Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00182
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: February 28, 2007
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00182
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text









Green Ideas
Aid

Environment

Editorial, Page 4


Green Industries
Seeks Project
Volunteers

Story, Page 7

i M


Fix It Chick-
Expands
Business Here

Story, Page 10
iI


Spring Brings
Poisoning
Hazards

Story Page 14
'I


Wednesday Morning


Monticello


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2007


Conservation



Subdivisions




Get Go-Ahead


Law Aims To Preserve

Area's Rural Character


THE GOAL of the conservation subdivision ordinance is to preserve the county's rural
character. One of the more controversial elements of the ordinance is the bonus den-
sities that it offers as an incentive to encourage open spaces. (News Photo)


Water Meter Two-Step:


Council, Staff Hold Talk


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

All's well that ends well,
William Shakespeare wrote, a
theme that echoed last week in
the City Council's workshop
on the water meter issue.
The council scheduled the
workshop with the water de-
partment's personnel following
council members' venting of
frustration over the perceived
lack of progress on the repair
and replacement of water me-
ters, a project that council
members consider critical to
the planned restructuring of
water rates.
The council members fig-
ured that a workshop would
help clear the air and get to the
bottom of the problem.
And it did, to the degree that
most appeared to leave the
meeting feeling a little better.
Initially, however, the mood
was anything but a goodwill
fest.
In reaction to the council's
earlier criticism of the depart-
ment's efforts on the water me-
ter evaluation project, City Su-
perintendent Don Anderson
and the department employees.
came to the workshop armed
for battle.

Anderson, who had not at-
tended the council meeting be-
cause of illness, decried the
council members' "soapbox"
posturing on the issue, as de-
picted in the newspaper article.
The fact was that the water
department personnel were
"busting their butts" to get the
job done and they didn't de-
serve the criticism, he said.
Demott Anderson, head of
the water department, was
equally forceful in his remarks.
He pointed out that his peo-
ple had submitted the re-
quested paperwork to City
Hall prior to the council meet-
ing. If the information had not
reached the council members
in time, the fault lay with the
bookkeeping department, he
suggested.
Bottom line, only five meters


were inoperable at present, he
reported. It also needed to be
remembered that his depart-
ment consisted of four em-
ployees, who were additionally
charged with taking care of the
sewer system and sundry other
problems that arose, he said.
1- *


City Clerk Emily Anderson
took issue with the representa-
tion that her staff was in any-
way to blame for the
bottleneck. She didn't appreci-
ate her staff being made the
scapegoat, she said. The' fact
was that her staff too was
overworked and doing the best
possible job under the circum-
stances, she said.
The finger pointing and re-
criminations aside (even the
newspaper came in for criti-


cism for allegedly overstating
the council's frustration), the
consensus was that confusion,
misunderstanding and mis-
communications had contrib-
uted to, if not created, the
problem.
"I'm confused," Councilman
Tom Vogelgesang confessed at
one point, citing the discrep-
ancy between the original esti-
mates of hundreds of
malfunctioning water meters
that now appeared to be no


AUSTIN
... riding for the brand was
theme of his talk
more than five. If that was the
case, however, he was pleased
with the results, he said.
Vogelgesang and colleague
Luther Pickels never denied
the fact of their earlier criti-
cism. Rather, they apologized
(See Water Meter, Page 2)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Commissioners recently ap-
proved two interrelated ordi-
nances that will make possible
conservation subdivisions and
increased densities in selected
areas of the county.
The two measures, one of
which now goes to the Depart-
ment of Community Affairs
(Qf'A) for review andi c,.m-
ment, were recommended by
the Planning Commission after
many months of consideration.
Conservation subdivisions,
by definition, are residential
developments that aim for the
preservation and protection of
open or green spaces. They ac-
complish this by concentrating
dwelling units on limited
areas, similar to the clustering
model, but differ from the lat-
ter in that they must dedicate a
defined percentage of upland
property to green space.
In return, conservation -sub-
division developers are al-
lowed to exceed the density --
or number of houses that are
permitted in a particular zon-
ing category -- as an incentive.
The associated ordinance,
actually a Comprehensive Plan
amendment, establishes the
mechanism for the allowance
of density bonuses, or in-
creased densities, in Ag-3,
Ag-5 and Ag-20 zones.

Ag-3 translates into one-
house-per-three-acres, Ag-5
into one-house-per-five-acres,
and so on.
The density bonus allows a
developer to put more houses
per acre on a property than is
permitted by the particular
zoning category, provided the
developer meets the conditions
established in the related con-


servation subdivision ordi-
nance.
Among the conditions: A de-
velopment must consist of 80
or more acres and be located in
one of the three named zones
to be eligible for the conserva-
tion subdivision designation
and the density bonus.
The development must also
dedicate an established per-
centage of the property to open
space, with at least 50 percent
of this open space being land
that is suitable for home build-
ing.
A developer, in other words,
can not dedicate a portion of
the property that is largely or
entirely wetlands, as is possi-
ble under the clustering model.
The greater the percentage of
the land that is dedicated to
open space, the greater the per-
centage of the density bonus
that is possible, as established
by a formula in the ordinance.

-.. .
.. .l -,.
, !: d I*,.


That portion of a property!
that is dedicated to open space
is also known as a set-aside.
A minimum set-aside of 40
percent, for example, will re-
sult in a 20-percent density bo-
nus. A minimum set-aside of
55-percent, meanwhile, results
in a 30-percent density bonus.
And a minimum set-aside of
70 percent results in a 40 per-
cent density bonus.
The typical example given is
a 100-acre parcel that is in an
Ag-5 zone, which would nor-
mally allow for the construc-
tion of 20 houses, or one-
house-every-five-acres.
If the developer agrees to
concentrate the 20 houses on
30 acres and leave 70 acres in
open space, he or she qualifies
for a 40-percent density bonus,
or eight extra houses, for a to-.
tal of 28 houses on the 30
acres.
The idea is that all sides win
with such a development: the
developer gets to maximize
profits with the increase of sal-
able houses, the home buyers
(See Subdivision, Page 2)


A COMMITTEE composed of three planners was re-
sponsible for the drafting of the conservation subdivi-
sion ordinance. From left. committee members Angela
Gray and Brad Mueller and citizen Tom LaMotte. (News
Photo)


S I County Commission Approves

..il Coordinator's Job Description
Commissioner Jerry Sutphin cal newspaper and also post
: '..: LAZARO ALEMAN alone questioned the widening on the county's web-site an
S-enior Staff Writer of the range and ultimately on the web-sites of the Floric
voted against it. Association of Counties an
Crnmmissioners last week an- Commission Chairman Jun- the Florida League of Cities.


proved the creation of a county
coordinator position and the
advertisement of the job, as
recommended by the commit-
tee that researched and drafted
the description.


The only change that com-
missioners made was to the
. . salary range.
t .- .. Rather than going with the
recommended $62,000. to
$82,000 salary range, commis-
DON ANDERSON, city superintendent, came to the sioners adjusted it to $50,000
meeting in a combative mood. (News Photo) to $82,000.


ior Tuten, a leading proponent
of the change, offered the jus-
tification.

"With a population of
14,000, I think it's a good rea-
son for the adjustment," Tuten
said
Commissioner Skeet Joyner
concurred.
"I think by widening the
range we'll get more
applicants," he said.
Commissioners decided to
advertise the position in the lo-


it
Id
la
Id


As stated in the job descrip-
tion, the coordinator's respon-
sibilities fall into six broad ar-
eas. These areas are policy and
operations; 'budget and fi-
nances; agenda preparation;
personnel; community rela-
tions; and miscellaneous
duties.

The coordinator will occupy
a place just below the board of
county commissioners on the
(See Coordinator, Page 3)


I 'I


139TH YEAR NO. 16,5U ULIN I,!


lln r V ADM" I rn CFNTSC









PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 28, 2007

Congressman Allen Boyd


Hosts Agricultural Summit


Congressman Allen Boyd a
member of the Agriculture
Sub- committee of the I-louse
Appropriations Committee.
hosted an Agriculture Summit,
Saturday, to discuss the draft-
ing of the 2007 Farm Bill, and
the needs of farmers in North
Florida.
Boyd was joined by the
Chairman of the US House
Agriculture Committee and
chief architect of the 2007
Farm Bill, Collin Peterson.


Bill Beaty has recently
earned the professional desig-
nation of a Florida Certified
Landscape Contractor, by
the Florida Nursery Growers
and Landscape Association.,
(FCLC.)
Beaty earned the state certi-
fication after a two day exam
that measures business
acumen, horticultural knowl-
edge, and landscape skills
through both written and field
testing, and successfully com-
pleting a three hour horticul-
ture exam prior to the event.
Beaty demonstrated his
skills in 15 areas, four written
exams: Accounting, Construc-
tion, Documents, Landscape
and Construction Laws, and
Estimating; and 11 field
exams: Plant ID, Play Layout,
Site Evaluation, Grading and
Drainage, Tree Installation, Ir-
rigation, Surveying, Palm
Banding, ,Equipment
Operation, Pruning, and Re-


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

An unidentified driver was
killed Sunday morning in a
fiery single-vehicle crash on
I-10, in Jefferson County.
FHP reports the driver, is-
unknown pending identifica-
tion, and was driving a 1999
Honda Accord eastbound on
I-10 in the inside lane at 8:10
a.m.
The vehicle traveled off of
the roadway completely onto
the center median at mile
marker 230.


Boyd and Peterson heard
from farm families and farm
groups on ways to improve our
nation's farm policy, and en-
sure that Florida's farmers
have the tools and resources
that they need.
"The year, passing the Farm
Bill must be, and will be, a top
priority for Congress," said
Boyd.
"Today's Agriculture Sum-
mit allowed me to discuss
Florida's agriculture priorities


BEATY

training Wall Construction.
Beaty was recently promoted
to Senior Vice President-, and
named Director of Landscape
Operations for Greenways of
America, Inc., which special-
izes in large commercial land-
scape projects.


The driver over corrected to
the right, causing thel vehicle
i'. rieener the roadway in a
clockwise rotation.
The vehicle traveled across
both eastbound lanes, onto the
south shoulder of the
roadway.
After leaving the roadway,
the vehicle's left side collided
with a tree, bursting into
flames after the impact.
FHP reports that it could not
be determined whether or not
the driver was wearing a seat
belt and more information
will be forthcoming, when it
becomes available.


with representatives from Flor-
ida's major crops and specialty
crops.
"I will take back to Wash-
ington what I heard here today,
so that farmers in Florida will
have a voice in our nation's
agriculture policy," Boyd said
Saturday.
"I appreciate this opportunity
to hear from farmers and
ranchers in North Florida
about how the 2007 Farm Bill
is working for them, and what
they would like to see in the
Farm Bill that we will write in
Congress this year." Peterson
said.
"1 look forward to working
with Congressman Boyd and
Members of Congress from ag-
ricultural areas nationwide to
pass a bill that meets the needs
of all of our agriculture pro-
ducers and consumers."
Florida Agriculture Commis-
sioner Charles Bronson, Flor-
ida Farm Bureau President,
John Hoblick, and University
of Florida's Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences
(IFAS) Vice President Dr. Joe
Joyce, also took. part in the
meeting.
Boyd believes that a core
mission of the farm bill should
continue to be promoting prof-
itability and income potential
in agriculture, and a degree of
stability in our nation's food
and agriculture system.

The 2007 Farm Bill also
needs to look to the future and
support farm-based renewable
energy as a way to move our
country closer towards energy
independence.
"The rewrite of the farm bill
presents huge promise and po-
tential for the agriculture in-
dustry," Boyd stated.
"In this bill, we have the op-
portunity to develop more ef-
fective disaster assistance.-
better access to agricultural
credit, and more programs to
encourage agricultural re-
search, development and con-
servation.
"As a fifth generation
farmer and one of a handful of
active farmers in Congress, I
look forward to working with
Chairman Peterson and my
other colleagues in Congress
to write a farm bill that allows
our farmers to continue to pro-
vide us with the highest qual-
ity, safest, and most affordable
food supply."


Water Meter Two-Step


(Continued From Page 1)
for having misunderstood the
progress that the department
had apparently made on the
project.
It had been their clear under-
standing from the meeting,
however, that numerous me-
ters yet remained to be evalu-
ated, the two said.
"We obviously have a big
breakdown in
communications," Pickels said.
"That's something that we're
going to have to overcome. I'm
flabbergasted to learn that we
are this close to being caught
up (on the meter repair and re-
placement project)."
The council members attrib-
uted the misunderstanding to a
failure of communications,
both between the water and
bookkeeping departments and
the council and city
employees.
The obsolete computer pro-


gram that monitors the water
meter accounts at City Hall
also came in for its share of
criticism.
"Until we change the book-
keeping program, we're going
to continue to have problems,"
Superintendent Anderson de-
clared. "We need to bite the
bullet and buy a new
program."
The program wasn't the
only problem, Emily Anderson
countered.
"The program is bad," she
conceded. "But it's only going
to be as good as the informa-
tion that goes into it."
She made the point that even
when all the collected data was
accurate, it would still require
several months of evaluation
before rate restructuring deci-
sions could be made.
In the end, most agreed that
they were better off for having


held the workshop. That, at
least, was the interpretation
that Pickels chose to put on the
proceedings.
"I feel everybody's feeling
better now," Pickels said. "I
think we've done a lot of good
here today."

To which Vice Mayor Ger-
rold Austin added humorously,
"Please, don't make us do a
group hug now."

Austin, of course, had him-
self waxed poetic earlier about
city employees and officials
being part of one family that
needed to look out for each
other and "the brand".

"Riding for the Brand," Aus-
tin called his little pep talk,
which idea he got from a book
of the same title by western
writer Louis Lamour.


ENJOYING the quiet of the library to get caught up on his reading, is Mike Anufrom.
The library draws a good number of patrons to use its computers, and read maga-
zines. (News Photo)


ACA Science Fair


Winners Named


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy
Annual Science Fair were re-
congized at the recent event.

Students from Michele
Tharpe's seventh grade Life
Science classes, and Mary
Hartsfield's eighth grade
Earth Science class, presented
their projects to be judged in
one of three categories: Bio-
logical, Chemical, or
Physical.


Each student was inter-
viewed by two judges, and
awards were given for each .
grade in the three categories.
Seventh grade winners in
Biological were Philip Watts,
first'place, Tyler Jackson, sec-
ond place, and Matt Tuten,
third place.
Winners in Chemical, Keli
Dollar, first place, Austin Ri-
chie, second place, and Cody
Kelly, third place.
Winners in Physical in-
cluded, Ben Sadler, first
place,, Trent Roberts, second
place, and Corey Burres, third


place.
Eighth graded winners in
Biological, Katherine Hogg,
first place, Rebecca Haberg,
second place, and Clark
Christy, third place.
Chemical, Brittany O'Brian,
first place, G. H. Liford, sec-
ond place, and Sarah
Sorensen, third place.
Physical, Casey Wheeler,
first place, Anna Finlayson,
second place, and Taryn
Copeland, third place.
The judges were profession-
als in several scientific disci-
plines. from. Jefferson, Madi-
son and Taylor counties.
After the judging was com-
pleted, the elementary teach-
ers 'brought their classes into
the gymnasium to view the
projects.

Subdivision
(Continued From Page 1)
get access to large portions of
communally maintained acre-
age, and the county gets to re-
tain its rural character.
Commissioners will hold a
second and final public hear-
ing on the two ordinances once
the DGA's response is
received. A ...
The rules give the DCA 60
days to respond to the
proposal, once the county has
submitted the appropriate pa-
perwork for review.
"I expect that we will have
significant discussions with the
DCA," Attorney Scott Shirley,
who acts as the county's legal
advisor on planning and zon-
ing matters, told commission-
ers at the recent hearing.
"Anytime that you suggest
increasing density, the DCA
has concerns," Shirley added.


AIRFORCE
RESERVE
ABOVFg BREYOND


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Police De-
partment has joined forces
with the Epilepsy Association
of the Big Bend to help pre-
vent head injuries and offer
free bicycle helmets to resi-
dents.
MPD Investigator Sgt. Chip
Springer reports that Spring is
fast approaching and every-
one should get out and enjoy
the bicycle trail.
"Whether walking, jogging,
skating or biking, members of
MPD want you to be safe,"
said Springer.
"Head injuries are one of
the leading causes of seizures
and wearing a helmet when
engaged in activities where
falls are likely to occur, such
as cycling, skating or horse-
back riding, can prevent most
head injuries," Springer
states.


The Epilepsy Association of
the Big Bend has donated
150 bicycle helmets of vari-
ous sizes to MPD, and the
helmets are high quality,
lightweight and available in
sizes to fit every member of
the family.
MPD is providing these hel-
mets free of charge to
citizens.
Anyone wishing to protect'
their children or themselves
from potential head injury,
can come by MPD and re-
quest a free helmet. A parent
or guardian must accompany
children.
The limit is one per person
while the supply lasts.




1-800-USA-NAVY
www.navyjobs.com


Learn more. Find out if your small business qualifies by
calling 523-7333 or go to:
www.capitalhealthpartnership.com.



Capital

SHealth

Partnership


Bill Beaty Certified

Landscape Contractor


Unidentified Driver

Killed In Crash Sun.


Free Bicycle Helmets

At City Police Dept.


business


tip #16

Healthy employees take less sick days off.
Providing an affordable health plan that
emphasizes preventive care can help.

SIf you do not currently offer your employees health
benefits, you may be eligible for a 40% premium savings
for Capital Health Plan coverage through the Capital
g Health Partnership.


0



Ib

II

I!
S
S

S

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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 28, 2007 PAGE 3

Society Thanks All Donors,


Volunteers For Benefit


LOCAL florists worked long hours on Valentine's Day, and also took care of procrasti-
nators who came in the next day, nearly exhausting their supplies. At top: flower de-
signers from left, Merle Love, Nevin Perry, Jessie Brown, were busy at Gellings
Flowers and Gifts. At bottom Edye Corley designs a bouquet for a customer. (News
Photos)


Parents Of ACA Student


Win $10,000 On TV Show


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The apparent strong liking_
of fairy tale princesses won
$10,000 for the parents of
Aucilla Christian Academy
K-3 student on America's
Funniest Home Videos re-
cently.
The video, entitled, "Pucker
Up Princess" was filmed of
three year old Aidan Cribbs
and his eight year old sister
Morgan, during a 2006 trip to
Disney World.
Mom, Marsie Cribbs re-
ported to host Tom Bergeron,
that they went to see the prin-


cesses because they thought
Morgan would enjoy it, but
little Aiden quickly stole the
show.
The video showed each of
three princesses, Cinderella,
Sleeping Beauty and Snow
White, offering the children
their cheeks to kiss, b ut Aidan
wanted no part of that, but
was determined to kiss them
on the lips. He did just that.
Hilarity erupted from the
television studio crowd when
he would not give up and
ended up getting the kisses he
sought from each of the prin-
cesses, despite their turning
their cheeks to him to be
kissed.
While Bergeron was inter-


viewing Marsie and husband
Melvin after they had been
announced the winners, Aidan
sat quietly on his mother's
lap.
When Bergeron asked Aidan
if he was thinking about kiss-
ing more princesses, he
quickly nodded yes.
The tape aired two weeks ago
on channel 27 and the family
will go on to compete for the
$100,000 grand prize at the
end of the season.
The Cribbs family, from
Perry, could not discuss their
experiences on the TV show,
other then what was seen on
the screen, as it would violate
their contract.


Edenfield Expanding Garden


Center In Old News Office


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Edenfield Hardware is
expanding their garden center
and relocating it to the former
News office, located at 100
W. Dogwood Street.
Co-owner Trisha Wirick
said, "We're being optimistic,
but we're hoping to have eve-
rything moved and ready by
mid-March."
She said that all garden re-
lated items such as hoses,
rakes and shovels, lawn and
garden ornaments and decora-
tions, and plants, will be lo-
cated there, along with a cash
register for easy checkout.
Company offices will also
be relocated to that building.
"Customers will be able to
back in and load whatever
they need," said Wirick.
"We're going to get in more
mulch items, more potting
soils, bailed pine straw, and
we're going to carry more out-
door furniture, expand on our
bird seed and bird feeders and
bird houses, and old whiskey
planters," said Wirick.
"There's more space back


there, so we will be able to
spread it out and display
items more efficiently."
She added that they are go-
ing to stock up on a variety
of garden items.
"And one real nice thing,"
said Wirick. "We're working
with Green Industries, which
plants many different garden
vegetable seeds, and we'll be


purchasing plants such as to-
matoes and peppers, from
them."
Wirick said that when she
and husband Mark first pur-
chased Edenfield's, using the
building was in their future
plans, and when the Monti-
cello Trading Post recently
closed at the location, it fit
right into their plans.


Gnarly '80's Party

Set At Opera House


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Main Street has teamed up
with the Monticello Opera
House to host a "Gnarly 80's"
party, 8 p.m. until midnight,
March 24 at the Opera House.
The cost is $15 per person.
Residents are invited to pull
out those leg warmers, fish
net stockings, rock concert T-
shirts, tight rolled jeans, and
oh yes, the Aquanet and at-
tend the totally rocking event
that will benefit both Main


Street and the Opera House
for the local face lift projects.
Entertainment will be pro-
vided by Capital City DJs,
who will be playing every-
one's favorite music and vid-
eos.
Participants can also enjoy
"A Taste of Our Town" food
provided by local restaurants
and chefs.
"Costumes are not required,
but you're totally square if
you don't wear one," said
Main Street President Nicole
Honcell.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Humane Society members.
wish to extend their apprecia-
Stion to all volunteers, donors
and attendees at the recent
Bless the Beast Benefit who
were not acknowledged in an
earlier article.
Items for the homemade
cake auction were prepared
by: Evelyn Buzbee, who pro-
vided two kaluuha cakes; a
pineapple cake, and a coconut
cake; Kim Prothro, a Key
Lime Cake; Bette Boland, a
lemon cheese cake, and eight
layer chocolate cake; Carol
Buzbee, a strawberry cake;
Ruby Ford, a red velvet cake;
Darcy Pitts, an Italian cream
cake; and Phyllis Brittle, a
blueberry cake, and a cheese
cake with pecan crust and
blueberry topping.
Volunteers also included


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

A collision killed two
Greenville residents, critically
injured a four year old child,
and seriously injured a woman,
Friday, on US 90 East.
FHP reports Rhonda C.
Rudloff, 48, and passenger
four year old Brannon Tolar
were traveling eastbound on
US-90 in a 2004 Nissan Sen-
tra at 11:54 a.m.
Roger Olson, 39 and passen-
ger Heather Olson, 30, were
traveling westbound in a 1987
Toyota truck.
For unknown reason, Rud-
loff left the eastbound lane
and entered the westbound
lane.
The left front of Rudloffs
vehicle struck the left front
end of Olson's vehicle in the
westbound lane.

Coordinator
(Continued From Page 1)
organization chart and serve as
a link between the board and
the department heads and the
board and the other constitu-
tional officers.
The position requires five
years of applicable govern-
ment experience, with at least
two years of management or
supervisory experience and a
Bachelor's Degree or better.
The coordinator will serve at
the pleasure of the board,
meaning that commissioners
will be able to fire the individ-
ual if three of the five are un-
satisfied with the job
performance.


AkiicricaWzllart



mnore u '
rnenones-


U -


Xan Holton-Baker, chief vol-
unteer Wendy Bitner, Angela
Henderson who was in charge
of the live and silent auctions,
Teresa and Mark Kessler,
who assisted with the
auctions, Nicole Kessler,
Kandy Crowe who sold tick-
ets at the door, Sherry
McClure, Mary Helen Ringe,
Ed Rifige, Martha Jean
Martin, Denise George, Caro-
line Carswell for food repara-
tions, and Evelyn Buzbee,
who ran the cake table.
Also, Carol Austin, Darla
Willis, Danielle (last name
unknown), Al, who did the
cooking, George Carswell,
and Kevin Kelly.
Donors included, Nancy
Baker, Judy Pickle, Simpson
Nurseries, Susan Floyd, Mal-
loy Nursery, Kaleidoscope,
Carol Wiles, Macy's, Hazel
Mills, Boyd Sod farm, Wil-
liams Panhandle Propane,


After the impact, Rudloffs
vehicle rotated counterclock-
wise and came to a final rest
in the eastbound lane facing
northwest.
Olson's vehicle rotated
counterclockwise and entered
the north shoulder, coming to
a final rest facing southwest.
Rudloff and Roger Olson
were both killed in the crash.
Tolar suffered critical injuries
and Heather Olson, serious
injuries.
No one involved was wear-
ing seat belts, and charges
are pending.




11111RC


contact:
James Muchovej
(850) 997-6508
ajjmuchovej@juno.com


Melissa Solan, Jack Harkness,
Imagine Antiques, Green
South Equipment, Inc., and
At Home In Thomasville.
.Also, June Harris, Candy
Crowe, Southern Friends,
Vanessa Bradberry, Wendy
Montgomery, Rex Bishop,
William and Evelyn Shelley,
Great Adventure Outfitters,
Martha Jean Martin, Eden-
field's Hardware, Monticello
Florist, Veterinary Associates,
Judy Miller, Brenda "Wilfong,
Pam Kelly, Kevin's Sporting
Goods, Becky McNeil, Sue
Henrickson, Town and Coun-
try, Jefferson Builders Mart,
and Rainbow Acres.
Also, Tammie's Sweets and
Deli, John Culbreth, Shear
,Pleasure Salon, Hilton Key
West Resort, Curves, Mi-
lady's Shop, Beef O'Brady's
ofThomasville, Sorensen Tire
Center, C & J Paintball, and
Little Pond Farm.
"If we inadvertently forgot to
mention anybody, we greatly
appreciate them for their ef-
forts and apologize for not
mentioning them," said Presi-
dent Caroline Carswell.
She concluded that mem-
bers would not know how
much the event raised for the
care of area homeless and un-
wanted animals, for another
several weeks because checks
were still coming in.

Got A Cute Photo?

Send It To Us And
We'll Share It With
Our Readers!

Kids Dogs *
Strange stuff, etc.

Monticello News
P.O. BOX 430
Monticello, FL
32345
"You Can't Be Without It"


"Familiar Faces And Quiet Places"

A Pictorial And Narrative
History Of Jefferson County

By Derelyne Delp Counts

Available At The Chamber Office
And Leading Merchants



NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING


THE DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY ANNOUNCES A WORKSHOP TO
WHICH THE PUBLIC IS INVITED


DATE: March 8, 2007
TIME: 6:00 P.M.
PLACE: 1490 W. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32344

SUBJECT:. Rental Fee Schedule Howard Middle
School


A 17


Crash Friday Kills 2,

Injures Woman, Child


Year 2007

Sandbaggers Classic

Jefferson Country Club

March 5th, 2007

1 P.M.


$50 entry fee includes 18 holes, cart,
Steak dinner, door prize


Organized by the Monticello Rotary Club
Benefits Rotary Youth Camp and
local service projects


419b









PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 28, 2007


Monticello News
(ISSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

CILAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer



Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly Ex-
cept for the weeks of July 4th, Thanksgiving, Christmas,
& New Years. Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post
Office. Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Green Ideas Aid


Environment


As the debate surrounding
global warming continues to
heat up, more and more
Americans have found smart
ways to think and act green. If
you are interested in becoming
"green," but are not sure where
to begin, try the following easy
tips:
According to the Environ-
mental Protection Agency
(EPA), billions of pounds of
chemicals are used in the U.S.
each year. Homeowners can
reduce the effect their house-
cleaning has on the Earth by
using environmentally prefer-
able cleaners.
For instance, OdoBan's
Earth Choice products are a,
new line of environmentally
friendly cleaning products that
were designed for homeowners
in partnership with' the' EPA's
Design for he Environment
(DfE) program.
The line includes a variety of
products for cleaning glass,
showers, grease, allergens, car-
pets and toilet bowls each of
which offers the strongest
cleaning agents possible, while
remaining less harmful to the
environment.
Replacing ordinary light-
bulbs in your house with more
efficient corkscrew-shaped
fluorescent bulbs could help
reduce the amount of carbon


released into the atmosphere.
In fact, it's estimated that if
every house in America re-
placed just one regular bulb,
the carbon-reducing effects
would be the same as if 1 mil-
lion cars were taken .off the
road.
You can reduce the amount
of fuel your vehicle uses by
keeping tires properly inflated,
sticking to the speed limit and
lighteningthe load you carry
in the trunk.
It's also a good idea to avoid
quick stops and starts and to
keep your car well maintained.
Of course, the best way to
reduce fuel consumption is to
drive less frequently. So think
twice about driving some-
where you could get to on
foot.
Walking is better for the en-
vironment and can save you
some green when it comes to
paying for gas.
As you can, see being green
does not have to involve great
hardship or sacrifice.
On the contrary, being green
can be easy if you just follow
some of the above-listed tips in
your daily life.
Just remember, no matter
what you do the think and act
green, the sooner you begin,
the better.


.. , .4 .. .

DONNA WILLIAMS puts the finishing touches on the envelope as she prepares tax
notices for mailing, in Nov., 1991, as then Tax Collector Frances Walker opened the
tax roll to begin collection. (News File Photo)




SOpinion & Comment



Who's Who Folks At It Again


February rolled around and
so did letters from those
"Who's Who" folks telling me
I've been selected again for in-
clusion in their prestigious
books.
1 think it was the "Who's
Who of the South" or maybe it
was "Who's Who in American
Business" who wrote that 1
was "chosen because your
peers in publishing recom-
mended you." What a bunch of
bull!
The only thing good about
the "Who's Who" letters is they
provide grist for the column
mill. Trust me, when you
knock out columns for 30
years, you always look for col-
umn material.
Besides having no interest in
being in anybody's "Who's
Who," I've reached the age
where I really want to be left
alone.
I don't need anymore calls
from the phone companies tell-
ing me how much money I can
save on long distance calls. 1
don't need calls from stock
brokers with hot tips, and I
don't need to hear about fan-
tastic investment opportunities
in Texas oil wells!


Publisher'sI


Notebook





Ron Cichon


It escapes me why the
"Who's Who" people have
contacted me over the past
several years. I throw their let-
ters in the trash and when the
next February rolls around, an-
other letter arrives telling me
I've been selected.
Heck, if I was running a
"Who's Who" book and some-
body turned me down, I'd find
another person to "honor." But
then what do I know about the
"Who's Who" business?
I have been giving some
thought to those "stellar quali-
ties" the "'Who's Who" people
say I possess. Of course, they
never say exactly what they
mean so one can only imagine.
Just for fun I made up a list


f-'i


of my "stellar qualities." Here
they are:
1. I turn off lights when I
leave a room.
2. I wipe my feet before en-
tering a house.
3. 1 never leave dirty dishes
in the sink.
4. I don't throw trash on the
streets or in my neighbor's
yard.
5. I don't do drugs and I'm
kind to animals.
6. I share produce with oth-
ers from my garden.
7: 1 have a dental checkup
every six months.
8. I'm working on reducing
fats in my diet.
9.1 exercise every morning.
10. 1 bathe regularly.


That's it folks. I think those
are the things that have the
"Who's Who" people hot on
my trail!
Sooner or later, I figure they
will get the idea that I'm not a
very good prospect for their
book.
Why, I've known people who
did some pretty big things and
they don't even get contacted.
Take Pud, for example. Pud
was in my high school me-
chanical drawing class and he
could smoke a cigarette faster
than anybody.
Or how about Porky? He
could out eat aiy five people I
know.
Then there were those two
guys in Lamont who re-
sponded to an earth tremor by
shooting the ground with pis-
tols.
And we once had a female.
employee, in fact she held an
advanced degree from a major
university, who arrived at the
office one day announcing
with great excitement that one
had to find an exit before get-
ting off the Interstate.
I think these folks ought to
be in "Who's Who."


No Responsibility Required


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
February 26, 1997
Through the patronage of
a near capacity crowd at the
Opera House dinner and auc-
tion Saturday $10,700 was
raised to make the gazebo in
the garden a reality.
An altercation Sunday eve-
ning in the southeastern sector
of the city resulted in the
shooting death of a man.
The County Commission's
approval Thursday night of a
resolution supporting the crea-
tion of a specialty license tag
to champion child bearing in-
stead of abortions created no
small stir, underscoring the
volatility of the issue.
There were several minor in-
juries in a two vehicle accident
which occurred, 3:30 p.m.,
Feb. 18 on Hwy. 27, three
miles north of Waukeenah.
The Jefferson County Fire
Rescue was kept hopping in
the last two weeks responding
to fires, accidents, 56 EMS
calls, and false alarms called in
about controlled burns.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
February 25, 1987
In the past three weeks, Jef-
ferson County has received
5.15 inches of rain. Last week-
end alone, Monticello received
4.25 inches of rain, and more
rain is expected later this
week.
With the public hearing of
the Florida Public Service


Commission (PSC) less than a
week away,, opponents of toll
free dialing service to Talla-
hassee exchanges have got an-
other strike against them.
According to Rob Vandiver,
bureau chief of communication,
division of legal services with
the PSC, a recommendation to
deny the petition against the
serve was made last week by
the PSC's legal department.
Secretary of Commerce John
"Jeb" Bush told Chamber of
Commerce members Tuesday
that a community's commit-
Sment to economic growth must
be "patient and long range."
THIRTY YEARS AGO
February 24, 1977
A special celebration noting
the 150th anniversary of Jef-
ferson County will be held
March 25, the day before the
Tour of Homes opens.
The school system will lose
no state monies because ill-
nesses among students have
subsided and the children have
returned to the classrooms.
Last Friday night, the Tigers
basketball team played their
last home game of the season.
The Tigers averaged an earlier
loss as they beat Havana
80-52.
Local merchants have of-
fered numerous prized to the
participants in the 1977 March
of Dimes fundraising Walk-A-
Thon.
(See From Our, Page 5)


By DENNIS FOGGY,
Columnist

America has lost its perspec-
tive when it comes to assuring
that our society maintains a
reasonable and balanced grip
on civility. As a society, we
have been brow beaten into be-
coming a nation quick to dis-
miss deliberate misbehavior.
Not just dismiss, but deter-
mined to find any justification
to eagerly defend the most bla-
tant wrong doers. Most re-
cently, Miss America, who is
supposed to be a role model
and represent all that is good
in young women, went on a
drinking and lewd venture in
the Big Apple. Her punish-
ment? A second chance, of
course.


In essence, sending the mes-
sage that very poor judgment
and intentional misconduct has
very little, if any
consequences. Just drive an-
other nail in the America cof-
fin of personal responsibility.
Maybe we should structure
our society around something
like the board game
Monopoly. Let's give every-
one a pile of "chance" cards to
pull from for their errant be-
havior. That way we can make
the playing field level for all.
Americans and not just celebri-
ties, the wealthy and beautiful
people.
In the stack there should be:
1. A "Get out of jail free" card.
2. A "Pot of gold" card. 3. A
"No big deal" card. 4. A "It's
my private life" card. 5. A


"Pretty person" card. 6. A
"Special circumstances" card,
and 7. A "Multiple chances
card".
Hear is the reasoning: 1. If
O.J. Simpson and Robert
Blake can obviously do in their
wives and skate free, using ra-
cism and celebrity status, what
about the rest of us also having
a "get out of jail free"?
2. If the Catholic church can
pay out a billion dollars to
cover over 600 pedophile
priests and keep most out of
jail, where is the "pot of gold
card" for the rest of us'? (The
"get out of jail free" card also
applies here),
3. If athletes like those at the
university of Miami can tlomip
on other players and beat them
with their helmets and not get


kicked out of sports entirely,
then our little league players
should learn from this and
carry a "no big deal card"
around with them.
4. If the president of the
'iiit'd States can go on TV
and wave his finger at us and
lie Jiicl\ to our faces and to
a grand jury and not be run out
of office on a rail, then we all
need one of:hose "It's my pri-
vate life" cards when we get
caught doing something cata-
strophically stupid.
5, When the female school
teacher gets only probation
and a slap on the wrist for be-
ing a pedophile with her un-
derage student because she is
;'.r~cus. let's pass out those
"licu\ Person" cards for the
(Sec No, Page 5)


Boyd Eyes New Farm Bill


By ALLEN BOYD
Congressman

This year, Congress will set
upon the important task of re-
writing the farm bill, which
will establish our national agri-
culture policy into the next
decade. In drafting the 2007
Farm Bill, the needs of farmers
in North Florida must be con-
sidered.
Every five years, Congress
writes a new farm bill, and
many people who are not
farmers may think that this


legislation- does not affect
them. They would be very
wrong.
All Americans have a stake
in the farm bill. The scope of
this legislation is far-reaching
and includes providing assis-
tance to farmers, enhancing
conservation programs, pro-
moting rural growth and jobs,
alleviating hunger and improv-
ing nutrition, investing in food
and agriculture research, and
even securing our nation's en-
ergy future.
Our most recent farm bill,
the Farm Security and Rural


Investment Act of 2002, made
major improvements to the ag-
riculture industry. In the 2002
Farm Bill, Congress made a
commitment to improve the
farm safety net and bring pre-
dictability to the federal gov-
ernment's farm support pro-
grams in a fiscally responsible
way.
Since the enactment of the
2002 Farm Bill, Florida's
farmers, as well as the entire
North Florida community,
have benefited greatly from
the provisions of this impor-
tant legislation, which helped


our farmers compete with the
more heavily subsidized farm-
ers in other parts of the world.
Unfortunately, our country's
economic environment is not
the same as it was in 2001
when the 2002 Farm Bill was
drafted and we enjoyed a pro-
jected multi-billion dollar,
multi-year budget surplus.
Due to fiscal recklessness
and deficit spending over the
past six years, many important
farm programs could be at
stake as we face the possibility
of a "smaller pie" when it
(See Boyd, Page 5)


I


_ n I a~CPI













Letters...

Family Thanks All For

Kindness After Fire


Dear Editor:
This past Sunday our family
suffered a horrific blow with
the loss of my grandson and
his wife's home to fire.
During this tragedy, we were
overwhelmed with many acts
of kindness.
We would like to take a mo-
ment to thank the people of
Jefferson County for opening
their hearts, and wallets to
helping our family during this
time of uncertainty.
There have been many acts


of kindness from neighbors
and strangers over the past few
days, people we will probably
never meet to be able to thank
in person.
Please let me take this time
to say "thank you," from the
bottom of our hearts.
Our family moved to Jeffer-
son County in 1993; we al-
ways believed it was the best
decision and the past few
days have proven that in fact it
was the right decision.
; Sincerely,
The Odom Family


Dear Editor:
I, Ev,a Mathis, grandparent of
Darious Mathis, a Pre-K stu-
dent at Jefferson Elementary
School, would like to highly
commend Bertha Daniels with'
the highest level of honor and
gratitude, for taking the extra
time. and tireless effort to lo-
cum my grandson, Darious,
who wandered off in the park-
ing lot, Tuesday, Jan. 23,
2007, at the PTO meeting.


Her concern for his safety
and return was evident by the
quick thinking and action she
showed in handling this very
serious situation.
Overall, he was found safe,
and I owe it all to Bertha Dan-
iels..
God bless her, and thanks so
much.
Sincerely,
Eva Mathis


No Responsibility


(Continued From Page 4)
rest of us, for when we get in
some kind of trouble.
6. When the most prestigious
and honored award in college
football (The Heisman
Trophy) can be presented to
the quarterback of Ohio State
University although he was
previously suspend for break-
ing NCAA rules in taking in-
appropriate funds, then we all
need one of those "special cir-
cuListanre's" cards. "
`:7. When ofe" bf the most
promising atliktes in 'baseball
(Darryl Strawberry) just can't
overcome his destructive be-
havior and is given chance af-
ter chance after chance to
straighten up and continued to
fail, then we all need one of
those "Multiple Chance" cards.
It is quite clear America oper-
ates on very questionable stan-
dards when it comes to holding
people accountable for their
actions.
On the other side of this per-
sonal responsibility coin is the
lopsided "who it is" mentality
when it comes.to expecting ap-
propriate personal responsibil-
ity.
Most recently, when movie
actor and producer Mel Grib-


son and "Kramer", the actor
from the long running comedy
series "Seinfeld", each made
inappropriate racial "slurs", the
left leaning gang just wouldn't
accept a public apology and
was quick to demand a pound
of flesh and, a pint of blood.
But when one of their own like
Hilary Clinton publicly mocks
oriental people by comically
speaking in "pigeon" Chinese
or Jessie Jackson openly calls
New Your City "Heime Town"
in reference to its large Jewish
community, a simple and often
forced "I'm sorry" suffices for
complete forgiveness!
No wonder so many of our
kids are confused, out of con-
trol and in trouble. If we as a
society can't get our act to-
gether, then we should expect
future generations to have little
if any concept of a standard
and balanced sense of personal
responsibility for themselves,
their families or others.
The "play fast & loose"
mentality that we have devel-
oped over the past few
decades, is our gift to future
generations. We certainly
can't expect them to call us the
next "Great Generation", leav-
ing them such a legacy.


From Our Files


(Continued From Page 4)
FORTY YEARS AGO
February 24, 1967
The Gleaners, Sunday
School class of the First Bap-
tist Church, met at eh home of
Mrs. Bill-Rice Monday eve-
ning.
According to County Agent
Albert Odom, "Corn produ-
cion in 1967 is more appealing
than at any time in the past
several years. In fact it is hard
to remember a time when the
corn price was as favorable as
now, and it shows promise of
holding steady or even im-
proving."


FIFTY YEARS AGO
February 22, 1957
O.L. Crocker has recently
opened a law office in the bus
station in Monticello and will
conduct his law practice from
that location.
Friends of Ed Carney will be
interested to know that he re-
ceived his Eagle Scout award
Thursday night, Feb. 7, at the
Trinity Methodist Church in
Tallahassee.
Birney Linn Jr. and Richard
Linn, sons of Mr. and Mrs. J.
Birney Linn are serving with
the nay as Aviation Electri-
cians in Jacksonville.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 28, 2007 PAGE 5


TAMMIE PECK cuts the ribbon at the grand opening of her new business, Tammie's
Sweets & Deli. From left, Illeane Vorce, Gregory Peck, Buck Bird, Bobby Plaines,
Mary Frances Gramling, Chamber Director, Paula Sparkman, Katrina Walton, Frank
Blow, Eleanor Hawkins, Patsy Burnsed. (News Photo)




College Should Prepare


Students For Careers


By KATHLEEN
MARQUARDT

By now we are aware what
abysmal failures our schools
are at teaching our children
anything of value.
While we know our schools
inculcate the students with
multiculturalism, unsound sci-
entific theories, and sustain-
able development as a neces-
sary avenue to survival of
planet Earth, most of us as-
sume that these "educators" at
least pretend to be providing
the students well-planned and
complete curricula. Sadly,
even this is not so.
At a college in New York
City, students decide on a ma-
jor when they matriculate. No,
not the way you and I did vay
back when or the way most of
our children do. At this school
they do not have to choose one
of the offered majors- the old
standbys.
These students get to
dream up a major. Yes, that's
right they make one up out of
thin air, apparently no matter
how bizarre.
.I met three young women
who graduated from this
school a few years ago. They.
each told me of their majors:
one, violent protest and its af-
fect on art and dance; the sec-
ond was feminism, ecology,
and multiculturalism in rela7
tionship to art; the third was
are and dance.
When I asked how the
school put together the courses
to complete a degree in their,
majors, they told me the
school didn't- they did.
They each chose which
classes would be proper for
them to fulfill the needs of the
major. Also, they said you
could work as hard'as you
wanted (or not). You got to
say exactly what was needed,'
whether it be two courses a se-'
mester or seven.
I didn't get to how they were'
graded. One of the student's'
parents were there and the fa-
ther said, "all of this came out
of the sixties. Isn't it great?
I didn't answer, but asked



Progress

Energy
Fundraiser


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


The Progress Energy Relay
for Life team will host a Yard
Sale from 7 a.m. until, Satur-
day.
The fundraising event will
be held at the Farmers & Mer-
chants Bank parking lot.
Many new and used, big and
small items will be up for sale
at fair prices.
Furniture, miscellaneous
household, tools, yard mer-
chandise are among items
available.


what careers these majors'.had
led them to. One was'teaiching
two classes of yoga, one had
two clients for her pilates
training, and the third was
loafing at her parent's beach.
house still trying to find out
who she is.
So I asked, what careers
might they lead to. I was told
they didn't have to lead to any-
thing.
How many 18 year olds do
you know who can put to-
gether a whole course of
study? I mean one that is vi-
able'and will educate them on
things that might.be helpful to
them in the outside world.
I is as if parent's from the
sixties generation gave their
children all so much for doing
nothing that they are all going
to be some kind of artists.
What I amlsure their parents
gave them was no idea of the
need to work. If the parents
are rich, that's fine -- they-can
support their children for their
entire lifetime. But the parents
of one of these students are not
wealthy and will not be leav-
ing her enough to survive on.
So, in spite of being a col-
lege, "graduate," she has come
out with no vocational skills to
go with of her lack of desire to
succeed in-the business world.
And no thought of what she
might like to do other than to
dance.
I have an idea. Why bother
with institutes of "higher learn-
ing" anyway. If today's youth
know what they need to study,
let them be self-tutored. Par-
ents could save a bundle.
Oops, I'm forgetting. All
those left wing academics need'
to be sustained.
But in earnest, what is going
to happen when this generation
of college graduates cannot
even pretend to teach because
what they have learned has
turned their brains to mush?
I see so many children of
'60s parents who have no clue


When was


the last


time you


made an


investment


that saved


lives?


about where they are going
and how to survive 'without
handouts from home., They
are almost mindless.
They truly blow with the
wind, responding to outside
forces with no thought that
they could even choose a di-
rection for their lives.
Part of it has.to be because
they have been told how awful
America is -- from polluting
our air, land, and waters to our
abusive behavior to other cul-
tures, countries, and religions.
Being Americans themselves
has to be a heavy burden to
live with, having nothing good
to aim for or to visualize for
the future.
What I am coming to is this
question: would these young
women be .in any different --
better -- place f tihe. i.d a'real
education?
(Kathleen Marquardt was
founder of Putting People
First and author of the book
"Animal Scam, the beastly
abuse of human rights." She
is also news editor for
Freedom21.com and Vice
President of the American
Policy Center.)


Boyd
(Continued From Page 4)
comes to the 2007 Farm Bill.
However, shortchanging the
next farm bill would be terri-
bly unwise and detrimental to
our nation's producers who
must be able to compete in a
global market.
Despite our budget chal-
lenges, the rewrite of the farm
bill presents huge promise and
potential for the agriculture in-
dustry. In this bill, we have
the opportunity to develop
more effective disaster assis-
tance, better access to agricul-
tural credit, and more pro-
grams to encourage agricul-
tural research, development,
and conservation.
Additionally, a core mission
of the farm bill should con-
tinue to be promoting profit-
ability and income potential in
agriculture and a degree of sta-
bility in our nation's food and
agriculture system.
We must maintain programs
that help our agricultural pro-
ducers survive the unpredict-
ability of weather and markets.
We also need a farm bill that
looks to the future and sup-
ports, farm-based renewable
energy as a way to move our
country closer toward energy
independence.
I am committed to working
in Congress to expand on the
2002 Farm Bill in these and
other areas that will help our
agricultural producers.
As a fifth generation farmer
and one of a handful of active
farmers in Congress, I know
firsthand the challenges facing
farmers in North Florida. I be-
lieve it is important for me to
communicate to my colleagues
in Congress the real impact
that changes to the farm bill
can have on our agricultural
producers, our food supply,
and our communities.

,


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the Press IIs



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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 28, 2007L ife s t


UtiS4 7d~lVlC4t V
V ae
Q Se~cdc bGcd ~d4~dace 'zedte t 4~d4e j'Q
V Ue


BREAKFAST PIZZA

1 8 oz. can refrigerated dinner
rolls.
6 eggs beaten
1/2 lb. bacon, cooked and
crumbled
1 cup cheddar cheese shredded
1 4 oz can sliced mushrooms,
drained

Spread rolls into a lightly
greased 12 inch pizza pan and
press firmly perforations to
seal.
Combine eggs, bacon,
cheese, and mushrooms in a
medium bowl and pour over
prepared crust. Bake at 375 de-
grees for 12 to 15 minutes.
Serves 6.

Alice Stadin
Library Cookbook

CHICKEN CATALINA

4 whole chicken breasts
1 can whole cranberry sauce
1 16 oz bottle Catalina dress-
ing
1 pkg.-onion soup mix
2 to 3 tbs. olive oil
salt and pepper to taste

Slice chicken breasts in half
so they are not so thick. Saute
in olive oil until lightly brown.
Place in greased oven pan.
Mix cranberries, dressing, on-
ion soup mix, oil and season-
ings and pour over chicken-
breasts.
Bake 350 degrees for 45
minutes, basting with sauce 2
or 3 times as they cook. Serve
with rice or noodles.
Do not cover with foil while
cooking.

Blanche Bilinski
Library Cookbook

JELLO PARTY SALAD
2 3 oz pkg. lime Jell
1 can crushed pineapple,
undrained'


1 8 oz cream cheese softened
1 small tub Cool Whip
Dash onion salt

Mix Jello according to direc-
tions on the box, less 1/2 cup
of water, because of pineapple
juice.
Stir in pineapple and dash of
onion salt. Place in refrigerator
until set, but not firm.
Cream cream cheese and add
Cool Whip. Mix with Jello
mixture. Place in fancy dish
and return to refrigerator until
firm.
Top with cherries, if desired.
NOTE: The dash of onion salt
is a must for unique flavor,
and is equal to 1/8 teaspoon.

Cleo Kelly
Library Cookbook

COLD MARINATED
CHICKEN

2 onions sliced thin
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 stalk celery
1 carrot sliced
1/2 cup vinegar
1 cup dry white wine
6 tbs.. olive oil
2 bay leaves
1 tbs.. tarragon, more if fresh
3 tbs.. minced fresh parsley
1 tsp. salt
1 1/2 tsp..pepper
3 boneless, skinless chicken
breasts.
Prepare marinade by mixing
all ingredients except chicken
breasts in a pan with a lid.
Bring to a boil, turn down
heat and simmer. Cut breasts
into bite sizes. Add to mari-
nade and cook until chicken is
opaque, no more than 10 min-
utes.
Let cool in marinade. Re-
frigerate overnight. Refrigerate
overnight. May be served as a
cocktail hors d'oeuvre, or a
lunch with a salad, or heated
over pasta for a meal.

Pierrette Kealin
Library Cookbook


Club Members Attend

FSU Women's Game


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Members of the Boys and
Girls Club at the County Teen
Center attended the Florida
State Women's Basketball
game against the Georgia
Tech Lady Yellow Jackets,
Feb. 9.
The Florida State Women's.
Basketball coaches provided
the Boys and Girls Club with
20 tickets for the members.



Sausage Dog

Fundraiser

Set Thurs.
Sheriff David Hobbs and
the Jefferson County Sheriffs
Office Relay for Life team
will host a Sausage Dog Sale
11 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. Thurs-
day.

The fundraising event will
be held in the Farmer's &
Merchants Bank parking lot
area at the Courthouse Circle.

The dogs will sell for $3,
onions and peppers will be
available.
Deliveries can be made by
contacting Cricket at 997-
1045 with the order.
All proceeds will benefit the
County Relay for Life event,
for the American Cancer So-
ciety.


RED HAT LADIES meet for lunch to celebrate February birthdays. From left, Mona
MacKenzie, Mary Connell, Irene Evans.


Red Hat Ladies Enjoy

Valentine's Day Lunch


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

SRed Hat ladies met to cele-
brate Valentine's Day, they
trimmed their hats to reflect
the occasion.
Ladies used everything
from cards and flowers to


teddy bears and jewelry.
When they entered Pizza
Hut for their luncheon meet-
ing, the ladies were given a
a number, which was later
used for door prize drawings.
Ileane Evans read the story
of the Valentine legend for
Queen Mum Thelma Birdwell
who was unable to attend.


Historical Association

Will Meet Monday


The Jefferson County His-
torical Association meets 6
p.m. on Monday at the
Wirick-Simmons House.
Do you love historic homes
and gardens? Are you a his-
tory and archaeology buff?
Do you enjoy making new
friends?
,If so, join this active group
of members for an evening of,
fun and fellowship, and learn-
ing at the stately white home
on the corer of Pearl and Jef-
ferson streets in downtown
Monticello.
Local author and historian
Dee Counts will be the key-


note speaker.
Hors d'oeuvres and a cash
bar (wine and soft drinks
only) will be served at 6 p.m.
The meeting will begin at 7
p.m. at the Episcopal Church
Parrish Hall, just a short walk
away.
Members will be updated
on lots of exciting news, hap-
penings, and new program an-
nouncements.
This is a membership
awareness meeting not to be
missed.
Call 997-2465 for more de-
tails.
Members old and new are
welcome.


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The ladies sang Happy
Birthday to all those having
birthdays in February.
The Red Hats meet at noon
on the second Saturday of
each month.
For more information about
the group, or for the next
meeting location, contact
Birdwell at 997-8672.


A. M. Prayer
Breakfast Set
The Business Community
Prayer Breakfast takes place 7
a.m. Thursday, at the First
Presbyterian Church Fellow-
ship Hall.
Guest speaker is Casey Wel-
don, former FSU quarterback.
All are encouraged to attend
and to bring a friend.

IN MEMORY
Michael Austin Buzzett
"Buzz"
Nov. 8,1952 Jan. 12, 2007
My heartfelt thank you for
all the cards, calls, visits, and
support after Mike's passing.
Our friendship celebration
was grand.
Family and friends from far
and near came together to
commemorate his love of life.
I'm sure that Buzz was
smiling down from Heaven.
My thanks and my prayers
go out to all of you,
Barbie Gantt


Monticello News
Keeps You
Informed!!


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 28, 2007 PAGE 7

Art Center

S TO Offer

Knitting,

Crocheting


LOLA EDWARDS
Lola Lucille (Reams) Ed-
wards, 87, died Friday, Febru-
ary 16, 2007 in Penobscot,
Maine.
She was born in Vero
Beach, FL on October 15,
1919, the daughter of Joseph
William Reams and Nettie
Irene (Peters) Reams.
Lola, known as Lucille to
family and close friends,
graduated from Vero Beach
H.S. in 1938 and went on to
nursing school at Orange Me-
morial Hospital, Orlando, FL,
graduating as a R.N. During
WWII, she served as a nurse in
the U.S. Army Air Corps, at-
taining the rank of 1st Lt. Fol-
lowing the war Lola continued
with a nursing career spanning
40 years. She lived her entire
life in Florida until moving to
Castine, Maine in 2002.
Lola was active in numerous
clubs and organizations over
the years, including Eastern
Star, American Business
Women's Association, and Pi-
lot Club. An aid and accom-
plished gardener, she enjoyed
membership in garden clubs
everywhere she lived.
A celebration of her life will
take place later this year. Con-
tributions in Lola's memory
may be made to the Alz-
heimer's Association, 225 N.
Michigan Ave:, FL: 17, Chi-
cago, IL 60601 or at
ww.alz.org.
She is survived by two
daughters, Pamela Farmer-
Scott (Robert) of Castine, ME
and Melody Canty (Jeff) of
Clinton, KY; five grandchil-
dren, Allison Farmer Ullery
(Donald) of Hagerstown, IN,
Amanda Canty of Bowling
Green, KY, Kate Canty of
Nashville; TN, Kevin Canty
and Sarah Canty, both of Clin-
ton, KY; one brother, William
R. Reams of Vero Beach, FL
and one sister, Kathryn Elliott
of Crestview, FL; many cous-
ins, nieces and nephews. ,
Lola was predeceased by
her husband, Ed in 2005 after
59 years of marriage.


PERRY RED HATS meet for lunch and enjoy line dancing at Three Sisters Restaurant.


The service to celebrate her
life will be held on
Wednesday, February 28, 2007
at 11:00 AM at Fellowship
Baptist Church located on Co-
lin Kelly Highway (Hwy.
145N) in Madison. Burial will
follow in Evergreen Cemetery
in Greenville.

Pastor Steve McHargue,
Pastor Chris Peterson and Pas-
tor Garland Jones will take
part in the service. The family
received friends Tuesday, Feb-
ruary 27, 2007 from 6:00 to
8:00 PM at Beggs Funeral
Home in Madison. In lieu of
flowers, you can make a con-
tribution to the Brannon Tolar
Fund at Farmers and Mer-
chants Bank, Greenville, Mon-
ticello or Tallahassee Branch
Office.
She is survived by two sons,
Billy Tolar (Kisha) and Brian
Bass; two grandchildren, Bran-
non Tolar and Brent Hender--
son; husband Paul Rudloff;
parents father and mother,
Franklin and Louise Carroll;
two brothers, Frankie Carroll
(Dela) and Jamie Carroll (Ai-
mee); two sisters, Brenda
Wynn (David) and Glenda Sir-
mon (Johnny); five nieces, Re-
becca Wamblot (Gary), Kristin
Sirmon, Breanna Carroll, Au-
drey Wynn and Keli Murray
(Johnny); Seven nephews, Jer-
emy Carroll (Stephanie), John
Sirmon, Jordan Carroll, Justin
Sirmon, Heath Carroll, Brett
Wynn and Caleb Wynn; two
great nieces, Alexandria Car-
roll and Ashley Wambolt; two
great nephews, Ashton Carroll
and Maverick Murray. And a
host of Aunts, Uncles, Cousins
and friends.

She was preceded in death
by her maternal grandparents,
A.T. and Gertrude Wilson and
her paternal grandparents Lee
and Mary Carroll.


MONBJCELLEW IY NWS
YOUL IR H9/OMEOii 'WN HEWSIPA ERLI


Green Industries Seeking


Spring Project Volunteers
Green Industries Institute From 10 a.m. 12 p.m. on teers are asked to assist
reports that with spring on the' Friday and Saturday, March 2 hospitality for a profess'
horizon, plants are beginning and 3, volunteers will build a workshop from 10 a.m.
p.m., to hand out matt
to come up and volunteers are composting area. ad othr hand out mate
needed now more than ever. From 10 a.m. 12 p.m. on and other helpfuljo
Seedlings for tomatoes and Monday, March 5 they will be Volunteers are also askc
cucumbers are sprouting in learning to compost. This is a bring baked goods,
the greenhouses, tropicals are workshop all about compost- fruits, or any other snack
growing out of their pots, and ing, so volunteers are being be served during cc
there are some new liners to asked to bring a friend and breaks.
pot up. come and learn how to com- Ths professional work


A schedule has been put to-
gether listing dates, times, and
activities for which volun-
teets are sought.
As always, there will be
food and soft .drinks, and
plants to take home.
Even if volunteers can only
spare an hour or two, their
participation is greatly appre-
ciated.
From 10 a.m. 2 p.m. on
Wednesday, Feb. 28, volun-
teers will be sprucing up and
planting the outdoor areas. A
lunch will be provided.


post easily at home.
Refreshments and handouts
will be provided.
This workshop will be re-
peated on a Saturday for those
who cannot make it to the
weekday event.
Contact Kim.at 997-4088
x28 to register for the Com-
posting Workshop, so there
will be enough food and
handouts available.
From 10 a.m. 12 p.m. on
Tuesday and Wednesday,
March 6 and 7 volunteers will
sow seeds and pot up liners.
On Friday, March 9 volun-


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Where did February go????
It's time to March out to GII and get
your hands dirty!
A ^

GREEN N.D US TRI-E S
i N-- 1 I T U' T E

For Prufessional Development
Join Friends of Green Industries Institute and
be a part of something special.

For more information call Kim Kennedy at
997.4088 ext 28
or e-mail kim areenindustries.ora


with
ional
-2
trials
obs.
ed to
fresh
:s, to
coffee

shop


is posted by Green Industries
Institute titled 'Blueprint for a
Green Future.'
In return for all the help,
volunteers will benefit from
the presentations and. enjoy a
picnic lunch.
A "Sellin' o' the Green"
Plant Sale fundraiser is being
planned for Saturday, March
17.
Volunteers will be preparing
for the sale the week before
the event.
More information will be
available as the date nears.
To volunteer, contact Judi
Persons at 997-4088 x21.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Jefferson Arts, 575 West
Washington Street, is plan-
ning a series of Springtime
events.
In honor of National Cro-
chet Month, crochet instruc-
tor Melanie Mays is offering
free beginning crochet lessons
10 a.m. 12 p.m. on the Sat-
urdays of March 3, 10, and
17.
Pre-register for this offer by
calling 997-6026. One can
also sign up for more ad-
vanced classes in crochet and
knitting boards.
A Beaded Tapestry Crochet
Workshop is scheduled from
10 a.m. 2 p.m. on Saturday,
April 28.
This is an intermediate level
class. One must know how to
crochet, in order to take this
class.
Call now to reserve a place
at this workshop.
Crochet with the Tallahas-
see Crochet Club 10 a.m. 12
p.m. on the last. Saturday of
each month at Jefferson Arts.
Projects include the making
of hats for soldiers, blankets
for the homeless, baby blan-
kets and hats for TMH and
the Nicaragua Peace Corp.
This is free! Just bring
books and yam. Get involved!
Get hooked!
The Art Gallery regular
hours a are 10 a.m. 2 p.m. on
Wednesday's and Saturday's.


1i;tJhi


R E S T A U R A N T


OPEN:


Thursday, Friday & Saturday
Dinner 5:30 P.M. until Closing
Lunch 11:30 A.M. 2:00 P.M. Buffet

Available for Private Parties
Call for Details
850-321-7102


SReal Estate
=0 Home Sellers 3I

Sand ore Can Now Hold Onto More Equity i
a n d Mo r e i Assist-2-SellaBl, l he nation's largest discount real estate company has opened its newest
a f office in Tallahassee, Florida under broker-owner lilton lighaower. Known for its i_ r
1 innovative "Full Service with $avings!"r' concept, Assist-2-ScllK now% boasts more than
... ...- 600 franchise offices in the United States and Canada.
Steve W walker Homebuvers in the Tallahassee area lace a dilemma. "In order to purchase a bigger. .i
more expensive home. most need to keep as much equimlyas possible when selling their
SR ealty, LLC current residence," said IIilton Hightower.
R a t) LL One option is the time intensive "For Sale By Owner" strategy, but the pitfalls and aggravations are seldom vsorth the
250 S. Jefferson St., effort And as most people know, using a traditional ral l estate company can mean forfeiting five or even six percent of the
SMonticello, FL total sales price in agent commissions. There is another choice. Assist-2-Sell oilers home sellers a Dl)irect-To-IHuycr "T
program for a very atTordable flat fee, regardless of the selling price of the home. and \w ith no up-front or hidden fees. Under
339 Silver Lake Rd., Monticello (850) 997-4061 Office this pr'og'am,. Assist-2-Sell's team of licensed REAI.TORS. \iill market a home for a flat fee of just $2,495, payable onlo
16 Acres $375,000 after the successful selling and closing of the home. And since Assist-2-Scll is a member of the local MIS, Assist-2-
i 3BR/2BA 2,500 sqft Come Visit Us On the Web Sell iK also offers sellers the "MLS For Less"-' program. In this program. sellers have an option of placing their home in
Completely Refurbished for more info: the MIS system i at otal commission of 4% Best of all. even if the property is listed on MLS. and Assist-2-Sell n
Cypress Pond w/boardwalk www.SteveWalkerRealty.con produces the buyer, the seller pays only the flat fee of $2.495.
S] CALL US! "Don't let the name fool you. This is not a do-it-yourself concept. Under Assist-2-SellR's marketing programs. sellers
.receive the full services of professional REALTORSf' at a fraction of what they might nomnally pa\." continued
S...........ii ... .... i.- Hightower. "Cucstomers can't believe ho\ much they save wiith our programs." these lfull-servtic programs includes
Jim Von Stein Toll Free: (866) 496-3442 signs. free advertising. feature sheets. answering the phone inquiries from buyers. showing the home to perspective buyers,
SBroker www.VonSteinRealty.com negotiating the purchase agreement. interacting with inspectors and appraisers. handling all the paperwork. supervising the
Broker www.VonSteinRealty.comclosing, and more.
"When people first call us, they're thinking there must be a catch. TlIhe can't believe he'll actually\ sell their home for
Sust $2,495. But they are pleasantly surprised when they find out \\e do e\eirthing other real estate agents do bul for a lot
less money. For example, if you compare $2.495 to a six percent commission, a home that sells for $250.000 will save the
Sow\\ner more than $12,500.
S"If your home is priced fairly. it's going to sell. regardless of whichh real estate company. sou choose." Hightower said
-31 -REA LTY i ncI "'[he question is hosw much do you ,want to pay to sell it'?"
=Lq A I1 ic The Tallahassee Assist-2-Sell i franchise serves home sellers and homebuyers in Tallahassee and the surrounding area
Ll | The office is located at 1616 Metropolitan Circle. Suite 1). For more information, call Itlon I lightower at 850-422-)008
or visitt wwvw.Homes4Tallahassee.com.
i P.O. Box 1009 (352) 498-0041
Steinhatchee, FL 32359 cell: (352) 356-1001 L
iii ii II i _








PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 28, 2007
- - - - -
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EMERGENCY HOME ENERGY

ASSISTANCE

FOR THE ELDERLY

The Area Agency on Aging for North Florida a announces the availability of
Emergency Home Energy Assistance for the Elderly Program (EHEAP) funds for
eligible households in Jefferson County. To be eligible, an individual who is at least
sixty years of age must reside in the applicant household, a bill that indicates an
immediate disconnection date if payment is not received by the utility company (this
includes propane and electric), and the household income must be at or below 150%
of the Federal Poverty Income Guidelines.

Please contact Terrie Mihan (850-342-0271) to schedule an appointment or to
request more specific information about the Emergency Home Energy Assistance
Program.

The Emergency Home Energy Assistance for the Elderly Program is funded by the
State of Florida Department of Elder Affairs and is administered by the Area
Agency on Aging for North Florida, Inc.


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Sports


Saturday

Last Day

For Park

Signup


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Recreation Park Director
Kevin Aman, reports that 9 to
11 a.m., Saturday is the dead-
line for taking registration for
T-Ball, Coach, Little League
Baseball, and Girls Youth
Softball.
The registration fee is $30
for T-Ball, Coach Pitch and
girls Youth Softball. The reg-
istration fee for Little League
Baseball is $35.
Parents may pre-register
their children during park
hours through the Saturday
deadline, and must present a
copy of the child's birth cer-
tificate at the time of registra-
tion.
Registrations will not be
taken over the phone.
Aman added that anyone
who misses registration will
be put on a waiting list, there
will be no exceptions.
Players will be given the
choice of playing on the same
teams as last year, f they are
returning to the same league,
or they will be placed into a
draw, with one exception, all
girls youth softball players
will be placed in a draw.
T-Ball is for children ages
6-7; Coach Pitch, ages 8-9;
Little League Baseball, ages
10-12; and Girls Youth soft-
ball ages 10-13. Players must
reach the age required in their
specific league by April 30,
2007.
For further information, con-
tact Aman at 342-0240.



7 Teams

Register

For Classic
Past Rotary President James
Muchovej reported last week
that seven teams have com-
mitted to the Annual Rotary
Sandbaggers Golf Classic,
slated for March 5, tee time 1
p.m., at the Country Club,
with a couple more in the
wings.
"We can take another six or
so teams," said Muchovej.
He added that additional
sponsors are always needed.
All proceeds will go to
benefit Rotary Youth Camp
and local service projects.
Golfers are asked to be pre-
sent at 12:30 p.m. for check
in.

The tournament will be a
shotgun start with a best-ball
format, as usual for the four-
person teams competing.
The entry fee is $50 per per-
son and $200 per team, and
includes 18 holes of golf, a
golf cart, the Rotary's famous
10-ounce rib eye steak din-
ners with all the trimmings,
and door prizes.
Hole sponsorships are also
available for $100, where
sponsors will have their
names placed on a particular
hole on the golf course.
Trophies will be awarded
for Last Place, Low Gross,
and Low Net.

"We are always looking for
someone new to take the big-
gest and coveted Last Place
trophy," said Muchovej.
He added that the weather
conditions were members
only real concern for the clas-
sic.
"We're just praying that it
doesn't rain," said Muchovej.
"As long as it doesn't rain,
we'll be fine."
Last years event saw over 30
golfers and raised more than
$1,800.
For further information
contact any Rotarian or
Muchovej at 997-6508.


MONTICELLO MAGIC, front left, Jay Finlayson, Austin Bentley, Lenorris Footman.
Middle, Anthony be La Torre, Jicarre Watkins, Zak Steele, Back Row, Justin Brown.


ACA Varsity Girls To Play


In Godby Tournament


The season opener for the
Aucilla Christian Academy
varsity softball team facing
off against Hamilton County,
resulted in a rain-out and re-
scheduling, at the bottom of
the third inning, with the
Lady Warriors leading 9-4.
ACA will face Hamilton
County, 5 p.m., April 13,
there for the second scheduled
game, and pick up at 9-4,
where the first game left off,
then continue to play in the
scheduled game, as 4 double-
header.
In the second game, Taylor
County squeaked by Aucilla,
6-5.
Taylor led Aucilla 5-1 until
the seventh inning when the
Lady Warriors came to life,
scoring four runs to tighten
the score.
"We were hitting slow that
day," said Coach Roslyn
Bass.
Lady Warriors had five
hits and committed three er-
rors.
Bethany Saunders pitched
four innings, striking out
three, walking three and giv-
ing up four hits.
Brittany Hobbs pitched the
final three, striking out one,
walking two and giving up.
five hits.
At the plate, Hobbs went
two for three, one RBI, two
runs; Hannah Sorensen went
one for one, two RBI; and
Shaye Eason went one for
two, one RBI, one run.
Aucilla pitchers had a com-
bined no-hitter game against
Maclay, in the five inning
game, which was won 11-0



American Stroke
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Trimi MMwrhes On
For people over age 55, the incidence of
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Stroke Warning Signs:
Sudden numbness or weakness in
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Sudden trouble seeing in one or
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Sudden severe headache
with no known cause. -


by the ten-run rule.
Lady Warriors had 12 hits
and committed two errors.
Hobbs pitched the first
three, striking out one and
walking one.
Paige Thurman pitched the
final two, giving up no walks
and no hits.
At the plate, Lindsey Day
went two for two, one RBI,
one run; Lisa Bailey went two
for two, one run; and Hobbs
went one for two, one RBI,
two runs.
Thurman scored two runs;
and Michaela Roccanti, Jo-
anna Cobb, Mallory Plaines,
and Erin Kelly, each scored
one run.
Aucilla walloped Branford,
34-0.
"Branford gave us a lot of
walks, 14 to be exact, many
resulting in home runs, and
two hit-by-pitches," said
Bass. "They were very, very
rusty."
The Lady Warriors starters
only played the first inning,
and the substitutes played the


second through fifth.
'We had to start bunting in
the second inning just to get
some outs," said Bass. "It
was real bad."
Hobbs pitched the entire five
inning game, called due to the
ten-run rule win, striking out
six, and giving up two hits
and no walks.
Since ACA scored so many
runs, Bass supplied only the
statistics for the top hitters.
Roccanti went one fo- c.
one RBI, three runs;
Sorensen went two for
two RBI, five runs; Nicole
Mathis went two for four, two
runs; and Plaines went three
for six, three runs.
Due to the senior trip next
week, there will be no action
on the diamond until the
Godby Tournament, 8 p.m.,
March 2; and 9 a.m. March 3;
the final game at either 1 or 3
p.m. to determine the overall
winner.
Teams competing in the
tournament include ACA,
Godby, Sneads, and Madison.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 28, 2007 PAGE 9


Monticello Magic

Wins Last 2 Games


The Monticello Magic, the
Thomasville YMCA 12 and
under basketball team, won
the last two games and now
stand 4-2 on the season.
The Magic defeated the
Heat for a 30-17 win.
Zak Steele scored 15 points;
Lenorris Footman, seven
points; Jay Finlayson, and Ji-
carre Watkins each scored
four points.
In the next game, the Magic
dethroned the Kings 27-14,
"This was our best game of


the year," said Coach Mac
Finlayson. "Going into the
match, it was said that the
Kings were the team to beat
this year, they have three
really good shooters but we
played real good defense and
kept them from the hoop."
He added that the Magic was
in the lead, 19-4 at the half.
Steele led the team with 15
points; Footman, nine points;
Finlayson, two points; and
Watkins, one point.


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 28, 2007


Mood Swings To


Face Ace-N-U


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Mood
swings, ladies' A-league ten-
nis team, fell to the third slot
last week after winning three
of six matches against the
Capital City Aces.
Captain Patty Hardy said
she originally thought they
fell to the third slot last week
after losing to the Bainbridge
Different Strokes, 5-1.
"We still lost against Bain-
-ll I lit h ..


bridge, 4-2 to retained our
second place spot because
they were playing an illegal
substitute," said Hardy.
She added that presently, it
is a close point race between
the top three teams with Bain-
bridge at number one with 28
points; Sets in the City, sec-
ond, with 25 points; and the
Mood Swings, third, with 24
2 points.
Team #1, Katie Brock and
Lisa Jackson, lost the sets, 4-6
and 0-6.


Team #2, Hardy and Cindy
Wainright, lost the first set, 1-
6, won the second, 6-2 and
lost the tiebreaker, 6-7.
Team #3, Angie Delvecchio
and Laura Kirchhoff, won by
forfeit. '
Team #4, Trisha Wirick and
substitute, Cathy Neal, lost
the first set, 2-6, won the sec-
ond, 6-0, and won the tie-
breaker, 6-2.
Team #5, Lindsey Taylor
and Susan Scarboro, lost the
sets, 4-6 and 3-6.
Team #6, Maxie Miler and
Jennifer Ellis, won the sets,
7-5 and 6-3.
The Mood Swings will face
the Thomasville Ace-N-U,
9:30 a.m., Thursday, at Tom
Brown Park.


MiAN


'p


ROSHAWN PARKER runs with a pass during a flag football game at the St. Phillip's
Boys and Girls Club in the after school program.


MOOD SWING tennis players, front: Jennifer Ellis, Maxie
Jackson, Laura Kirchhoff, Linsey Taylor, Angie Delvechio.
Wirick, Cindy Wainright, Susan Goodwin,



JCHS Tigers Fall To

Bronson 62-53


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County High
School varsity boys basket-
ball team wrapped up the post
season after losing the Re-
gional quarterfinal to
Bronson, 62-53.
"I'm very proud of my
boys," said Coach Quinton
Adams. "We had an up and
down season but came to-
gether at the end."
Leading the charge for the
Tigers was LaMarcus Bennett
with 26 points, three assists,


four steals.
Tim Crumitie, 14 points,
three steals.
Jon Dady, six points, two
assists.
Anthony Johnson, three re-
bounds.
Lucius Wade, three points,
four assists, two steals.
Jordan Blair, two points,
two rebounds.'
And Harold Ingram, two
points.
Adams concluded that many
of the Tigers will be returning
next year and he has very
high hopes for the team.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Monticello Christian
Academy boys basketball
team lost to Corinth Christian,
67-38, to stand 2-7 on the sea-
son.
Philip Payne lead the score
for the Chargers with 25
points, one of which was a
three-point bucket.
Chip Gallon,. five points



MCA Girls

Lose To

Corinth

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Christian
Academy girls basketball
team fell to Corinth Christian
49-18, to stand 1-6 on the sea-
son.
Leading the score for the
Lady Chargers was Christian
Morrow with eight points;
Kanisha Jordan and Sarah
Parrott each scored six points;
and Latisha Harris scored two
points.
The girls will not compete
in the State Playoffs.
In related news, MCA Prin-
cipal Danielle Matthews said
hte sports program at MCA is
now completed for the
season, because softball could
not be set up in time for play.


with one three-pointer; Luke
Lingo, four points; Jared Bai-
ley, one three-point bucket;
and Ian Morrow, two points.
The Chargers will not com-
pete in the State Playoffs.

In related news, MCA Prin-
cipal Danielle Matthews re-
ported that sports for the year
at MCA have been
completed, because softball
could not be set in enough
time to allow for play.













GA .
i |
[ i
Growing.











_.. . .







Remember Only you can prevent forest fires
t Apublc sorvl otho U 0S DA
IT7 i ForeOBI ServIcle and your SLtLO FOlSt.ers


Miller, Roslyn Bass, Lisa
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MY NAME is Annie. I am
I'm really a sweet dog.
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a female Shepherd mix, with all my shots
How can you resist this face? Won't you


The Fix It Chick Expands


Handyman Business Here


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

A Leon County business,
The Fix It Chick, has recently
expanded, obtained a Jeffer4-
son County license.and will
be provided handyman serv-
ices for local residents.
Owner Donna Ahtolchick,
said she had done carpentry
work for 15 years for family
and friends, and about nine
months ago, began her busi-
ness in Leon County.
"People needed the service
and I like the work so much, I
decided to make it a formal
business," said Antolchick.
"I have a friend in Jeffer-


son County who practically
begged me to obtain my
handyman license for Jeffer-
son County because there was
a dire need there."
She performs minor carpen-
try, minor plumbing and elec-
Irical, interior painung,
molding, dry wall repair and
wall paper removal.
"I hope to have the business
in Jefferson County on a daily
basis soon," she said. "I'll
just have to see how the need
arises."
Antolchick has two people
helping with the business,
Betty Conner, who has 35
years experience in construc-
tion, everything from the
ground up, and her primary


role with the Fix It Chick is
preparing estimates.
Her other helper is Mitchell
Musgrove, who has ten years
experience in flooring, gen-


and am spayed.
please take me


eral carpentry, roofing paint-
ing, "and the whole nine
yards."
Antolchick said their pri-
mary business hours are Mon-
day through Friday, but they
will potentially also work on
weekends.
For estimates or further in-
formation contact the Fix It
Chick at 567-4895.


Protect your heart...

HEART DISEASE IS THE NUMBER ONE KILLER OF AMERICANS BOTH MEN AND WOMEN. AND FOR 250,000 AMERICANS
EACH YEAR, A FATAL HEART ATTACK IS THE FIRST AND ONLY SYMPTOM OF THE DISEASE.

Physicians have long been thwarted by the lack of an effective screening tool for atherosclerosis the
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NEW STATE-OF-THE-ART 64-SLICE SCANNER can produce an image of a patient's
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HEART ATTACK IISK FACTORS:


D HIGH BL.( OOD PRISSIURE

D DI.\BE IES

D HIGH i.HULESTEROLN

D SMOKING


D SEDENTARY LIFESTYLE

D BEING OVERWEIGHT

D HIGH-STRESS LIFESTYLE

D FAMILY HISTORY OF HEART DISEASE


WHAT YOUR CALCIUM SCORE MEANS

Calcium is a rough indicator of ho'. much or little
heart-hurting plaque y''-i have. LJtle other numbers|
measuring heart and arterial funcri',n, the calcium
score helps determine your risk.
* 0 c: No identifiable plaque.
Very low risk of heart disease.
* 1 10 c Minimal plaque burden.
Significant heart disease very unlikely.

* 11 100 c> Mild plaque burden.
Minimal heart disease likely.


* 101 -400


S Moderate plaque burden. Moderate
heart disease highly likely.


Over 400 c ExItensive plaque burden.
Significant heart disease highly likely)
" Calcium scoring is recommended for men over age 45 and women over age 55 who have risk factors for heart disease.
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67-53 Loss To Corinth


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 28, 2007 PAGE 11


Citizens Urged To Prepare


For Tornados In March


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Chris Floyd, emergency
services director, Capital Area
Chapter of the American Red
Cross warns that March
brings tornadoes to North
Florida and that now is the
time to prepare North Floridi-
ans for such storms.
A tornado is defined as a
violently rotating column of
air extending from a thunder-
storm to the ground.
Tornadoes may occur any-
where at any time of the year.
Tornadoes are also closely as-
sociated with hurricanes and
often occur during Hurricane
Season, June 1 through Nov.
30.
The southern states are also
susceptible to waterspouts,
weak tornadoes that form
over warm water. Water-
spouts sometimes move in-
land, becoming tornadoes,
causing damage and injuries.
A Tornado Watch occurs
when tornadoes are possible
in the area. Remain alert for
approaching storms.
A Tornado warning occurs
when a tornado has been
sighted or indicated by
weather radar. Move to a pre
Designated place of safety.
Stay informed of local
weather conditions by tuning
; into local radio and television
, stations or by listening to
NOAA Weather Radio for the
latest tornado watches and
warnings.
Tornadoes occasionally de-
velop in areas in which severe


thunderstorm watches or
warnings are in effect.
Environmental clues to look
for include dark, often green-
ish sky, wall cloud, large hail,
loud roar, similar to a freight
train,.
Some tornadoes appear as a
visible funnel extending only
partially to the ground, and
some tornadoes are clearly
visible while others are ob-
scured by rain or nearby low-
hanging clouds.
Tornado safety before the
storm includes, developing a
plan for your family for
home, work, school, and
when outdoors, with frequent
drills, knowing the county in
which you live, and keeping a
highway map nearby to fol-
low storm movement from
weather bulletins.
Listen to the radio and tele-
vision for information, if
planning a trip outdoors.
Those most at risk include:
people in automobiles,
elderly, the very young and
physically or mentally im-
paired, people in manufac-
tured (mobile) homes or peo-
ple who may not understand
the warning due to a language
barrier.
If a warning is issued, or if
threatening weather ap-
proaches, if in a home or
building, move to a desig-
nated shelter, such as a
basement.
If an underground shelter is
not available, move to an inte-
rior room or hallway on the
lowest floor and get under a
sturdy piece of furniture and
stay away from windows.


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Also, get out of
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Instead, leave it immediately.
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hicle, lie flat in a nearby ditch
or depression. Manufactured
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After you have received a
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For additional information
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to become a Disaster Resis-
tant Neighborhood call the
'Capital Area Chapter of the
Red Cross in Monticello at
342-0211.


Got A Cute Photo?

Sent It To Us And We'll Share It
With Our Readers

Kids Dogs Strange Stuff, etc.

Monticello News
P.O. Box 430
Monticello, FL 32345

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Phone:50-77-4136 2840-B Industrial Plaza ww avyob om eight Clearing & Driveways
Fax 850-656-1275 Tallahassee, Florida 32301 Muscular Dystrophy Assodation office (850) 948-4019
Mobile: 850.251-4308 E-mail IhunlQocenrathealingconsulloans com 1-800-572-1717* www.mdausa.org RAYMOND HERNDON Mobile (850) 570-0458


I I' I -


SI I t


Anchor

YTrus t

Properties
220 Tenthl St. SE Steinhatchee, fL 32359
352-498-7770 ToCllree 877-498-7770 o
Pam Wessels Mark Rebin Larry Nichols
Realtor/Broker Realtor Associate Realtor Associate


I







PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 28, 2007


Great


Gift Idea







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News



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If you know
a child with
muscular dystrophy
who can benefit
from a special
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or her about MDA
summer camps.
They're fun and free!


Muscular Dystrophy Association
Jerry Lewis, National Chairman
1-800-572-1717
www.mdausa.org


Gotcha!





1. The first rule of
Advertising is to get
their attention.


2. The second rule is
sustained, repeated
Advertising

Advertising
doesn't
cost...
IT PAYS!!!!

Call Us!


997-3568

Monticello
News
'You Can't Be
Without It!'


STOP LEG CRAMPS -:LEgcramps"
BEFORE THEY STOP YOU. :Ulcet
Triple Calcium
,, ,,:' t ... ., l., : : l. J, ric .


UWW1's4 Warehouse Sale
First Saturday of the Month
*Comforter Sets *Window Coverings
*Bedspreads *Pillows -
Saturday, March 3, 2007
Doors Open 8AM 12 Noon -7
707 Gil Harbin Industrial Blvd., Valdosta. GA. "
Call for Directions: 800-633-2215 :- ..


LEGAL
Job Advertisement County
Coordinator Jefferson County,
Florida Jefferson County is seeking
a County Coordinator. This is a
professional position within
Jefferson County government. The
complete Jefferson County Job
Application, the Job Announcement
and the Job Description can be
obtained through the County Clerk
of Courts Office, Jefferson County
Courthouse, Room 10, Monticello,
FL 32344, by telephone at
850/432-0218 or on the County's
web site lttp://co.ielferson.l1.iis. The
completed Jefferson County Job
Application and resume are due in
the Clerk of Courts office by noon,

"Familiar Faces
And Quiet Places"

A Pictorial And Nar-
rative
History Of
Jefferson County

By Derelyne Delp
Counts

Available At The
Chamber Office And
Leading
Merchants


LEGAL
March 19, 2007. EOE.
R/D 2/21,23,28,3/2,7,9,c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION IN RE:
ESTATE OF CHRISTOPHER W.
JOHNSON Deceased. File No.
07-07-PR Division
NOTICE TO CREDITORS The
administration of the estate of
CHRISTOPHER W. JOHNSON,
deceased, whose date of death was
July 8, 2006; File Number 07-07-PR
is pending in the Circuit Court for
Jefferson County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
County Courthouse, Rm 10,
Monticello, FL 32344. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below. All creditors of the
decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate, on whom a copy
of this notice is required to be
served must file their claim with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM. All other creditors of
the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS
NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOT WITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH


2 Gorgeous Houses With Beautiful Lake &
Golf Course Views

Be Right on Top of the PB Dye Champion Golf Course
Call or visit our webiste for more info!
www.Dremierrealestateauctions.com


239-394-2507


Lic# BK3189552/AB2580


In Florida..............$45.00

Out Of State.........$52.00





Extensive Coverage

Of Jefferson County

Every Wednesday & Friday




Mail check or money order

to

MONTICELLO NEWS

P.O. Box 428

Monticello, Florida 32344





Monticello


News


you Can't


Be 'Without It'


MUSIC & LYRICS
(PG13)
Fri. 5:40-7:55-10:10 Sat. I:10-
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DADDY'S LITTLE
GIRL
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Fri. 5:30-7:45-10:00 Sat. 12:55-
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BRIDGE TO
TERABITHIA
(PG13)
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3:15-5:25-7:35-9:45 Sun. 1:05-
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5:25-7:35
THE NUMBER 23
(R)
Fri. 5:10-7:20-9:30 Sat. 12:50-
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THERE'S NO SUCH THING AS


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FREE ADS


.,4.


If you have something to give

away We will help you with a

free classified ad

published twice


OR


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want to return it to its

rightful owner -

We'll help you

Two free classified ads



Monticello News

997-3568

Classified Ads Work!


AUCTION NOTICE
An auction of old used poles will be held
Saturday, March 3, 2007 at 9:00 A.M. at the
Tri-County Electric Cooperative Perry
Warehouse located at
242 Arthur Padgett Road, Perry, Florida.

Contact Darrell Tuten, 850-973-2285, Ext. 219
between 7:00 A.M. and 3:30 P.M. Monday
through Friday if you should have any questions.


. i

\\
i:\ ??
;i ;


*.. ;... :









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 28, 2007 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday;..$9.00
Each Additional Line....$1.25
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGAL
ABOVE, ANY CLAIMS FILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH BARRED. The date of
first publication of this notice is:
February 21, 2007. David IM.
Andrews, Esquire Attorney for
Personal Representative Florida
Bar No. 141061 Law Office of David
M. Andrews 125 Nix Bat Yard Road
St. Augustine, FL 323084
Telephone: (904) 826-1987 Fax:
(904) 826-4236 RUTH JOHNSON
Personal Representative 59 Hibbard
Street Amsterdam, NY 12010
R/D 2/21.28/07,c
HELP WANTED
Part-time Receptionist Needed
for busy CPA office. Please fax
Resume to 342-9899 or Call for
appointment 342-9898
S/D2/28 tfn,c
Driver-Bynum Transport needs
qualified drivers for Cental
Florida-Local & National OTR
positions. Food grade tanker,
no hazmat, no pumps, great
benefits, competitive pay & new
equipment. (866)GO-BYNUM.
Need 2 years experience.
R/D2/28,3/2fc
Earn Up to $550 Weekly
Working through the
government PT No Experience.
Call Today!! (800)488-2921 Ask
for Department W21
R/D2/28,3/2fc
2 Drivers Needed $100.00 a day
528-5218
R/D 2/23,28,3/2,7c
Need cleaning assistant to clean
offices in the evening, in
Monticello. Please call
850-894-6254 or Fax
850-894-6224.
2/16,tfn,c
AmeriGas Propane has an
immediate opening for a
SERVICE TECHNICIAN for
our Monticello district which
includes servicing the greater
Tallahassee area. Individual will
install, repair, and maintain
propane gas system, appliances
and equipment- Requirements
include a high school diploma
(or equivalent), a valid class B
CDL with hazmat and tanker
endorsements, a great driving
record and satisfactory
completion of a DOT physical,
drug test and background
check. We offer competitive
wages, medical & dental
benefits, 401k savings plan and
liberal vacation & holiday
policy. Drug free work
environment. EOE. Fax
resumes: Attention: Sales &
Services Manager (850)
997-3854 or call (850) 997-3331.
R/D 2/21,23,28,3/2,c
Cox Auto Trader is currently
seeking drivers to deliver our
magazines in the Tallahassee
FL, Madison, FL and
surrounding areas. Computer
knowledge helpful, requires
reliable vehicle, good driving
record, valid drivers license &
insurance. One day a week -
Thursdays. Pick up magazines
in Madison. Call 386-590-1255
1/24,26,31,2/2,7,9,14,16,21,23,28
,3/2,c
Cleaning service needs people in
Monticello area after 5 p.m. 3
days a week part time work
must be able to pass a back
ground check. Only serious
minded inquires only. Call
Karen at 850-942-6200 or
850-926-7029.
2/7,9,14,16,21,23,28, c
AVON! Start the year with a
new career,, earn 50%, only $10
to start! 570-1499
R/D
1/31,2/2,7,9,14,16,21,23,28,pd
Need cleaning assistant to clean
offices in the evening, in
Monticello. Please call
850-894-6254 or Fax
850-894-6224.
2/16,tfn,c
The Jefferson County Road
Dept. is accepting applications
for the following positions: (1) a
Mechanics position. Must have
experience in gas and diesel
engines and/or have high school
diploma or GED and will train.
A class A CDL license would be
a plus. (2) A Truck driver with a
class A CDL license. Must have
a high school diploma or GED.
(3) An Equipment Operator/
class A-CDL driver. Must have
a high school diploma or GED.
Closing date for all positions
will be March 9, 2007.


2/23,28,3/2,7,9,14,16,c

BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
Learn to buy' Foreclosures, tax
liens, and rehabs for pennies on


BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
the dollar. Mentor walks you
through each deal A-Z to ensure
SUCCESS (800)433-4556
R/D2/28,3/2fc

SERVICES
We do not give simple answers
to complex questions. Instead,
we offer tools that help people
develop a sustaining -faith.
Christ Episcopal Church, three
blocks N. Of the courthouse.
Sunday services at 8:30 and
11:00 AM. 997-4116
R/D 2/28,c
I build sheds, decks, handicap
ramps, exterior carpentry work,
window/door replacement. Call
Bob 242-9342
R/DI/10,12,17,19,24,26,31,2/2,7,
9,14,16,21,23,28,3,2,7,9,14,16
Child Care Services- infant to 3
years old. Reasonably low
prices. In my home. 997-5498
I-1/1,TFN,c
If you have a child attending
FSU/FAMU high schools, and
carpooling is not working, for
an affordable fee, you have an
option. Cal Freeman Davis
510-5162, 421-8060
R/D 2/21,23,28,pd
D&J Soft Wash Brick, Siding,
Stucco, and More. Free
estimates and great work for a
low price. Owner operated,
850-210-3906.
2/16,21,23,28,pd

Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
new menopausal products.
Jackson's Drug Store.
5/12 tfn, c
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2'11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, S/D, tfn
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
Tfn

FOUND
Large white dog with brown
spot over right eye and tail,
black leather collar. 997-2358
R/D23,28, 3/2,7nc
R/D 2/21,nc

GARAGE SALE
Moving Sale Saturday March 3,
8 to 2 645 E. Madison St.
Monticello. Various household
& yard items.
R/D 2/28, 3/2pd

AUTOMOTIVE
$500.00 POLICE IMPOUNDS
Cars from $500! Tax Repos, US
Marshall and IRS sales! Cars,
Trucks, SUV's, Toyota's,
Honda's, Chevy's, & more. For
Listings Call (800) 425-1730
x2384
R/D2/28,3/2fc

FOR SALE
Mobile Home, $5,000 65', 3
BDRM, 1 BA 997-8466
2/28,3/2,pd
Specialized feed for Alpacas &
Lamas. Call Marcy @
850-421-2403
2/9,14,16,21,23,28,3/2,7,c
FOR SALE you move 93
Merritt 54x24 DW 3 BR, 2 -
BA w/fireplace, 12x10 metal
shed and more included. No
calls after 9:00 pm please
850-997-3318 or 850-544-7785

NEED CHILDCARE?
ENROLL TODAY
The Little University Co.,
is now accepting Infants.
Open enrollment for all ages and
sibling discounts. Limited Spaces
for Arbor School Readiness.
Call 997-2970


FOR SALE
2/16,tfn,nc
NEW QUEEN POSTER
bedroom set bed, dresser,
mirror, chest, 2 night stands.
$4000 value, must sell $1500.
850-545-7112.
12/6,tfn,c
DINING ROOM Beautiful
cherry table, 2 arm & 4 side
chairs, lighted china cabinet.
Brand new in boxes, can deliver.
Must move, $799. 850-545-7112.
12/6,tfn,c
Homes For Sale, Palm Harbor
Factory Liquidation Sale. 2006
Models Must Go! Modular,
Mobile & Stilt Homes. 0%
Down When you own your own
land!! Call for Free Color
Brochure. (800)622-2832
R/D2/28,3/2fc .

FOR RENT
Gadsden Square 2 3 BR, 2 BA
apartments HW floors, for rent.
4 office spaces ranging from 500
sq ft & up. 850-510-9512
2/21,23,28,3/2c
Spacious 2/1 and 1/1 apts, also
office space, near Monticello
center. Section 8 OK. Call
850-491-8447
1/24,tfn,c

REAL ESTATE
Wanted One to two acres with
well and septic tank. Call
997-7441.
2/28,tfn.nc
. ... .. . . . .


REAL ESTATE
Jefferson Co. Land Auction 700
acres, starting @ 1200/ac
owner/agent/March 10th www.
700AcreAuction.com
2/4-3/10,c
House 3 Bedroom, 2 '/ Bath,
in ground pool, on 6 fenced
acres. 1% miles from Monticello
City limits,-on Old Lloyd Road.
Call after 5pm 997-2063,
322-3767.
R/D 2/14,16,21,23,28,pd
Newly Renovated 2 BD/ 1 Bath
$69,900 Info. call 212-3142
2/14,16,21,23,28,pd
House For Sale By Owner
4 Bdr, 1 Full Bath, 2 half Baths.
Located on 900 S. Mulberry St.
Call 229-890-5956
R/D2/28,3/2,7,9pd
2.57 acres in Shaw
Plantation/Woodville. 1986
liveable singlewide with no well;
seller currently paying $20. Per
mo. to adjoining property for
water. AS IS price reduced for
clean up and repair. $35,000.
Premier Properties,
850.421-0020
R/D2/28tfn.c
20.20 acres in Gadsden County
near Nicholson Farmhouse. No
road frontage/easement off
Hwy. 12. Possible hunting
camp, subdivision, homesite or
investment. $10,000 per
acre/$202,000.00 Total. Premier
Properties. 850-421-0020
R/D 2/28tfn,c


__ &fl_


BRYNWOOD CENTER

RN, CNA
Full-time, and Part-time
Excellent pay PLUS differentials
ADMISSIONS/MARKETING COORDINATOR
Experience in Marketing & Health Care Preferred
Full-time
Dietary Part-time
Medical Records Full-time

If you are interested in this GREAT opportunity,
Contact us at:
BRYNWOOD CENTER
1656 SOUTH JEFFERSON STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
PHONE: 850-997-1800, FAX: 850-997-7269
www.deltahealthgroup.com
Drug Free Workplace EOE/m/f/d/v


For Sale by First United Methodist Church 2400 sq.
ft. home at 895 West Washington Street: This former
Methodist Parsonage with split floor plan has 4 bed-
rooms and 3 1/2 baths, refinished hardwood floors.
New tile floors in kitchen, laundry and baths, carpet
in the family room and master bedroom. Bathrooms
newly renovated. Wood stove insert in fireplace.
Large lot landscaped with magnolias, camellias, crepe
myrtles and azaleas. Large deck and screened porch.
$259,500. For more information
call 997-5545


ARNP ORT CRT RN LPN
Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner position available at DMH Pediatric
and Family Medicine Clinic in Madison. ORT, CRT, RN and LPN positions
available at DMH in Perry. RN and LPN 7p shift receives additional pay
incentives. Applications may be picked up at the clinic or
www.doctorsmemorial.com and emailed to dianam@doctorsmemorial.com,
faxed to 850-584-0661 or call HR 850-584-0866.
Doctors Memorial Hospital, Perry, Florida


km.m aa MEN s u m MERV mamme .

Housing Vouchers


SWe accept al1 vouchers
2/2 $615 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 $50 dep. m

Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571
A E
1.mmmi-m-mm- m m m- m mm m


(850) 997-4340


iS Kh

'1B i'


Property Management Services!!!
Great Rentals
2/1 1/2 bath mobile home east of
town on 5 acres $500/month


Wooded Tract 2.09 hillside acres east
of town on graded County Road $30,400

Just Listed!! 3 bedroom 2 bath delightful log
cabin with front and back screened porches,
board fence pasture, double carport and out
building on 4.07 acres $385,000

Lloyd Acres on a wooded hillside a 3 bedroom
2 bath home with oak floors, fireplace and lots of
very nice extras including shop for $87,500

Historic Budd House built ca 1882 by commu-
nity leader of the day for his family. Lovely wood
work, high ceilings, spacious rooms, grand fire-
places, marvelous porches, currently 4 bedrooms
and 2 baths $355,000

Waterfront Home!! Like New, roomy, 3 bed-
rogm 2 bath home with spacious family room, big
carpoit, terrific sdreene-d iorch across the back of
thethouse, nice barn with 5 hillside acres on very
nice lake near 1-10 and US 19 $385,000 See it at
www.TimPeary.com

Amazing Buy!!! Mixed Use Property 12
plus partially cleared acres on US 19 south land
use designation permits 4 houses per acre near
Dennis' Trading post only $36,500 per acre

Long and Thin 13.29 acres some wooded
some open $5,000 per acre

Cherry Tree Lane Price Slashed!!! 3 bed-
room 2 bath doublewide with fireplace, big porch,
garage, shed, above ground pool, with big trees,
fence paddocks, on county maintained paved
now $110,000

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly
wooded acres Only $36,500

Pasture and Pecans 5-10 lovely acres on
paved road $15,500 per acre Very nice property,
good deed restrictions

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Great Opportunity!!! Comfortable 4 bedroom
3 bath home on five fenced acres with guest cot-
tage w/bath, 2 car garage, big shop, pasture 100
pecan trees and a nice pool Only $365,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Wooded Acreage 5.35 acres on private road
off Paul Thompson Road $128,500

Waukeenah Hiqhway 27.99 acres good
home site fenced pasture $545,000

Aucilla Shores 5 level wooded acres $75,000

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath double-
wide with nice deck, fenced yard on 1 acre
$73,500

Investment Property Choice lot on the
Ecofina River 20 minutes to the Gulf, State
property on 3 sides, septic tank on property,
paved road only $195,000


Realtor Tim Peary

850-997-4340
See all our listings at
www.TimPeary.com

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


Ii









PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 28, 2007


RECOGNIZED by the VFW for his work as a
ington.


REV. JB. DUVAL, was
tos)



Spring


Plant P
With spring around the
ner, poisoning hazrds oc
more frequently with
time spent outdoors.


Exposure to outdoor plants,
pesticides, garden chemicals
and food poisoning tend to
occur more in the spring sea-
son.
Deborah Smith, education
coordinator for thp Florida
Poison Information Center-
Jacksonville, says, "Chewing
or swallowing a small amount
of certain plants or pesticides
can potentially lead to serious
consequences for young chil-
dren."
However, parents can pro-
tect their child and prevent
accidental poisonings by re-
viewing a few simple preven-
tion guidelines.
Outdoor Plants:
*Learn to identify outdoor
landscaping plants by their
common and botanical names.
*Remove any poisonous
plant and replace it with a
safer, nonpoisonous plant.
*Keep plant food away
from children.
*Teach children that it is
dangerous to put any part of a
plant, berry or wild mush-
room into their mouths.
*Call the poison informa-
tion center to obtain a list of
toxic and nontoxic plants.
Symptoms include burning
in the mouth, vomiting or di-
arrhea .
Pesticides and garden
Chemicals:
*Store pesticides and other
chemicals in locked cabinets
out of sight and reach of chil-
dren.


firefighter and EMT was Thelman Wash-


recognized by the VFW for his community service. (News Pho-




Brings Pesticide,


oisoning Hazards
cor- *Read manufacturer's label about these potential spring
occur for instructions for use, pre- poisoning hazards and other
moe cautions and restrictions, potentially dangerous sub-
*Npvp r trnnsfpr npotieidtP tn stances.


other containers, especially
old drinking containers.
*Avoid the use of pesticides
products that require leaving
powder or pellets in areas
where children and pets play,
or may otherwise get to them.
*Never reuse pesticide con-
tainers.
Symptoms include dizziness,
headache, chest discomfort,
vomiting, sweating, diarrhea,
weakness, difficulty in breath-
ing, pinpoint pupils, and even
death.
Food Poisoning:
*Wash all countertops,
utensils and hands with warm,
soapy water before and after
food handling and prepara-
tions.
*Do not leave perishables
out of the refrigerator for
more than two hours.
* *Cook meat, seafood, eggs
and poultry thoroughly.
Keep picnic food properly
cooled and stored.
*Never thaw food and meat
at room temperature.
*Dispose of all can foods
with bulging lids, dents or
cracks.
Symptoms include nausea,
vomiting, abdominal cramp-
ing and diarrhea
For poisoning emergencies,
call the Poison Information
Center toll free, 24 hours a
day, at 1-800-222-1222.
The health care profession-
als at the center will immedi-
ately respond to poison
emergencies and answer
poison-related questions


WANTED: OBSERVANT DINERS
FOR APPETIZING ASSIGNMENTS
We're seeking frequent restaurant patrons to visit our clients'
establishments "anonymously" and document their experiences
for customer service training. Compensation for correctly
completing the visit and online survey includes dining check
reimbursement* plus a small bonus.
LUNCH I& DINNER ASSIGNMENTS NOW\ AVAILABLE IN
Across FL and the U.S.

SEEKING SAVVY TRAVELERS TOO!
Special assignments for hotels &resorts across S.E.
As well as RV owners (past present) in Lakeland &Sarasota

EARN MORE & REGISTER EXCLUSIVELY AT
www.MysteryGuestlnc.com


oter bulsnses uo0ss the US A end Cnedn MG! Is bated in Wnor Pnrk, FL. has been ,nrponred tinc 952 nr a meimbi 01
Mystery Shorping Providers Asso lion, 8r B On Line etrer usine r t eerau olCenltl Flarde & Wnier Pail Chemboel I Comlelr


SFC WILLIAM L. REAMS was recognized by the VFW for his work in law enforcement.


RECEIVING the Commitment Award from the VFW is Nathaniel Gallon, Sr.


The many

faces

of canng
Find out what you can do. Contact us
at 1(800) 899-0089 or www.voa.org
V Volunteers
of America"

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Extraordinary opportunity to own a piece of
Florida paradise with this single family home!


Call or visit our website for more info!
www.Dremierrealestateauctions.com


239-394-2507


Lic#s BK3189552
AB2580


2006 Taurus SE, $T-G4;.Z $11,816. Stk# P533
2006 Taurus SE, $T5-9:.$11,816. Stk# P546
2005 Focus, S--3Z. $10,177. Stk# P545
2003 Focus, $9-99.$7,087. Stk# 260044B
2004 F250 Crew Cab Diesel, $27-7.,--$25,987. Stk# P548B
2003 Honda Accord EX V6 Sedan $16,877
2005 Focus, r2--9;. $8,859. Stk# 270067A
2003 Ford Ranger X-Cab XLT Off Road FX4 $10,977
2004 F250 X-Cab 2WD Lariat, ST- $19.Z$6,989. Stk# 260233A
2003 Chevrolet Suburban LT, $23-0. $19,309. Stk# 270074A
2002 F150 X-Cab FX4 Lariat, $t-S I-Q. $15,250. Stk# 260227A
2001 Nissan Pathfinder LE, $9-3,9. $10,989. Stk# P551A
1995 Toyota Tacoma Xtra Cab 4x4, $8,577. Stk# P552B
2005 Kia Rio, $8,999. Stk# 270064AI
2005 Ford Focus ZX4 SE, $12,477. Stk# 270019CA
2005 Ford 500 Limited, $18,977. Stk# P556
2004 Ford Ranger XL, $10,477. Stk# P558B
2203Ford Explorer XLT, $9,977. Stk# 260235B
2002 Ford Taurus SE, $7,977. Stk# 270031CA
2002 Ford F150 Crew Lariat, $17,977. Stk# P553
2001 Ford Ranger XLT Off Road Supercab, $12,977. Stk" 270090A
2000 Ford F250SD Off Road Crew 4x4, $16,977. Stk# 260201C
1995 Ford Mustang, $6,977. Stk# P5571
2005 Chevrolet Equinox LS, $15,800. Stk# P555A
2005 Chevrolet Cavalier, $9,977. Stk# 270019CA
2003 Chevrolet Cavalier LS Sport, $9,977. Stk#270072A
2004 Buick Century Custom, $7,977. Stk# 27006213
2002 Buick Century Custom Premium, $4,997. Stk# 2700631


408 SW 52nd Street,
CapeCoral, FL 33114


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