan-
ket Drive.
Recently, 48 units of blood
have been donated to the


300
(R)
Fri. 4:10-7:00-9:50 Sat. 1:25-
4:10-7:00-9:50 Sun. 1:25-4:10-
7:00 Mon. Thurs. 4:10-7:00
NO PASSES
DADDY'S LITTLE
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Fri. 5:30-10:00 Sat. 12:55-5:30-
10:00 Sun. 12:55-5:30 Mon. -
Thurs. 5:30
BRIDGE TO
TERABITHIA
(PG13)
Fri. 5:20 -7:25-9:40 Sat. 1:00-
3:05 -5:20-7:25-9:40 Sun. 1:00-
3:05 -5:20-7:25 Mon. Thurs.
5:20 -7:25
NORBIT
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Fri. 4:35-7:05-9:35 Sat. 1:40-
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Fri. 4:20-7:35-10:05 Sat. 1:05-
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Turn Left, go to Tennessee St
Tun] Right. 1 I'2 mile on Left
Across froln John Deecc Equip.


American Legion Will

Honor Gladys Roann


St. Patrick's Day Dinner Newborn care


SHERICKA JONES AND TERRY HAWKINS


Got A Cute Photo?

Sent It To Us And We'll Share It
With Our Readers


Kids Dogs Strange Stuff, etc.

Monticello News
P.O. Box 430
Monticello, FL 32345

"You Can't Be Without It"


LEVERN WILSON
KATHERYN WILSON


complements.
Tickets must be purchased
in advance and cost $7.50 per
person, and will be limited to
75 persons. There are only a
few tickets available at this
time. To reserve a meal con-
tact John Hrynciw at 997-
8023. Serving will begin at 6
p.m..
At the meeting following
the dinner, the names of the
Boys State and Girls State
candidates who have been se-
lected to represent Post 49
will be announced.


"1 MS. Thompson
Will Marry
Mr. Wilson
Rev. and Mrs. James
Thompson announce the mar-
riage of their daughter Kath-
eryn Denise Thompson to
Leverne Wilson, Jr. the son of
Elvira and Leverne Wilson,
Sr. 4 p.m. Saturday, March
31, 2007 at the Monticello
Opera House.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The American Legion and
Ladies Auxiliary will hold a
special meeting 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday March 13 in honor
of Community Service






PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 9, 2007


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Snorts


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 9, 2007 PAGE 9


ACA Drops 1st District


Game To Carrabelle 9-6


BILL BROWN


The Aucilla Warriors
dropped their first district
game 9-6 to Carrabelle on
Friday.
This loss dealt a severe, al-
though not fatal blow to their
hopes of the record fifth
straight district championship.
After being behind 6-1 after
the fourth inning, ACA man-
aged to get one in the fifth to
enter the sixth on the short
end of a 6-2 score.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

After winning four con-
secutive games, the ACA JV
baseball team stands 5-3 on
the season.
"We're having a little fun
now and starting to play some
baseball," said Coach Joe
Striplin.
The Warriors downed
Madison Central in the first
game, 5-4.
Marcus was the wining
pitcher, striking out ten of the
batters he faced.
At the plate, he scored one
run.
Clark Christy went one for
three with two runs.
Kent Jones went one for
three; and Casey Wheeler and
Trent Roberts each scored one
run.
There were no statistics
available for the previously
unscheduled game against
Lincoln, however the Warri-
ors won, 9-5,. in the game
which counted toward the
regular season.
Aucilla blanked Carrabelle



Tigers Lose 1

Maclay 19-3

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School varsity baseball team
now stand 1-1 on the season
-after dropping the home game
against Maclay Friday night,
19-3.
The game was called after
five innings die to the ten-run
rule.
Cecil Hill pitched the game,
giving up six earned runs,
pegged with committing six


After two were out in the
bottom of the sixth, an error,
walk, infield hit, and another
walk, one run had scored and
the bases were loaded with
two outs and the score 6-3.
Matt Bishop stepped to the
plate and drilled a triple down
the first base line to send
three runners across the plate
and tie the score.
The next batter grounded out
to end the inning.
A scoreless seventh scored
extra innings where the visi-
tors scored three on the four


Friday night, 9-0.
Wheeler was the pitcher,
striking out four and giving
up three hits.
At the plate, he went two
for three with two singles,
two runs.
Marcus Roberts went two
for three, one triple, one run.
Trent Roberts went one for
three, one single, one run.
Levi Cobb went two for
three, one double, two runs.
And Christy, Kent Jones
and Tyler Jackson, each
scored one run.
In the game against Carra-
belle Tuesday night, the War-
riors squeaked by with a 9-8
win.
Kent Jones was the starting
pitcher and struck out two.
Christy pitched three in-
nings, striking out two.
And Marcus Roberts
pitched the final inning, strik-
ing out no batters.
At the plate, Jones, Christy,
Marcus Roberts and Cobb, all
scored two runs and Jackson
scored one run.
The Warriors are slated to
face off against Brookwood, 4
p.m., Friday, here.



ro

Friday
errors and giving up seven
hits.
At the plate, he went two for
two, one double, one run, one
RBI.
Curtis Hightower and Mar-
quis Dobson both went one
for two, one run; and Shayne
Broxie and Lamarcus Bennett
both went one for two.
The Tigers will face Lake
City, 4 p.m., Thursday, there.
The Tigers hammered Lake
City in the first meeting of the
season, 19-3.


hits to take a 9-6 lead and the
win when the Warriors failed
to score in the bottom of the
eighth.
Dustin Roberts pitched the
first seven innings for
Aucilla. He struck out five.
Stephen Dollar gave up
three runs on four hits, and
one strikeout in the eighth, to
be charged with the loss. His
record is now 1-1.
Matt Bishop led Warrior
batters with a triple, single,
walk and three RBI in five
trips to the plate.
Dollar hit safely twice; El-
liot Lewis followed with three
hits; and Josh Carswell had a
double to account for eight
Aucilla hits.
In order to consistently
score and tack up wins, the
team must improve on de-
fense and getting hits with
runners in scoring position.
Twice, runners were on third
base with one out, and no
score resulted.
The Warriors loaded the
bases in the eighth and could
not score. Two errors also re-
sulted in two Carrabelle runs.
On Tuesday, Aucilla trav-
eled to Apalachicola, and on
Thursday, Munroe comes to
Finlayson Field. Both are
district games and most
likely, must-wins to have a
shot at the district title.
Maclay, March 15, and
FAMU High, March 16, are
the next scheduled games on
Finlayson Field.


The Monticello Mood
swings, ladies A-league ten-
nis team, had to split points
with Ace-N-U Tuesday, due
to the threat of severe weather
and the courts being too wet
and slippery as a result.
Consequently, they fell
from the third position in the
16 team league, to the fourth
.... ,,B^ ^ ,'T -


.

..- .- .-* .. .' .






AUCILLA WARRIOR Dustin Roberts' powerhit heads for the fence at a recent ACA
practice session. (News Photo)



ACA JV Girls Defeat


Carrabelle 15-3 Friday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy JVsoftball team now
stand on an undefeated 4-0
season after defeating Carra-
belle Friday, 15-3.
"Our score was the result of
our trademark," said Coach
Frank Brown. "A lot of stolen
bases and the girls are per-
fecting their sliding tech-
niques and using them much
more often as part of their
newly acquired forte."


He said that the Lady War-
riors dominated from the start
of the short four inning game,
called due to the ten-run rule.
"We jumped on it early in and
stayed on it," said Brown.
Taryn Copeland pitched the
first two innings, 'striking out
two and walking one.
Sixth grader Ashley Schofill
pitched the final two innings,
striking out four and walking
five.
At the plate, Brooke
Stewart, one hit-by pitch re-
sulting in a walk, a walk, and
a strike out.
Schofill, two put-outs, two
fly-outs and a walk.
Brooke Kinsey, two
put-out, a walk and a double.
Skylar Hanna, a fly-out,
double, walk and put-out.
PamelaWatt, two doubles
and a single.
Copeland, one single, two
doubles and a walk.
Sunnie Sorensen, two sin-
gles and a fly-out.
Lisa Kisamore, one-put-out,
one single.
Ashley Evans, a fly-out and


a double.
Keli Dollar, a double and a
put-out.
Katlyn Watts, one put-out.
Kayla Haire, hit-by-pitch
resulting in a walk.
Michaela Metcalfe, one
walk, one single.
Hadley Revell, two walks.
"Morale is high right now,
but we still have to face some
tough teams," said Brown.
The game slated against
Carrabelle Monday night, was
canceled at their request.
The Lady Warriors are
slated to play against Madison
Central, 4 p.m., Tuesday,
here.


"All four of the top teams
are within one point of each
other," said Captain Patty
Hardy. "So we're not in too
bad a shape."

The Ladies are set to face
Sets In The City, 9:30 a.m. at
Forest Meadows, Thursday.


With your help,
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If It Happens In Our County
You'll Read It In
Your Local Newspaper


Order Your Subscription Today!
In State......................$45.00

Out Of State.............$52.00
Extensive Coverage of Jefferson County
Every Wednesday & Friday
Mail Your Check To:
Monticello News
P.O. Box 428
Monticello, Florida 32344



Monticello News
'You Can't Be Without It'
['


Warriors To Play

Brookwood Friday


Mood Swings Tennis

Team 4th in League


c~-


--~~~-~~-


-~--r--_-









PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 9, 2007

Aucilla Tennis Team

Defeats Apalachicola


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

ACA varsity tennis team
now stands 4-2 on the season
after defeating Apalachicola
Friday, 7-0.
"It was all over very
quickly," said Coach Kathy
Jackson.
In singles action, Courtney
Connell downed Adrian
Jones, 8-0; Caitlin Jackson
hammered Ashley Chamber,
8-0; Rebekah Aman beat Jo-


anna Thomas, 8-0; Nikki
Hamrick downed Caitlyn
Roland, 8-1; and Sarah
Sorensen routed Katrina
Prickett, 8-0.
In doubles action, Connell
and Jackson downed Jones
and Chamber, 8-0; and Aman
and Hamrick beat Thomas
and Roland, 8-1.
In related news, the matches
scheduled for Thursday
against NFC were canceled
and rescheduled to 3:30 p.m.,
April 4, here, due to the threat
of severe weather.


Locals Open RV Park

In Ashburn, Georgia


Local residents, David Jack-
son, J. T. Surles, and Lori
Blush, have opened a new RV
Park in Ashburn, GA, and
owner operator, David Jack-
son will feature a Jefferson
County RV Rally to kickoff
the grand opening of the park,
March 16 and 17.
The name of the facility is
Wanee Lake Golf& RV Park.
Amenities include full util-
ity hookups in pull-thru's with
30 or 50 AMP hookups, a
nine hole golf course, tennis
court, seven acre fishing lake,
full-service clubhouse with
drinks and food, and wi-fi
(wireless Internet) hookup.


The cost of the Rally grand
opening kick off is $25 per
night or $40 for two nights,
and includes a cookout Satur-
day night featuring Boston
butt, baked beans and cole-
slaw.
During the kickoff, golf
rates will apply. However,
tennis and fishing will be
available at no additional
charge.
Ashburn is located approxi-
mately 20 miles north of
Tifton, GA, and the facility is
located only five miles from
1-75.
For further information, con-
tact Jackson at 528-0035.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 9, 2007 PAGE 11


Homes Of

Mourning
(Continued From Page 7)
1,2007 in Sarasota, FL.
A native of Lamont, he had
been a longtime resident of
Sarasota, having previously
lived in Orlando, FL andAt-
lantic City, NJ. He had been a
chef and in later years, he had
been an accomplished roofing
contractor. He was a devout
member of Sarasota, Mt. Cal-
vary First Baptist Church.
Funeral services will be Sat-


urday, March 10, 2007 at
11:00 a.m. at Mr. Mariah Min-
istries of Lamont. Burial will
follow at Mt. Mariah Minis-
tries Cemetery. Viewing will
be held Friday, march 9, 2007
at 2:30 7:30 p.m. at Tillman
Funeral Home in Monticello.
Brother Thelma Kinsey
leaves to cherish his memory a
devoted mother, Elnora
Kinsey, three sons, Gary L.
Kinsey (Vernal) of Baltimore,
MD, Isaiah M. Kinsey, and
Michael J. Kinsey (Diondra)
both of Sarasota, FL; two
daughters, Zina Spikes (Mark)


of Atlanta, GA and Katrina
Kinsey Ward (James) of Sara-
sota, FL; one loving and de-
voted brother; Henry Kinsey
of Miami, FL; five truly de-
voted and committed sisters,
Theresa Smith (Archie), Lillie
Bell Walker (Wilfred), Rachel
Coleman (Charles) all of Mi-
ami, FL; Gertrude Green and
Lula Brown both of Sarasota; a
loving aunt; Viola Row and a
loving uncle, Dan Manuel,
both of Tampa, FL; fifteen
grandchildren, a host of nieces
and nephews and countless
other family members and
friends.


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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 9, 2007


LEGAL
Job Advertisement County
Coordinator Jefferson County,
Florida Jefferson County is seeking
a County Coordinator. This is a
professional position within
Jefferson County government. The
complete Jefferson County Job
Application, the Job Announcement
and the Job Description can be
obtained through the County Clerk
of Courts Office, Jefferson County
Courthouse, Room 10. Monticello,
FL 32344, by telephone at
850/432-0218 or on the County's
web site hlllp://co.iffcrson.ll.us. The
completed Jefferson County Job
Application and resume are due in
the Clerk of Courts office by noon,
March 19, 2007. EOE.
R/D 2/21,23,28,3/2,7,9,c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION.
CASE NO: 06-191-CA
VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND
FINANCE, INC., a Tennessee
corporation, as assignee of CMH
HOMES, INC., Plaintiff, v.
PATRICIA D. CHESHIRE, an
unremarried widow; MARK GRAY
and LINDA GRAY, husband and
wife; NISSAN MOTOR
ACCEPTANCE CORPORATION,
a California corp.; EAST TEXAS
DISTRIBUTING, INC., and
WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL
ACCEPTANCE FLORIDA, INC., a
Florida corp., Defendants. NOTICE
OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment dated February 26, 2007,
entered in this cause, I will sell to
the highest bidder for cash at the
Jefferson County Courthouse in
Monticello, Florida on March 23,
2007, at 11:00 a.m., Central Time,
at the South door all that certain
property located and situate in
Jefferson County, Florida as more
particularly described Commence
at the intersection of the East
right-of-way line of State Road 59
and the North boundary of the
Southeast quarter of the Southwest
quarter of Section 22, Township 1
North, Range 3 East, Jefferson
County, Florida and run North 87
degrees 59 minutes 56 seconds East


LEGAL
913.14 feet along said forty line to
the POINT OF BEGINNING,
thence continue North 87 degrees 59
minutes 56 seconds East 367.86 feet
along said forty line to a point,
thence South 191.7 feet to a point on
the north right-of-way line of a 60
foot graded road, thence South 87
degrees 59 minutes 10 seconds West
307.33 feet long said road to a point,
thence South 85 degrees 56 minutes
West 60.64 feet long said road to a
point, thence North 193.97 fdet to
the Point of Beginning. Containing
1.62 acres, more or less, and being a
part of the Southeast quarter of the
Southwest quarter of Section 22,
Township 1 North, Range 3 East,
Jefferson County, Florida. Any
person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the
date of the lis pendens must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have
hereunto set my hand and official
seal this 26th day of February, 2007.
CLERK OF COURT By. Norma L.
Wilkins AS Deputy Clerk Attorney
for Plaintiff: Louis L Long, Jr.,
Esquire 1201 Eglin Parkway
Shalimar, FL 32579 (850) 651-9944
3/2,3/9/07,c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT IN AND FOR JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 07-45 ca IN RE: The
Marriage of JOSEPHINE
MORRIS, Wife/Petitioner, and SID-
NEY MORRIS, Husband/Respon-
dent NOTICE OF ACTION To:
SIDNEY MORRIS Address Un-
known YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your' written defenses, if any, to it,
on MICHAEL A. REICHMAN, pe-
titioner's attorney, whose address is
P.O. Box 41, Monticello, FL 32345,
on or before April 6, 2007, and file
the original with the clerk of this
court either before service on peti-
tioner's attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or peti-
tion. Dated on February 12, 2007
KIRK REAMS Clerk of Court As
Clerk of the Court .erie B. Pearson


wZ


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Lake Oconee

Lake Sinclair Georgia

RV/M VP Wwww.rmTlakeoconee.com
11'fi~~ MM


LEGAL
Deputy Clerk
2/16, 23/07, 3/2, 9/07,c

NOTICE
AA: Mon., Thurs., Sat.;
Al-Anon: Mon. 8 p.m.; Christ
Episcopal Church Annex, 425
North Cherry Street 997-2129,
997-1955 for info
3/2,7,9,14,16,21,23,28,30,pd

HELP WANTED
Kennel Worker to learn all
phases of animal care.
Qualifications: Must love
animals, be honest, dependable,
and have reliable
transportation. Alcoholics and
drug abusers do not apply. Call
for interview, 877-5050
R/D 3/9,tfn,c
The Jefferson County Road
Dept. is accepting applications
for the following positions: (1) a
Mechanics position. Must have
experience in gas and diesel
engines and/or have high school
diploma or GED and will train.
A class A CDL license would be
a plus. (2) A Truck driver with a
class A CDL license. Must have
a high school diploma or GED.
(3) An Equipment Operator/
class A-CDL driver. Must have
a high school diploma or GED.
Closing date for all positions
will be March 9, 2007.
2/23,28,3/2,7,9,14,16,c
Need cleaning assistant to clean
offices in the evening, in
Monticello. Please call


IELP WANTED
850-894-6254 or Fax
850-894-6224.
2/16,tfn,c
Part-time Receptionist needed
for busy CPA office. Pis fax
resume to 342-9899 or call for
appt. 342-9898
2/2/,tfn,c

BUSINESS'
OPPORTUNITIES
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE
Do you earn $800/day? 30
Machines, Free Candy All for
$9,995. (888)629-9968
B02000033. CALL US: We will
not be undersold!
3/7,9,fc
Learn to buy Foreclosure, tax
liens, and rehabs for pennies on
the dollar. Mentor walks you
through each deal A-Z to ensure
SUCCESS (800)433-4556
3/7,9,fc

SERVICES
Marie's House Cleaning Service
Lady's you don't have time to
clean like you need. Call me.
Reasonable Rates, References
Upon Request. Cell phone -
850-445-5940 Home phone -
850-997-4409
3/7,9,pd
I build sheds, decks, handicap
ramps, exterior carpentry work,
window/door replacement. Call
Bob 242-9342
R/DI/10,12,17,19,24,26,31,2/2,7,
9,14,16,21,23,28,3/2,7,9,14,16


Living Estate Auction
Saturday, March 10, 2007 at 9:30 a.m.
9730 SW County Road 14, Madison, FL
FIIRNITURE: Oak 4 stack lawyer's bookcase. cherry 3 pc. fluted column pen-
cil post b/r set. victorian marble top dresser. victorian nl/I walnut vencer 2 over 3
wash stand, victorian m/t side able. cherry dining table w/ 6 windsor style chairs,
cherry china hutch, good oriental rugs- 4x10. 4x5, 4x6. Abizan, llamedan. etc..
rockers, imght stands, end tables, hurled walnut veneer english armoire, (2) cedar
chests, several Aladdin lamps (imod. 23) AMERICAN INDIAN: Pottery (60's-,
90's), arrowhleads. tools, points. heads, small Navajo rug (1960). peace pipe. how
& quiver, Nicolasa, Santa Clara, Acoima, Pueblo. Navajo. e. etc. GUINS: Rem. 270.
AR 14 -223. Win 30-30. Marlin i3 300. Reml. I 100 20ga. Savage 31 I double 12ga.
Rein. auto 22. Old octaion barrel pump Savage 22. black powder Kentucky sIquiri
rel rille. 50 cal. Frontier black powder TRACTOR: 674 Internalional Iiesel
(rehuill & repainlcd. r111ns good') TOOIS: Troy Bill pony tiller. Troy Bill 3550
watl generator (Nesw), Ixcell 2500 p..i. pressure washer, Poulanl & Homnclite
chain saIws, Northswood 10" table saw. Craftsman 10" table saw, B&D.) power
miter sa\w. AMT 5 1/8" joniner-planer, weedeater, linmh saw, electric drills, circular
saws. recipe. saws, rOILer. halml tmer drill. cordless drills. ( I ) sa., assortment of shop
materials (nails. screws, bolts, etc.). jacks. new alumlinuml windows. 8' and 12'
extension ladders, 14' step ladder, some cherry and poplar boards. reel & rods. 12
hole chicken nest hoxesc wire. like new 50 chick brooder cages. garden carl
POLITICAL MEMLORABILIA: Ronald Regan photo "'ot" and the signed le
cast. 1I'73 ]-anlin minit stcling Nixon!Agn\inew Inaugural pilae PRIN'IS &
PAINT: Rav llnrm wildlife It include, large 1971 eagle prim ol' Iihe original doeie
for West Pointl'. railic House Gallery. (I i water coloi o/c MISCt: Flow bIlue bIowl
recent Roseville, Old Japan wall pocket. Griswold, Wagner skillets. dishes. pots
& pans, 6 Whillier arrow hack style bar stools, bedding. Kitchen Aid blender.
Wroughl iron trundle bed (like new). Imahogalny Martha Washington sewing stand,
ladies French slanti front desk. several old hooks: Harvard Classics. Civil War
History, Scribner's Lincoln War Years. Eastern Press leather bound works. GE
washer. Amrtaa dryer, 2 Compaq computers, many items too numerous to list.
only one item w/ reserve 1999 Cruise Master Georgie Boy 33 ft. w./ slideout. 330
Cummins Turbo Diesel. Allison auto motor coach with 30,.19) actual miles.
Auctioneers Notes: This will he a large sale with quality everywhere' Something
for everyone. All Cordially Invited. No buyer's premium cash or good person
al and business checks,
Directions: 1-10 exit 251. west on SR 14. 5 miles to sale site. or from Perry, N.
221 to Shady Grove cast on SR 14. 9 miles. Preview Sale Morning 7:30 a.m. to
Sale Tioe, Concession i by local church Elgoup.
I:or Itformatioin. Call
850-997-6880
(.1. Auctions AB 13(1629 C(ol. Jerr (Colviln A ,#2182


SERVICES
Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
new menopausal products.
Jackson's drug store.
5/12 tfn
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.


SERVICES %?t1R
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quick responses.
6/22, tfn

GARAGE SALE
YARD SALE Saturday 3/10/07
8 AM till Nobles Subdivision
1245 Florida Avenue household
items/ Linens / comforters


OPEN HOUSE
Sat. & Sun. 2 4pm

New Home
240 Green Meadows Dr., Monticello, FL.
3 Br/ 2 Ba, Large Double Car Garage, Concrete Drive
& Sidewalks on approximately 1 1/2 acres
$207,000.00

850-997-1093





What's Noew


With Jim!

At Roy Campbell Chevrolet


2002 Chevy Cavalier
2 Door Sport Coupe, Automatic Transmission,
Power Windows, Power Door Locks, Tilt, Cruise,
Aluminum Wheels
".i 12 a!-.


All vou add i Tax Ta and Tille
Royy Cctpbuell
S JstDo It?' 206 Moultrie Road
229-226-3901 Thomasville, GA
'-T l (just past 19 on Hwy 319N)


Real Estate and More





www.mymonticellomortgage. com

(850) 577-1300 (850) 577-1300


654 Pineview Land
$67.500-1.53 Acres
3BR/2BA w/1.040 sqft.
Clean home on cozy lot
Storage building included
CALL US


Steve Walker

Realty, LLC
2',i S .etlie;sonl S .
Monticello, I1 L

(850) 997-4061 Office
Come Visit Us On the Web
flor more info:
vwvw.SteveWalkerRealty.com


LAND CLEARING IN.


LandClerinoMuchig Mwin


Jim Von Stein Toll Free: (866) 496-3442
Broker www.VonSteinRealty.com



Mn tein

lEuMLS REALTYInc.

P.O. Box 1009 (352) 498-0041
Steinhatchee, FL 32359 cell: (352) 356-1001
m ~









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 9, 2007 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$9.00
Each Additional Line....$1.25
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


GARAGE SALE
3/7,9,pd

FOR SALE
Fantail Bantom chickens, $2
each. 997-2344
3/9,14,pd
GOATS asking $100 each. Call
Debbie at 997-0901, leave
message.
3/9,tfn,nc
DRIVERS! ACT NOW! 21
CDL-A Drivers needed *
36-43cpm/ $1.20pm $0 Lease
NEW Trucks CDL-A +3 mos
OTR (800) 635-8669
3/7,9,fc
For Sale You Move 93 Merritt
54 x 24 DW 3-BDR. 2-BTH
w/fireplace, 12x10 Metal Shed
and more included. 997-3318 or
251-0865 no calls after 9:00 pm
please.
2-16,TFN,nc
Drivers-Car hauling career.
GREAT HOME TIME!
Exceptional Pay & Benefits!
Paid Training! Min. 1 yr.
Class-A CDL exp. req. THE
WAGGONERS TRUCKING
(912)571-9668 OR (866)
413-3074
3/7,9,fc
Host Families & Representatives
sought for foreign exchange
students ages 15-18 arriving
August. Has own insurance/
spending money. For more info
call 1-800-SIBLING
(1-800-742-5464)
www.aise.com
3/7,9,fe
$150 Queen Pillow-top Mattress
Set, New in Plastic with
warranty.. 850-222-9879
12/l,tfn,c


Cherry sleigh


bed SOLID


FOR SALE
WOOD- BRAND NEW in box,
$250. (850) 545-7112
12/1,tfn,c
LEATHER SOFA &
LOVESEAT. NEW, warranty,
sacrifice $795. (can deliver).
(850) 425-8374
12/l,ifn,c
NEW king POSTER bedroom
set bed, dresser, mirror, chest,
2 nightstands. $4400 value, must
sell $1650. (850) 545-7112
12/l,tfn,c
KING PILLOWTOP Mattress
Set. Brand new in plastic. Must
move, $225. (850) 222-9879
12/1,tfn,c

FOR RENT
Mobile Home for rent 3
Bedrooms 2 Bath located in
Wacissa. Call After 5:00 p.m.
850-997-8421
?19.14,pd
Spacious 2/1 and 1/1 apts, also
office space, near Monticello
center. Section 8 OK Call
850-491-8447
1/24,tfn,c
Jefferson Place Apts., I & 2 BR,
HUD Vouchers Accepted 1468
S. Waukeenah St. Office 300,
Monticello. 997-6964. "This
institution is an Equal
Opportunity Provider and
Employer".
9/6,tfn, c
REAL ESTATE
Wanted One to two acres with
well and septic tank. Call
997-7441.
2/28,tfn.nc
$0 DOWN HOMES Gov't &
Bank Foreclosures! Low or no
down! No credit OK! Call Now!


2006 Taurus SE, $14,4.. $11,816. Stk# P533
2006 Taurus SE, $15-97.Z $11,816. Stk# PI546
2005 Focus, $"4-W $10,177. Stk# P545
2003 Focus, $9,99..$7,087. Stk# 260044B
2004 F250 X-Cab Diesel, $2-7-7. $25,987. Stk# P548B
2005 Focus, $t-2.;7 $8,859. Stk# 270067A
1990 Dodge 350 Ram Van, $8,500. Stk# 260208B
2004 F250 X-Cab 2WD Lariat, $ fr9-2. $16,989. Stk# 260233A
2002 F150 X-Cab FX4 Lariat, +2. $15,250. Stk# 260227A
2001 Nissan Pathfinder LE, 9$-3-7.. $10,989. Stk# P551A
S2005 Ford Focus ZX4 SE, $12,477. Stk# 270019CA
2005 Ford 500 Limited, $18,977. Stk# P556
2004 Ford Ranger XL, $10,477. Stk# P558B
2003 Ford F150 Lariat XCab 4x4, $18,977. Stk# P554
2003 Ford Explorer XLT, $9,977. Stk# 260235B
2002 Ford Taurus SE, $7,977. Stk# 27003 ICA
2001 Ford Ranger XLT off Road Supercab, $12,977. Stk# 270090A
1995 Ford Mustang, $6,977. Stk# P557B
2005 Chevrolet Equinox LS, $15,800. Stk# P555A
2005 Chevrolet Cavalier, $9,977. Stk# 270019CA
2004 Buick Century Custom, $7,977. Stk# 270062B
2004 F350 Lariat LE Crewcab Diesel 4x4 77k miles, Grill
Guard, Warn Winch, DVD player $31,477.
2004 F250 XLT Sport X-Cab Diesel 4x4 Lift Kit w/35" Tires,
Ranch Hand Grill Guard, Leather, Superclean, $26,777.
2004 Chevy Silverado X-Cab 4x4 5.3 Liter V8 $13,997.
2003 Chevy Silverado 1500 HD 4x4 Crewcab LS w/ Leather
$18,877
2003 Honda Accord EX 4DR. White over Tan Leather,
Heated Seats, Loaded $16,977.
2004 Ford Escape Limited Black over Tan Leather, Moon Roof
14,195 miles $15,977.


DO

NOT

ENTER

Great pioneers don't hesitate.'
MDA researcltpursues
every possible avenue.


REAL ESTATE


(800)749-2905
3/7,9,fc


Beach Living at its Best! Ocean
Isle, NC. Exclusive islnad resort
lots. Close to Mytrle Beach and
historic Wilmington. From
450k. (910)579-2800
3/7,9,fc
Jefferson Co. Land Auction 700
acres, starting @ 1200/ac
owner/agent/March 10th www.
700AcreAuction.com
2/4-3/10,c
House For Sale By Owner 4
Bdr, 1 Full Bath, 2 half Baths.
Located on 900 S. Mulberry St.
Call 229-890-5956
R/D2/28,3/2,7,9pd
NEW PRICE! 10+ AC-
$299,000! UPSCALE
EQUESTRIAN GATED
COMMUNITY! 200 Year Old
Oaks. Established lush pastures.
Paved private rds,u/g utilities. 2
miles from HITS! Exc
financing! CALL (866)352-2249
x 1156.
3/7,9,fc
New energy efficient 3 Bedroom
2 Bath house on approximately
1 2 acres with extra large
double car garage, front porch,
paved driveway, and sidewalk.
240 Green Meadows Dr.
$207,000 997-1093.
3/7,9,14,16,21,23,28,30,pd
Cute, well maintained 3 br
home in growing Tallahassee.
Enclosed family room for
growing family or home office.
Great for first time home buyer

CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots,
Land! We Make
Mortgage Loans,
Reverse Mortgages!
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc
878-3957


FOR RENT
2 BD/2 BTH, brick, screened
pool, 2 car garage, fenced,
non smokers, no pets, $895
per month

FOR SALE
Two "Homes of Merit"
handicap accessible on 5
acres, $234,000 near head
Waters of Aucilla River 11
miles NE
Wooded, isolated, 5 acres,
$50,000
Gas, Grocery plus Home in
Lamont on 1 acre, $231,000
Cottage style home from
yesteryear, 2BD, needs cos-
metic work, detached stor-
age/workshop, 1/2 mile from
Courthouse, $100,000


-'\\ -933-6363
All Realty Services
Big Band Florida
LETTRMON
'. ws-'"


REAL ESTATE,
or investor. Seller providing one
year warranty at closing.
$82,000. Premier Properties,
850-421-0020.
R/D3/9,tfn,c
20.20 acres in Gadsden County
near Nicholson Farmhouse. No
road frontage/easement off
Hwy. 12. Possible hunting
camp, subdivision, homesite or
investment. $10,000 per acre/
$202,000.00 Total. Premier
Properties. 850-421-0020
R/D 2/28tfn,c
Business opportunity on
westside business zoned mixed
use by Leon County. All
concrete construction makes
this current restaurant sturdy
and fire resistant; 2400 ft on .78
acres about State Road Hwy. 20
and Jackson Bluff Road.
$385,000. Premier Properties.
850-421-0020
R/D 3/9,tfn,c

NEED CHILDCARE?
ENROLL TODAY
The Little University Co.,
is now accepting Infants.
Open enrollment for all ages and
sibling discounts. Limited Spaces
for Arbor School Readiness.
Call 997-2970


Southern Forestry Realty
www.soforest.com

119+ac, Gadsden Co. 60-
70 ac 12-yr old planted
pines, hardwood bottoms,
great road system. Beautiful
creek divides property.
$3850/ac.
58+ac, Madison Co. 30 ac
12-yr old planted pines,
frontage on Aucilla River &
Hwy 90, beautiful oaks, road
system. $5172/ac.
199+ac, Jefferson Co. 35
min. E of Tallahassee. Natural
upland pines & hardwoods. Full
of turkey & deer, ponds w/fish
& ducks. Power available.
$3250/ac.
Ill+ac, Jefferson Co. 18-
20 yr old planted pines, 50 ac
hardwood bottom. Nice rolling
topography, 35 min to Tallahas-
see. Full of game near Aucilla
River. $5000/ac.
82+ ac, Leon Co. Great in-
vestment property. Various aged
planted pines, hardwoods &
rolling hills. Somewhat secluded
w/deeded easement. $6500/ac.
200+ ac, Leon Co. rolling hills
covered in natural longleaf pine.
Secluded w.deeded easement.
Good interior road system.
$1,200,000.

Rob Langford
850-556-7575
Many more investment opportu-
nities available in North Fl,
South GA, and Southeast AL.


Ar Y Managers & Assistant Managers


Arby's in Monticello is seeking highly motivated individuals
with initiative to excel. Competitive Salary, Bonus, Paid
Holidays, Vacation, 401K Plan. contact Gerry at
352-494-7552 to arrange for interview.


Housing Vouchers

We accept ll vouchers
2/2 $615 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 $50 dep.

Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571
AMI IW W 1 W W HM I


REALTOR


(850) 997-4340


'Link is back in town'
Wooded Tract 2.09 hillside acres east of town
on graded County Road $30,400

Country Retreat 29.7 acres and a delightful
roomy cabin with extras to include pool and hot
tub, wrap around porches $480,000

Loq Cabin 3 bed 2 bath with screened front
and back porches, board fenced pasture, double
carport, out building on 4.07 acres $385,000

Lloyd Acres on a wooded hillside a 3 bedroom
2 bath home with oak floors, fireplace and lots of
very nice extras including shop for $87,500

Historic Budd House built ca 1882 by commu-
nity leader of the day for his family. Lovely wood
work, high ceilings, spacious rooms, grand fire-
places, marvelous porches, currently 4 bedrooms
and 2 baths $355,000

Lake front Home!! 3 bedroom 2 bath home
with spacious family room, big carport, terrific
screened porch nice barn with 5 hillside acres on
very nice lake near 1-10 and US 19 $385,000

Amazinq Buy!!! Mixed Use Property 12
acres on US 19 south land use designation per-
mits 4 houses per acre near Dennis' Trading post
only $36,500 per acre

Cherry Tree Lane Price Slashed!!! 3 bed / 2
bath doublewide, fireplace, big porch, garage,
shed, above ground pool, big trees, fenced, on
paved road now $110,000

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly
wooded acres Only $36,500

Pasture and Pecans 5-10 lovely acres on
paved road $15,500 per acre Very nice property,
good deed restrictions

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Comfortable 4 bedroom 3 bath home on five
fenced acres with guest cottage w/bath, 2 car
garage, big shop, pasture 100 pecan trees and a
nice pool Only $365,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Wooded Acreaqe 5.35 acres on private road
off Paul Thompson Road $128,500

Waukeenah Hiqhway 27.99 acres good
home site fenced pasture $545,000

Aucilla Shores 5 level wooded acres $75,000

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath double-
wide with nice deck, fenced yard on 1 acre
$73,500

Investment Properties
-Choice lot on the Ecofina River 20 min to
the Gulf, State property on 3 sides, septic
tank on property, paved road only $195,000
-3 mobile homes on 4 acres 4 allowed
$118,000


Realtor Tim Peary

850-997-4340
See all our listings at
www.TimPeary.com

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


ADVANCED



SALES
RESIDENTIAL/COaMMERCIAL
MFG.HMIS. WITH LAND
ACREAGE/LOTS
MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE -
No FEE TO LIST -
FREE MARKET ANALYSES -
YOU NAME IT, WE'LL FIND IT!
READY TO SELL IT, IT'S SOLD!
1 50 W. WASHINGTON STREET
(IN THE COURT HOUSE CIRCLE)
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
CALL US OR STOP BY TODAY
850-997-1691

Vs_________________


. E








PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MARCH 9, 2007

Church Forms Health

Ministry Program


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Greater Fellowship MB
Church has formed a Church
Health Ministry.
The program will offer
monthly group discussions on
various health topics.
Health professionals have
agreed to come to the meet-
ings and offer knowledge to
help combat health issues on
related topics.
The first program 'Under-
standing Diabetes' is sched-
uled for 6:30 p.m. Monday,
March 12 at the church loca-
tion 690 Cypress Street.
This workshop will be pre-
sented by the Tallahassee Me-
morial Hospital Diabetes
Center.
It will include the impact of
diabetes and diabetes preven-
tion; warning signs and com-
plications; overall diabetes
management, know your
numbers; key measures of
diabetes control, A1C levels;


blood pressure, foot examina-
tions, eye examinations; and
free glucose meters for diabe-
tes patients.
Upcoming workshops will
include Exercise; Heart Dis-
ease; and Stroke, just to name
a few.
There will be regular door
prize drawings: pedometers'
and free lunch coupons.
Contact Gloria Cox-Jones
for additional information
997-4572 or Jennifer Allen
997-5980.


Wanee Lake Golf & RV Park
In Ashburn, Georgia invites the Big Bend area to
join in the GRAND OPENING kickoff
March 16th & 17th
$25.00/ 1-Night or $40.00/ 2-Nights
Golfing at reduced rates Fishing & Tennis at No
Charge. Enjoy the cookout Saturday night'for
no additional charge.

For more Information & reservations call david at
(850) 528-0025 or (229) 567-2727 or visit us at
www.waneelake.com


MONTICfCELLO NE)VWS
YOUR l HMETWN NEWSPAPER


Fou sr
01711,


Fight Breast Cancer

oTod ay


SIMPLY FIT

J4 Women


Summer is around the corner get started on
your tan with our New Tanning Beds or relax
in our dry Far Infrared Sauna.
Monticello's
new women's gym features 10 state of the
art hydraulic machines.

CALL 997-7339 FOR M(RE INFORMATION
189 E. Walnut Street
Monticello, FL
Simply Fit or \Women is a limited liability company


It Works Wonders.


American
Heart
Association


Craig's Lawn Service
FREE Estimates

Mowing, Weed Eating, Hedge
Trimming, Light Tree Trimming,
Flower Bed Clean Out, Spring/Fall
Clean Up & Mulching
850-294-0711
850-294-0711 Licensed & Insuredj



RHB Mowing, Inc.

and Tractor Service
Bush Hogging, Box Balding, Root Raking,
Harrowing, Driveways, Fire Breaks, Horse
Pasture, Food Plots, Etc.
Licensed and Insured
(850) 545-9724
Roland Brumbley Fax: (856) 224-87951


The Fix-It Chick
Honey-Do" HandymanI
850-567-4895

Licensed, Bonded & Insured .
We do what your honey don't... No list too small, no job too big!
General Carpentry, Interior Painting, Wallpaper Removal, Deck Building,
Minor Electrical/Plumbing/Wall Repairs, Replace Locks, Hang Pictures,
Install Window Treatments...... and much more, Just Askl


"SPRUCE UP THIS SPRING"
MAKEOVERS.....
ADDITIONS.....
DREAM HOME.....

FREE ESTIMATES

KESSLER
CONSTRUCTION LLC

997-4540

License & Insured CRC 1329001

1* *' .-

S Mason's Decorative Fabrics


il Ryan and Company Antiques '



- -. "l','t q. .,


,SELECTIVE FABRIC
O% OFF .

v^ ^yi*-,.h"'6


HOME

IMPR VEMENT

IDEAS!!


Celebration g
38 Years







Bennett's



24-Hour Ser ice


(
l '
ji


Commercial & Residential Repair Specialists
Sewer Cleaning Home Repair

3402 Apalachee Parkway
878-3178
Serving Monticello/Tallahassee since 1969


Gulf Coast Panel Profiles
Gulf Coast .,,


Supply & Mfg., Inc.
40 Year Warranty
Metal Roofing Buy Direct From Manufacturer
* Over 24 Colors In Stock
* Five Different Profiles To Choose From


* Fast Friendly Service
Jlob Site Delivery Available /





CallToday For A Free Quote And A Full Color Brochure Package


4020 SW 449th St. Horseshoe Beach, FL 32648
Ph: (888) 393-0335
Fax: (352) 498-7852
,>w I,, i 1 , i. L .' C.o l


\/4 41

\


235 '*NsI .Jackson Street
Thomasville, C.A 31792 ZN. 22iS-IO4I
Est 1983
M ,.aT-".PIn ust. S- .r ..... -


HIM
a tl freey on o iw


lolt
Drv., itl


T- % 04F WW' 11 1 I.,. -


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