Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00184
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: March 7, 2007
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00184
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text








Photos
Show Storm
Damage

Photos, Page 3


Home
Reading Helps
Students

Editorial, Page 4
I I


Wirick
Cat Home
Safely

Story, Photo, Page 6


$800,000
Expected
Shortly For EOC

Story,. Page 10


Wednesday Morning


Monticello


I1l0Tu VFAR NN T1 85 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & .Fridays


ews


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7,2007


Storm Wreaks


Havoc


Massive


Outages


Noted

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The courthouse clock
stopped at 2:10 a.m., about
the time when power outages
occurred across the county
early Friday morning while a.
funnel cloud hovered over the
area.
Tri-County Madison Office
Manager of Finance George
Webb reported that reports of
power outages began as early
as 2:30 a.m. and work crews
were kept busy.
Webb said that no crews
other than Tri-County crews
were called in to correct ;he
outages. However, two crews
from Tri-County were called
in from Taylor County to assist
with the work required for re-
storing the power.
"We had approximately a
couple thousand without
power, all of which was to-
tally restored between 8 and
10 a.m.," he said.
Nevertheless, at least one
S resident on North Salt Road
did not have power restored
Until 3:30 p.m. Friday.
The major damage was
caused by large limbs and
trees falling and downing
power lines.
Power was restored by
Progress Energy about 9 a.m.
Friday at the Monticello
News and other visible loca-
tions on North Jefferson
Street.
Residents a mile or so from
the courthouse reported
power coming back on at 10
a.m.
Progress Energy crews were
in evidence around the area as
they worked to restore the out-
ages.
Emergency Management Di-
rector Carol Ellerbe said there
were several thousand resi-
dents without power, with it
being returned in stages
throughout the county.
"The major part of the prob-
lem appeared to be the power
station located on Drifton/Au-
cilla Rd., which belongs to
Progress Energy.
Although, power had to be
temporarily diverted from
Georgia, repairs were quickly
made, restoring all power in
the county by 1 or 2 p.m. at the
latest, Ellerbe opined.
Embarq Media Relations
spokesperson Michelle Pin-
nau said they had no major re-
ports of service outages,
though phones were out
around town, including at the
Monticello News office.
"We had no specific net-
works that were out, all of our
services issues were related to
commercial power loss," she
said.
Pinnau said that their net-
(See Outages, Page 2)


THIS TRUCK and camper suffered extensive damage at Camper's World was reported to be among the hardest
Camper's World, when this large tree fell on the roof of hit areas in the county. (News Photo)
the truck and damaged the side of the trailer.


Sheriff, Police Are Kept Busy


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Law enforcement personnel
were out in force Friday
morning, during and long
thereafter, the storm, helping
with tree removal, setting up
barricades to blocked areas,
and generally checking on
residents to assure there were
no injuries.
Sheriff David Hobbs re-
ported that three to four depu-
ties were called in early to
travel the county, and check
residents who may have sus-


trained any damages or inju-
ries, and assisting with tree
removal and barricades to
prevent any accidents, as well
as an additional dispatcher to
assist handling incoming
calls.
Deputies manned East US-
90 near Big Joe Road, where
a large tree had fallen, par-
tially blocking access, and
many power lines down.
"Deputies detoured traffic
and helped power companies
and county workers with the
removal of trees," said Hobbs.
In areas of Flatwoods Rd.,
Hartsfield Rd. and Bassett


Dairy Road, deputies went
door to door and any homes
appearing to have sustained
damage, quite often gaining
access only on foot, to assure
no residents were injured.
Hobbs said Friday morning
that he was not aware of any
homes that were destroyed or
any injuries in the county.
"It took us by surprise,"
said Hobbs. "We were ex-
pecting major rain and were
hit with the primarily strong
wind instead.
""I am extremely proud of
my deputies and dispatchers
for a job well done," said


POWER line sags under the weight of this heavy tree at Camper's World. No doubt
similar situations accounted for power outages in many places.


Hobbs. "We were very fortu-
nate, I understand it was some
kind of tornado but didn't ac-
tually touch down. We're
very lucky it was no worse
than it was, and we can thank
the good Lord for that," he
added.
MPD Investigator Chip
Springer reported that MPD
had "batten down the
hatches" early in preparation
for the storm.
I checked the fuel in the
generator here at the station
just in case the power went
out, and we had to slightly
change our radio system in
case the power went out, we
would still be able to commu-
nicate," said Springer.
He added that the entire staff
were placed on alert and offi-
cers did a great job, traveling
the city, accessing any prob-
lems and alerting the responsi-
ble entities.
S "The majority of it was
downed trees and power
lines," said Springer.
He said that all officers
working the day shift were
called in early with meetings
being held throughout the
night and day at Emergency
Management, giving officials
an up-to-date heads-up on the
situation.
"We did provide shelter
here at the station for one
homeless man who had been
living in the woods near the
Interstate," said Springer.
"He stayed here until the
storm had safely passed."
(See Sheriff, Police, Page 2)


Much


Harm


Done

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Emergency Management Di-
rector 'Carol Ellerbe said that
although an actual tornado had
not been documented touching
down in the county, early Fri-
day morning, there was much
damage, mainly from downed
trees and power lines, with
minimal structural damage re-
ported.
No severe injuries were re-
ported. "We were very blessed,
said Ellerbe. "I think the num-
ber one lifesaver in the area
was residents owning and us-
ing their NOAA radios."
"When a tornado doesn't
actually touch down, it's
called a funnel cloud, and that
appears to be what we had
here," said Ellerbe .
She said that most damage
was reported at Camper's
World off of S. 19, Big Joe
Road, Frank Lacy Rd., Harts-
field Rd.. Curtis Mills*Rd.,
though there was the report of
a shed roof being blown off in
Wacissa, and one tree slicing
through a single-wide home
on Hartsfield Rd. near Forest.
She added that the weather
was not severe enough to open
up the shelter, but crews were
on standby if the need should
arise.
"We were ready for what
ever happened," said Ellerbe.

She said that she, Mike
Bishop and Robert Harrell,
worked shifts throughout the
night to cover the office and
react as necessary.
County Road Department
Superintendent David Harvey
reported that major areas hit
by the funnel cloud in the
county included; Bassett
Dairy Rd., Hartsfield Rd.,
Drifton/Aucilla Rd., Flat-
woods Rd., Big Joe Rd., and
Frank Lacy Rd.
He said there were reports
of trees blocking not only the
six major hit areas, but an ad-
ditional 25 areas.
As of Monday morning,
there was confirmation of
multiple trees which had
been blocking as many as 58
roads in the county.
Crews worked throughout
the early morning hours, re-
moving debris and continued
to work Monday morning.
"We have to use our own
forces because there was no
Disaster Declaration, so it will
probably take up to a month to
clear all of the downed trees
and debris, though all roads
are now passable." said Har-
vey.
He added that most reports
received by his department
(See Damage, Page 2)


I I


t.JY ti yE K N". 1, ju% 1:'l &









PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.. MARCH 7, 2007



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LINEMEN were hard at work removing trees from power lines and restoring power.


Damage is Widespread
(Continued From Page 1) many large'live oaks down on Apartments.
were residents complaining of Frank Lacy Rd., and one pine "It didn't get cleared unt
dead trees that could come about 6:30 or 7 am. because
down at any time. tree approximately 30 inches
*- ; t'-t .1 r ,f" ": I:I -. b
" " : Tt, *"- ', - . ..-iv,,-&-''''''' .
~ ~ ~ ,a ,' -, "" '' -- r :- ,: '.t.


.;r "*.:'' I . , ." -''
.:. .P ,, ... .. -,t, , - ., ,. " ... . .


"On a daily basis,ave check
the county for any dead or
lightning damaged trees, mark
and schedule them for re-
moval," said Harvey.
"A lot of people don't un-
derstand that it is actually
much more common to see a
perfectly healthy tree downed,
snapped off or uprooted, than
it is for a dead tree to come
down in storm.
"During the storm, we did-
n't get one report of any dead
trees that had come down on
homeowners property."
He noted that there were


in diameter Ithat hau ucci
snapped off and fallen.
"I can't help but ask, how
much force does it take to
down a tree like that," he said.
City Superintendent Don
Anderson reported that city
workers didn't have near the
activity seen in the county.
"Demott (Anderson) came
in several times beginning at
2:30 or 3 a.m., quickly check-
ing the city for any damages,"
said Anderson.
"We had one large tree
down across the road on S.
Waukeenah St. just off of 19
South, near Jefferson Place


Two Suspects Sought

In Home Invasion


:il
se


we had to wait tor Progress
Energy to come and assure
that power in the area had
been discontinued and to
check downed lines before
the city crews could remove
the tree from the road.
A second tree located on
Dixie St. near S. Waukeenah,
was down and quickly re-
moved."
He added that additional
crews were not called in and
the city was extremely lucky.
"We didn't get much rain,
mainly a lot of wind, most of
the storm averted the city," he
concluded.


Owner Of Orchard Meadows

Arrested For Embezzlement


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Attorney General Bill
McCollum reports the arrest
of Willie M. Peacock, owner
of an assisted living facility in
Jefferson County, on charges
he embezzled Veterans' Dis-
ability funds from a resident
at the facility.
Authorities with the Attor-
ney General's Medical Fraud
Control Unit arrested Peacock
Feb. 23 in Madison County,
after an investigation into
charges of grand theft and ex-
ploitation of a disabled adult.

Sheriff, Police
(Continued From Page 1)
"I'm really surprised," said
Springer, "that as small as this
community is, we have a very
good perspective on any major
problems and how best to han-
dle anything that comes up.
The community is prepared to
do any task in need of them,
and just letting it roll off their
backs like a duck."


Peacock, 40, owned and op-
erated Orchard Meadows As-
sisted Living Facility, located
east of town.
The investigation, con-
ducted jointly by Medicaid
Fraud Control UnIt and the
Inspector General 6f the US
Veterans Administration, was
initiated by a report of exploi-
tation from Florida Depart-
ment of Children and
Families.

Investigators determined that
Peacock diverted at least 13
monthly Veteran Disability
checks worth more than
$11,000 to his own business
accounts.



The many

faces

of caring
Find (out what you can do. Contact us
at 1(800)899-0089 or wwwvvoa.org
V Volunteers
ofAmericaw
rr T. ere#are im trs m tol rn..


SCaminez, Brown &


Hardee, P.A.


JOND. CAMINEZ
BOARD CERTIFIED CIVIL TRIAL ATTORNEY

IAN BROWN

CARY A. "BO" HARDEE, III


,.

," !


PERSONAL INJURY & WRONGFUL DEATH

(850) 997-8181
1307 S. JEFFERSON STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
THE HIRING OF A LAWYER IS AN IMPORTANT DECISION THAT SHOULD NOT BE BASED SOLELY UPON ADVERTISE.
MENTS. BEFORE YOU DECIDE, ASK THE LAWYER TO SEND YOU FREE WRITTEN INFORMATION ABOUT THEIR
QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE.


The checks were received
by Orchard Meadows after
the resident had moved from
the facility.

Peacock is currently being.
held in the Madison County
Jail. He is charged with 13
counts of grand theft and one
count of exploiting a disabled
adult, a third degree felony.
If convicted of all charges,
he faces up to 70 years in
prison and a fine of $70,000.
Orchard Meadows Assisted
Living Facility is no longer
operational.

The case will be prosecuted
by the State Attorney's Office
of the Second Judicial Circuit
of Florida.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Deputies are currently seek-
ing two suspects in a home in-
vasion and attempted robbery
which took place Wednesday
night on Lloyd Creek Rd.
Sheriff David Hobbs said he
could not release the home
owners name or address be-
cause the case remained under
investigation.
"Wednesday night at ap-
proximately 6 or 6:30, we re-
ceived a 911 call and
experienced a hang up," said
Hobbs..
He explained that in such
instances, dispatchers try to
recall the number, which at
the time, no one answered,
and a deputy was dispatched
immediately to the area to
check on the residents.
"The next call came in be-
fore the deputy had arrived on
the scene and reported that
there had been a forced entry
into a home and a property
owner shot," said Hobbs.
Upon arrival the property
owners, a man and his wife,
met the deputy out in front of
their home.
"They said that there were
two black males, armed with
handguns and wearing ski
masks and gloves," said
Hobbs. "Apparently, one had
stayed outside with the hus-


Outages
(Continued From Page 1)
work basically needs power to
operate and there are back up
batteries just in case of power
outages.
"Because the power was out
longer than the battery power
could handle, the batteries
went dead, she said.
"As soon as we lost our
backup power, crews were
deployed to set up generators
and quickly restore service."
By press time, Progress En-
ergy had not returned calls
seeking additional informa-
tion



Freedom of

tte Pess Is

Everybody S!

Freedom!!


band, using him to get inside
of the house." Hobbs said the
suspect struck the husband in
the face with the handgun, be-
fore using him to make' his
wife give them access to the
home.
While at the door, the wife
opened it and the second sus-
pect entered, hitting her about
the head with his handgun.
"He kept telling her to give
him the money," said Hobbs.
Both victims were treated at
TMH for injuries and
released.
The suspects fled the area
through the nearby wooded
area. Deputies quickly sealed
the area, set up a perimeter
and called for assistance from
the Madison Cl K-9 Unit, who
were able to determine the
route the suspects took, and
giving deputies good informa-
tional leads about them.
"We do have leads and have
been investigating since it
happened, and we'll stick

Got A Cute Photo?

Send It To Us And
We'll Share It With
Our Readers!

Kids Dogs *
Strange stuff, etc.

Monticello News
P.O. Box 430
Monticello, FL
32345

"You Can't Be Without It"


with it until it is solved and
arrests are made," said Hobbs.
He added that it was an iso-
lated incident, that no other
homes in the area had been
disrupted, and that if any resi-
dents happened to see any
persons or vehicles they
thought may be suspicious or
they did not recognize, to call
and inform the Sheriffs De-
partment at 997-2523.






Having several IRAs
or 401(k)s at previous
employers may feel right,
but it can be difficult to
keep track of where your
money is invested or know
if you're on track to meet
your retirement goals.
We can help ensure your
investments are properly
diversified and cared for.

To learn why consolidating
your retirement accounts to
Edward Jones makes sense,
call today.
Robert J. Davison
Investment Representative 'e
205. E Washington St
Monticello, FL 32344
850-997-2572
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC

Edar-oe
MAKN SNEFINVETIN


THE JEFFERSON COUNTY

SCHOOL BOARD


Announces the regular school board meeting
to which the public is invited. The meeting -
will be held at the Desmond M. Bishop.
Administration Building on
Monday, March 12, 2007 at 6:00 p.m.


Agendas may be picked up at the district
office at 1490 W. Washington Street,
Monticello, FL Monday through Friday
between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.
A copy of the school board packet will be
available for review at the district office.


I -

Protect your heart ...

HEART DISEASE IS THE NUMBER ONE KTIIER OF AMERICANS -- BOTH MEN AND WOMEN. AND FOR 250,000 AMERICANS
EACH YEAR, A FATAL HEART ATTACK IS THE FIRST AND ONLY SYMPTOM OF THE DISEASE.

Physicians have long been thwarted by the lack of an effective screening tool for atherosclerosis the
buildup of plaque that can clog arteries and lead to heart attacks. Now, in seconds, ARCHBOLD'S
NEW STATE-OF-THE-ART 64-SLICE SCANNER can produce an image of a patient's
coronary arteries and the calcium that may lie inside. More importantly, the scanner produces a
picture indicating future risk for heart disease, while there is still time to do something about it.


HEART ATTACK RISK FACTORS:


D HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

D DIABETES

D HIGH CHOLESTEROL


D SMOKING


D SEDENTARY LIFESTYLE

D BEING OVERWEIGHT

D HIGH-STRESS LIFESTYLE

D FAMILY HISTORY OF HEART DISEASE


WHAT YOUR CALCIUM SCORE MEANS

Calcium is a rough indicator of how much or little
heart-hurting plaque you have. Like other numbers|
measuring heart and arterial function, the calcium
score helps determine your risk.


* 1 -10


: No identifiable plaque.
Very low risk of heart disease.

: Minimal plaque burden.
Significant heart disease very unlikely.


* 11 -100 E> Mild plaque burden.
Minimal heart disease likely.


* 101 -400 c


Moderate plaque burden. Moderate
heart disease highly likely.


Over 400 : f IExtensive plaque burden.
Significant heart disease highly likely

+ Calcium scoring is recommended for men over age 45 and women over age 55 who have risk factors for heart disease.
** lhis exam is not for individuals who are currently expcricncin chest pain.



i$150 Calcium Scoring
S'Special Heart Month promotional pricing. Regular price S200. Valid through April 30, 2007. Payment dtu at time of scrvic ,a
insurance will not be filed. I
To schedule an appointment, either consult your physician or call \rchbold Radiology at (229) 228 2084 or Archbold's Ieart &
SVascular Center at (229) 228-2830.
L u-m -= ---J









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 7, 2007 PAGE 3




Storm Leaves Its Mark


i- a-


* ' N- p- -
'" 'C'.
Ih,. r
.:4t~~~ ~ ,v', ~1";


THIS building at US 90 and Big Joe Road suffered structural damage to its awning.


CAMPER'S WORLD was one of the areas suffering more damage Friday.


AT ELIZABETH CEMETERY falling trees and limbs damaged headstones.


STRONG WINDS blew out half of this sign at Davis Motors on North Jefferson.


s^'. .'scl
,m, '- -L^*. ""^ j- ^

PL i = .4 . P .:.,-.. ., -_
=..< .. ..,; :.:. . ;, :-' ..'- i-- : ...


HARTSFIELD ROAD, east of town, endured much damage from falling trees and
limbs.


HOME OF Andrew Schluck, 1333 Hartsfield Road was destroyed in the storm.


N&AJ


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Sc


NJ


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-a



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A .-1
Vy


M. ~' 4 IjJ '


COURTHOUSE CLOCK stopped
power went out in the City.


at 2:10 a.m. when


LIMBS hang dangerously low over Hartsfield Road.


A t


THIS TREE is one of many that fell upon power lines
during the storm. (News Photos)


S.-


ji-t::~d~:-~einrr:


r


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r
9,






r










PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 7, 2007




Monticello News
(ISSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

OcLAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer



Published Wednesdays and Fridays -Twice Weekly Ex-
cept for the weeks of July 4th, Thanksgiving, Christmas,
& New Years. Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post
Office. Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net





Home Reading


Helps Students


Reading with your child at
home is one of the most im-
portant chapters of learning.
The following tips from top lit-
eracy experts can help your
children become better
readers:
1. Read with your children.
"'Even if your children can
read by themselves, take turns
reading and discuss the
content," says Marsha Roit,
Ed.D., co-author of
SRA/McGraw-Hill's "Open
'Court Reading."
Douglas Fisher, Ph.D., co-
author of Glencoe/McGraw-
Hill's Grades 6-12 Literature
programs and Professor of
Language and Literacy Educa-
tion at San Diego State Uni-
yersity, agrees. "As kids get
blder, find age-appropriate ma-
terials to read, like an interest-
ing newspaper article. Or read
*the same book they are reading
in class so you can discuss it.
The point is to share the read-
ing experience."
2. Ask questions about
what your children are read-
ing.
"Reading together encour-
ages higher-level thinking,"
says Terry Dodds, M.Ed., a
Direct Instruction consultant,
literacy author and former
classroom teacher. "Ask your
children what might happen
next. This builds summariza-
tion and recall skills."

3. Create a home atmos-
phere that encourages read-
ing.
Jan Hasbrouck, Ph.D., co-
author of Macmillan/McGraw-
:Hill "Treasures" and former
-reading specialist and profes-
sor, advises, "Create and area
in your home with good light


and comfortable seating and
try to set aside one TV/video-'
game-free night per week for
family reading."
4. Take cues from the class-
room.
Kelly Fair, Marketing Man-
ager for Wright
Group/McGraw-Hill's "Break-
through to Literacy," empha-
sizes the importance of
leveraging schoolwork at
home. "If your children's
school program provides mate-
rials for home activities, par-
ents absolutely should utilize
them."
5. Encourage your children
to read different types of ma-
terials.
Roit emphasizes the impor-
tance of reading everyday ma-
terials at home, outside the
classroom. "If you are taking
a trip, send for brochures and
maps and have your children
read them out loud with you."
Jeffrey Wilhelm, Ph.D., Pro-.
fessor of English Education at
Boise State University, co-
author of Glencoe/McGraw-
Hill's Grades 6-12 Literature
program and a middle and
high school teacher, stresses,
"Kids want to stake their iden-
tity and often leverage 'pop
culture' materials to do so.
Don't ignore the value of
graphic novels or a popular se-
ries like the Harry Potter
books. These are great ways
to encourage adolescents to
read more."
Reading at home enhances
classroom learning and helps
children develop the habit of
reading for pleasure.
With a few pivotal activities,
parents can help their children
build better reading skills that
will last a lifetime.


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
March 5,1997
The Suwannee River Wa-
:ter Management District wants
,Jefferson County to join an ef-
.fort to have the region desig-
'nated a national heritage area.
Maintenance crews at Flor-
ida Power are now airborne as
;they work from helicopters to
-replace some 400 miles of
:overhead shield wire.
A youth charged with the
-armed robbery of the Pic-N-
'Chic convenience store on
'Sept. 27, 1996 was found not
guilty by a six-member jury on
Friday, following a two-day
trial.
A new state law requires that
indigent defendants who are
'able, pay an upfront applica-
tion fee before they are as-
,signed a public defender.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
March 4, 1987
Effective next week, fuel
oil (kerosene or diesel oil)
used for heating or cooling
purposes will be taxed at a rate


not to exceed four cents a gal-
lon. Sheriff Ken Fortune said
Wednesday that the state's at-
tempt to ease prison over-
crowding is going to be felt by
county commissioners all over
Florida, including Jefferson
County. For the first time
since Fire Chief Wesley How-
ell has been with the Monti-
cello Fire Department, all six
firemen, including Howell,
have been through basic train-
ing and are certified.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
March 3,1977
Reductions in the Fire De-
partment expenditures due to
lack of money in the City
treasury caused some verbal
sparks at Tuesday's council
meeting
Objections to entrances to
the proposed shopping center
on US 19 South from Chero-
kee Street by residents were
lodged with the City Council
Tuesday
(See File, Page 12)


SOpinion & Comment



Rudeness Is On increase


A recent, poll found 79 per-
cent of respondents said
Americans were rude and get-
ting ruder. No Kidding!
We've all had the experience
of the fast food order taker
slouching at the counter and
snarling "for here or to go?"
Then while you are placing
your order the fast food
worker is talking over her
shoulder to her coworker.
Sad to say, it happens all the
time. Rude? It's worse than
rude, it's a dogone disgrace!
Here you are spending your
money and the clerk can't even
greet you with a cheery hello
and give you his or her atten-
tion while you are placing an
order or paying your bill.
After finishing breakfast at a
Jacksonville hotel, I took my
ticket to the girl at the register.
She stuck her hand out and had
her head turned talking to
someone else.
I didn't put the ticket or my
money in her hand, I waited
for her to look at me.
When she finally turned to
me, she said, "Well?"
In the most pleasant voice I


Publisher's


Notebook


Ron Cichon


could muster while seething I
said, "I read somewhere that it
is extremely rude to ignore a
customer and chat with some-
one else while the customer is
trying to pay his bill.'"
With what was pure arro-
gance, she straightened up and
said, "I'm sorry if I've of-
fended you in some way."
Of course, she said it in such
a way that clearly indicated
she wasn't sorry at all, just an-
noyed with me.
I don't wish to bore you with
other examples of rudeness,
you have your own stories to
tell.


The question is, why are we
so rude to each other? What
happened to manners?
Here's my take on the prob-
le . .
For openers, too many par-
ents don't teach their children
manners.
Whatever the little darlings
do is fine. They're so cute,
you know.
So these cute kids grow up
without including "please,"
"thank-you," and "excuse me"
in their vocabulary.
The second problem is we
grow more isolated all the
time.


How do we develop and
practice good social skills
when we interact less and less
with other people?
Over the years as households
became self sufficient, need
for help from our neighbors
dwindled. We don't have any
more community barn
raising! *
I live in a neighborhood and
rarely see my neighbors. They
are busy and I am busy. Once
in a while we'll see each other
outside and chat for a minute
or two. Then we're off to do
the things we have to do.
Now with computers in the
home, we can fire off E-mails,
find' oiut 'the temperature 'in'
Pago .Pa6, arid -order stuff'
from E-bay.
Not much social interaction
there! We've got cell' phones
ringing in restaurants, angry
drivers on the road, and incon-
siderate people waiting on us
in shops and restaurants.
What do we do?
For openers, we can make it
our personal business to be
considerate to others. That
may start a trend!


Animal Behavior Is Mystery


By PATRICIA KRAFT
Columnist

I was disappointed way last
year to learn from Mr.
Foggy's column in The News
that our doggies don't really
love us, hard news to take dur-
ing the chilly months of winter
when nothing is more pleasant
than sitting before the fire, feet
warmed by the faithful pooch.
Only the truth about animals
grows more wiggly every day
it seems.
As I recall my anthropology
professor's definition of a hu-
man (a long while back I must
admit) was roughly this: big
brain, walks on 2 legs, makes
tools and talks about it.


Big brain cases and special
jaw shapes can be seen in dug
up skulls and there are places
on the skulls where tongue
muscles attach making possi-
ble that day and night yammer-
ing which causes the rest of us
to clap our hands over our
ears.
If tools were found among
the bones, that meant there was
a culture. This was a big deal
because changes in technique
could be tracked and dated and
compared. It opened up a
whole new field of study with
grants for trips to exotic for-
eign locations.
Tool making equals smarty
human beings. So what are we
to make of Betty, the Oxford
University crow that bent a


piece of straight wire into a
hook to retrieve food? 9 out of
10 times! She didn't invent
the hook but she did manufac-
ture it.
And there is the work with
chimps using American Sign
Language and symbols. Per-
haps you have seen the film of
the chimpanzee Mom empa-
thizing with her human worker
over the loss of a child? Anec-
dotal, but pretty impressive.
What might she have said had
her tongue been attached dif-
ferently?
My mother never managed
to teach our mutt Poosta the
abstract notions of "heel" and
"stay". Poosta did, however,
bring certain requested toys for
play, having learned to match


the sound of the word to the
object with no other clues that
I could detect. Not a big vo-
cabulary, I admit, but isn't that
the way babies learn words.
One could say that wild ani-
mals who hunt in packs oper-
ate on instinct, but they are
also taught strategies by the
grown ups. Wild African dogs
learn to hold their tails straight
up when hunting small prey in
tall grass. This stimulates the
peripheral vision of their kin,
constantly updating the team
on the progress of the game. It
seems like instinct is just a
word for behavior we don't
understand.
What dog owner has not
laughed to watch his sleeping
(See Animal, Page 5)


New Robin Hood Needed?


By DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

You would think that I
would be one of the last people
on earth to buy into the "class
warfare" concept when it
comes to taxes,, but I recently
stumbled into the Florida prop-
erty tax laws.
A friend of mine who pur-
chased a small piece of vacant
land next to mine, called and
inquired if I knew why his
taxes were so high on this va-
cant and unimproved lot.
When I inquired at the Jeffer-
son County Tax Appraisers


Office, I discovered the taxa-
tion disadvantages for any per-
son owning a small piece of
land and/or the advantages of
owning a massive chunk of
prime Florida real estate.
Essentially, if you were for-
tunate enough to have inher-
ited a large section of land or if
you are otherwise wealthy and
can purchase a bountiful piece
of property, the Florida Consti-
tution has a built in "loop
hole" that allows for not hav-
ing to pay "fair market value"
(like the little guys do) for
your prime piece of real estate.
It is called the Agricultural As-
sessment".


It was sold to the public and
enacted into law by govern-
ment officials years ago to
give a tax advantage to farmers
engaged in legitimate agricul-
tural enterprises.
Unfortunately, the interpreta-
tion and loose rules for quali-
fying for the "AG" assessment
are such that the owner of a
large section of unimproved
(AG) land can pay less than
the little guy down the road
with a much smaller piece of
unimproved property.
Not too long ago, a local in-
dividual purchased a partial of
land and subdivided it into
5.25 acre home sites and sold


them individually. Regardless
of the fact that the physical
land itself had not changed, the
appraisal value skyrocketed
the moment that happened and
increased when I built the first
home on one of the lots.
Now, keep in mind that the
"new" assessed value of each
5.25 acres is $110,250.00.
Near four of these lots is a
fifty acre partial I would con-
sider prime wooded real estate.
According to the County Tax
Appraiser's web site, "just as-
sessed value" of that land is
only $11,314 because it is
"AG Timberland #2".
(See New Robin, Page 5)


From Our Photo File


STUDENTS in the second and third grade at Wacissa School in 1928, included:
Bottom row: T. J. Lewis, Ardney Boland, Harvey Jones, Russell Maloy. Second row:
Harrison Connell, Loren Walker, Perry Snyder, J.C. Brumbley, Milton Davis, Sinclair
Knight. Third Row: Olivia Connell, Myrtice Hightower, Millard Walker, Mary Young-
blood, Mildred Swim, teacher, Darhulah Snyer, Zella Mae Boland, Orine Connell,
unidentified. (Picture furnished by Albert Carter.)


e"LlE '
II I- ~p~








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 7, 2007 PAGE 5


New Robin Hood?


(Continued From Page 4)
Down the road from me sits
-over 500 acres of some of the
-most beautiful real estate I
,have seen in the county.
Loaded with ancient old oak
.trees and rolling hills, I have
-seen no less than eight giant
-yellow earth movers at one
-time working to "improving"
,the land and making it even
nore attractive. Total assessed
"'just land tax value" listed on
:the Appraiser's web site,
:$141,610. (In actuality, to-
ygether my friend (with his va-
:cant lot) and I are paying the
state and county more in taxes
for our collective ten acres
than the person with 100 times
-as much land at over 500
-tacres!)
SDo you think that the person
:who owns the 500+ acres "val-
fued" at $141,610 would swap
eeven up with me and my friend
'for our collective 10.5 acres
:($220,500 just land value?)
Financial sense would say
"sure" as they would stand to



Animal
(Continued From Page 4)
pooch with soft little yelps,
legs in motion in dreamy pur-
suit of cat, deer or 'possum'?
Maybe he dreams the exact
same dream every single day
but it's clearly a form of visu-
alization. Don't we humans
have to visualize when we plan
our tomorrow's? Isn't that a
;major part of intelligence?
It's hard to believe full-
blown consciousness struck
humanity like a lightning bolt.
If it did, some people must
have been in the. clubhouse
drinking that day, not out on
the golf course.
I'm guess there are no doggy
Romeos or Juliets (although
there might be doggy Monta-
gues and Capulets). But I do
know that the older I grow, the
more my loye resembles
Poosta.'s, .no longer puppy
love, but love based on mutual
dependability, trust and com-
panionship.


increase their land holdings by
almost $80,000. Of course
they wouldn't trade! Why
not? (Because we all know
and common sense tells us that
500+ acres of prime real estate
in Florida is worth a "king's
ransom" a literal fortune!!)
But not as far as paying taxes
on such a vast piece of prop-
erty are concerned, if you have
"worked the Agricultural As-
sessment strings correctly!
Don't misunderstand what I
am saying here! I am not tak-
ing a shot at Dave Ward our
Property Appraiser. I know
Dave and he is a hard working,
decent and honest man, who
runs a competent operation
and is bound by the Florida
Constitution and Department
of Revenue guidelines for
property appraising.
He didn't invent the agricul-
tural assessment "loop holes",
but is bound to implement
such rules according to the
guidelines and state constitu-
tion. I also don't blame the
large land owners, who are
simply and legally taking ad-
vantage of existing state tax
laws.
Currently, I would estimate
taxes would be $2500 from my
friend for his 5 acres and
$3500 for the 500+ AG acres,
totaling state and county reve-
nue of $6000 a year. The ob-
vious and equitable solution
would be to have a standard
flat rate for all vacant and un-


improved property, let's say
$12.00 per acre. The little guy
would pay a reasonable $60.00
per year for his vacant and un-
improved 5 acre lot and the big
500+ acre land owner would
pay a "fair share" of $6060.
Still quite a bargain for land.
that in reality is actually worth
millions of dollars.
Like many other outdated
laws, the Agricultural Assess-
ment legislation has outlived
its noble, and original inten-
tions of protecting "true" farm-
ers and legitimate agricultural
business enterprises. It has be-
come an avenue whereby large
land owners are provided a le-
gal opportunity to reduce their
annual tax burden on land with
a future potential value of mil-
lions of dollars.
What we need is a Florida
Property Tax Robin Hood to
stand up for all the little
people. Unimproved property
should be exactly that and, ac-
cordingly, taxed "objectively"
in an equally and equitably
manner across the state.
Using a "subjective" or
guessing method to assess
taxes should be outlawed. No
agricultural assessment should
be granted for any property
unless all workable acres are
covered fence to fence with
crops, are obviously main-
tained pasture lands for cattle
grazing or clearly have neat
rows of intentionally planted
trees.
Don't expect any State Rep-
resentative (including ours) to
go near this "hot potato" any


"Familiar Faces And Quiet Places"


A Pictorial And Narrative
History Of Jefferson County


By Derelyne Delp Counts


Available At The Chamber Office
And Leading Merchants

lISn n; -""mlB Ba mimai!]|.iaiililS!


time in the future. One would
reason that with just a hand
full of large land owners vs.
the voting masses made up of
us little people throughout the
state, it would not only be
smart but quite easy for any
legislator to champion fixing
this property taxing inequity.
But that is not how the system
works!
Talking a good game to the
naive little people to get
elected and stay in office,
while garnering the power and
prestige of rubbing elbows and
staying in favor of the affluent,
is the true hallmark of politics.
So we little people will all go
on, not letting our politically
powerful voices be heard. Not
calling and bugging our State
Representatives to fix the
problem. We will continue to
be satisfied, each in our own
individual way, doing the
heavy tax lifting when it
comes to our property taxes.


M7NZfCECIL NEWS


The Jefferson County Recyclinq Proqram accepts


the following items for recycling:


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
lau.dry, detergent boxes, shipping, obxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to'the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?






Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.




Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.




The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


... Pull Out Those Leg Warmers

... Fish Net Stockings

... Rock Concert T-Shirts

... Tight Rolled Jeans

...Oh! Don't Forget the Aquanet



...and join Main Street for

a GNARLY 80's party!



Saturday, March 24, 2007

Monticello Opera House

8:00 p.m Midnight

$15.00 per person


Includes:
Capital City DJs will be playing all your favorite
music and videos too!


"A Taste of Our Town"featuring
Local Restaurants and Chefs



Costumes are not required, but you are totally

CUARE if you don't!



All proceeds will be donated to Main Street and the
Monticello Opera House to help with a little face lift!















PAGF 6. MONTICELLO. (FL). NEWS, WED., MARCH 7, 2007


Card Club

Holds First

Meeting

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Euchre (pronounced U-
ker) Card Club organizational
meeting was held at the home
of Bobbie and Fred Golden,
Friday, Feb. 16, with 13 peo-
ple present.

A light supper was served
before starting the card game.
Euchre is played with a
partner and groups rotate at
the end of each set.

This was a learning and get
acquainted evening.
Several of the folks had not
played in years, and three had
never played. However, after
some basic lessons, everyone
was involved.
More JC Euchre Card Club
evenings are planned.
Contact Golden at 997-6599
for additional information.


Rosie, The Wirick Cat, Home


SafelyAfter Three Months


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


-~~-Y"I f;".--


MACKENZIE WIRICK hugs her cat Rosie, who w
nally located after a three month absence.
Photo)


The saga of Rosie, the
Wirick cat, has come to a
happy ending, after some
three months of anguish for
six year old Mackenzie
Wirick.
Rosie's adventure began
about two days before
Thanksgiving.. It happened
like this:
Trisha Wirick, CO-owner of
Edenfield's Hardware, said
one of the store's vendors
backs his truck in near the
building, and unloads his
merchandise.
Rosie, curious feline that
she is, jumped unnoticed into
the back of the trailer and
hitched a ride to the next stop
in Madison.
vas fi- Wirick explained that
(News when the truck reached its
destination, Rosie was quite
obviously terrified.
When the driver opened the
door, Rosie jumped, ran and
S disappeared..
The owner of the hardware
store in Madison, where the
delivery was made, was able
to quickly capture Rosie and
these put her inside of the store and
ited to called Wirick to report that
*s. She they had her cat.
d at "We told them we couldn't
get there right away, and
Rosie doesn't like to be con-
fined. She's an escape artist,
and that's just what she did
before we could ever get over
S there," said Trisha.
rs In the meantime, over the
Acad- following months, there were
Relay sightings of Rosie all through-
e fund- out Madison, behind McDon-
ald's, near the City Works
event building, but no one could
rive, a ever get close enough to catch
her.


begin
untinue
with a
e most

at the
on a
:ed.
ne dol-
em to
d 'out-
pecific

there
;ht 5-9
h 15.
I have
n pick
iut on

ien be
ler. At
, the
ck for
order


The Wiricks went to Madi-
son on several occasions,
looking for Rosie, but were
unable to locate her.
She was even spotted by
Ted Beggs of Beggs Funeral
Home and Sally and Sam
Worley, who give music les-
sons in Madison.
Back on the home fort,
Mackenzie was obviously
heartbroken over her missing
cat.
"I was even told that she
had her Sunday School class
praying every Sunday that she
would come back home," said
Trisha.
"She has cried on several
occasions, and just two days
before Rosie was returned to
us, she told me that she only
has one cat now (Rosie was
one of four adopted from the
Humane Society), just sound-
ing so pathetic about it."


Trisha added that the Wor-
ley's had called and asked if
the cat they had been seeing
was in fact, the Wirick family
feline.
"I told her that it was and
she said that the next time
they went over there, they
would try to catch her."
The next time the Worley's
were in Madison for their
regular music lessons, when
they stepped out of the build-
ing, there sat Rosie, looking
up at them.
"They picked her up and
brought her back home," said
Trisha. "I took her to the


house that night, and when I
woke Up Mackenzie Thurs-
day morning, I didn't do it in
the traditional way.
"I held Rosie out where
Mackenzie could see her and
I said 'Mackenzie, Rosie's
home.', and you should have
seen the excitement and the
joy in Mackenzie's eyes."
Rosie again resides at
Edenfield's but every day at
3:15 p.m., when Mackenzie
gets off the school bus, she
rounds up Rosie, picks her up
and will not let her down.
"She's going to make. sure
Rosie doesn't get away from
home again," quipped Trisha.


"Familiar Faces And Quiet Places"

A Pictorial And Narrative
History Of Jefferson County

By Derelyne Delp Counts

Available At The Chamber Office
And Leading Merchants



















193 NW US HWY. 221 GREENVILLE- iFL., (85 Q)948-2840
If you are uninsured, you iay '
qualify for our sliding fee program.
Serving Madison, Jefferson & Taylor
Counties since 1984
SWe accept Medicare. Medicaid &
most insurance plans
Open Mon. Fri. 8-5 walkins welcome, 24hr telephone coverage
North Florida Medical Centers, Inc.






"Where Pharmacy is Phamily"
Home Health Care *Free Blood Pressure
Gifts *Counseling on Medication
Free Delivery for Prescriptions
166 East Dogwood Monticello 997-3553






3316 Capital Circle NE Suite 2
Tallahassee, FL
850-668-4200


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


The Library will offer Digi-
tal Bridge Computer Classes
10 a.m. 12 p.m. March 13 '
March 30.
The classes are free to card
holders. Library cards may be
obtained at the circulation
desk.
A $10 fee per class will be
charged for supplies and lit--
erature.
Participants who are already
attending classes will be
given preference to other
classes.
Class #1- Introduction to
Microsoft Word 2003 will
meet every Tuesday and
Wednesday during the weeks
of March 13 28.
Microsoft Word 2003 intro-
duces participants to all the
basic features they need to
create professional looking
reports, documents, and cor-
respondences.
Topics covered include


Word basics, editing docu-
ments, formatting fonts and
paragraphs, creating basic ta-
bles, working with basic page
layouts, using proofing tools,
and working with Web fea-
tures.
Students must be able to use
the mouse to attend this class.
Class #2- Beginning Com-
puters will meet every Thurs-
day and Friday during the
weeks of March 15 March
30.
This class is designed for
users with little or no prior
computer experience.
Participants will learn about
the basie computer hardware
such as, the CPU, keyboard,
mouse, printers, scanners, and
other peripheral devices.
Participants will also learn
how to perform basic comn-
puter operations, including
using the mouse, launching
programs, manipulating Win-
dows, working with the desk-
top, and saving files.
Instructor Angela Scott re-
quests that only serious appli-


SHomes Of Mourning


JAMES BROCK
James W. Brock, age 92.
died Saturday, March 3, 2007
in Monticello.
A native of Pelham, Mitchell
County Georgia and a former
resident of Meggs, Georgia,
before moving to Monticello,
Florida in 1951. James was a
farmer, and he was of the Bap-
tist Faith.
Graveside Funeral Services
was held Tuesday, March 6,
2007 at 11:00 A.M. in Rose-
land Cemetery Monticello. No
Visitation was planned.
Mr. Brock is survived by
three daughters, Margie Foun-
tain of Monticello, FL, Patricia
Fender of Thomasville, GA,
and Judy Rodgers of Mitchell
County, GA; sixteen grand-
children and twenty-six great-
grandchildren.
ROBERT LASTINGER
Robert Dennis Lastinger, age
21,a Chef, died Wednesday,
February 28, 2007 in Cobb
County, Georgia.
Dennis was a native of
Huntington, West Virginia. He
was a former resident of
Lusby, Maryland. He had been
living in Suwannee, Georgia
for the pass two years. He en-
joyed Extreme Sports and be-
longed to Motor Cross USA
Association. He was of the
Baptist faith.
Funeral service will be 2:00
P.M. Wednesday, March 7,
2007 at Central Baptist Church


Aucilla, Florida. Interment will
follow at Elizabeth Cemetery.
Family received friends Tues-
day, March 6, 2007 from 6:00
to 8:00 P.M. at Beggs Funeral
Home Monticello Chapel.
Dennis is survived by his fa-
ther Ed Lastinger (Shan) of
Lusby, Maryland and his
mother Carol Sue Garner
(Craig) of Suwannee, Georgia;
two brothers Troy and Cam-
eron Lastinger both of Lusby,
Maryland; two sisters Laura
Cossette of Panama City, Flor-
ida, Abigail Lastinger of
Lusby, Maryland and Paternal
grandmother Judy Lastinger of
Aucilla, Florida.


cants participate in
classes, as space is lim
10 participants per class
may be contacted
342-0205.

ACA Plans

Cancer

Fundraise
The Aucilla Christian
emy Student Council
for Life team, has three
raising events planned.
The first fundraising
is a Penny/Change Dr
school only fundraiser.
This Drive will
March 5, and cc
through March 16,
class competition for th
money collected.
A Dress Down Day
school will take place
date soon to be announce
Students will pay a o0
lar fee, allowing the
come to school dressed
of-code, but under sl
guidelines.
For the community
will be a Pizza Hut Nig
p.m. on Thursday, Marc
Team members wil
vouchers that people ca
up and use at Pizza H
that night.
The vouchers will th
turned in with their ord
the end of the evening
team will receive a che
20 percent of the total
amount per voucher.


180 S. Cherry St. Suite F
Monticello, FL
850-997-1400


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M Ed L M T
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keithrelaxationm3ssage.com
lie t.


9 9

9V Lcve is initieAairV

V Roses & Flowers
V Chocolates & Candy

FLORAL DESIGNS Stuffed Animals
Vol F LOKAL DESIGNS Qetll, Carids
SINCE 1934
F A V O Courinlet Baskets
S"Floeris always make people better, Blooming Plants "
S happier, more helpful; they are stunshie,
food and medicine for (Ue soul." '
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99^^^ ^^ ^ ^9^ ^999 9 9 O 4


Sleep Studies, C Pap, BiPap Titrations & Pulmonary Functions
Studies
Bishop L. McMiller, B.S., RRT
We have a Registered Polysomnographist
(Registered Sleep Technician) on Staff
850-973-8116 Cell 850-464-4849
fax 850-973-8118
289 SW Range Ave. Madison, FL 32340
(next door to OptionCare)


Welcomes
Jerry Boland M.D.

Office Hours 8:00am 5:00pm
Thursday's ONLY.

Call for an appointment
342-0170


www.HealthyJefferson.com


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 7, 2007 PAGE 7


1st Baptist

TO Hold

Fundraiser

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The First Baptist Church
Relay for Life team will host
a Saint Patrick's Day Dinner
5 8 p.m. Saturday, March
17 in the fellowship hall at
325 West Washington Street.
A meal of Corn beef and
Cabbage, or ham, will be
served. It will include pota-
toes, peas, rolls, homemade
desserts, and cold tea.
Tickets are on sale now: $7
for adults, and $3 for
children, and may be pur-
chased from any team mem-
ber, or picked up at the
church office.
Team Captain Arlene
Young may be contacted at
342-1188 for those wanting to
volunteer and for further in-
formation on this team event.


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Robin Kessinger, National
Flatpicking Champion guitarist
returns to the Opera House for
this third annual concert, 8
p.m., Friday.
In earlier concerts, Kessinger
has thrilled Opera House audi-
ences with his bluegrass and
traditional Appalachian music.
He grew up with a rich Ap-
palachian heritage surrounded
by generations of musicians.
His father, Bob Kessinger,
was an accomplished mandolin
player who taught Robin many
tunes.
World renown fiddler and
recording artist, Clark
Kessinger, (his uncle) and
family friend Robert Rutland
(Georgia Slim) both contrib-


uted to Robert's formative
years as a musician.
It has always been the music
of Appalachia itself that he
found irresistible, so much so
that he has dedicated his life to
passing on.his heritage to oth-
ers and preserving this great
American music.
Robin has been featured on
PBS and BBC television spe-
cials and NPR radio shows.
Jack Williams, Opera
House Chairman of the Board,
remarked: "No matter what
your musical tastes, you will
love the haunting beauty of his
music and his virtuosity."

Tickets can be purchased at
the door at $12 for adults, $10
for members, and $5 for stu-
dents.
For additional information,
call the House at 997-4242.


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ACA Principal Reports


Recent,

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Richard Finlayson, princi-
pal of Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy reports some recent, and
upcoming events at the
school.
He reminds parents not to
forget re-enrollment forms
and fees for students to attend
school next year, are to be
turned in by March 15, to
guarantee them a spot in their
class.
"We are already projecting
that several of our classes will
be full next year, so it is im-
portant to meet the deadline,"
said Finlayson.
He recognized Rikki Roc-
canti as the 2007 VaidLicto-
rian, and Caitlin Murphy as
Salutatorian.
Honor graduates include:
Lisa Bailey, Joanna Cobb,
Serena Harvin, Will Knight,
Melissa Martin, Taylor
Rykard, Angela Steinberg,
Jennifer Tuten, and J. T.
Ward.
Tiffany Brasington, Kalyn
brown, Jessica Hunt, Wilson
Lewis, John Stephens, and
Dana Jane Watt were in-
ducted into the ACA Beta
Club.
Will Hartsfield was selected
as the local American Legion
representative to attend Boys
State this summer.


Coming
Aimee Love was the first
runner up in the Big Bend Re-
gional Spelling Bee in Talla-
hassee.
Philip Watts, Tyler Jackson,
Matt Tuten, Katherine Hogg,
Rebecca Hagberg, Clark
Christy, Keli Dollar, Austin
Richie, Cody Kelly, Brittany
O'Brian, G. H. Liford, Sarah
Sorensen, Ben Sadler, Trent
Roberts, Corey Burrus, Casey
wheeler, Anna Finlayson, and
Taryn Copeland, all placed in
their respective divisions dur-
ing the ACA annual science
fair.
Lisa Bailey was the District
Champion in the Florida High
school Athletic Association's
three-point shooting competi-
tion.
Lindsey Day was named the
Tallahassee Democrat's fe-
male basketball player of the
week.
Finlayson said that the first
Father/Daughter Dance was a
great success.
Special thanks go to "DJ
Dan" and Mr. Thomas for
their help, and the PTO gives
additional thanks to Sara De-
mott, Traci Giddens, Hayley
Winchester, and to all the
moms who came out to lend a
hand to support the PTO.
Three week reports will be
issued, and the Prom Lunch-
eon is March 9.
The Prom is March 10, and
-the third and fourth grade


Events

field trip to the Science Circus
in Tallahassee, and the Spring
Musical (presented by fourth
grade students and led by
Mrs. Demott) at 7 p.m.,
March 15.
The Spring break is March
19-23; and the Annual Stock-
holders meeting will be held
April 16 in the auditorium.
In addition to the annual re-
port, Board members will be
elected for the upcoming
school year.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Cindy and Rickie Chancy of-
Monticello and Terry McNeal
of Panama City, F'L. an-
nounce the engagement of
their daughter Carie Lyn
McNeal to Christopher Allen
Houp, the son of Peggy Danzl
of Florence, KY. and the late
Richard Allen Houp of Jack-
sonville, FL.
The bride-elect is the grand-
daughter of the late Dr. and
Mrs. Charles Woods of Pan-
ama City, Margaret Chancey
of Lynn Haven, FL., and the
late Howard McNeal of Lynn
Haven.
The groom-elect is the
grandson of Loretta Geiger
and the late Robert Geiger of
Florence, KY. and the late


Cooley

Sculpture

Dedication
The opening event of Florida
H:'itage Month, 2007, fea-
tured the dedication 'of
"American Royalty" by Brad-
ley Cooley and Bradley
Cooley Jr., 10 a.m. Thursday,
March 15, at the R. A. Gray
Building, 500 South Bronough
Street, Tallahassee.
Sited at the corer of the
R.A, Building, this is the third
of four planned figural groups
representing native Floridians
of different historical eras.
A reception immediately fol-
lows the R. A. Gray Building
Heritage Gallery, and is free
and open to the public.


Mr. and Mrs. Earl Houp.
McNeal is a 2001 graduate
of Aucilla Christian
Academy, and received her
RN degree from Tallahassee
Community College.
She then went on to receive
her Bachelor's in Nursing de-
gree from Florida State Uni-
versity and plans to continue
her education to become a Pe-


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Cancer pain Pain from auto accident injuries


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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 7, 2007



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ASSISTANCE

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The Area Agency on Aging for North Florida a announces the availability of
Emergency Home Energy Assistance for the Elderly Program (EHEAP) funds for
eligible households in Jefferson County. To be eligible, an individual who is at least
sixty years of age must reside in the applicant household, a bill that indicates an
immediate disconnection date if payment is not received by the utility company (this
includes propane and electric), and the household income must be at or below 150%
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S prts


HMS Bees Lose 2 To


Stand 0-2

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Howard Middle School
baseball team now stand 0-2
on the season after suffering
two losses and lost the season
opener against Shanks 9-3.
Trevon Youman stepped to
the plate striking out once and
hitting a single later scoring a
run when he stole home.
Devondrick Nealy and De-
montray Johnson both went
one for two with one.RBI and
one run.
Patrick Pagel and Lenorris
Footman .both went one for
two.
Gerrold Austin, Deandre
Tucker and JaCorey Dixon all
traveled to the plate twice and
struck out.
Nealy pitched three innings,


On Season
giving up five hits, no walks
and striking out four.
Alphonso Footman pitched
the remainder of the game,
striking out three and giving
up four hits and no walks.
In the second slated game of
the season against Madison,
there was a cancellation due
to rain-out.
In the second game against
Madison, the Bees lost 12-1.
Johnson went one for two
with one run; Lenorris Foot-
man went 0 for two; Nealy
and Pagel both went one for
two; and Tucker went 0 for
two.
Johnson pitched two in-
nings, giving up eight hits,
two walks and striking out
three.
Alphonso Footman pitched
the rest of the game, giving
up five hits, one walk and
striking out two.


4-H COUNSELOR Gladys Neely helps Christopher
Jones pull in "The Big One."



Warriors Fall To


1-2 On The Season


BILL BROWN

After an away trip to Lanier
County, GA and a 12-1 loss
the Aucilla baseball record
stands at one win and two
losses.
Playing with only ten of 13
roster members, including JV
player Trent Roberts, the
Warriors defense continues to
improve.
Only two errors were re-
corded, however, the offense
continues to be almost non-
exsistant, as only one safe hit
was produced.
The safe hit came off the
bat of Dustin Roberts, driving


in Matt Bishop and giving the
Warriors the lead after one
half of the first inning.
Trent Roberts pitched the
first two and two-third in-
nings, giving up seven hits,
nine runs and four walks.
Dustin Roberts tossed the
last one and one-third innings,
giving up one hit, three runs,
four walks and striking out
two.
Two players were out sick
and two had not returned
from the senior trip. Hope-
fully, all will be on board for
the first important game of
the season, the district game
against Carrabelle, Friday.


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Monticello Magic Splits


Final Games Of Season


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Magic, the
Thomasville YMCA 12 and
under boys basketball league
team, split the final two
games of the regular season to
end 5-3 and the number three
seed in the upcoming tourna-
ment.


The Magic fell to the Clip-
pers, 27-23.
Coach Mac Finlayson said
it was a good game with two
pretty evenly matched teams.
Zac Steel led the Magic
with 11 points, Lenorris Foot-
man, eight points; and Jacarre
Watkins, four points, all from
the free-throw line.
The Magic went out with a


Jefferson County High

Reports Track Schedule


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


LENORRIS FOOTMAN


JCHS Posts

Baseball

Roster
The roster has been re-
leased for the Jefferson
County High School baseball
team.
The Tigers include; Curtis
Hightower, James Jones, Ce-
cil Hill; Arnez Ammons, Tel-
vin Norton, Thomas Smith,
Lamarcus Bennett, Nick
Parker, Shayne Broxie, Ka-
marin Kirksey, Marquis Dob-
son, and Tony Roberts.
The Tigers are coached by
Alfreddie Hightower. the as-
sistant coach is Jim Norton.


Lady Bees

Softball

Roster

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Howard Middle School has
reports the roster for the Lady
Bees softball team.
Representing the school this
year are; Laynessa Massey,
catcher/pitcher; Jana Barber,
pitcher/catcher; Emily
Howell, first base; Alyssa
Lewis, second base; Misty
Watson, third base; Simaria
Martin, shortstop; Sarah
Boland, right field; Timeshia
Graham, center field; Mi-
chelle Watson, left field; Mi-
kayla Norton, Brionna Jones,
Shanice Young, and Kadesjah
Norton.
Serving as head coach is
Regina Willis. The assistant
coach is Hattie Ruth Jordan,.

A' snrica"Heart .iI
Ass'ociatit, i

It keeps
more than
menmones. :
*:, alive;} "',


Jefferson County High
School reports the track team
schedule for the season.
Action began at the
Rickards Relay, Feb. 20 and
continued with the Trojan In-
vitational at Lincoln High,
Feb. 27. Results will be
forthcoming.
The Tigers continue to the
Jesse Forbes Invitational, 8
a.m. March 3, at Godby High.
The Lion Invitational, 3 p.m.,
March 6, Leon High; The
FAMU Relays, 3 p.m., March
9 and 8 a.m., March 10, at


FAMU High.
The Cougar Invitational, 3
p.m., March 13, at Godby
High; and The Ram relays, 3
p.m., March 16 and 8 a.m.,
March 17, at Rutherford
High.
The Disney relays, 3 p.m.
March 23, and 8 a.m., March
24, at Walt Disney's Wide
World of Sports in Orlando;
The Maclay Invitational, 8
a.m., March 31, at Maclay;
and the Class 1A District 3 fi-
nal, 3 p.m., April 10, at Ma-
clay.
Serving as Tiger head coach
this year is Dwayne Jefferson.
The assistant coach is Derrick
Martin.


JCHS Girls Down

Lake City Christian


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Lady Tigers mauled
Lake City Christian in the
season opener of softball ac-
tion, 23-3.
Coach Earlene Knight said
that all in all, Jefferson had a
good outing.
Jamaria Cuyler was the
winning pitcher, striking out
three and giving up two hits.
At the plate, Cuyler went


two for four.
Kiarra Powell went one for
one, scored four runs and
stole two bases.
Chandra Tucker went two
for three, had a three-run
home run, six RBI's and four
stolen bases.
Chanta Brooks went two for
three with a three-run home
run, had five RBI's and
scored three runs.
Brittany Harvey went one
for one with one stolen base
and scoring two runs.


ACA Tennis Team Falls


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy varsity tennis team lost
to Thomasville in a close 4-3,
Tuesday.
In singles action, Courtney
Connell lost to Katie Gee,
8-0; Kaitlin Jackson fell to
Kristin Gee, 8-2; Rebecca
Aman lost to Sarah Hardy, 8-
4; Nikki Hamrick fell to
Sarah Rice, 8-4; and Sarah
Sorensen downed Katie
Jones, 8-5.
In doubles action, Connell
and Jackson defeated Laura
Fletcher and Rice, 8-2; and
Aman and Hamrick beat
Laura Lilly and Rachel McEl-
reath, 8-1.


q


bang and hammering the un-
defeated Celtics, 28-16 in the
final match-up the regular
season.
"This was one of our better
games," said Finlayson. "Our
two guards held their own
pretty well out there on the
coprt." He added that he is
proud that the Magic were
able to defeat the Celtics.
Steele led the charge with
128 points; Footman, seven
points; and Watkins, three
points, all from the free-throw
line.
Finlayson said the three
losses suffered by the Magic
throughout the season were
not major defeats. "We lost
two games by one point and
lost one by four. It's a pretty
evenly matched league."
The Magic are slatted to
face the Clipper in the tourna-
ment match-up.
"We lost to them twice dur-
ing the regular season, but
we're going in there to sheer
the Clippers for the win,"
concluded Finlayson.


HMS Girls

Softball

Schedule

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Howard Middle School re-
ports the schedule for the girls
softball team.
Action began Friday against
Perry sand continues today*
Tuesday) against Shanks,
4:30 p.m., here.
Trinity, 3:30 p.m., Wednes-
day, there; Shanks, 4:30 p.m.,
March 13, there; Perry, 4
p.m., March 15, there; March
19-23, spring break.
Trinity Catholic, 4 p.m.,
April 3, here; Holy
Comforter, 4:30 p.m., April 4,
here; Holy Comforter, 4:30
p.m., April 10, here; and
wrapping up the season, a
double-header against Apala-
chicola. 4:30 p.m., April 12,
there.


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 7, 2007


$800,000 For EOC

Expected In Near Future


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Officials here continue
awaiting receipt of the contract
for the $800,000 that was
awarded to the county late last
month for the construction of
an Emergency Operations
Center (EOC).
Emergency Management Di-
rector Carol Ellerbe said
Wednesday that receipt of the
contract is expected any day.
Once the contract is received,
the board will proceed with the
pursuit of the project, Ellerbe
said.
Meanwhile, she said, the ef-
forts continue to put together
the necessary paperwork for
the solicitation of bids for the
drawing of the architectural
plans.
Ellerbe said the EOC has to
be up and operational by June
2009, according to the dictates
of the awarding document.
When construction must begin


on the project, however, is
something that won't be known
until the contract is received,
she said.
It was the expressed concern
of local officials earlier that
the state would require that
construction begin by this
coming June, a timeline that
officials feared the county
could not possibly meet, given
the lack of architectural plans.
But that fear appears has been
largely allayed at present.
The county received word of
the $800,000 award on Jan. 25,
a goal that the community had
been pursuing for several
years.
The state early last year de-
termined that the county's ex-
isting EOC on North Jefferson
Street was incapable of with-
standing hurricane winds of
111 miles per hour or greater.
The center was one of 22
EOCs in Florida that state offi-
cials identified as being inade-
quate in the event of a major


hurricane.
Local officials want to con-
struct a 2,400 sq. foot EOC at
the industrial park, just north
of the jail. They hope the cen-
ter will be the first step in what
they envision will eventually
become an expanded facility
housing all the county's emer-
gency response services.


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DREAM HOME.....

FREE ESTIMATES

KES'SLER
CONSTRUCTION LLC


1-850-668-4835
FREE In-Home Con-
sultation & Estimates
Professional Installalion Each Franchise
Independently Owned and Operated
www.budgetblinds.com


997-4540


License & Insured



CRC 1329001


Mason's Decorative Fabrics


Ryan and Company Antiques


Gulf Coast

Supply & Mfg., Inc.

40 Year Warranty
Metal Roofing Buy Direct From Manufacturer
* Over 24 Colors In Stock
* Five Different Profiles To Choose From
* Fast Friendly Service
* ,ob Site Delivery Available


Call Today For A Free Quote And A Full Color Brochure Package


4020 SW 449th St. Horseshoe Beach, FL 32648
Ph: (888) 393-0335
Fax: (352) 498-7852
WW v 'j I I i .', :i COT, c


-4 -


BUYING & CONSIGNING


I
I


2622 Crawfordville Hwy
926-SAVE (7283)
Mon-Fri 9-6 Sat 9-5
Or by Appointment


N WA MC p-IIII

DebeRenlo


Panel Profiles












^ ..a l j :,
l *"


9-35 West Jlackson Street
Thomasville, CA 3179Z Z?~9 2-9cY3-1041
Est. 1983


C


I -


4 ~ "~~6,. *


t R AN I A-


C::
17
i- ~I;UIL?~CI








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 7, 2007 PAGE 11


Financial Security


WHEN BANKS SAY NO, WE
SAY YES!
PERSONAL & BUSINESS
BAD CREDIT, NO CREDIT, BANKRUPTCY.
WE ARE THE LOAN SPECIALISTS!
UP TO $500,000 LOW INTEREST
TOLL FREE:
1-866-834-6795


165 E. Dogwood St.
Monticello
850-997-3503


1921 Capital Cir N.E.
Tallahassee
850-942-9700


12% Bonus
Would you like to earn more interest than what your
CD's or savings account is currently paying?
* Until March 15th we are paying a 12% Bonus with
NO LOSS to your Principle GUARANTEED!
Last year our savings plan returned over 10%!
We do all types of ROLLOVERS, such as
IRA's, 401K, 403-B, ect...
Call Mike Denmark
(850) 838-5317 or (850) 584-8552


Planning for your financial life --
today and tomorrow
Specializing in:


SInvestment planning
* Retirement planning
* Asset Allocation
Call (800) 477-8818 today.
Mark E Branham, CFP, ChFC
121 E Rutledge St
PO Box 526
Madison, FL 32341
(850) 97,3-8888
(800) 477-8818
mark.e.branham@ampf.com


* 401(k) rollovers
SEstate planning strategies
* Small business planning


Th, Pnn--. Ad,!-' -C ^
Ameriprse 1
Finacncial


Serving Madison,

Jefferson, Taylor &

Lafayette Counties


Freddy Pitts
Agency Manager

Jimmy King, Agent
233 W. Base St. Madison (850) 973-4071

Doug Helms, Agent
105 W. Anderson St. Monticello (850) 997-2213

Freddy Pitts, Agent
813 S. Washington St. Perry (850) 584-2371


Financial advisory services and investments available through Ameriprise Financial
Services; Inc., Member NASD and SIPC.
2007 Ameriprise Financial. Inc. All rights reserved.


Lafayette


Lance Braswell, Agent
County Mayo, FL (386) 294-1399


SBuL siness CALL TO ADVERTISE
YOUR BUSINESS

Directory 997-3568
Directory


essler Call 997-6026
Quality Service K essler Call 997-6026
Family Owned & Operated March
Construction LLC National Crochet
SHO.DY'S Repair; Remodeling & New Construction Er& ~i-, Month
Portable Toilet Rentals Licensed and Insured FREE Classes 3rd. 10th, & 17th10 Noon
S850-948-7891 Portable Toilet Rentals NEE Licns an ds ured
SEstimates Mark Kessler Beaded Tapestry Crochet Workshop
5565-A Crawfordville Rd April 28th, 10 AM 2 PM
alahassee, FL 32305 ALE Owner" Phone: 850-997-4540 Sign Up Now!
FAX 850-656-6150 WANDA JENKINS CRCI3 291W
www.oldfashionedknittingboard.com www.divacrochet.com

ELesdIsre 3 FLINT RIVER BUR ETTE PLUMBING & Bell Mobile Home
TIMBER COMPANY WELL SERVICE T & Setup
864 -NW US 221 BUYERS OF PINE AND L Family Owned Since 1902 Tr port
Greenville, Fl. 32331 HARDWOOD TIMBER Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled Fixtures- Relevel Tie-downs ~ Permits
tion* LHaul ing* Site Prep* SPECIALIZING IN PINE Faucets Pumps Replaced Sewer & Water
Phone: 850-948-7891 Road Work* PULPWOOD THINNING Connections Tanks Replaced Water heater Call F r FREE Estimates
Cell: 850-973-7135 Free Estimates and Consultation Repairs- All Repairs K B 5
Fax: 850-948-2482 Repairs- All Repairs Kevin Bell 850-948-3372
E-mail: Joe Reams, Jr. John T. Sanders Dave Dumas WE I TA M TA
'joeballreams@msn.com Owner (850)643-7575 (229)224-4331INSTALLROOFS


North Florida. Cabinets cor Northside Mower and Register's
& More LLC Small Engine Repair
it MeLn Ca ount r T tFor Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub
and Vanities. oProp erTties Cadet, Snapper, Murray & More, 315 Waukeenah Iwy.
S Built to last, quality guaranteed.o Warranty, Repairs for all makes & models. 1/4 Mdl e Off US 19 South
220 T'enthi St. SE Steiniatcliee, FL 32359
Licensed/Insured 352-498-7770 ee877-498-7770 Pickup Delivery Service Available 997-2535
850-264-3391 Pam Wessels Mark Rebin Larry Nichols 562-2962
Realtor/Broker Realtor Associate Realtol Associate

Sister Fay GULF COAST M & M Transmission
Palm Reader & Advisor PROFESSIONAL ROOFING MsETAL 10 o Foreign & Domestic
Are you Unhappy? Worried? Sad? Roof Inspections, new roofs, ROOFING Frn
Have you been Disappointed? re-roofs, & repair specialist. All Types Front Wheel Rear Wheel
Give me a call and let me help you. CCC# 1325926 of Metal Full Drive Train
Serving Leon County for 50 years Folsom Constructing, LLC.850-566-6504 Full line or Roofing Differential
We Do Parties! Tarot Cards*Palm Readings*Astrology .32301 accessories in y st ock n78 NE DuvaI) Ave. 2
Call infor 2 free questions! Special Flashings MadeAll Types Warranted.Meta Available Madisol, FL 32340
Licensed by County & City SiAvailable
Mon.-Fri 10am-8pip, Sun1-5pm, 1729 Mahan Drive Cut to your desired lengths .Delivery Service Available 850-973-4516
(850)878-9327 Call Toll-Free 888-393-0335 352-498-0778 Horseshoe Beach, FL
Comfort Speciahst Commercial &
Residential Service -
TRANE SalesE
InslallationE
/IMiHUNT l/F o T Herndon Trucking
NHelp u"t Truck Rental Custom Hauling
@||[*loJrlll lHelp us fight amyotrophic
FIRST IN SERVICE lateral sclerosis, better known Sand Gravel Refuse
.FREE ESTIMATES as Lou Gehrig's disease. Backhoe Service
TIMHUNT State License t CACO 52439 1.800-USA-TAVY Light Clearing & Driveways
Phone. 850-877-4136 2840-B Industnal Plaza Wwwnavyjobs.om M L
Fax: 850-656-1275 Tallahassee, Florda 32301 Muscular Dystrophy Association ce (850) 948-4019
Mobile' 850-251-4308 E-ma1ll 1unt@centralhoal ngo n.ul tants ..... 1-800-572-1717. ww*r.mdausa.org RAYMOND HERNDON Mobile (850) 570-0458


BIRD & LEINBACK
ATTORNEYS AT LAW

T. Buckingham Bird, Bruce A. Leinback
and Paula Sparkman


PA1.


INSURANCE








PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 7, 2007


Months Months
1L5 "1.4
60,000 '
WARRANTY
Growing a Reputation ofSatisfied Customers!


Files
(Continued From Page 4)
FORTY YEARS AGO
March 3, 1967
Mrs. Charles Landreth en-
MUSIC & LYRICS
tertained last Thursday eve-
(PG13)
Fri. 5:40-10:10 Sat. 1:10-5:40- ning with a dessert bridge at
10:10 Sun. 1:10-5:40 Mon. her home on East Pearl Street.
Thurs. 5:40 Mr. And Mrs. Emerson Ridge-
DADDY'S LITTLE GIRL way had as their quests over
(PG13) the weekend her sister, Mrs.
Fri. 5:30-7:45-10:00 Sat. 12:55- Irby Averitt of Quincy.
3:10-5:30-7:45-10:00 Sun. Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Mercer
12:55-3:10-5:30-7:45 Mon. and daughter, Dee, were in
Thurs. 5:30-7:45 Jacksonville Sunday to attend
BRIDGE TO the Beauty Show.
TERABITHIA Mr. and Mrs. Parks Carmi-
(PG13) chael of Gainesville will be the
Fri. 5:20 -7:25-9:40 Sat. 1:00- guests of Mr. and Mrs. Ernie
3:05 -5:20-7:25-9:40 Sun. 1:00- Clark.
3:05 -5:20-7:25 Mon. Thurs.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
5:20 -7:25
NO PASSES March 3, 1957
NORBIT Daniel Lloyd Monroe IV
(PG13) was born to Danny and Betty
Fri. 4:35-7:05-9:35 Sat. 1:40- Monroe of Waukeenah March.
4:35-7:05-9:35 Sun. 1:40-4:35- 4. Keathley Bowden, pub-
7:05 Mon.-Thurs. 4:35-7:05 lisher and editor of the Monti-
WILD HOGS cello News, announces this
(PG13) week the appointment of Paul
Fri. 4:20-7:35-10:05 Sat. 1:05- R. Smith to the desk of the as-
4:20-7:35-10:05 Sun. 1:05-4:20- s
sociate editor. At the same
7:35 Mon.-Thurs. 4:20-7:35
NO PASSES time the publisher explained
GHOST RIDER that Mrs. Christine Smith had
(PG13) joined the News staff as local
Fri. 4:30-7:15-9:55 Sat. 1:20- reporter and office
4:30-7:15-9:55 Sun. 1:20-4:30- bookkeeper.
7:15 Mon. -,Thurs. 4:30-7:15
RENO 911: MIAMI LEGAL
(R) Job Advertisement County
Fri. 7:55 Sat. 3:25-7:55 Sun. Coordinator Jefferson County,
3:25-7:55 Mon. Thurs. 7:55 Florida Jefferson County is seeking
NO PASSES a County Coordinator. This is a
THE NUMBER 23 professional position within
Jefferson County government. The
(R) complete Jefferson County Job
Fri. 5:10-7:20-9:30 Sat. 12:50- Application, the Job Announcement
3:00-5:10-7:20-9:30 Sun. 12:50- and the Job Description can be
3:00-5:10-7:20 Mon. Thurs. obtained through the County Clerk
5:10-7:20 of Courts Office, Jefferson County
NO PASSES Courthouse, Room 10, Monticello,
FL 32344, by telephone at
850/432-0218 or on the County's
All new high web site hlll://co.ielersoii.n.ius. The
S back seats and completed Jefferson County Job
more renova- Application and resume are due in
tions on the the Clerk of Courts office by noon,
March 19, 2007. EOE.
way. R/D 2/21,23,28,3/2.7.9
IN THE' CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JtIDICIAL


i e park
L March 17 & 18, Sat & Sun.
10 a.m to 4 p.m.
Palm Coast 4th Annual Fine Arts Show
Community Center and More!
305 Palm Coast Pkwy NE Art Vendors
Music
Contact: Liz Monaco
Food
386-871-8895 o
Kid's Crafts
or
www.flaglercountyartleague.com Demonstrations
For a list of hotels with AlP rates! Clinics
And a 15 ton Sand Sculpture
Presented by The Flagler County Art FREEADMISSION
League and City of Palm Coast Dept of
Recreation & Parks.
2007 Sponsors, 7hank you
cv MiddletaiT bright house :
kL-0 LAWN & PEST CONTROL rw
(: II.::, ., N6 Jsournal


Real Estate and More



LAND CLEARING, INC.

Jim Von Stein Toll Free: (866) 496-3442
.Broker www.VonSteinRealty.com


Von

MLS 7REALTYinc.
P.O. Box 1009 (352) 498-0041
Steinhatchee, FL 32359 cell: (352) 356-1001


Steve WNNalker- I wi
Realty, LLC
5. . -Jeffer.,oln St..
Monticello, FL NB
654 Pineview Land No Burning or Debris
$67.500-I 53 Acres (850) 997-4061 Office
3BRJ2BA 1 /1.040 sq1t Come Visit Us On the Web No ole or Deep Rut
Clean home on cozy lot otr more info:
Storage building included c
CAI.L US www.SteveWalkerRealty.com
I) 4 II II


9w


Land Clearing e Mulching Mowing










MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MARCH 7, 2007 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday;..S9.00
Each Additional Line....$1.25
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON (COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 07-63-CA IN RE: The
Marriage of AISHA STEWART,
Petitioner/Wife, and
CHRISTOPHER STEWART,
Respondent/Husband NOTICE OF
ACTION To: CHRISTOPHER
STEWART, Address Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on
MICHEAL A. REICIIMAN,
petitioner's attorney, whose address
if P.O. Box 41, Monticello, FL
32345, on or before April 20, 2007,
and file the original with the clerk
of this said court either before
service on petitioner's attorney or
immediately thereafter, otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition. Dated on
02/28/07. KIRK REAMS Clerk of
Court AS Clerk of the Court Jeri b.
Pear-:;n Deputy Clerk
R/D 3/7.14,21,28/07,c


NOTICE


AA: Mon., Thurs., Sat.: Al-Anon:
Mron. 8 p.m.: Christ Episcopal
Church Annex, 425 North Cherry
Street 907-2129, 997-1955 for Info.
R/D 3/2.7.0,14,16,21,23,28,30,pd

HELP WANTED
DRI ERS! ACT NOW' 21
CDL-A Drivers Needed *
36-43cpm/ $1.20pm $0 Lease
NEW Trucks CDL-A +3 mos
OTR (800) 635-8669
3/7,9,fc
Part-time Receptionist Needed
for busy CPA office. Please fax
Resume to 342-9899 or Call for
appointment 342-9898
S/D2/28 tfn,c
2 Drivers Needed $100.00 a day
528-5218
R/D 2/23,28,3/2,7c
Need cleaning assistant to clean
offices in the evening, in
Monticello. Please call
850-894-6254 or Fax
850-894-6224
R/D 2/23tfn,c .
Drivers-Car hauling career.
GREAT HOME TIME!
Exceptional Pay & Benefits!
Paid Training! Min. 1 yr
Class-A CDL exp. req. THE
WAGGONERS TRUCKING
(912) 571-9668 or (866)
413-39"4.
3/7,9.FC
The Jefferson County Road
Dept. is accepting applications
for the following positions: (1) a
Mechanics position. Must have
experience in gas and diesel
engines and/or have high school
diploma or GED and will train.


HELP WANTED
A class A CDL license would be
a plus. (2) A Truck driver with a
class A CDL license. Must have
a high school diploma or GED.
(3) An Equipment Operator/
class A-CDL driver. Must have
a high school diploma or GED.
Closing date for all positions
will be March 9, 2007.
2/23,28,3/2,7 9,14,16,c
Host Families & Representatives
sought for foreign exchange
students ages 15-18 arriving
August. Has own insurance/
spending money. For more info
call 1-800-SIBLING
(1-800-742-5464)
,'www.aise.com
3/7,9,fc

BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
ALL C-\SH C.\ND R ROUTE
Do you earn $800/day? 30
Machines, Free Candy All for
$9,995. (888) 629-9968
BO2000033. CALL US: We will
not be undersold!
3/7,9,fc
Learn to buy Foreclosures, tax
liens, and rehabs for pennies on
the dollar. Mentor walks you
through each deal A-Z to ensure
SUCCESS (800) 433-4556.
3/7,9,fc

SERVICES
We welcome the faithful, the
seeker and the doubter. Christ
Episcopal Church, three blocks
N of the courthouse. Sunday
services at 8:30 and 11:00 AM.
907-4116.
3/7,c
Marie's House Cleaning Service
Lady's you don't have time to
clean like you need. Call Me.
Reasonable Rates References
Upon Request Cell Phone -
850-445-5940 Home phone -
850-997-4409
3i',9,pd
I build sheds, decks, handicap
ramps, exterior carpentry work,
window/door replacement. Call
Bob 242-9342
R/D 1/10,12,17,19,24.26,31,2/2,7,
9,14,16,21,23,28,3/,,7,', 14,16

Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
new menopausal products.
Jackson's Drug Store.
5/1-. tfn, c
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/I tfn


OPEN HOUSE
Sat. & Sun. 2 4pm

New Home
240 Green Meadows Dr., Monticello, FL.
3 Br/ 2 Ba, Large Double Car Garage, Concrete Drive
& Sidewalks on approximately 1 1/2 acres
$207,000.00

850-997-1093


--__-f

BRYNWOOD CENTER

RN, CNA
Full-time, and Part-time
Excellent pay PLUS differentials
ADMISSIONS/MARKETING COORDINATOR
Experience in Marketing & Health Care Preferred
Full-time
Dietary Part-time
Medical Records Full-time

If you are interested in this GREAT opportunity,
Contact us at:
BRYNWOOD CENTER
1656 SOUTH I JEFFERSON STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
PHONE: 850-997-1800. FAX: 850-997-7269
wvw.dlcllahealthgroup.comn
Drug Free Workplace EOE/m/f/d/v


SERVICES

Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, S/D, tfn
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
Tfn


LOST
Dog Boxer Brindle, male,
Waukeenah area. REWARD!!!
997-1868
R/D 3/2.7,nc

FOUND
Large white clog with brown
spot over right eye and tail,
black leather collar. 997-2358
R/D23,28, 3/2,7nc


FREE
Baby bunnies to good home.
997-0342.
3/2 7.nc


GARAGE SALE
YARD SALE Saturday 3/10/07
8 AM Till Nobles subdivision
1245 Florida Avenue household
items iiens/ comforters
3/',9,pd


FOR SALE
Specialized feed for Alpacas &
Lamas. Call Marcy @
850-421-2403
2/9,14,16,21,23,28,3,2,7,c
FOR SALE you move 93
Merritt 54x24 DW 3 BR, 2 -
BA w/fireplace, 12x10 metal
shed and more included. No
calls after 9:00 pm please
850-997-3318 or 850-544-7785

2/16,tf:k.nc
Queen Pillow-Top Mattress Set.
Brand new in plastic with
warranty. $150. 850-222-9879
SOLID WOOD Cherry sleigh
bed BRAND NEW in box,
$275. (850) 545-7112.
12/6.tfn,c
SOFA & LOVESEAT. Brand
NEW LEATHER, still wrapped.
lifetime warranty, sacrifice
$795. (delivery available). (850)
425- d374.
12/6,tfn.,
Sofa/loveseat. new micro fiber
set, $475, must move, delivery
available. 850-222-7783
12/6,tfn,c
BEDROUM. New 6 piece set
still boxed, $599, can deliver
(850) 425-8374
12/6,tfn,e

FOR RENT
Spacious 2/1 and 1/1 apts, also
office space, near Monticello

Help us cure
neuromuscular diseases.


Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717 www.mdausa.org


FOR RENT
center. Section 8 OK. Call
850-491-8447
1/24,tfn,c

REAL ESTATE
Wanted One to two acres with
well and septic tank. Call
997-7441.
2/28,tfn.nc
$0 DOWN HOMES Gov't &
Bank Foreclosures! Low or no
down! No credit OK! Call Now!
(80") 749-2905
3/7,9,fc
Jetterson Co. Land Auction 700
acres, starting @ 1200/ac
owner/agent/March 10th www.
700AcreAuction.coin
2/41-3/10,j
Beach Living at its Best! Ocean
Isle, NC Exclusive island resort
lots. Close to Myrtle Beach and
historic Wilmington. From
450K (910) 579-2800.
3/7,9,fc
New energy efficient 3
Bedroom, 2 Bath, on
approximately I Vz acres with
extra large double car garage,
front porch, paved driveway,
and sidewalk. 240 Green
Meadows Dr. $207,000
997-1093.
R/D 3/7,(),14,16,21,23,28,30,pd
House For Sale By Owner
4 Bdr, 1 Full Bath, 2 Half Baths.
Located on 900 S. Mulberry St.
Call 229-890-5956
R/D2/28,3/2,7,'pd
NEW PRICE! 10+ AC-
$299,000! UPSCALE
EQUESTRIAN. GATED
COMMUNITY! 200 Year Old
Oaks. Established lush pastures.
Paved private rds, u/g utilities.
2m iles from HITS! Exc
financing! Call (866) 352-2249 X
1150o.
3/:,9.f,f
2.57 acres in Shaw
Plantation/Woodville. 1986
liveable singlewide with no well;
seller currently paying $20. Per
nio. to adjoining property for
water. AS IS price reduced for
clean up and repair. $35,000.
Premier Properties,
850-421 0020
R/D2'28tfr.,c
20.20 acres in Gadsden County
near Nicholson Farmhouse. No
road frontage/easement off
Hwy. 12. Possible hunting
camp, subdivision, homesite or
investment. $10,000 per
acre/$202,000.00 Total. Premier
Properties. 850-421-0020
R/D 2. 8tfr,c

NEED CHILDCARE?
ENROLL TODAY
The Little University Co.,
is now accepting Infants.
Open enrollment Ior all ages and

sibling discounts. Limited Spaces
for Arbor School Readiness.
Call 997-2970



AROC

ECS"'VI


807-B -r
Prrrd t. Screen 9f. Quitman
- -sN I-


WE SELL HORNEI
PONIES & MULE9


2 0~3-7504.


Frhay, .:- March 16 -:2 10:00 a.-.e

(( z = "J.C Friffn damiy-Trst Iriate r oplandRecreatinaLn
Prea rtch10-ds,35e Aes. rpry12. 0.Aes, .els,0Pncrookh RontdPie


Property 101 1315t A, PRope
GAHoy. 3/ DeH Hy -103
Pa 'Ie& ni Rvuaiion Pcwrual -89
G-rtRoid rFmiage &'d
Octuiftd Ho.,mms & Mki- F,,
~II i ~Prop
., ,on 6
SEL
/jinamcic 3 Tmoo' DJefdc 1oot a,'! W 2 (99 h,
Zin,,,orc 7 Too, 0oo5,c i ,,M m .!ell, 1.762 hrs
Rowell Auctions, Inc.
10%a Buyers Plermoui GAL AU-CO02594


Prty 102 402 Acres. Big Creek Road
CUalividlobIe A-CTe,
Acres Plantcd inule
,iilnt Hutrlnj Tra-,
erty 103 Complete Peanut Buing Point
it Acres, Meigs. GA
UNG AS GOING CONCERN
n The Heart of Southwest Georgia
Peanut Country"
Property 10 Auction Site for All 3 Properties
For Complete Auction Details Call
800-323-8388


'~' ,A.'fl ~e~' 'I'-4 m m-.i I ~ 4L61 II.~RIJ ii.


Housing Vouchers


We accept all vouchers
S2/2 $615 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 $50 dep.

Pool & Youth Activities

,. 575-6571
A S l.lg a l E I M E N 0 0 M SEE 0
- - -i i v i i v v v v v v v v v v v v v v


(850) 997-4340


'Link is back in town'
Wooded Tract 2.09 hillside acres east of town
on graded County Road $30,400

Country Retreat 29.7 acres and a delightful
roomy cabin with extras to include pool and hot
tub, wrap around porches $480,000

Loq Cabin 3 bed 2 bath with screened front
and back porches, board fenced pasture, double
carport, outbuilding on 4.07 acres $385,000

Lloyd Acres on a wooded hillside a 3 Dedroom
2 bath home with oak floors, fireplace and lots of
very nice extras including shop for $87,500

Historic Budd House built ca 1882 by commu-
nity leader of the day for his family. Lovely wood
work, high ceilings, spacious rooms, grand fire-
places, marvelous porches, currently 4 bedrooms
and 2 baths-$355,000 -

Lake front Home!! 3 bedroom 2 bath home
with spacious family room, big carport, terrific
screened porch nice barn with 5 hillside acres on
very nice lake near 1-10 and US 19 $385,000

Amazinq Buy!!! Mixed Use Property 12
acres on US 19 south land use designation per-
mits 4 houses per acre near Dennis' Trading post
only $36,500 per acre

Cherry Tree Lane Price Slashed!!! 3 bed / 2
bath doublewide, fireplace, big porch, garage,
shed, above ground pool, big trees, fenced, on
paved road now $110,000

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly
wooded acres Only $36,500

Pasture and Pecans 5-10 lovely acres on'
paved road $15,500 per acre Very nice property,
good deed restrictions

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Comfortable 4 bedroom 3 bath home on five
fenced acres with guest cottage w/bath, 2 car
garage, big shop, pasture 100 pecan trees and a
nice pool Only $365,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Wooded Acreaqe 5.35 acres on private road
off Paul Thompson Road $128,500

Waukeenah Hiqhway 27.99 acres good
home site fenced pasture $545,000

Aucilla Shores 5 level wooded acres $75,000

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath double-
wide with nice deck, fenced yard on 1 acre
$73,500

Investment Properties
-Choice lot on the Ecofina River 20 min to
the Gulf, State property on 3 sides, septic
tank on property, paved road only $195,000
-3 mobile homes on 4 acres 4 allowed
$118,000


Realtor Tim Peary

850-997-4340
See all our listings at
www.TimPeary.com

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


D0 ARBY'S Managers & Assistant Managers

NOT

ENTER Arby's in Monticello is seeking highly motivated individuals
With initiative to excel. Competitive Salary, Bonus, Paid
Great pioneers don't hesitate.' Holidays, Vacation, 401K Plan. contact Gerry at
ev resery possi ues 352-494-7552 to arrange for interview.
every possibfle-javenue.


m


i l ,i i









PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS. WED., MARCH 7, 2007


THE EMBARQTM TALLAHASSEE STORE GRAND OPENING


* For starters, the new money-saving EMBARQTM Together Plan5". A new
way to link EMBARQTM wireless and home phones for under $75 a month**
(other monthly charges apply). One bill, one plan, one company and a whole lot more.
Plus, get a great deal on a super-slim Sanyo KatanaTM phone when you sign
up for one year of EMBARQTM Wireless Internet. Ask us how.


* Enter to win the EMBARQTM "It Takes Two" Sweepstakes. The grand prize
is $10,000 each awarded for two lucky winners. The second prize is a trip for
two to romantic San Francisco. (No purchase necessary to enter or win. There are three ways to
enter: call 1-800-735t-6293, click embarq.com/togetherplan or visit your local EMBARQTM Store before April 8th.)


NOW IS A GREAT TIME TO STOP BY.
OUR GRAND OPENING IS BEING HELD 3/18 THROUGH 3/24.


VISITAN
EMBARQ'"
STORE


NEW LOCATION! TALLAHASSEE (Market) 14~1O Market Street in The Pavilion:, shopping renter


T I


EMBARQ"

Where Common Sense Meets Innovation ".


"Taxes, fees and surcharges (including a Camer Universal Service charge of 9 1. whth may vary by month; Carrier C ost R recovery surcharge of f $0 99, a USF charge of up to 9.1% that vanes quarterly, cos recovery fees of 50 55 per ne. sateocal fees that vary by area. and certain in-state surcharges) are excluded Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government required charges Residential
customers only EMBARQ may cancel services or offer or substitute similar services at its sole discretion without noce Additonal restrictions apply Local service: Local and in-state long distance (including local oll) series are governed by the apphcabte state tariffs andor state terms and conditions See rates, terms and condions at embarq com Requires approved credit Home Phone
service includes loca l calling and applicable calling features Unlimited Nationwide Long Distance: For residential voice service usage oly State-tostate and international long distance services are governed by Embarq Communications, Inc, Terms and Conditions of Service Local and in-state long distance (including local toll) services are governed by the applicable state tanffs andor state
terms and conditions of service Monthly lee does not include usage for Directory Assistance, EMBARQ" Calling Card service or operator services Service is not intended for commercial use. Intemet data or facsimile service This calling plan is restricted to one pan per qualifying residential access ne and is not available in student housing associated with educational institutions If Embarq
Commu nications, Inc., determines that usage is not consistent with residential voice conversation, or for any other use that does not involve a person-to-person conversation or voice message the service may be assessed a data usage fee or disconnected U S residents in EMBARQ bcal ternlones ony with dial-1 service qualify Calls to 900. 986. 555 and 700 NPAs are not considered united
interstate and intrastate dial-1 calling Monthly fee includes one phone lne Customers first i voice will include a partial monthly fee and the first month billed in advance There will be no pro-raon of any monthly recurring charge for partial hil when customer cancels service Local toll and internaonal rates vary. and surcharges may apply, nclud:ng surcharges on residential calls made to foreign
mobile phones Call 1-866421-7935 for local toll and international rates Operator-assisted calls and oll-free'calling card calls made from payphones in the U S will be assessed a surcharge All rates subject to change Add:tional restnctons may apply EMBARQr Together Plans": 574 90 monthly rate applies hiie customer subscribes to both services of the EMBARQT Together Plan'" If one
service is cancelled, the standard monthly rate will apply for the remaining service Taxes, fees, and surcharges are additional, subject to change wilhoul notice a nd based on nonprornotinal sadard monthly rate Wireless: Requires approved credit Services may not be available in all areas Terms and conditions apply, see embarq corn Offer available to residential customers only Subject
to cancellation or change without notice Wireless service: Coverage not available everywhere May not be combined with certain offers See sore or embarq corn for details Device subject to availability Service plans: S75 (1-yr term) cr SOT50 (2-yr toem) early termination and, if not an EMBAROQ" wtre[ne customer, a 36 activation fee applies per inme Adeposit may be required Unused plan
minutes do nol carry errward Partial minutes are charged as full minutes EMBARQ may terminate service if a majority of minutes in a give n month are used while roaming Overage charges wil apply Unlimited Calling to EMBARQT' Home Phone: Calls to your EMBARQ" home wireline number do not count toward any minute allocabon One Voicemail: Supports only EMBARO" wireless
(primary ine only) and wireline phones All phones must be under the same cu s tomer name No purchase necessary to enter or win Must be 18 years or older One entry per person. Void where prohibited Enter during store hours from 2;14,r07 to 48,'07, vista embargo comtoogetherplan or call 1- 800-735-6293 Call or visit store or website for complete rules I 2007 Embarq Holdings Company
LLC, All nghts reserved The name EMBARQ and the Jet logo are trademarks of Embarq Holdngs Company LLC EMB1-06-1623-24




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