Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00181
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: February 23, 2007
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00181
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text









Car Buyers
Avoid

Scam Artists

Editorial, Page 4


BOys, Girls Clubs
Attend

Titan Opener

Story, Page 8
IE NI


Use Caution With
Over Counter

Medications

Story, Page 10
I


New Security

Rules At

Courthouse

Story Page 14


' arll


Friday Morning


Monticello


931 TH YEAR NO. 15, 50 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007


Tax Reform Leads Hearing


REPRESENTATIVE LORANNE AUSLEY talks with Ron Smith, a member of the Jeffer-
son County Legislative Committee, following Tuesday night's public hearing. (News
Photo)


SENATOR AL LAWSON speaks with Police Chief David Frisby and wife, Merry Ann
following the hearing Tuesday night. Frisby talked about the negative impact that ta:
reform would have on small cities and counties. (News Photo)


Accord Aims At Regional


Economic Development


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


The County Commission last
week entered an agreement
with 13 other counties in the
Panhandle for the expressed
S purpose of promoting
economic development on a
regional basis.
"By entering this agreement,
we are basically agreeing to
work together, on a regional
level, to target particular
industries to serve as catalysts
for economic development in
our 14-county region,"
Economic Development
Director Julie Conley
explained to the commission.
She pointed out that the
agreement would give the
local community access to
research data, input into the
site selection process, the
opportunity to propose local
sites for consideration, and
participation in the
decision-making process,
"with a view towards how a
project will impact our
community."


"Conley cautioned, however,
that, as with any economic de-
velopment effort, results
would not be forthcoming im-
mediately. But there were no
risks involved either, she said.
Called the Catalyst Project
for Economic Development,
the idea is to take a regional
approach to economic devel-
opment by counties identified
as Rural Areas of Critical Eco-
nomic Concern (RACECs).
RACECs are counties where
the average wages, business
and industry development, as
well as household and per cap-
ita income, are considered be-
low par, when compared with
the rest of the state and the
country.
Some four years in the mak-
ing, the catalyst project is be-
ing spearheaded by Enterprise
Florida, Inc., (EFI), the state's
public-private organization for
economic development, which
was given the task of formulat-
ing a statewide strategic plan
for the economic development
of rural counties.
In 2003, EFI held regional
forums in the state's three des-


ignated areas of critical eco-
nomic concern and came up
with regional priorities and an
action plan for the diversifica-
tion of the rural economies.
The RACECs, in turn, cre-
ated a seven-point Plan for Ru-
ral Economic Development,
called the 7-point plan, which,
among other things, called for
the creation of a regional mar-
keting initiative.
In response, the Legislature
in 2005 appropriated $2 mil-
lion to 'implement the market-
ing and research component of
the 7-point plan.
The idea is to target select in-
dustries, identify potential sites
for these targeted industries in
the participating 14 counties,
and develop the necessary in-
frastructure to accommodate
the targeted industries, among
other goals.
The way the agreement
works, this county will reap
monetary benefits from any in-
dustry that locates in any of
the participating counties."
Likewise, this county will
(See Accord, Page 6)


Global Warming, Poor

Also Draw Attention


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Legislators held their annual
pre-session hearing at the Op-
era House on Tuesday
evening.
But with only two of the
four legislators attending and
several constitutional officers
also missing for one reason or
another, the hearing was a
down-scaled version of previ-
ous hearings.
Senator Al Lawson and Rep-
resentative Loranne Ausley
were the two legislators who
attended. Senator Nancy Ar-
genziano and Representative
Will Kendrick were reported
to be attending other meetings,
- although their aides did attend.
As expected, the governor's
proposed tax reform, with its
potential of reducing local
governments' revenues, was
very much the main topic of
discussion.
It was a point raised by City
Clerk Emily Anderson (speak-
ing on behalf of Mayor Julie
Conley, who was away), Com-
missioner Skeet Joyner, Police
Chief David Frisby, Farm Bu-
reau President Stephen Mon-
roe, and Legislative Commit-
tee secretary Dick Bailar,
among others.
All, to a person, expressed
concerns about the governor's
proposed tax reform and asked
that the legislators proceed
with caution on the matter.
While it was true that the pre-
sent system had inequities, it
was the expressed sentiment
, that it was not up to the state to
Dictate a one-size-fits-all solu-


tion to the problem.
"We get a little antsy when
the state tells us how best to
deliver services to our
citizens," Anderson said. "A
one-size-fits-all quick solution


LAWSON


S AUSLEY
may not be the best solution."
Bailar questioned the consti-
tutionality of portability, the
proposal that would allow
homeowners to transfer their
Save Our Homes three-percent
cap from one dwelling to an-


other.
"We think there's a constitu-
tional issue there," Bailar said,
mentioning that taxing authori-
ties arid property' values can
vary dramatically from county
to county.
Bailar also pointed out that
doubling the homestead ex-
emption from the present
$25,000 to $50,000 would de-
prive this county of an esti-
mated $1 million in revenues.
Not to mention the impact that
the proposal to place a three-
percent'cap on commercial and
nonresidential structures
would also have, he said.
If the legislators were deter-
mined to. approve the tax re-
form measures, at least let the
changes be phased in and con-
sider providing alternative
funding sources for small
counties, Bailar asked.
Frisby's appeal was rendered
almost in the form of a prayer.
"Protect us from the dou-
bling of the homestead exemp-
tion," Frisby requested, citing
the previously mentioned
negative effects that such
measures would have on small,
fiscally-constrained counties
and municipalities.
Joyner- hammered the same
theme. If the tax reforms were
approved, the lost revenues to
this county would negate the
$600,000 that the county be-
gan receiving last year as a fis-
cally constrained rural county,
he said.
"It would put us right back
where we started," Joyner said.
As for the governor's stated
perception that local govern-
ments were out of control in
their spending, Joyner said he
took the statement "as an insult
to me".
"We need to educate Gov.
Crist about the problems that
(See Tax Reform, Page 2)


ii-


... ..
HORSES and small horse farms are very much a part of the county, adding to the ru-
ral flavor of the area. (News Photo)


Dixie More Than Continental


Unbeknownst to some per-
haps, Dixie Plantation is more
than white columns, long leaf
pines, live oaks, Spanish moss,
bobwhite quail, bird dogs and
the Continental, possibly the
best wild quail field trial in the
world.
It is also a natural paradise
encompassing 9,000 acres of
rolling hills and woodlands,
the site of historic house con-
sidered an architectural treas-
ure, and sponsor of the Mid-
night Sun Horse Show, among


other activities.
All to the effect that the
plantation, which is managed
by the Geraldine C. M. Living-
ston Foundation, contributes
much to the local economy in
the way of food and gasoline
sales, lodgings and miscellane-
ous other economic activity.
In addition, the plantation
contributes directly to the local
economy through taxes, wages
and salaries, charitable contri-
butions and other operating ex-
penses.


Indeed, each year, according
to the plantation figures, the
enterprise contributes in excess
of $750,000 to the local econ-
omy.
How fortunate to have an en-
tity that contributes greatly to
both the environment and the
economy of Jefferson County,
says spokesperson for the
foundation.
What's more, the enterprise
is also engaged in several re-
search and educational
(See Dixie, Page 2)


I









PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FLI, NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 23, 2007

Farm Bureau Members

Attend District

Legislative Meeting


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The County Farm Bureau
was recently involved in the
Multi-County District Legis-
lative Meeting in Mayo, to
discuss the upcoming Legisla-
tive session.
The county was represented
by Bureau members Dorothy
Lewis and Doug Helms.
Newly elected State Repre-
sentative, Debbie Boyd, from
Newberry, was on hand to re-
port some of the issues that
'will be discussed during the
'session.
John Hoblick, new president
of the Florida Farm Bureau.


was also present to discuss
Bureau involvement in the
Tallahassee Legislative arena.
"Some of the priority issues
this year," said Lewis, "will
be to keep Florida's Agricul-
tural Assessment Law, or as it
is more commonly called, the
Greenbelt Law, in its present
format. We do not need to
make any changes in this
method of taxing agricultural
'lands in our state."
Farm Bureau has been
known as a champion of Pri-
vate Property Rights in Flor-
ida, and also as champion of
protecting the Greenbelt Law.
"These issues have always
been a priority with Farm Bu-
reau," concluded Lewis.


*i~yfflI^Sa~~~fi .
FROM LEFT, Dorothy Lewis, Women's Committee Chairr
Lynn Bannister, representative from Senator Bill Nelson's
native from Senator Mel Martinez's Office.


Wacissa Woman Faces

Pending Charges In

Vehicular Accident


CHARLIE WARD served as auctioneer at the Humane
Society's recent Bless the Beast Benefit. (News Photo)


4 Dixie
(Continued From Page 1)
S projects.
-- The plantation, for example,
each year offers county fifth-
grade students an opportunity
to tour the operation and learn
About the positive effects of
farming and forestry on the en-
vironment.
Consider: Each year, the
trees on the plantation take
i i 33,600 tons of carbon dioxide
out of the air and release equal
Amounts of oxygen in return.
The pristine forests also filter
runoff, allowing clean water to
enter the Aucilla River and the
aquifer.
In addition, the foundation
continuously strives to im-
prove the habitat for quail,
man, County Farm Bureau; deer and non-game species,
while managing the forests for
Office; Kevin Doyle, repre- a continuous supply of timber
(See Dixie, Page 5)


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Charges are pending against
a Wacissa woman in a single
vehicle crash, which caused
her passenger serious injuries,
Saturday evening.
FHP reports that Letitia R.
Robert, 32 and passenger
Willis Reddick, Jr., 48, both
of 13976 CR-259, were trav-
eling north on 259 at SR-59,
at approximately 8:35 p.m.,
in a 1986 Ford pickup truck.
The vehicle went off of the
east side of the road, striking


a speed limit sign.
Robert overcorrected across
the road and crashed into the
wooded area on the west side
of the road.
Trooper Gus Smyrnios ob-
tained a blood sample from
Robert at the scene, which
will be sent to the FDLE
Crime Lab for analysis.
The crash is deemed to be
alcohol related and Robert,
who sustained minor injuries,
and Reddick, who sustained
serious injuries, were not
wearing their seat belts.
Both were transported to
Southwest Community Hospi-
tal.


HANNAH KIRKLAND and Mattie Jack pose for the cam-
era. Kirkland received the dog as one of her Christmas
gifts.


Tax Reform Dominates Legislative Hearing


(Continued Fromage 1)
counties face," Joyner said.
The two legislators quite
agreed with the expressed
;concerns and with the view
that tax reform would
Definitely be a dominant issue
iin the coming legislative
session.
Unfortunately, Ausley said,
her colleagues in the House
had already come up with a so-
lution that wasn't very delib-
erative. Her hope was that her
counterparts in the Senate
would do a better job of it, she
said.
"We need to look at the big
:picture," Ausley said. "We
can't do this lightly. This is
critical."
Lawson quite agreed.
"It's obvious that we need re-
form," Lawson said. "But dou-
bling the homestead exemption
would hurt many of my coun-
ties. I. have already told the
'governor that I will have to
fight him every step of the way
on this so as not to get it on the
ballot, because if it gets on the
*ballot, it will pass.
"I represent counties where
'60 percent of the properties are
already off the tax roll," he
added. "If this passes, cities
and counties won't be able to
provide services."
Interestingly, global warm-


ing surfaced as a concern, the
first time in memory that such
an issue has been raised.
A Madison County resident
and member of the Environ-
mental Alliance of Florida
raised the issue, in relation to
proposed coal plants in Perry
and other parts of the state.
"There are alternatives to coal
and we need to get moving on
that," this individual said, cit-
ing scientific data that indi-
cates that coal plants contrib-
ute inordinately to global
warmirig, and that the potential
for economic benefit from so-
lar and other alternative
sources of fuel is also great.
"I'm asking the legislators to
think of our grandchildren as
constituents," the man said.
Sallie Worley also asked the
legislators to think about the
environment and the earth. If
the earth was sick and inhabit-
able or inhospitable to human
life, all the other issues and
considerations were moot
points, she said.
"We have to look out for the
earth and future generations,"
Worley said.
The two legislators agreed
that global warming and other
environmental issues were fast
becoming more relevant, espe-
cially in light of the documen-
tary "The Inconvenient Truth"


and other scientific findings.
"It's an issue that is resonat-
ing more and more than in
other years," Ausley said, add-
ing that her husband had
switched to an electric scooter
after seeing the "The Incon-
venient Truth."
Lawson echoed the senti-
ment.
"I've been involved in envi-.
ronmental issues the last 24;
years," he said. "But it's only
in the last couple of years that
many of us in the Legislature
have started really paying at-
tention to it.
George Hinchliffe, executive
director of Healthy Start, re-
quested that the legislators di-
rect their attention to the
correction of present funding
inequities in the system.
Hinchliffe pointed out that
the 14 counties presently not
being funded by the Healthy
Families program are counties
specifically identified by the
Department of Children and
Families as having the highest
risk and lowest resiliency lev-
els in the state.
Of the 14, he said, the major-
ity were in north' Florida, and
included Jefferson County.
The Healthy Families pro-
gram promotes child health
and development, enhances
parenting ability, and meets


family medical and social
needs, among other things.
"We need this funding in
these counties," Hinchliffe
said.
He also requested funding
for the shuttle service and to
serve more high-risk mothers
and their babies in this area.
School Superintendent Phil
Barker presented the school
districts' legislative priorities.
These included requests for
full funding of the universal
pre-kindergarten program,
complete with transportation
and support services; full fund-
ing of transportation (the dis-
trict last year received
$387,252 in state funding and
expended $821,933 for this
service); and full sparsity
funding, to allow for increases
in teacher salaries and for the
hiring of additional personnel.
Sheriff David Hobbs could


not attend, but he requested via
a letter that the legislators pro-
ceed with mandating the iden-
tification of sexual predators
on drivers' licenses, as another
measure of protection for chil-
dren.
Other appeals included a re-
quest for increased funding to
small libraries, regulation of


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contact:
James Muchovej
(850) 997-6508
ajjmuchovej@juno.com


telephone utilities, and assis-
tance with the recycling of va-
cant school buildings, such as
Howard Middle School:
A brief reception followed
the hearing, where residents
and officials got to mingle and
speak one-on-one.


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Year 2007

SSandbaggers Classic

Monticello CC


March 5th, 2007

1 P.M.


$50 entry fee includes 18 holes, cart,
Steak dinner, door prize

Organized by the Monticello Rotary Club
Benefits Rotary Youth Camp and
local service projects


I










MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 23, 2007 PAGE 3


VFW Post 251 Hosts


Annual Awards Banquet


- v


c.
'- -


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Members of the local Veter-
ans of Foreign Wars of the
United States Post 251 and
the Ladies Auxiliary held
their annual Awards Banquet
Saturday, at Jefferson County
High School.
Outstanding area citizens
were presented certificates of
recognition for their outstand-
ing work.
Post Commander Ned Hill
and Senior Vice Commander
Byron Barnhart coordinated
the program, beginning with
the Presentation of Colors, In-
vocation, and Pledge of Alle-
Sglance.
Dignitaries and special
guests were introduced fol-
Slowed by the dinner, catered
Zand served by Mary Howard.
, Receiving special recogni-
tion and certificates were:
Z SFC William L. Reams, Law
SEnforcement; Thelman Wash-
- ington, EMT/Firefighter; Glo-
Sria Cox-Jones, Feeding the
SElderly.
STwynetta Howard, Teacher
Sof the Year; Archie M. Seab--


rooks and Ossie Neely for
Community Service; Debbie
Snapp, Monticello News cov-
erage.
Mary and Sam Madison, Sr.
accepted the award for the
Sam Madison Jr. Foundation,
youth activities;
Nathaniel Gallons, Commit-
ment Award; Byron Barhart,
Member of the Year; and,
District II Commander John
Nelson, for his efforts and
commitment to the VFW Post
251 and the District
High school student winners
received awards for the
"Voice of Democracy" essay
competition.
Students recognized
include: Arsenio Bright, first
place at the local level, and
second place at the district
level; Iesha Jackson, second:
place; Nickolas Parker, third.
place; and Shalin Pitts, fourth
place.
Others recognized for their
participation were: Jakyra
Farlin, Brittany Harvey, An-
thony McDaniel, Takedral
Gilley, Alyssia Thomas, and
Breterrica White.
. Middle school students rec-


ognized for their short written
essays on Democracy, receiv-
ing the Patriot's Pin include:
Samantha Hamilton, first;
Hannah Eby, second place;
Deja Lewis, third place; and
Deandre Tucker, fourth place.
Others recognized for their
participation were: Levin Bel-
lamy, Breana Harvey, and
Brenda Guerrero.
Keynote Speaker James
Harvey spoke about commit-
ment.
"Monticello will not change
because of you but, you can
change Monticello," he said.
"We need to be a part of our
community, and our children.
"Mentor them to be the very
best they can be. You can be
anything as long as you com-
mit to be," he concluded.


VFW POST 251 recognizes Gloria Cox-Jones for her mission to feed the elderly.


. ..


SAMANTHA HAMILTON won middle school first place
in the Patriot's Pen competition, at the VFW Awards
Banquet.


quet, emphasizing the importance of commitment.
JAMES HARVEY was the keynote speaker at the ban-
quet, emphasizing the importance of commitment.


. .. ". ... , ~ 'e-,'




MARY AND SAM MADISON, SR. were recognized for
the youth activities of the Sam Madison Jr. Foundation.


i ARSENIO BRIGHT won first place locally and second
place in the District level high school Voice of Democ-
racy essay competition. (News Photos)


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 23, 2007




Monticello News
(ISSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
9 Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer



Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly Ex-
cept for the weeks of July 4th, Thanksgiving, Christmas,
& New Years. Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post
Office. Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net
.......................~


Car Buyers Avoid Opinion & Comment


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touch because of hidden prob-
lems that affect their value and
safety.
Often, the vehicles are
picked up at junkyards by the
curbstoners for very little
money.
The con artists then perform
minimal repairs to make the
vehicles appear safe and sound
and sell them to an unwary
buyer at a significant profit.
Law enforcement officials
estimate that 60 to 90 percent
of cars advertised in the classi-
fieds or at the curb are sold by
unlicensed dealers. So how do
you avoid curbstoning? Try
these tips:
Know with whom you're
dealing: Try to stick to estab-
lished, reputable car dealers. If
you do decide to visit a private
seller, ask to see his or her
driver's license and make sure
the name is the same on the ti-
tle.
Avoid meeting in a parking
lot if possible. Also, make sure
you have a way to get back in
touch with the seller once


you've purchased the vehicle.
Beware of a seller who only
provides his or her cell phone
or pager number or an e-mail
address.
Know your history: Ask to
see any service records the ve-
hicle may have and get a his-
tory of the vehicle. You can
get a vehicle history report
from a service called Carfax.
The reports can reveal hidden
secrets in the car's past- such
as whether it was in an acci-
dent or flood. They can even
help you spot odometer fraud
(the illegal practice of rolling
back a car's odometer to make
it appear less used).
Know what's under the
hood: Take the car to a trusted
mechanic for a complete in-
spection.
Inspections can-turn up evi-
dence that the car was rebuilt
after an accident, as well as a
variety of mechanical prob-
lems that could cost money
down the road..
Be wary of any seller who
discourages you from taking a
vehicle to a mechanic before
buying.
Know your mileage: Look
for signs of odometer tamper-
ing. If a car says it only has
15,000 miles on it, take it for a
spin an see if it feels like a
relatively new car. If it
doesn't, the odometer may be
off.
Also, a car should have its
original tires if it has fewer
than 20, 000 miles on it. If it
doesn't that could be a sign of
fraud.


Stressful Situations

Affect Mind, Body


Stress matters. At least
that's what health research
tells us. Recent studies have
shown that stress can affect
your body and mind-- and not
in a good way.
Our bodies evolved to be
finely attuned to a predator's
attack. When we sense
danger, our bodies quickly
release hormones into our
bloodstream that increase our
heart rate, focus our attention
and cause other changes to
quickly prepare us for coming
danger. Stress was-- and still
is-- crucial to our survival.
The type of stress we're
adapted to deal with, however,
is the short, intense kind-- like
fearing a bear will make a
lunch of us.
The stresses of modern life--
like money trouble, difficulties
at work or bad traffic-- may
not be as extreme, but we often
have little time between
periods of stress to recuperate.
The chronic stress can
eventually take both a mental
and physical toll.
It's long been known that
blood pressure and cholesterol
levels go up in people who are
stressed. Studies have now
linked chronic stress with


cardiovascular problems like
hypertension, coronary heart
disease and stroke.
The immune system is also
affected by stress. When your
immune cells are bathed in
high levels of stress hormones,
they get tuned down. People
under a lot of stress, like
caregivers of people with
Alzheimer's disease, are more
likely to get the flu or a cold.
Chronic stress affects the
brain, too. Brain cells bom-
barded by stress signals 'even-
tually start to shrink and cut
connections to other brain
cells.
The network that coordinates
our thoughts, emotions and re-
actions starts to rearrange.
That may explain why studies
have linked high levels of
stress hormones with lower
memory, focus and problem-
solving skills.
You can take several steps to
help you cope better with
stress. First, get enough sleep.
Sleep deprivation throws your
stress hormones off balance.
Develop a network of people
you can talk to when life gets
difficult. People who have la-

(See Stressful, Page 12)


& Short Takes & Other Notions


By RON CICHON
Publisher

It often takes years for good
ideas to come to fruition. Fre-
quently people get discouraged
and move on but those who
hang in there typically get
something accomplished.
We've seen that with the ex-
pansion of the Library, devel-
opment of the Humane
Society, renovation of the Op-
era House, the community wa-
ter system and a host of other
worthwhile projects that con-
tribute to community better-
ment. Kudos to those who stay
the course.

A couple of successes scored
recently are the funding of an
Emergency Operations Center,
and the proposed horse arena.
And, there are a number of
other projects in their early
stages including a county
sewer system and expansion of
the water system.


Our city streets could stand
some resurfacing... Everyone
knows Valentine's Day is in
February, but didja know the
first American railroad was
chartered Feb. 28 in 1827...
Office wag said only you can
be yourself because nobody
else is qualified for the job.
Very nice turnout Tuesday
night for the Legislative dele-
gation. One of the major con-
cerns from local government
officials is the proposed dou-
bling of Homestead Exemption
which will cause serious prob-
lems for county and city budg-
ets.
Quotes taken from federal
employee performance evalua-
tions: "Donated his brain to
science before he was done us-
ing it." "A photographic mem-
ory but the lens cover is glued
on." "He'sets low personal
.standards and then consistently
fails to achieve them." "He
brings a lot of joy when he
leaves the room."
Quotable quote: "Love is an


act of endless forgiveness, a
tender look which becomes a
habit."
Big crowd out for Bless the
Beast event. I understand
Charlie Ward did his usual hi-
larious job as auctioneer... I
don't know about you, but I
don't care that Brittany Spears
shaved her head or got a new
tattoo or whatever... Some
very different ideas about
property taxes are coming out
of the Legislature. This session
should be a real show.
Didja know Hearst Castle in
San Simeon, California is the
most expensive private house
ever built. It cost publisher
William Randolph Hearst $30
million, to erect the 100-room
structure between 1922 and
1939?
Nearly 40 percent of workers
will change jobs in the next 12
months, according to a major
recruiting and staffing firm...
A new study on the aging
readiness of America finds that
fewer than half of American


cities and. counties have plans
to meet the needs of aging
baby boomers... The Energy
Policy Act of 2005 provides
valuable tax credits, as much
as $300 to consumers who pur-
chase qualified high efficiency
heating, cooking, and water
heating equipment.
News that wounded soldiers
treated at Wa'lter Reed Hospi-
tal are living in a dump of an
old hotel with mice and mold
is an outrage,. White House
Press Secretary Tony Snow
acted like it was no big deal
and said, the President'would-
n't have anything to say or
would be issuing no orders to
remedy the situation.
Amazing!
Some self-help authors say it
takes 21 days to make or break
a habit... Opera House Stage
Company will present Board-
walk Melody Hour Murders, a
dinner theater show that will
play the first two weekends in
May.


Student Athletes Know Pain


By DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist


I am somewhat ashamed to
admit that it wasn't until I
started teaching school that I
became aware of and alarmed
regarding the number of sig-
nificant injuries young chil-
dren suffer in their pursuit of
athletic excellence.
This is not a.surprise when it
comes to full contact sports like
football. The fact that there are
literally tens of thousands of
injuries to youngsters not in-
volved in contact sports, how-
ever, should be very alarming,
There seems to have been a
rush by parents over the past
several years to enroll their
children in some form of athletic


endeavor. Not a bad idea to en-
courage and foster a program of
physical fitness, but in many
cases, the drive to perfection cre-
ates excessive training and opens
the door to serious injury.
For girls today, it is far more
than cheerleading. Young girls
today partake in nearly every
form of athletics. As. a matter
of fact, gymnastics and softball
is dominated by young women.
While all of these sports provide
an opportunity for injury, cheer-
leading and gymnastics lead the
way.
The major problem, which is
totally avoidable, is overworking
the muscles and skeletal system.
The desire (or demand in some
cases) for repetitive training to
gain perfection, only places im-
mense stress and strain on body


parts that are still under develop-
ment.
One would think that positive
parental involvement into the
equation would bring this prob-
lem under control.
On the contrary, most parental
involvement has had the oppo-
site effect! They either want to
relive their wasted youth vicari-
ously through their young chil-
dren or they actually believe that
there is some future potential for
a college scholarship or lucrative
financial sports career.
This creates even more stress
and demand on the child to prac-
tice, practice, practice ( day in
and day out) to satisfy mom, dad
and the coach.
Even professional athletes have
an "off season" for rest and reha-
bilitation, that is not granted to


Home Improvements


Purchasing a home is per-
haps the most significant in-
vestment that many Americans
will ever make.
One way that millions of
Americans are increasing the
return and value of their homes
is through remodeling.
Remodeling is not only a
great way to enhance your in-
vestment, but it can also pro-
vide you with greater
satisfaction with your living
environment. But before you
call the contractor, there are a
few other things to consider.


"Remodeling projects can
offer significant rewards
whether you are looking to put
your house on the market in
the immediate future or even if
you are not interested in sell-
ing for years to come", said
Jim Ferriter, executive vice
president, retail lending for
GMAC Mortgage.
"But before you get started,
you need to identify which re-
modeling projects will increase
both the resale value of your
home as well as your day-to-
day comfort."


Here are some ideas for
home improvement projects
that pay off:
Kitchens. Kitchen remodels
are among the best for recoup-
ing the cost of renovations.
Modernize with new appli-
ances, countertops and cabi-
nets.
Bathrooms. Adding a bath-
room increases the value of
your home. Upgrades such as
light fixtures, vanities with
plenty of storage, ceramic tile
or marble and a new coat of
paint are just some of the ways


i


many of our year round youth
competitors.
A significant problem foster-
ing injuries is the presence of
untrained coaches. They are,
by and large, oblivious to the
fundamentals of the anatomy
and physiology essential to in-
struct and manage young ath-
letic activities.
There is a reason that most
states require physical educa-
tion teachers and coaches to
have a four year degree, with
an academic background in
physical education, anatomy
and sports physiology and
health.
While teaching, I clearly re-
member the number of ab-
sences for students suffering
from some form of sports in-
(See Student, Page 5)



Pay
to improve a bathroom.
Decks. Building a deck en-
hances your enjoyment of your
yard and lets you recover ap-
proximately 85 percent of the
project costs in added value.
New rooms. Converting an
attic into a bedroom or adding
a family room are great ways
to add value and make your
home fit your needs as your
family grows.
Painting. One of the most
affordable and effective im-
provements you can make to
(See Home, Page 5)


From Our Photo File


IN NOV., 1991, then JCHS Principal Kelly Kilpatrick enlisted the help of eight stu-
dents to help load an 1800 pound safe on the back of a truck, when the move was
made from old to the new administrative offices at the school. (News File Photo)


I








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 23, 2007 PAGE 5


Allen Boyd Receives FSU's


Circle Of Gold Award
Congressman Allen Boyd, and luncheon', Boyd toured Thro
one of Florida State Univer'., SU's Center for Advanced public si
sity's most prominent alumni 'Power System. the chart
was honored by his alma mater r i, Boyd, a fifth generation form an
Wednesday, when the FSU former, earned his bachelor's He also i
Alumni Association presented degree in business from FSU late voice
him with its Circle of Gold in 1969. ing and
Award given to "worthy indi- <" He has represented Florida's mise.
viduals who, through ihejif' ..nd Congressional District for Amon
service and achievements, per- ,1() years. Before that, he search p:
sonify the university's tradmioni. i'served in the Florida House of been inst
of excellence." .Representajiies for eight ing is tl
Prior to the award ceremony' ears. Consortil
'


'ughout his career in
service, Boyd has led
ge for government re-
d fiscal responsibility.
is known as an articu-
e for consensus build-
reasonable compro-

ig numerous other re-
rojects that Boyd has
rumental in establish-
he Southeast Climate
um, which has devel-


Student Athletes Know Pain


S(Continued From Page 4)
your home is painting both the
interior and exterior. Painting
the exterior not only helps
Maintain the beauty of the
home, it also helps prevent
damage to the siding.
Enhancing energy effi-
ciency. Replacing your old
furnace, putting in new win-
dows and doors and replacing
your roof can help you im-
prove your monthly energy
costs as well as enhance the re-
sale value of your home.
Some states even offer credits
for remodeling projects de-
signed to enhance energy effi-
ciency in the home.
So how can you pay for
your remodeling projects? Ac-
cording to a recent nationwide
study sponsored by GMAC
Mortgage, over half of con-
sumers would pay for their re-
modeling projects with cash
from either their-checking or
savings.
However, approximately 29
percent would'use a home eq-
uiity'line of'credit or home eq-
uity loan.
SWhy are more and more peo-
ple turning to the home equity
option? One reason is that
borrowing against the equity in
your home is often cheaper


than making out credit cards
that usually carry higher inter-
est rates. In addition, pay-
ments on a home equity loan
or home equity line of credit
may be tax deductible.
*A home equity loan pro-
vides a flat amount of funds
that you pay back in fixed
monthly payments over a set
period of time.
If you like the idea of a
fixed, nonadjusting rate of in-
terest and a constant monthly
payment and you are also cer-
tain of your total costs while
allowing for some overbudget-
ing, a home equity loan might
make sense for you .
*The home equity line of
credit is like a credit card by
nature, with homeowners ac.
cessing cash when they have
the need.
The interest rate is usually
variable, often tied to the fluc-
tuation of the prime rate of in-
terest.
You can make minimum
payments and allow for
month-to-month decisions on
cash flow.
The home equity line of
credit is a revolving line of
credit that stays open as long
as you haven't used up your
credit limit.


(Continued From Page 4)
jury. Nearly every week some-
one would come to class with
their arm in a sling, a cast or
restrainer on a limb or strug-
gling to get from class to class
on crutches.
More often than not, the
girls problems resulted from
some mishap at gymnastics
class or fall while cheerleading'
after school, while the boys dis-
covered what it was like to be'
run over by a thirteen year old'


225 pound linebacker on the
football field.
Sadly, I am also aware of
some devastating mishaps to
my students that are downright
heartbreaking. One would-be
champion gymnast injured her
back so badly that after sur-
gery she now lives with a steel
S rod in her back'., .,,k.. .
Another has overworked an
Elbow so badly that the damage
'causes her to suffers from pain-
ful arthritis like an 80 year-old.


Most devastating, however,
is the beautiful and intelligent
young girl who fell and broke
her neck during a routine gym-
nastics exercise and is a quad-
riplegic today, with little hope
for any significant recovery.
I guess the moral is if your
child wants to partake in ath-
letic activity, understand that
there is no perfect way to pro-.
tect them from injury. .
Additionally, I would recom-
mend looking into the, sport or
activity offered and inquire
about the professional training
of the coach or volunteer who
is heading up the program.
Most importantly, exercise
positive parental involvement
by monitoring practices and
competition to insure the kids
are having fun as intended, and
not simply serving as tools to
foster some would be coach's
dream of greatness.


* Built Locally
* All Wood
* Any Color Finish
* Installed On Time
* Custom Countertops
* Our prices are competitive,
e-tlin l c. ar'fi' eed'quality.
guaranteed


FMB RELAY FOR LIFE Team, Susan Aarons, Connie
Robinson, Mandy McClellan man the chili lunch booth
and raised some $355 for the Cancer Society in sales
and additional donations. (News Photo)


oped new methods to predict
the consequences of climate
variability for agricultural
crops, forests and water re-
sources in the southeastern
United States.
With Boyd's help, the con-
sortium, which includes FSU,
the University of Florida, the
University of Miami, the Uni-
versity of Georgia, Auburn
University, and the University
of Alabama at Huntsville, has
received $11.25 million in fed-
eral funding over the past four
years, and is in line to receive
another $4.5 million this year.
Since it was established in
2000 at FSU, Boyd has been a
strong supporter in congress of
the Center for Advanced
Power Systems, a hub of re-
search and educational activi-
ties promoting the
development of advanced elec-
trical power systems for the
US Navy.
It also performs research that
is critical to improving the
safety, reliability, and effi-
ciency of the national's electric
power infrastructure.


Dixie
(Continued From Page 2)
for lumber and paper produc-
tion.
Finally, the foundation coop-
erates in research projects with
institutions such as FAMU and
Tall Timbers.
"What a debt we owe to the
late Geraldine Livingston for
having, the foresight to estab-
lish this foundation and ensure
that we will have Dixie Planta-
tion and these benefits
forever," says the spokesper-
son.


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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 23, 2007 L ife s t y le


'Dop a note or

Jerry Hawthorne reported
in January that 15,800 county
maps were ordered by the
Chamber, with a profit of
$4,500 made from the sale of
ads for the map.
At the February meeting of
the Chamber, Mary Frances
Gramling informed the group
that all of the County Guide
publications .ordered in 2005
are gone.
She said that the guides,
and maps, were used by real-
tors and businesses, to pro-
mote the county.
The Chamber is planning a
new edition, and will increase
the number to 12,500 copies.
At the recent VFW Recog-
nition Banquet, John Nelson
was serenaded with "Happy
Birthday" by Legion mem-
bers and guests.
Joyce Kinsey, a member of
the Central Baptist Church
SRelay for Life team is looking
forward to a pleasant day and
a good turnout Saturday for
their Bake Sale fundraiser
downtown in front of the Post
Office.
The Ronald McDonald
House Charities is offering a
$1,000+ college scholarship
for local high school seniors.
This scholarship is in its
fourth year and is geared for
students facing financial diffi-
culties: Go to: www.rmhc.org
for more information.
Aimee Love is a fifth grade
student at Aucilla Christian
iAcademy, and will compete
in the Big Bend Regional
Spelling Bee Saturday.
A Live studio audience is in-
vited 12:30 p.m. to the
WFSU-TV Public Broadcast
Center, 1600 Red Barber
Plaza.
The program will be broad-
cast on Channel 11. If Love


FIRST BIRTHDAY
Noah Benjamin. Black, son
of Jennifer and John Black,
and younger brother to sisters
Hannah and Sydney, cele-
brated his First Birthday
Thursday Feb, 15, 2007.
Family and friends will en-
joy birthday cake and ice
cream at home Saturday.

Dial 211 For

Services

Helpline
Dialing 211 provides a serv-
ice created for people in need
to find a social service
agency, a United Way of
America project, begun in
1997, in Atlanta.,
Today about 46 percent of
the U.S. population has access
to the free 211 service, and
the service is available
locally.
Dialing the number affords
211 Hour Crisis counseling.
and a wide range of related
programs.
Cell phone dial 224-NEED
(6333.)
Monticello News
Keeps You
Informed!!


V Deb&e Snap



call 997-3568

wins at this level, she will
travel to Washington, DC to
compete and join in the ex-
citement of "Bee Week" at
the Scripps Howard National
Spelling Bee.
Donna Hagan, Healthy Start
Coalition, reminds all about
the community forum 9:30
a.m. Tuesday morning at the
Library.
"State of the Jefferson
Community" will be dis-
cussed. Join her and others
for an insight into the picture
of health and well-being for
the county in terms of child
hunger, infant mortality,
transportation, and the preva-
lence of substance abuse.
Cumi Allen stopped by to
let us know that Minister
Shirley Washington delivered
the poem "A Negro Mother,"
by Langston Hughes, at the
Black History Program held
recently at the Opera House.
Speaker Dr. Flossie Byrd
shared with the audience pho-
tos of old school houses in the
county.
School buses for the black
community were unheard of
as there was almost no means
of travel for the blacks of the
community at that time.
Jodie's Coin Laundry is of-
fering evening activities dur-
ing the week.
On Monday at 6:30pm
knitting and crocheting,
classes are conducted by
Teresa Ward. This newly
forming group will be making
blankets and hats for a new-
born clinic in Tallahassee
Thursday at 7 p.m. a
Spanish/English ministry will
begin. Volunteers are needed,
and interested persons may
contact Ody at 997-2435.


SIXTH BIRTHDAY
Taylor A.. Mitchell will
celebrate her sixth birthday
Friday, Feb. 23, 2007.
She is the daughter of An-
gela ,' Jones arid Tavares
Mitchell.
Her maternal grandparents
are Johnnie R. Hill and Titus
Jones; her paternal grandpar-
ents are Ann and Herbert
Mitchell.
She will celebrate her
birthday with family and
friends this Saturday at
Chuck-E-Cheese.


Club Members Attend

District III Meeting


Monticello Woman's Club
President Jan Wadsworth and
members Edith Adams and
Dianne Braren attended the
GFWC/FFWC District III
Arts and Crafts Festival on
Saturday.
The event was hosted by
the Tallahassee Woman's
Club.
Wadsworth reported the ac-
tivities of the Monticello
Club. She mentioned fund-
raising events held over this
past year, and the induction of
17 new members.
The lunch provided con-


sisted of a potato and corn
chowder, spinach and cheese
quiche, tomato and cheese
salad, chocolate cake with
raspberries, and strawberries,
and coffee.
Blue ribbons were won by
Edith Adams, for her hand
embroidered holiday picture;
Dianne Braren for her hand-
made basketweaving entry;
and Linda Ricke who entered
a full size bedspread, hand ap-
pliqued and quilted.
Ricke was not able to
attend.


Church News
i-


New Bethel AME Church
will hold a Black History Pro-
gram 11 a.m. Sunday.
Speaker is Elder Michael
Mays of St. James PB Church,
Thomasville. Sweetfield MB
Church will render the music.
***
Elizabeth MB Church will
host its annual Black History
Program 3 p.m. Sunday.
Elder Joseph Linder and
Bountiful Blessings Ministries
of Greenville are in charge of
the service, with a special
presentation by Prof. Donald
Blair of FAMU.
Ethnic dress is encouraged
and dinner will be served after
the service.
***
Old Greenville AME Church
will host a benefit program 11
a.m. Sunday. Speaker is Rev.
Emma Henderson and congre-
gation of Mt. Olive AME
Church. Rev. Gilbert Connelly
is the pastor.
***
Miracle Temple Healing and
Deliverance Center, formerly


the Assembly of God Church,
685 South JefferSon Street,
will hold a revival 7:30 p.m.
nightly Monday through Fri-
day.
Guest speaker is Evangelist
Ruby Madry of Orlando, on
the topic of "Restoring the
Kingdom of God Within."
The service is non denomi-
national and transportation will
be provided. Call 997-0036.
***
The Dixon/Baker/Bailey
Women's Missionary Society
of Bethel AME Church will
celebrate its Evening In White,
3 p.m. Sunday.
Speaker is Rev. Shirlean
Thomas, Tanner Chapel AME
Church, Quincy. Guest Choir
is Union Hill AME Church
Choir, Wacissa.



AIR3o BaE
U..".-mVE

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J7 Lighthouse Singers of Madison 4
4 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24TH @ 7:00 a


7 LAMONT UNITED

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J LAMONT, Florida

J Join us for refreshments after the sing
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JAN WADSWORTH, Monticello Woman's Club
President, attended District III Arts and Crafts Festival.


I'; t


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EDITH ADAMS, of the local Woman's Club won a blue
ribbon at the District III Arts and Crafts Festival, for her
hand embroidered holiday picture. (News Photos)


Accord
(Continued From Page 1)
share with the other participat-
ing counties any monetary
benefits that are derived from a
business that locates here as a
result of the agreement.
The county also has to pay a
proportionate annual dues for
its inclusion in the group.


KING
CARD OF THANKS
The King Family would like
to express their deepest appre-
ciation to all the wonderful
family and friends of Rever-
end James Theodore "Ted"
King, who departed flrn-m this
earthly life on Thursday,
January 11, 2007.
A Celebrating of Life w'as
held 1 p.m. on Saturday,
January-20, with Interment at
Rest Haven Memorial Park
4615 Hanna Avenue East,
Tampa, FL.
King was born in Monti-
cello, FL. on October 21,
1939 to Leona and James T.
King, Sr.
He was educated in the pub-
lic schools of Jc Icei .on
County and was a 1957
graduate of Jefferson County
High School.
He was in the Army in the
82nd Airborne from 1963-
1966.
In appreciation your
sincere, deep concerns and
the unlimited support that you
shown during that time was
very much appreciated.
We pray God's richest
blessings be with you always.
The Family


SAFFO
IN MEMORY
In loving memory of
Mother Flowerzell T. Saffo
who passed away on February
17, 2005.
You are still sadly missed
by fi'.vil, and friends but we
know you are in a better place
where there is no more pain
and sutffring.
The childkirn, grandchildren,
and great rt\ii',i!lJ!in came
1.,<.'' the weekend of Feb-
ruary 17 I- 18, 2007 to share

With a memorial at her
grave site on! S.itiitd.i,, and
ehumrh attendance at St, Rilla
Missionary Baptist C(luidli on
Sl,,i :'. the church where she
grew up,
The children would also
lil.. to thank the many friends
for your prayers and support
during the illness of our dear
sister Altamease.
We ask for your continued
prayers and may God richly
bless each of you.
Her Children


When Bethany was born wth hIr wvase
disabilila os Colin, the t\bbol, i,'r el ont
Eot&r Seal y ,da~ i-Oini lIkeo 0
nd Bekoetky ridre her blWr Oik it h le~
Arnericans Wi t a distlbly anM J i 1 00 SO
is there will, help, Ihopernd he ttaoh. Cdli
Easter 'ealk of v atIt ItII C'teIVICII 12 ow


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 23, 2007 PAGE 7


Homes Of Mourning


BERNARD COOPER
Bernard "Bernie" Cooper,
III, 17, died Thursday, Febru-
ary 15, 2007 in Tallahassee.
Born in Tallahassee, Bernie
was a student in the Adult
Community Education pro-
gram in the Leon County
School system. He was a natu-
ral at gymnastics and a smooth
conversationalist. He was a big
brother figure to not only his
siblings but also to his cousins
and friends.
Funeral services will be at
1:00 pm Saturday, February
24, 2007 at, Gethsemane Mis-
sionary Baptist Church (302
Wallis Street) in Tallahassee,
with burial at Southside Ceme-
tery. Visitation will be from
3:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Friday
at Tillman Funeral Home in
Monticello (850-997-5553).
Mourning Bernie's sudden
passing and treasuring his love
Sand memory are his father,
Bernard Cooper, Jr. (Yulonda)
of Lamont; his mother,
Shevonda Stroman of
Miramar, FL; his brothers,
Bernard Cooper, IV of Talla-
hassee and Keishad Stroman of
Miramar; his sisters, Keiyera
Cooper of Tallahassee and Yu-
nijha Cooper-of Lamont; his
paternal grandmother, Barbara
Peterson Taylor (Earnest); his
grandfather, Bernard Cooper;
his maternal grandfather, Ed-
ward Stroman, all of Tallahas-
see; his other grandparents,
Ulysses and Janet Bellamy of
Lamont, along with numerous
aunts, uncles, cousins and
friends.
Bernie was preceded in death
by his maternal grandmother,
Janice McMillian.
LOUISE LACKEY
Louise M. Lackey, 91, died
Saturday, February 17, 2007 in
Monticello.
Louise was raised in Sault
i, Ste. Marie, Michigan. She and
her husband retired to DeBary,
Fit.. ,a._m. de Monticello their
home two yeS ago. Louise
loved all kinds of crafts espe-
cially needlework. She loved
her family, especially her
grandkids.
Graveside service was held
2:00 p.m. Tuesday, February
20, 2007 at Oakland Cemetery
in Monticello. In lieu of flow-
ers memorials may be made to
Covenant Hospice, 1545 Ray-
mond Diehl Road Suite 102,
Tallahassee, FL 32308. Ar-
rangements by Culley's
Meadow Wood Funeral Home,
Riggins Road Chapel.
Louise is survived by her
loving husband of 53 years,
Robert L. Lackey; two daugh-
ters, Josephine Turner (Bob) of
Monticello and Mary Bosecker
(Sonny) of Rockport, Indiana;
six grandchildren, fourteen
great grandchildren 4nd 5 great
great grandchildren.
She is preceded in death by
five sisters and three brothers.
ETHEL REYNOLDS
SMother Ethel leee
SReynolds, 76, of Miccosukee,
died Thursday, February 15,
2007 in Tallahassee, Florida.
* Mother Reynolds was a
longtime resident of the Mic-
cosukee community where she
was a member of Saint Paul
Primitive Baptist Church hav-
ing served faithfully for nu-
merous years on the Mother's
Board.
The service will be at 11:00
a.m. Saturday, February 24,
*; 2007 at Saint Paul Primitive
,i Baptist Church (10917 T.S.
';Green Road) in Miccosukee,
m' with burial at Shady Grove #2
'. Cemetery. Visitation will be
; from 3:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at
STillman Funeral Home in
S: Monticello, (850-997-5553).
Left to cherish her undying
love and memory are her


daughter, Marie Mitchell St.
Aubin (Harold); her grand-
S daughter, Fayvian Collins; her
Sgreat-grandchildren, Nicole
Harp and Malik Collins all of
SConyers, GA; her
. goddaughter, Ethel Reynolds;
her special nieces and
Nephews, Gloria Nathan, Ruth
, Crowell, Morris Young and
SIsaac Reynolds; and a host of
Other relatives and friends.


She was preceded in death
by her husband, Amos Rey-
nolds; her parents, three broth-
ers, and four sisters.
WILLIE SCURRY
Willie Scurry, 76, died
Monday, February 19, 2007 in
Monticello.
A native of Jefferson
County, Mr. Scurry was a life-
long resident of Monticello.
He was a retired Logger.
Funeral service will be at
3:00 p.m. Saturday, February
24, 2007 at Hickory Hill Mis-
sionary Baptist Church, with
burial at Hickory Hill Ceme-
tery, Monticello.
Mourning his passing are
his sons, Willie Scurry, Jr.
(Gloria Dean) and Robert
Scurry of Monticello; daugh-
ters, Carolyn Footman (Her-
man), Christine Andrews
(James) of Monticello, Delores
Scurry, Elsie Scurry, Mary
Ann Scurry, Patricia Scurry
and Cathy Ann Williams (Al-
exander) all of Tallahassee; his
mother, Mrs. Elsie Scurry of
Monticello; brothers, George
Scurry of Sarasota, FL, Robert
Scurry (Dorothy) of Austin,
TX and Morgan Scurry (Ruth
Ann) of Monticello; sisters,
Sarah Salem (Austin), Louise
Scurry, Amelia Webb (Leotis),
all of Sarasota and Elsie
Young of Monticello; a special
friend Flossie Buggs of Monti-
cello; thirty four
grandchildren, seventeen
great-grandchildren and a host
of other relatives and friends.
Willie was preceded in death
by his father, Willie, Sr. and
three children, Douglas, Johri
and Ilene and his siblings,
(See Homes Of, Page 14)


Triple L Club To

Meet Tuesday


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Members of the Triple L.
Club will meet 10:30 a.mni
Tuesday for their regular
monthly meeting at First Bap-'
tist Fellowship Hall.
The group "Down Home"
will entertain with their musi-
cal talents. They will bring
.w -a !L,, JI


I.

iiA JT*


TICE-WILLIAMS

IN REMEMBRANCE
Diane Tice-Williams
June 4, 1955 Sept. 22, 2002
It seems like yesterday that
left me to be with Jesus, so
that there would be no more
fears to be shed, no more pain
to suffer, and no more heart-
aches to bear here in this
world.
Oh, how I miss hearing you
give me motherly advice, hear-
ing your laughter, and seeing
you cry tears of joy.
Selfishly, I wish you were
here with me, but the Lord did
it for the best. So, Mother, go
on and take your rest.
Lakisha Williams


with them a variety of special
instruments, and plan a good
selection of songs. The Down
Home group members include
Cliff Miller, Bill Moon, and
Sallie and Sam Worley.
Plans for a trip to Cypress
Gardens in May will be dis-
cussed.
Hostesses for this February
meeting will be Vi Payton,
Connie Sulephen, Colleen
Weber, and Mildred Wim-
berly.
A trip to the Seineyard Res-
taurant in Tallahassee turned
out to be very pleasant one
said President Phyllis
Weldon, as some 26 members
attended, and enjoyed a sea-
food lunch.

Church Sets

Health

Workshop


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Casa Bianca MB Church
Women's Health Ministry
will host a countywide Health
Workshop 3 p.m. Saturday at
the church on Waukeenah
Highway (259.)
The workshop is especially
designed for the entire family.
It will include free health
screenings: blood sugar
analysis/diabetes check, glu-
cose analysis, blood pressure
check, and a weight check.
A healthy dinner will imme-
diately follow the workshop.
For additional information
contact Bumette Thompson at
997-4484, or Celia Thompson
at 997-4787.


STEPHANIE and Alyssa Stephens
at the recent 4-H State Congress.


Gospel Sing

Set Friday

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Abundant Life Harvest
Church in Lloyd will host a
Gospel Sing featuring "The
Walkers" 7 p.m. Friday.
For directions contact Pas-
tor Chris Peterson at 997-
2607 or 510-8075.
The Gospel Sing is free and
open to the public.
Refreshments will follow
the Sing.


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PAGE 8. MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 23, 2007


The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy junior varsity baseball
team is now 0-2 season, after
dropping the first two games.
Coach Joe Striplin said that
both Maclay and Perry are
very good, well disciplined
ball clubs.
The Warriors were routed
by Maclay, 10-4.
Striplin did not have the
game statistics available, but
recalled the major highlights.
Clark Christy pitched the
entire game, striking out
three, giving up four hits, and
four earned and six unearned
runs.
"We overthrew the ball a
couple of times," said
Striplin.
The major hits of the game
came off the bats of Christy
and Casey Wheeler, both
smacking over-the-fence
home runs.
The Warriors fell to Perry,
4-1.
Marcus Roberts pitched the
entire game, giving up three
hits, one earned and three un-
earned runs, and striking out
three.
Trent Roberts and Wheeler
both went two for three with
two singles; and the lone
Warrior run was brought in
off the bat of Trent Roberts
on a base hit, and Marcus
Roberts came over the plate
for the score.


The Warriors are slated to
face off against Florida High,
4 p.m., Thursday, here.
Striplin said they are also a
very good ball club..
Lanier County is scheduled
for 3:30 p.m., Monday, there;
and Madison Central, 5 p.m.,
Tuesday, there.

MCA Girls
Fall To
LATMA 35-21

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Christian
Academy girls basketball
team stand 1:6 on season af-
ter being downed by LATMA
last week, 35-21.
Scoring for the Lady Charg-
ers were Rayne Baker with 18
points, two of which were
free throws; Kenisha Jordan,
two points; and Christina
Morrow, one point.
MCA is slated to play
against Cornith Christian
Academy, 2 p.m., Feb. 23,
here in the final game of regu-
lar season.

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Boys, Girls Club Members

Attend Titans Opener


". ......--- *... .
S ,: t -- .v ..
LAURA KIRCHHOFF of Mood Swings ladies tennis team 3 at a recent match.




LAURA KIRCHHOFF of Mood Swings ladies tennis team 3 at a recent match.


Mood Swings Tennis

Team In Third Place


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

After three consecutive
weeks in the number two slot,
the Monticello Mood Swings,
the ladies A-league tennis
team, slid to third place after
winning one of six matches
against the Bainbridge Differ-
ent Strokes last week.
"It was cold, very, very
cold," said Captain Patty
Hardy. "Hopefully we can
pull it back up this week, we
like it much better in the top
positions."
Team #1, Katie Brock and
Lisa Jackson, lost the first set,
0-6, won the second, 7-5 and


lost the tiebreaker, 6-7.
Team #2, Patty Hardy and
Cindy Wainright, lost the first
match, 3-6, won the second,
6-2, and lost the tiebreaker, 1-
6.
Team #3, Angie Delvecchio
and Laura Kirchhoff, lost the
sets, 3-6 and 2-6.
Team #4, Susan Goodwin
and Trisha Wirick, lost the
first set, 3-6, won the second,
6-4, and lost the tie breaker,
5-7.
Team #5, Lindsey Taylor
and Susan Scarboro, won the
sets, 6-2 and 6-3.
Team #6, Maxie Miller and
Jennifer Ellis, lost because
they had to forfeit.


The Mood Swings faced off
against the Capital City Aces,
9: 30 a.m., Thursday, at Tom
Brown Park

Chargers
Lose To
LATMA 60-42
The Monticello Christian
Academy boys basketball
team stands 2-6 on the season
after losing to LATMA last
week, 60-42.
Scoring for the Chargers
were Philip Payne with 14
points; Chip Gallon, 13
points, three of which were
free throws; Luke Lingo, ten
points; Josh Baker and Jack-
son Parrott, each scored two
points.
MCA is slated to play the
final game of the regular sea-
son against Crnith Christian,
3 p.m.,-Feb. 23, here.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Enthusiastic members of the
Boys and Girls Clubs at-
tended Saturday's home
opener for the Tallahassee Ti-
tans against Gulf Coast.
The Titans offered 300 tick-
ets to Big Bend area Club
members so that they and
their families could experi-
ence arena football, Tallahas-
see's newest sports
phenomenon.
I Titans Director of Opera-
tions Misty Sullivan explains
that the team offered 200 tick-
ets to kids in the Leon and
Franklin clubs, and 100 to
kids from Jefferson County.
"We think Boys and Girls
Clubs are a fabulous organi-
zation," she adds, pointing out
that the Titans have several
personal ties to the group,
starting with offensive tackle
Brian Ross.
Ross who played for FSU
from 2001-2004, is the cur-


The many

faces
of caring
Find out what you can do. Contact us
at 1(800)899-0089 or www.voa.org
V Volunteers
of America-
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"Familiar Faces And Quiet Places"

A Pictorial And Narrative
History Of Jefferson County

By Derelyne Delp Counts

Available At The Chamber Office
And Leading Merchants


rent director of the St. Phillips
Boys and Girls Club.
Another tie exists in Titans
Marketing Director Frank
Porter, who Was a running
back and free safety for FSU
in 1991.
He was a Boys and Girls
Club member as a child and
reports that the Club helped
him tremendously.
He added, "It gave me con-
fidence to interact with other
kids in a positive, competitive
environment," which 'ulti-
mately helped him develop as
an athlete and an adult.
Boys and Girls Clubs of the
Big Bend President Buddy
Streit said Club Directors
made sure that all Club mem-
bers who wanted to attend the
Titans game were able to do
so.
The clubs arranged buses to
meet the kids and their fami-
lies at their specific club-
houses to transport them to
the civic center for the game.
"We are pleased that the

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W


Tallahassee Titans organiza-
tion invited our Boys and
Girls Club members to their
first home game," Streit said.
"They have made it possible
for children who may not
have had the opportunity to
attend a professional sporting
event to do so."

L


MONTICELLO

NEWS



Covering

The Growth

Of The

Community!


B

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A

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H

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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 23, 2007 PAGE 9

Kings Of South Men's at,,a

Softball Team Roster fJ d


Coach Roosevelt Jones of
the Kings of the South soft-
ball team, has released this
years roster for the team.
Team members incldue:
Zeke Gillyard, Michael Steen,
Frankie Steen, Johnny River,
,Vincent Gentle, Andy Burley,
Randy Wade, Kevin Jones,
Warren Allen, Diandre How-
ard, Nick Russell, Wilbo
Ellis, Jr., Eldred Jennings, Joe
Andrews, Nod Thompson,


Desmond Smiley, and
Tommy Lyler.
Serving as the assistant
coach is Terry Thompson.
The Kings will play teams
from Greenville, Mayo, Jas-
per, Madison, Tallahassee,
Quitman, Perry, Green
County Spring, and Lake City
this year.
Anyone who wishes to play
on the team can contact Jones
at 342-1209 or 322-1871.


TIM FORD, former professional
encourage young boxers. (News


boxer, volunteers regularly at Cherry Street Gym to
Photo)


ACA Girls Tennis Team

Defeats Suwannee 5-2


The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy varsity tennis team
downed Suwannee 5-2, Fri-
day.
This was the Lady Warriors
second consecutive 5-2 win,
to stand 2-0 on the season.
In singles action, Courtney
Connell fell to Lauren Mi-
chaels, 8-2; Caitlin Jackson
downed Sydney Sine in an
8-8 tie and a 7-5 tie breaking
win.
Rebekah Aman slammed
Tori Henderson, 8-1; Nikki
Hamrick downed Rebecca
Wilkes in an 8-8 tie, and a 7-3


Lady Diamonds softball
Coach Roosevelt Jones, re-
ports the team roster..
Players are: Tasha Samuel,
Keandra Seabrooks, Nikki
Cooks, Tonya Young, Kista
Hills, Lisa Crumitie, Fannie
Mae Fead, Ashley Allen, Lil-
lie Daniels, Melissa Oliefant,
Twanda, Miller, Tashai head,.
Shericka 'Parrish, Valerie
Robertson and Kidra Thomp-
son.
Terry Thompson will serve


tie breaking victory; and' Au-
cilla had to forfeit the fifth
match for not having enough
players to compete, due to in-
juries.
In doubles action, Connell
and Jackson, beat Michaels
and Sine, 8-6; and Aman arid
Hamrick slammed: fresh play-
ers Michelle Poole and Sarah
Hurst, 8-1.
The Lady Warriors are
slated to face Munroe, 3:30
p.m., Thursday, there; Su-
wanne County, 3:30 p.m., Fri-
day, here; and Thomasville,
3:30 p.m., Tuesday, here.


as the assistant coach for the
Lady Diamonds.
Jones said he will be con-
ducting tryouts for anyone
who would like to play with
the team.
Practice will begin every
Saturday and Sunday, begin-
ning next week, and when the
-time changes, practices' will
be held on a daily basis.
For further information con-
tact Jones at 342-1209 or 322-
1971.


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Team Reports Roster








PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 23, 2007


use Caution With Over


Counter Medications


-4. .
.. .... .. .

-. '

* ..- .., .. ".


,ACA STUDENT J.T. WARD was one of the servers at the
Bless the Beast Humane Society Benefit. (News Photo)
a


With the constant changing
temperatures recently playing
havoc on the sinuses, the
Florida Poison Information
Center (FPIC) reminds the
public to use the same precau-
tions with over-the-counter
medications as they do with
prescription medications.
Debra Forest, RN, Senior
Specialist for FPIC explains:
"As with prescription medica-
tions, dosing errors can occur
with over-the-counter prod-
ucts, and are often due to tak- .
ing or being given a
medication dose twice.
FPIC advises parents and
caretakers to establish a rou-
tine for taking medications,
and communicate with all
family members to ensure that
a medication dose is not taken
or given twice.


Commonly used over-the-
counter products, like pain re-
lievers and cough medicines,
can be harmful if misused.
FPIC offers the following
guidelines for taking over-
'the-counter medications
safely;
' *Read the medication label
before each use, follow direc-
tions precisely. If you do not
understand the instructions
call the product information
phone number on the label, or
contact your pharmacist or
physician.
*Follow the recommended
dose; do not extend the maxi-
inum daily dose stated on the
label.
*Be careful when taking
more than one over-the-
counter medications. Medica-
tions may contain the same or


similar active ingredients,
which when added together,
may .exceed the maximum,
safe dosage.
*Some over-the-counter
products should not be mixed
with prescription medications.
Always speak to your phar-
macist or physician before
taking more than one pre-
scription medication or over-
the-counter medicine.
*Keep all medications, in-
cluding over-the-counter
products, out of children's
reach, locked up and out of
sight. Small amounts of some
adult medicines can be harm-
ful or life-threatening to a
child.
*Never call medication
candy.
*Do not let small children
see you taking any


medication.
*Keep all medicines and
household chemicals in con-
tainers fitted with safety caps.
*Always turn on the light
prior to taking any
medication.
*If you wear glasses, put
them on before taking any
medication.
*Never take medication out
of their original containers.
*Be aware of medications
or other household products
that look like candy or food.
*Post the Poison Informa-
tion center's emergency hot-
line phone number
(1-800-222-1222), near the
phone.
If you or anyone in your
household takes the wrong
kind of medication or the
wrong dose, call the hotline
and the health care profes-
sionals at the center will im-
mediately respond to poison
emergencies and answer
poison-related questions.
about medications.


Real Estate and More


S Stee W1alker

SRealty, LLC
.I5 S..lieffel son St..
Monticello, FL


339 Silver Lake Rd., Monticello
16 Acres $375,000
3BR/ 2BA 2.500 sqft
Completely Refurbished
Cypress Pond w/boardwalk
CALL US!


(850) 997-4061 Office
Come Visit Us On the Web
Sor. more inlb:
vwww.SteveWalkerRealty.corm


.11 i I II I


i m . i U


~ Poppell
S. Putnal & Associates
I aNnf SIIRVFYORs1
Terry L. Putnal
Lesley Putnal President land S. Hooker
Roland S. Hooker
Secretary Walton F. Poppell Manager
Surveyor
PO Box 388 180 S. Cherry St. SuiteA Monticello FL 32345
Phone 850-997-0005 Fax 850-997-8005
Emailaputnalinc@earthlink.net


ANYCODTIN ANYARE

BE I D ON P Y EN SL TS* L N
AV ID OELSR AM O

DIORE *9 MVIG ANRUP TAIER


P~ Of l YutB11 Wt C75 ef Oe


Competitive Rates Call for quote now
Programs for every situation
Apply on our website and receive a
$200.00 credit at closing!


Marianne Arbulu'
President


Alpha Mortgage Group, Inc.
1530 Metropolitan Blvd. Ste. M
Tallahassee, FL 32308
Tel: (850) 577-1300 Ext. 114
Fax: (850) 577-0555
Cell: (850) 528-5758
www.alphamortgage.us


-1m
ILJ.^s~ts~feaBB-- *.fkt


A;rlyle Realty, Inc.
2803 Highway 84 East Cairo, GA 39828
229-377-9771

Contact: Chuck Iwamasa at 229-377-2139
for more information or to schedule an
appointment to view this fine property.

wwwA a rA~ly4Iie al.com'


.,- "-;


www.mymonticellomortgage. com

(850) 577-1300 (850) 577-1300


Home Sellers |
Can Now Hold Onto More Equity 0

Assist-2-Sell[R the nation s largest discount real estate company has opened its newest
office in Tallahassee, Florida under broker-owner Illton Ilightowve. Known lor its
innovative "Full Service with $axings!" concept, Assist-2-SellRo now boasts more than
600 franchise offices in the I Inited States and Canada
Ilomebuyers in the Tallahassee area lace a dilemma. "In order to purchase a bigger.
more expensive home, most need to keep as much equity as possible when selling their
current residence." said 1 lilton lHightower.
(hne option is the time intensive "For Sale By I)wner" strategy, but the pitfalls and aggravanons are seldom xorth the
eilbrt And as most people know. using a traditional real estate company can mean forfeiting five or even six percent of the
total sales price in agent commissions. There is another choice Assist-2-SellR ofliers home sellers a "Direct-To-Buyer"TM
piograim lo r a svery affordable flat fee. regardless of the selling pnce of the home. and \ ith no up-front or hidden fees. tInder
this program. Assist-2-Sell's team of licensed REAlT1 )RS K \will market a home Ior a flat fee of just $2,495. pasable only
alter the successful selling and closing of the home. And since Assist-2-Sell R is a member of the local MIS. Assist-2-
Sell a also offers sellers the "MLS For Less"k program In this program. sellers have an option of placing their home in
tie MI.S system at a total commission of 4%. Best of all. even if the property is listed on MI.S. and Assist-2-SellR
iproduces the bu er. the seller pass only the Ilat fee of$2.495
Dl)on't let the name ftool you This is not a do-it-yourself concept. Under Assist-2-SellR 's marketing programs. sellers
reqgie the full services of. professional REALlTORSt at a fraction of what they might normally pa\." continued
ljightower "Customers can't believe ho\\ much these save with our programs Ihese full-service programs includes
signs. free advertising. feature sheets. answering the phone inquiries from buyers. show ing the home to perspective buyers,
negotiating the purchase agreement, interacting \\ith inspectors and appraisers. handling all the paperwork. supersising the
closing, and more
"When people irstl call us. they're thinking there inIist ,i e a catch. They can't believe well actually' sell their home Ior
just $2.495 But the\ are pleasantly surprised \\hen the, find out we do everything other real estate agents do but for a lot
less money For example. if you compare $2.495 to a six percent commission, a home that sells for $250.00 ()(l ill sa\e the
ow \ner more than $12.5()(0.
'If your home is priced fairly. it's going to sell. regardless of which real estate company l ou choose." lightower said.
"'The question is how much do you want to pay to sell it?"
The Tallahassee Assist-2-SellR franchise serves home sellers and homebuyers in lallahassee and the surrounding area
The'ilfice is located at 1616 Metropolitan Circle. Suite D. For more information, call Ililton I lightower at 850-422-0408
dr visit www.Homes4Tallahassee.com.
r7------------------


SSSE~.~CICIC~rrCl~rrrrr~C1CIC~rrrCIC~C~








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 23, 2007 PAGE 11


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Members of the Founders-
Garden Circle opted tooffer a
basket weaving class for their
February meeting, instructed
by Alphonso Jennings.
Participants met at the
Wirick-Simmons House to
learn the art of weaving by


FOUNDERS Garden Circle Chairperson, Edna
taught basketweaving techniques, Gloria Brown,
displaying the baskets they wove.


making handled baskets.
As there was just not
enough time on the meeting
date to complete their
projects, five of the members
met at a later date to finish
their baskets.
They met at the home of
Chairman Edna Fendley, who
prepared a lunch of BBQ
sandwiches, pickled vegetable
salad, chips and homemade


Circle Learns To

Weave Baskets


BUSINESS



DIRECTORY


CALL TO ADVERTISE
YOUR BUSINESS


997-3568


Your Local Professional Painters
Interior Exterior
Lic. & Ins. #4676

Joh Wils

PaintingServi
342-32889


John Collins
Fill Dirt

850-997-5808
850-251-2911


155 John Collins Rd.


JACKS BOATS AND TRAILERS, INC.
SHunting, Farming, Ranching
Sales, Service & Factory Parts
Store Hours:
Sat 8-12
UTIUT (850) 584-2162
VEHICLES 449 US 19 North, Perry AT

SPortable Toilets
Billy Simmons Septic
850-509-1465 cell
850-997-0877 home
Clean Portables for construction sites,
Family reunions, parties
SEvents and Types


www.vanguardnorth.com

It can be done...
S* On schedule
,. On budget
Just the way you imagined!
,. 1 Call
LcflCO" 997'0016
Vanit 'ard *


U
U U


Danny's Collisions
& Customs, LLC
Serving All of Your Paint and Body Needs


765 E. Washington St.


997-1500


I I


Kessler
Construction LLC
Repair; Remodeling & New Construction
E 1 Licensed and Insured
Estimates Mark Kessler

Phone: 850-997-4540
CRC1329001


Abbie 's FCowers

S Liz Santini
SNew Owner
1830 Thomasville Road
Tallahassee, Fl. 32303
(850) 224-3473 (850) 541- 8702
Full Service Florist





Call For quality work
45 Years In The Traae
Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
850-997-7467 850-544-2917
*Residential Commercial Interior Exterior
Wall Paper Hanging


Appliance Repairs:
Washers, Dryers, Stoves,
Refrigerators.
Owned & Operated by Andy Rudd
997-5648
Leave Message


"I Do Windows, Etc."
Margie Woods
Highly Recommended / Good References
Reasonable Prices
"The nicest gift you could give anyone....even yourself"


Residential
New Construction


(850) 997-6637
Cell # (307) 840-0004


I * t


1-10 CHEVRON
STAR CHEWING TOBACCO
Buy One get One Free


+tax pk 3 pks
305 $1.69 $4.63
2+
DTC $1.83 $5.00
2+
Marlboro $3.18 $8.99
Newport $3.35 $9.75


Ct.
$15.06
$14.20.
$16.28
$15.34
$28.94
$30.49


Full Line of
Swisher Cigars.

WE ACCEPT ALL MANUFACTURERS
COUPONS


I U


FRITH ABSTRACT
& TITLE CO.
Owners & Mortgage Title
Insurance Policies
Title Searches Real Estate Closings
Serving Taylor County
501 N. Byron Butler Pkwy. Perry, Fl
850-584-2672


Quality Service
S| Family Owned & Operated

HOWDY'S
Portable Toilet Rentals
5565-A Crawfordville Rd
Tallahassee, FL 32305 Owners
850-656-8633 ALLEN JENKINS
FAX 850-656-6150 WANDA JENKINS



RHB Mowing, Inc.
and Tractor Service
Bush Hogging, Box Blading, Root Raking,
Harrowing, Driveways, Fire Breaks,
Horse Pasture, Food Plots, Etc.
Licensed and Insured


Roland Brumbley


"For Your Best Deal"


LARRY FACEN








WALK IN556-3361 DRIVE OUT
243 North Magnolia Drive 2415 Tennessee Street
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
Office: (850) 671-5357 Fax: (850) 671-5753


(850) 545-9724
Fax: (850) 224-8795


The Trash Masters Inc.
SERVING JEFFERSON COUNTY
Call for Weekly Household
trash pick-up


997-2027
Steve or Tim


www.thetrashmasters.com


LARICHIUTA Craig
Larichiuta
Lloyd, Fl 32337


Limerock
Clay
Sand
Top Soil


ii I II


DOUG'S TREE & LAWN
SERVICE
Trimming Stump Grinding
Mowing Aerial Device
Removal Bush Hogging
Maintenance


997-0039 Lie. & Insured


2 WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!
Z 997-6500
WHEN You NEED To SOLVE COMPUTER PROBLEMS.
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY ONSITE SERVICE
*Diagnosis,*. Repair *Upgrades *Installations *Consultations
TutorialsORemoval of Viruses, Adware, Spyware


Register's Mini-Storage

315 Waukeenah Hwy.
(1/4 Mile Off US 19 South)

997-2535


PSYCHIC READER
PALM TAROT CARD
READINGS
ADVICE ON ALL
MATTERS OF LIFE
(850) 536-7236
3845 N. MONROE ST
TALLAHASSEE, FL


---I I -I4


B & M Tractor Service
Specializing in Food Plots, Bush Hogging,
Liming & Fertilizing, Spraying, and Fencing



Brad McLeod
Cell: (850) 210-2942 Mack McLeod
Cell: (850) 545-2325 Cell- (850) 510-0346
Home: (850) 997-1451 Hoe: 850997-3091
10534 South Salt Rd, Lamont, FL. 32331


North Florida Interiors, LLC
Specializing in all of your cabinetry needs
Kitchen, Counters and Vanities
Raised Panel, Solid Wood Drawers,
All Plywood Construction
Family business for over 25 years in south
Florida *Free Estimates Licensed & Insured
Call Mike Hilinski
850-997-6931 850-445-2188
We accept credit cards


S


Herndon Trucking
Truck Rental Custom Hauling
Sand Gravel Refuse
Backhoe Service
Light Clearing & Driveways
Office (850) 948-40.19
RAYMOND HERNDON Mobile (850) 570-0458


AnmericaqHeart
Association.^^.: :

It keeps
more than
memories',. '
-ive


* I I


*Lot Cleaning *Driveways *Dig Ponds *Road
Building *Culvert Installation *Fill Dirt
*Limerock *Gravel
Billy Simmons, Owner
Backhoe and Hauling Septic TanksContractor &
Excavation Contractor
Phone: (850) 997-0877
Cell: (850) 509-1465
Insured D.O.H. Lie. #SR0971265
Visa & Mastercard Accepted!


Septic Tank & Land Clearing

Complete Septic Service & Repair
Lot Preparing & Land Clearing

Thomas B. Scott, Sr.
339 Alexander Rd
Lamont, Fl. 32366
ph: 997-5536 cell: 933-3620


Keaton Tire Repair
"Service Is Our Business on and off the Road"


EDD KEATON
TRAVIS KEATON
54 Capps Hwy
Lamonl, FL 32336


850-997-0903 Shop
850-264-6871 Cell
850-997-0937 Fax
850-997-5443 Home


0;


salsa dip, iced tea, and cake.
Those who worked to com-
plete their baskets included
Fendley, Dianne Braren, Glo-
ria Brown,, Linda Caminez,
and Norma Wilson.
The Founders Garden Cir-
cle meets at noon on the sec-
ond Thursday of each month.




1-800-USA-NAVY
www.navyjobs.com


997-6788


--


im










PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 23, 2007


Stressful Situations


(Continued From Page 4)
ger social networks live
longer.
Keep yourself healthy and fit
so your body's better able to
deal with stress. Exercise regu-
larly, eat a healthy diet, don't
smoke and don't drink to ex-
cess.

American Stroke
Association,.
A Division of American
Heart Association

Time MJrOhes On3
For people over age 55, the incidence of
stroke more than doubles in each
successive decade.
Stroke Warning Signs:
Sudden numbness or weakness in
the face, arm, or leg, especially on
one side of the body.
Sudden confusion or trouble
speaking or understanding.
Sudden trouble seeing in one or
both eyes.
Sudden trouble walking, dizziness,
loss of balance or coordination.
Sudden severe headache
with no known cause.


Hea c ** Ie
Brief


If your stress seems to
much to manage, talk to yoi
health care professional.
Many therapies can help yo
deal with stress and its conse
quences. The effects of being
chronically stressed are too si
rious to simply accept as a fa
of modern life. (NAPS)


Central
Church of
Christ


Top three
reasons you
should sign up
to study the
Bible by mail,
in the privacy
ofyour home.

3. No "sales-
man" will call.

2. I's
completely
free (even the
postage)

1. Heaven!

Give Us A
Call!!

997-1166


. '. p: ". .




Quiet, Private Living In Downtown Modticello!
Riley Palmer Built in 06, 3 BR/2 BA, 1440 sq ft, on N. Cherry
Court, brick & Hardie board exterior, oversized one car
garage, large tiled kitchen, raised panel cabinets, solid surface
counters, wood floors, vaulted living room ceiling wuerown
molding, screened back porch, prewired for security and data.

$229,500 Ken Foster Palmer Properties 544-5040



FEBRUARY IS FOCUS ON

YOUR HEART MONTH


HAVE SOME FUN GETTING YOUR HEART
HEALTHY WITH
JUST 30 MINUTES A DAY, 3 DAYS A WEEK!!!!



SIMPLY FIT


JO'W Wnamw



Monticello's new women's gym features 10
state of the art hydraulic machines and 10 rest
stations which allows you to lose inches and
pounds, tone your body and strengthen your
heart with just 30 minutes a day, 3 days a
week!


CALL 997-7339 FOR MORE INFORMATION

189 E Walnut Street
Monticello, FL

S Simply Fit for Women is a limited liability company




With your help,
MDA is building
S / ;'w_, :. a tomorrow without
CONSTR i neuromuscular diseases.

SAHEAD 1-800-572-1717

Muscular Dystrophy Association
www.mdausa.org


Altha, Calhoun County, Florida I *W-"7:*", '.'7 t,,w B .,i.1
* Great Development Location Farm 2 238 Acres Farm 4 30 Acres CR 274
* Excellent Cropland Troy McCroan Rd Zoned Mixed Use (2:1)
:21 Zoned Ag (1:10) Excellent Horoestlle
221+ Acre Cotton Base Dothan Soil
* 161 Acre Peanut Base 1800 SF, 2 Bed, 1 Bath Framed Home
Farm 1 150 Acres CR 69-A Farm 3 40 Acres CR 274
*Zoned Mixed Use (2:1) Zoned Mixed Use (2:1) Selling from Farm 1
* Paved Road Frontage Road Frontage on 2 Sides For Complete Details Call
' Rowel Realty & Auction Co., Inc. 800-323-8388
10% Buyers Premium AU 479 AB 296 Myers Jackson CAI CES AARE Auction Coordinator
j(.II~iiU~A~uN~iiN1LtI*IiJ'I''Iii ~ A' f g1 L.II ilonori.] gjtW.JI


o0
ur

u l


LEGAL
Jefferson County Land Auction 700
acres, starting @ 1,200/ac
Owner/agent March 10th
www.700Acreauction.com
R/D 2/7,9,14,16,21,23,28 3/2,7,9
/2007,c


e- Job Advertisement County
g Coordinator Jefferson County,
Florida Jefferson County is seeking
a County Coordinator. This is a
ct professional position within
Jefferson County government. The
complete Jefferson County Job
Application, the Job Announcement
and the Job Description can be
obtained through the County Clerk
of Courts Office, Jefferson County
Courthouse, Room 10, Monticello,
FL 32344, by telephone at
850/432-0218 or on the County's
web site lttlp://co.jiiclferion.il.us. The
completed Jefferson County Job
Application and resume are due in
the Clerk of Courts office by noon,
March 19, 2007. EOE.
R/D 2/21,23,28,3/2,7,9,c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 07-45 ca IN RE: The
Marriage of JOSEPHINE
MORRIS, Wife/Petitioner, and
SIDNEY MORRIS,
Husband/Respondent NOTICE OF
ACTION To: SIDNEY MORRIS
Address Unknown YOU ARE
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on
MICHAEL A. REICHMAN,
petitioner's attorney, whose address
is P.O. Box 41, Monticello, FL
32345, on or before April 6, 2007,
and file the original with the clerk
of this court either before service on
petitioner's attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition. Dated on February 12,
2007 KIRK REAMS Clerk of Court
As Clerk of the Court Jerie B.
Pearson Deputy Clerk
2/16, 23/07, 3/2, 9/07,c


TABLES
Coffee & 7vo End
3 pc. Startnat $ 95
Am wd~ 1-*^ftr


10CAITAL C~1I~R'L N(W


NOTICE
AA: Mon., Thurs., Sat.;
Al-Anon: Mon. 8 p.m.; Christ
Episcopal Church Annex, 425
North Cherry Street 997-2129,
997-1955 for info
2/23,3/2,9,16,23,30,

HELP WANTED :
Two Drivers Needed $100 a day
528-5218
2/23,28,3/2,7,c
The City of Monticello is
accepting applications for the
position of Police Patrol
Sergeant. This position requires
a minimum of a high school
diploma and Florida Police
Standards. The successful
candidate must live within 25
miles of Monticello Police
Station. The position requires a
background check. Salary and
benefit information is available
upon request. Submit
application and resume to: City
of Monticello Police Dept. 195 S.
Mulberry St. Monticello, FL
32344 by March 2, 2007.
EOE/Drug -Free Workplace.
2/23,c
The Jefferson County Road
Dept. is accepting applications
for the following positions: (1) a
Mechanics position. Must have
experience in gas and diesel
engines and/or have high school
diploma or GED and will train.
A class A CDL license would be
a plus. (2) A Truck driver with a
class A CDL license. Must have
a high school diploma or GED.
(3) An Equipment Operator/
class A-CDL driver. Must have
a high school diploma or GED.
Closing date for all positions
will be March 9, 2007.
2/23,28,3/2,7,9,14,16,c
AmeriGas Propane has an
immediate opening for a
SERVICE TECHNICIAN for
our Monticello district which
includes servicing the greater
Tallahassee area. Individual will
install, repair, and maintain
,propane gas system, appliances
and equipment- Requirements
include a high school diploma
(or equivalent), a valid class B
CDL with hazmat and tanker
endorsements, a great driving
record and satisfactory
completion of a DOT physical,
drug test and background
check. We offer competitive
wages, medical & denial
benefits, 401k savings plan and
liberal vacation & holiday
policy. Drug free work
environment. EOE. Fax
resumes: Attention: Sales &
Services Manager (850)
997-3854 or call (850) 997-3331.
R/D 2/21,23,28,3/2,c
DRIVERS! ACT NOW! 21
CDL-A Drivers Needed *


T The donation is tax deductible.
SPick-up Is free.

r th-Blind -We take career of all the paperwork.


f ., .- .

i W o f .. : :





Lake Oconee

Lake Sinclair Georgia

R, ,ww.rri lakeoconee.con









ADVANCED GUTTER & METALS


100% SEAMLESS GUTTERS 5" x 6"
SEAMLESS GUTTERS GUTTER SCREENS


r' "3 "L *'^LI "
p %n~bi

", l'-*M ; ...-, U:- HS^!i


* 1-REE ESTIMATES (L- MnK)
* ALL WORK 100% GUARANTEED!
* OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE
MIKE OCHAT

850-728-4874 CELL
850-728-4876 OFFICE


LICENSED & INSURED


FLLiCe #060000120218


HELP WANJ~ED


36-43cpm/ $1.20pm $0 Lease
NEW Trucks CDL-A +3 mos
OTR (800) 635-8669
2/21,23,fc
Cox Auto Trader is currently
seeking drivers to deliver our
magazines in the Tallahassee
FL, Madison, FL and
surrounding areas. Computer
knowledge helpful, requires
reliable vehicle, good driving
record, valid drivers license &
insurance. One day a week -
Thursdays. Pick up magazines
in Madison. Call 386-590-1255
1/24,26,31,2/2,7,9,14,16,21,23,28
,3/2,c
Earn Up to $550 WEEKLY
Working through the
government PT No Experience.
Call Today!! (800) 488-2921 ask
for Department W21
2/21,23,fc
Cleaning service needs people in
Monticello area after 5 p.m. 3
days a week part time work
must be able to pass a back
ground check. Only serious
minded inquires only. Call
Karen at 850-942-6200 or
850-926-7029.
2/7,9,14,16,21,23,28, c
AVON! Start the year with a
new career,, earn 50%, only $10
to start! 570-1499
R/D
1/31,2/2,7,9,14,16,21,23,28,pd
Cashier Capital City Travel
Center. Experience necessary.
This is a Drug Free Workplace.
322-6600,997-3538
R/D 2/14,16,21,23,c
"Can You Dig It?" Heavy
Equipment School. 3 wk
training program. Backhoes,
Bulldozers, Trackhoes. Local
job placement. Start digging
dirt now. Call (866) 362-6497 or
(888) 707-6886
2/21,23,fc
Driver: DON'T JUST START
YOUR CAREER, Start It
Right! Company Sponsored
CDL training in 3 weeks. Must
be 21. Have CDL? Tuition
reimbursement! CRST. (866)
917-2778
2/21,23,fc
Need cleaning assistant to clean
offices in the evening, in
Monticello. Please call
850-894-6254 or Fax
850-894-6224.
2/16,tfn,c
SERVICES
D & J Soft Wash- Brick, Siding,
Stucco, and More. Free
estimates and great work for a
low price. Owner operated,
850-210-3906.
R/D 2/16,21,23,28,pd
I build sheds, decks, handicap
ramps, exterior carpentry work,
window/door replacement. Call
Bob 242-9342


SERVICES


R/D1/10,12,17,19,24,26,31,2/2,7,
9,14,16,21,23,28,3/2,7,9,14,16
If you have a child attending
FSU/FAMU high schools, and
carpooling is not working, for
an affordable fee, you have an
option. Call Freeman Davis
510-5162, 421-8060.
R/D/17,19,24,26,31,2/2,9,14,16,2
1,23,28pd
Childcare Services- infant to 3
years old. In my home. Call








MUSIC & LYRICS
(PG13)
Fri. 5:40-7:55-10:10 Sat. 1:10-
3:25-5:40-7:55-10:10 Sun. 1:10-
3:25-5:40-7:55 Mon. Thurs.
5:40-7:55
DADDY'S LITTLE
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(PG13)
Fri. 5:30-7:45-10:00 Sat. 12:55-
3:10-5:30-7:45-10:00 Sun.
12:55-3:10-5:30-7:45 Mon. -
Thurs. 5:30-7:45
BRIDGE TO
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(PG13)
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NO PASSES
NORBIT
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Fri. 4:35-7:05-9:35 Sat. 1:40-
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Fri. 4:30-7:15-9:55 Sat. 1:20-
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7:15 Mon.- Thurs. 4:30-7:15
NO PASSES
RENO 911: MIAMI
(R)
Fri. 5:25-7:35-9:45 Sat. 1:05-
3:15-5:25-7:35-9:45 Sun. 1:05-
3:15-5:25-7:35 Mon. Thurs.
.5:25-7:35
THE NUMBER 23
(R)
Fri. 5:10-7:20-9:30 Sat. 12:50-
3:00-5:10-7:20-9:30 Sun. 12:50-
3:00-5:10-7:20 Mon. Thurs.
5:10-7:20
NO PASSES

All new high
back seats and
more renova-
tions on the
way.


Priced for quick sale!
Sellers Motivated!
: 343 Attatulga Road,
Lamont Area
Custom 2004 Home on
5.66 acres. All brick,
Built in 2004, 3 BR/2
BA split plan, 2 car
garage. Hardwood,
tile & carpet flooring.
All appliances
Dianne Spooner, Broker, Hill Spooner & included. Like new.
Company Inc. 850-508-1846 Move-in-ready.
$279,000








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MONTICELLO. (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 23, 2007 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$9.00
Each Additional Line....$1.25
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


SERVICES
997-5498 reasonably low prices.
II/1,TFN,c
Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
new menopausal products.
Jackson's drug store.
5/12 tfn
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn

Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quick responses.
6/22, tfn
GARAGE SALE
Yard Sale: Feb. 24-25 8am -
5pm, Antiques, Appliances,
roll-top desk 90W/ Old Lloyd
Rd South 4 miles to Oaklands
Plantation Rd follow signs
342-1754
2/21,23,pd
BUSH BABY IS HAVING A
GIGANTIC "CLEAN OUT
THE BACK ROOM" SALE.
MAKE OFFERS.
EVERYTHING MUST GO.
SATURDAY 10-5 28 N.
CHERRY ST. ON
NORTHSIDE OF BUILDING.
R/D 2/21,23,C
ANTIQUES
Flomaton Antique Auction Fri.,
Mar. 2, 6 p.m. Sat., Mar. 3, 10
a.m. 1800-1900 Federal,
Empire, Victorian, including
Lighting, Statues & Paintings
Monticello Estate of Fay & the


ANTIQUES
late Richard Farmer Flomaton,
AL North of Pensacola, FL
251-296-3059 N. Heller 1094 See
Flomaton.com
2/23,c

BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
Stanley Home Products- Buy or
Sell or Hold a Fundraiser! Call
Lilly Mae Brumbley @
997-3339
R/D 2/16, 23 pd

FOUND
Found on Clark Road large
white dog with brown spot over
right eye and tail. Black leather
collar 997-2358
2/23,28,3/2,7,nc

AUTOMOTIVE
Ford Ranger XLT Supercab 2
wd 4.0 V6 127K AC AT
Toolbox. Needs some minor
work, but driveable now. $3,000
251-0763 8am 8pm
R/D 9/27,tfn ,nc
FOR SALE
Freezer- Upright, 5 /2'x3' Sears,
good condition, $75. 997-6275
2/23,pd
Troy-Bilt Tiller Bronco model
5.5 hp Practically new $400 or
OBO Call 997-3318 after 6 pm
2/21,tfn,nc
Specialized feed for Alpacas &
Lamas. Call Marcy
850-421-2403
R/D 2/9,14,16,21,23,28 3/2,7
For Sale You Move 93 Merritt
54 x 24 DW 3-BDR. 2-BTH
w/fireplace, 12x10 Metal Shed
and more included. 997-3318 or
544-7785 no calls after 9:00 pm
please.


FOR SALE


2-16,TFN,nc

$150 Queen Pillow-top Mattress
Set. New in Plastic with
warranty.. 850-222-9879
12/l,tfn,c
Cherry sleigh bed SOLID
WOOD- BRAND NEW in box,
$250. (850) 545-7112
12/l,tfn,c
LEATHER SOFA &
LOVESEAT. NEW, warranty,
sacrifice $795. (can deliver).
(850) 425-8374
12/1,tfn,c
NEW king POSTER bedroom
set bed, dresser, mirror, chest,
2 nightstands. $4400 value, must
sell $1650. (850) 545-7112
12/1,tfn,c
KING PILLOWTOP Mattress
Set. Brand new in plastic. Must
move, $225. (850) 222-9879
12/1,tfn.c
FOR RENT'
Gadsden Square 2 3 BR, 2 BA
apartments HW floors, for rent.
4 office spaces ranging from 500
sq ft & up. 850-510-9512
2/2123,28,3/2,c
Spacious 2/1 and 1/1 apts, also
office space, near Monticello
center. Section 8 OK Call
850-491-8447
1/24,tfn,c
Jefferson Place Apts., 1 & 2 BR,
HUD Vouchers Accepted 1468
S. Waukeenah St. Office 300,
Monticello. 997-6964. "This
institution is an Equal
Opportunity Provider and

NEED CHILDCARE?
ENROLL TODAY
The Little University Co.,
is now accepting Infants.
Open enrollment for all ages and
sibling discounts. Limited Spaces
for Arbor School Readiness.
Call 997-2970

CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots,
Land We Make
Mortgage Loans,
Reverse Mortgages!
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc
878-3957


SFORRil


Employer".
9/6,tfn, c
REAL ESTATE
House- 3 Bedroom, 2 '/ Bath, in
ground pool, on 6 fenced acres.
1 '/ miles from Monticello City
limits, on Old Lloyd Road. Call
after 5 pm 997-2063, 322-3767.
R/D 2/16,21,23,28,pd
Newly Renovated 2 BD/ 1 Bath
$69,900 Info. Call 212-3142
R/D 2/14,26,21,23,28,pd
S A





Southern Forestry Realty
www.soforest.com

119+ac, Gadsden Co.,- 60-
70 ac 12-yr old planted
pines, hardwood bottoms,
great road system. Beautiful
creek divides property.
$3850/ac.
58+ac, Madison Co. 30 ac
12-yr old planted pines,
frontage on Aucilla River &
Hwy 90, beautiful oaks, road
system. $5172/ac.
199+ac, Jefferson Co. 35
min. E of Tallahassee. Natural
upland pines & hardwoods. Full
of turkey & deer, ponds w/fish
& ducks. Power available.
$3250/ac.
lll+ac, Jefferson Co. 18-
20 yr old planted pines, 50 ac
hardwood bottom. Nice rolling
topography, 35 min to Tallahas-
see. Full of game near Aucilla
River. $5000/ac.
82+ ac, Leon Co. Great in-
vestment property. Various aged
planted pines, hardwoods &
rolling hills. Somewhat secluded
w/deeded easement. $6500/ac.
200+ ac, Leon Co. rolling hills
covered in natural longleaf pine.
Secluded w.deeded easement.
Good interior road system.
$1,200,00.

Rob Langford
850-556-7575
Many more investment opportu-
nities available in North Fl,
South GA, and Southeast AL.


Upcoming Auctions!

Ag & Construction Machinery, Farm Equipment,
Trucks, Trailers, ATV's, much more

"11th Annual Winter Auction"
Sunbelt Ag Expo Site
Moultrie, GA
Saturday, February 17, 2007 9:00 am

"5th Annual Winter Auction"
Iron City, GA
Saturday, February 24, 2007 9:00am
Don't miss these opportunities!
Call now to consign!
Turn your surplus equipment into Sold!


Mobile:
229-891-1832
Phone:
229-985-4565


Terry DeMott, Sr.
1894 Sylvester Highway
Moultrie, GA 31768
www.demottauction.com


For Sale by First United Methodist Church 2400 sq.
ft. home at 895 West Washington Street. This former
Methodist Parsonage with split floor plan has 4 bed-
rooms and 3 1/2 baths, refinished hardwood floors.
New tile floors in kitchen, laundry and baths, carpet
in the family room and master bedroom. Bathrooms
newly renovated. Wood stove insert in fireplace.
Large lot landscaped with magnolias, camellias, crepe
myrtles and azaleas. Large deck and screened porch.
$259,500. For more information
call 997-5545


Housing Vouchers
Im


6


We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 $50 dep.

Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571


3d~UiLEEEK~r+~i~ EYE UU U U UU UK


Sr1


(850) 997-4340


Property Management Services!!!
SGreat Rentals
2/1 1/2 bath mobile home east of
town on 5 acres $500/month


Wooded Tract 2.09 hillside acres east
of town on graded County Road $30,400

Just Listed!! 3 bedroom 2 bath delightful log
cabin with front and back screened porches,
board fence pasture, double carport and out
building on 4.07 acres $385,000

Lloyd Acres on a wooded hillside a 3 bedroom
2 bath home with oak floors, fireplace and lots of
very nice extras including shop for $87,500

Historic Budd House built ca 1882 by commu-
nity leader of the day for his family. Lovely wood
work, high ceilings, spacious rooms, grand fire-
places, marvelous porches, currently 4 bedrooms
and 2 baths $355,000

Waterfront Home!! Like New, roomy, 3 bed-
roonp 2 bath home with spacious family room, big
ca ort, terrific screened porch across the back of
the house, nice barn with 5 hillside acres on very
nice lake near 1-10 and US 19 $385,000 See it at
www.TimPeary.com

Amazinq Buy!!! Mixed Use Property 12
plus partially cleared acres on US 19 south land
use designation permits 4 houses per acre near
Dennis' Trading post only $36,500 per acre

New Listing Contract Pending 13.29 acres
some wooded some open $5,000 per acre

Cherry Tree Lane 3 bedroom 2 bath double-
wide with fireplace, big porch, garage, shed,
above ground pool, with big trees, fence pad-
docks, on county maintained paved now
$127,500

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly
wooded acres Only $36,500

Pasture and Pecans 5-10 lovely acres on
paved road $15,500 per acre Very nice property,
good deed restrictions

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Great Opportunity!!! Comfortable 4 bedroom
3 bath home on five fenced acres with guest cot-
tage w/bath, 2 car garage, big shop, pasture 100
pecan trees and a nice pool Only $365,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut .6.5 acres $650,000

Wooded Acreaqe 5.35 acres on private road
off Paul Thompson Road $128,500

Waukeenah Highway 27.99 acres good
home site fenced pasture $545,000

Aucilla Shores 5 level wooded acres $75,000

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath double-
wide with nice deck, fenced yard on 1 acre
$73,500

Investment Property Choice lot on the
Ecofina River 20 minutes to the Gulf, State
property on 3 sides, septic tank on property,
paved road only $195,000


Realtor Tim Peary

850-997-4340
See all our listings at
www.TimPeary.com

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


'U
U
U
UI
p
UI
U
U
UI
UI


ADVANCED



SALES
RESIDENTTIAL/CO MM ERCIAL
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CALL US OR STOP BY TODAY
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A.




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PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 23, 2007


''
II
~6~~L~C~ r

r ;"jp~~y:~
r


, ; Homes Of

SMourning

(Continued From Page 7)
Adam, Henry, Charlie and Vir-
ginia.
SROSA WILLIAMS
Mother Rosa Williarps, 93,
died Sunday, February 8,
'2007.
Mother Williams was a long-
time resident of the Wacissa
community until her health
failed her relocating her to
Brynwood Nursing. Center.
She was also a member of
Bethpage Missionary Baptist
Church where she served on
Sthe Mother's Board.
The service will be at 11:00
a.m. Saturday February 24,
2007 at Bethpage Missionary
end. I have Baptist Church in Wacissa,
with burial at Bethpage Ceme-
tery. Visitation will. be from
3:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Friday,
February 23, 2007-at Tillman
v e Funeral Home in Monticello
(850-997-5553).


PLEASE TAKE ME HOME! My name is Bruce. I am lovable and a good fri(
all my shots and am neutered. I'll be a good dog, I promise! (News Photo)


New Rules Aim To impro

Security In Courthouse


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

In an effort to enhance court
security, the Sheriffs Office,
in cooperation with the
Judges' Offices and Clerk of
Courts, has instituted a new
set of security measures in the
courthouse.
"Citizens should be aware of
the new rules that will affect
them," said Major Bill Bul-
lock.
"These measures were un-
dertaken in response to a
number of situations that have
occurred in courthouses in
other areas of the nation," he
said.
Bullock added that Sheriff
David Hobbs believes that
citizens here probably do not
have as much to fear from
violent acts perpetrated
against our judiciary or citi-
zens doing their judicial duty.
"He does, however, believe
that he has a responsibility, as
a constitutionally mandated
officer of the court, to main-
tain security for those en-
gaged in civil and criminal
activity in the courthouse,"
said Bullock.
"Hobbs believes as well,
that the courts are due consid-
eration, respect, and order be-
cause of the nature of the
tasks undertaken by our
judges, and the citizens, both
jurors and witnesses, who are
called upon to participate in
our system of justice."
Bullock reports that the
courts are also faced with a
mounting workload, and there



Gotcha!


1. The first rule of
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2. The second rule is
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IT PAYS!!!!


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Monticello
News
'You Can't Be
Without It!'


are a larger number of indi-
viduals attending court ses-
sions.
"Security personnel can not
deal with the number of peo-
ple coming into the courts as
efficiently as they have in the
past," he said.
The Sheriff intends that we
retain the level of courtesy
and individual recognition
county citizens are used to
when they come to the court-
house, but finds that we must
make some adjustments in or-
der to do so, and still maintain
the security expected by our
citizens."
People coming to court
should be properly attired and
those wearing baggy or ex-
traordinarily loose clothing or
other inappropriate clothes
such as tank tops, shorts, etc.,
will not be allowed past the
checkpoint.
Persons who come to court
will have to leave cell phones
and any other types of elec-
tronic communication
devices, knives and other
weapons, outside of the court-
room. None of these items
will be allowed past the secu-
rity checkpoint on the ground
floor. Anyone bringing these
items to the court will be
asked to return them to their
vehicle or dispose of them in
some other appropriate man-
ner.

Ladies should not bring
purses or handbags into the
courtroom. They should be
left at home or in their vehi-
cles.
No children under five
years of age will be allowed


Ready...Set... Shop...
Monticello News
Classifieds


in the courtroom.
No one will be allowed to
loiter outside of the court-
room, as was allowed in the
past. If individuals do not
take a seat in the courtroom
they must wait outside the se-
curity perimeter and well out-
side of the hearing of court.
These changes will go into
effect Feb. 26, 2007.


SLeft to cherish her precious
memory are her daughters,
Easter Manning and Josephine
Lewis; her sons, Lewis Wil-
liams, Jr. (Willie Mae), Sam
Williams, Issac Franklin, and
Ulysses Franklin; nine grand-
children; three great-
grandchildren and a host of
other relatives and friends.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, Lewis Wil-
liams, Sr. and two sons.


Dog Show v

AKC All-Breed
Conformation Show
Tt yand
I HAgility Trail. February e
V r 24 & 25th, 2007

V,- Judging beginning at 8:30 A.M. each day tf,
North Florida Fair Grounds ,

Adult admission for all
oo events is $5.00 "
"Get important information about 4
the different breeds of dogs
before you buy a dog
of your own."
"Breeders and owners on
Site to answer all of
4t.] your questions."
A -.--- S LEON COUNTY
.P 4ALLAHASSEE
E^Tou tmD EywCyMw CcuNC.
Vllr_ I I I I t V t lk"4 vl-oll


5- IR

MIIM~~trok'd


SMOKING

ILLNESS ALERT

The Corea Firm, P.L.L.C. is representing Florida
residents, and their survivors, who suffered medical
conditions caused by tobacco products.

You may be entitled to compensation for
smoking related illnesses.

Call The Corea Firm, P.L.L.C. toll-free for a free consultation


1-888-335-2962

The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon
advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our
qualifications and experience. Florida Attorney Jeremy R. Wilson, practicing in Dallas,
Texas, is responsible for this advertisement.


STOP LEG CRAMPS
BEFORE THEY STOP YOU.
Calcet's'triple calcium formula is designed to help
stop low calcium leg cramps.Just ask your pharmacist.


What's New


With Jim!
At Roy Campbell Chevrolet


2007 Chevrolet

Suburban LS
Auto, AC, Power Windows, Power Door
Locks, Tilt, Cruise, Power Seat, CD Player
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/


All you add is Tax, Tg and Title.


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229-226-3901 206 Moultrie Road
www.roycampbell.com Thomasville, GA
aail':-'r (just past 19 on Hwy 319N)


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FREE 2-NIGHT VACATION!
Donate Car Boat RV Motorcycle
1-800-227-2643
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Winner of the prestigious CIPCL[ OfL XC[ELLNCE for service after the sale!

FLEETWOOD

ro FAMILY HOME CENTER

of Tallahassee "Where Quality is Affordable" I
ASK FOR STEVE DANIELS, WILBURT GAVIN OR YVONNE BUSBY
8 .: ,.c,-i .424J O Fa, 8.51i '.- c, 'i: elil ... -52.?.-i'9 ,
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.14



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