Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00180
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: February 21, 2007
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00180
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text








Group
Watching For
Bird Flu

Editorial, Page 4


Bless The Beast
Benefit Well
Attended

Story, Photos, Page 7


Cherry St. Gym

Attracts
Serious Boxers

Story, Photos, Page 8
II


Chamber

After 5 Proves
Popular

Story Page 14


Wednesday Morning


Monticello


I -IPLI'VVA DN~nI A IA fl CINTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2007


Internet

Goes into

County

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Residents of Main Avenue
and vicinity -- an area loosely
defined by US 90 on the north
and Old Lloyd Road on the
east and about 3.5 miles west
of Monticello -- may soon
have access to the city's Inter-
net.
City officials are currently
in negotiations with a property
owner in the area who has ex-
pressed a willingness to donate
a small parcel to the city for
the erection of an antenna on
the site.
Tests reportedly conducted
on the site have shown that a
high enough antenna will pro-
vide high-speed Internet serv-
ice to the entire neighborhood.
Councilman Brian Hayes,
who.is negotiating the.agree-
ment with the property owner,
is most enthusiastic about the
possibilities for expansion of
the city's Internet service.
Hayes told the council re-
cently that he hoped to report
at the March 6 meeting that the
city had a deed in hand for the
donated parcel. The next step,
he said, would be to erect the
antenna on the site and begin
offering the service.
The City Council, mean-
while,has formally established
an information technology
committee to oversee the new
service that the city is offering.
At the latest count, the
Internet service had 42 sub-
scribers, with six applications
pending, according to City
Clerk Emily Anderson.
She reported that the antenna
on the Water Mill tower was
now up also, affording Internet
service to Lloyd area residents.
But she added the caveat that
reception depended on the to-
pography of the particular
property.
Once the Main Avenue an-
tenna goes up, it should afford
greater coverage of the area
between Lloyd and US 90, An-
derson said.
The city launched its Inter-
net service in early September,
following a couple of years of
research and setbacks.
(See Internet, Page 2)


Tax Reforms


Will Impact


Local Coffers


$1M Loss

Predicted

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


S Tax relief, tax reform,
I.' ; fS1^ doubling the homestead ex-
k il o emption and portability of the
"D Save Our Homes cap.
These are among the issues
S" that Floridians are sure to hear





o .. Charlie Crist's tax relief
More and more about in the
coming weeks.

Especially as legislators take


teup these mattconcers in the legisla-



S.;vidually and through organiza-
Leagutive session and begin debatingd




..th Gov. Charlie Crist's tax relief
Cuntieproposals.
IO.U ..... Expect also thatlocal city



and county officials will reasserting g that the
BRRRRRR. The recent frigid weather had even the plants bundling up- Temperatures governor's proposals, ifap-
dropped into the teens during the weekend causing havoc with early blooming trees proveidually and through orgnificantly and




and plants that were fooled by the unusually warmer weather earlier. These plants adversely affect government
and trees in front of Milady's and other nearby shops were well protected, htions such as the Floridre.




thanks to some thoughtful person. (News Photo) "I'm a supporter of property
tax overhaul, but I'm not a sup-
S portLeague of starving counties ofC) and





P la n n officials are asserting that ther-
dropped into the teens during the weekend, causing havoc with early blooming trees proved, wi significantly ander


tax overhaul, but I'm.not a sup-
n Oa a porter of starving counties of

Skeet Joyner said at a recent

Some Food For Thought "m auprtefpo::
fence to the governor's propos-
als.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

It was a rambling discus-
sion for the most part, but
Planning Official Bill Tellef-
sen hit on some key points that
he wanted city planners to con-
template'in their future consid-
erations on development.
"Food for thought", Tellef-
sen called his running com-
mentary.
Specifically, he wanted city
planners to consider increasing


BILL TELLEFSEN, planning official, has definite ideas
of where the city and county should be going, in terms
of planning and zoning decisions. (News Photo)


densities in areas where the in-
frastructure is already in place.
It made planning sense to con-
centrate developments in areas
that were already congested,
leaving room for rural areas of
the county to remain rural,
Tellefsen argued.
He cited the 450-unit devel-
opment that is slated to go up
eventually just west of town on
420 acres. Absent the agree-
ment between city officials
and the developer to limit the
project to 450 units, the origi-
nal zoning of the property al-
lowed upoto 2,000 units.

Why not have approved the
2,000 units? Tellefsen said. He
asked the planners to consider
the property taxes and utilities
revenues that the 2,000 houses
would have generated, money
that could be used for expan-
sion and upgrade of the city's
infrastructure, he said.

The idea, Tellefsen said, was
to make newcomers pay for
growth, while retaining the ru-
ral character of the county in-
tact.
What happened now as a re-
sult of the one-house-per-five-
acres and the
one-house-per-20-acres restric-
tions that prevailed in much of
the county was urban sprawl,
Tellefsen said.


Not only was urban sprawl
undesirable in itself, but it also
made it cost prohibitive to ex-
tend or provide utility services
into these areas, he said.
"The city and the county
need to raise densities in areas
where the infrastructure al-
ready exists," Tellefsen ham-
mered home.
He urged allowing high-rise
condominiums and apartment
complexes in certain areas of
the city, as well as' at the three
interchanges. What better way
to accommodate growth and
still retain the cherished rural
quality of the county? he
asked.
He also suggested that city
officials consider imposing ar-
chitectural standards to ensure
that new structures conformed
to the historic character of the
existing buildings.
Another topic he discussed
was the desirability of combin-
ing city and county planning
functions.
It made no sense for the du-
plication of services, especially
in a small community the size
of the city and county, Tellef-
sen said. He suggested that the
community could well become
a model for other communities
the state and maybe even the
country if it consolidated serv-
ices.
(See Planning, Page 2)


Added Joyner, "The gover-
nor is certain to hear a power-
ful shout-back from local gov-
ernments."
Joyner ventured that if the
governor's proposals are en-
acted, it will cut this county's
revenues by half. He went so
far as to suggest that such a re-
duction could result in elimi-
nation of library and parks
services.
"The total package could re-
duce revenues to local govern-
ments by $4.7 billion in five






"f~i
.' i ."'
.- ;"


years," Joyner said. "Frankly,
that scares me to death."
Joyner was referring to the
governor's proposed four
changes to the state's tax sys-
tem.

Briefly stated, the four
changes are: a doubling of the
homestead exemption from the
current $25,000 to $50,000;
making the Save Our Homes
three-percent cap transferable
or portable from one house to
the next; imposing a similar
three-percent cap on commer-
cial and non-homestead resi-
dential properties; and exempt-
ing from taxation those busi-
nesses that own less than
$25,000 in tangible personal
property, such as machinery
and equipment.
The governor's proposals
stem from taxpayers' frustra-
tion over the issues of afforda-
bility and the lock-in effect.
Many taxpayers say they can
no longer afford the rapid and
drastic increases to property
taxes in recent years.
The lock-in effect, mean-
while, keeps many longtime
homeowners from downsizing
or moving to another house,
given the resulting loss of the
three-percent Save Our Homes
cap and the consequent jump
in their property taxes.
How likely are these meas-
ures to pass?
Property Appraiser David
Ward identifies himself as a
neutral observer of the loom-
ing battle between the gover-
nor and local governments.
"This is really an issue that
should be spearheaded by the
FAC and the FLOC," Ward
says. "Property appraisers are
neutral when it comes to reve-
nues."
But three things, that he is
certain about are that the
homestead exemption will be
doubled, that some form of
portability will be approved,
and that the two measures will
have a significant impact on
this county's ability to raise
(See Tax Reforms, Page 2)


.-A- .


DAVID WARD, property appraiser, has no doubt that the
homestead exemption will be doubled and that port-
ability will be approved. (News Photo)


*


139TH YEAR INO. 14, nU t-LIN U-







PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 21, 2007


Fire Destroys Local

Couple's Mobile Home


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

A county couple escaped a
mobile home fire Sunday
morning with nothing more
than the pajamas on their
backs.
According to County Fire
Rescue, the first call came in
at about 5:40 a.m., to report to
a structure fire at 83 Circle Six
Trail, a mobile home owned
by Jackie Lynn and Brian
Odom.
Upon arrival, the structure
was totally involved, but the
couple was out safely.
Fire Rescue was assisted by
Monticello and Lloyd Volun-
teer Fire Departments.
Approximately, 7,500 gal-
lons of water was used to ex-
tinguish the flames.
The home and the contents
were totally lost, along with
the lives of the family cat and
dog, according to Zella Scott,


SGT. CHARLES CRUMITY, stationed in Iraq, remem- Valentine's Day. Red and white balloons, and bouquets
bered his Valentine Robin Brinson across the miles on of flowers were among the gifts she received.


Tax Reforms Will Impact Local Coffers


grandmother of Jackie Lynn.
Red Cross was on the scene
very shortly afterward to as-
sist the couple.
Donations for the family can
be made at Capital City Bank,
and help is encouraged from
the community to assist the
couple.
Jackie Lynn is the daughter
of Regina and Ben Smith of
Monticello; the granddaughter
of Lewis and Zella Scott of
Monticello, and Dot and
Steve Mann of Tallahassee;
and the great-granddaughter
of Rena Bell Walker and
Charles Walker of
Monticello.
Brian is the son of Paula
Carroll of Stuart, FL, and
Mike Odom of Monticello;
and the grandson of Charlotte
Odom of Monticello.
For additional information,
contact Regina Smith at 617-
2374 or Zella Scott at 997-
2213.


(Continued From Page 1)
revenues.
'If they get! on the ballot,
they will pass," Ward says of
the two measures. "And they
will get on the ballot. Abso-
lutely."
He points out that his pre-
liminary analysis of the effects
of the two measures on the
county indicate that they will
translate into a significant loss
of local revenues.
"It appears right off the bat
that portability and doubling
the homestead exemption will
take $1 million out of the
budget," Ward says.
Contrary to the popular and.
persistent perception that only
40 percent of the county's
homeowners currently pay
property taxes, Ward says the
actual number that don't pay
property taxes is just under 30
percent.
"The fact is that increased
property values have gotten
people who previously didn't
pay taxes," he says.
If the. homestead exemption
is doubled, however, the per-
centage of homeowners who
will not pay property taxes will
probably rise to 50 percent, he
says.
"One of the things that I'm
analyzing is what percentage


(1.
^ -31 w
*^&^


of people won't pay taxes,"
Ward says.
He points out that a majority
of county operations, including
those of constitutional officers
such as the sheriffs and his
own, are funded in large part
by ad-valorem taxes. The ex-
ceptions are fire protection and
solid waste pickup, which are
funded by the fire and landfill
assessments respectively.
Ward, in fact, estimates that a
third of the county's budget
comes from ad-valorem taxes,
with the remainder coming
from sales, gasoline and other
state-imposed taxes.
So far, it appears that school
districts will be exempt from
the doubling of the homestead
exemption and the portability
of the Save Our Homes cap.
But cities and counties, espe-
cially small counties already at
the 10 mill cap, will definitely
be impacted, he says.
Ward walks a fine line be-
tween the impacts mtit the gov-
ernor's proposals will have on
small cities and counties and
his understanding and sympa-
thy for taxpayers' frustrations
and the governor's stance.
"Crist made these campaign
promises and it's going to hap-
pen,". Ward says. "You're go-


ing to see it approved. The
governor has no sympathy for
the taxing authorities. He says
they've been squandering the
increased monies."
Ward cites Hillsborough
County as an example. Home-
owners in that county experi-
enced a 29 percent increase in
property taxes last year, he
says. County officials, mean-
while, stashed $650 million of
the resulting windfall "in a
rainy day fund that they have
no real plans for at present."
"That's exactly what causes
people to get in an uproar,"
Wards says.'

True, this county is nowhere
near Hillsborough County's
situation, Ward says. Yet
property values here have in-
creased in the double digits
during the last three years, and
county officials have made no
serious effort to reduce the
millage rate, he says.
True again that that this
county has had some long-
standing unmet needs that are
finally being addressed, Ward
says. Still, last year's increase
over the rolled-back rate repre-
sented a 17 percent tax in-
crease, he says.
Ward, in fact, takes issue
with some commissioners' dis-


Planning Officials Offers Thoughts


(Continued From Page 1)
Tellefsen also talked about
urban clutter, specifically in
relation to signs and the visual
clutter that they appear to cre-
ate. Yet tests showed that what
appeared to be signage clutter
was often really the clutter of
telephone and power lines, he
said.
Tellefsen cited a presenta-
tion where a zoning expert had
taken a photo of Tennessee
Street in Tallahassee with its
jumble of signs on both sides
of the streets and then deleted


from the photo all the tele-
phone poles and power lines.
Tellefsen said the difference
was amazing, in terms of the
clarity and visibility of the
scene. Suddenly, the sky, trees
and buildings were quite visi-
ble and the scene didn't appear
cluttered, he said.
It was all a matter of per-
spective and of perception,
Tellefsen said. Often, what one
thought one was seeing wasn't
really what one was seeing, he
said.


In other words, he said, the
real visual clutter was created
by the poles and power lines
that over time became invisible
to the eye as a consequence of
familiarity.
His point, Tellefsen said,
was that something as simple
as requiring underground utili-
ties could sometimes go a long
way toward cleaning up urban
clutter and creating a pleasing
visual presentation.
"It's just a little food for
thought," Tellefsen concluded.


Year 2007

Sandbaggers Classic

Monticello CC

SMarch 5th, 2007

1 P.M.


O

I)






II


II
U
U

U

U

U

U


contact:
James Muchovej
(850) 997-6508


ingenuous argument that an in-
crease over the rolled-back
rate is not really a tax increase,
since the millage rate remains
the same at the 10 mill cap.
The fact is that the rolled-
back rate, which was 8.3 per-
cent last year, is intended to
raise the same revenues as the
previous year, escalating prop-
erty values aside. By ignoring
the rolled-back rate, county of-
ficials in fact are realizing a
significant increase in tax
revenues, he says.
"We're at a point now where,
if all things are equal, county
officials are going to have to
begin dropping the millage
rate," Ward says.
"I get questioned on every-
thing that I do," he continues.
"You can fuss at me and even
negotiate and in fact it happens
all the time. But it appears to
me- that people by and large
don't really understand how
taxes come about.
"I have a part in it, an impor-
tant part, setting the property
values. But I'm not the only
one in this scheme that we call
taxation. The village rate is
just as important."


Internet
(Continued From Page 1)
The city charges a one-time
fee of $50 for setting up the
service. The installation charge
varies, but it's about $75. The
antenna is free. And the
monthly charge ranges from
$29 to $39, depending on the
level of service.
For more information on the
service, or to register, call 342-
0153.


Boyd Staffer To Be

Present At Library


A member of Congressman
Allen Boyd's staff will visit
Monticello 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.,
Wednesday, Feb. 28, at the li-
brary.
A Boyd staff member visits
Monticello the fourth Wednes-
day of every month, so citizens
of Jefferson County have the
opportunity to personally dis-


cuss issues concerning them.
Boyd's staff is trained to as-
sist constituents with a variety
of issues relating to various
federal agencies.
It is important to Boyd that
his staff is available for those
who are not able to travel to ei-
ther his Panama City or Talla-
hassee office.


Commodity Distribution


The Second Harvest USDA
Commodity program distribu-
tion, sponsored locally by
New Bethel AME Church,
Elizabeth MB Church, and
Hickory Hill MB Church is
scheduled for 9 a.m. until
noon on Saturday at, 6496
Brock Road at Ashville High-
way.


Food is distributed every
fourth Saturday of the month.
Volunteers are needed to
help bag the orders 6:30 p.m.
Friday evening Volunteers
will work until all the food
has been bagged.
Essie Norton may be con-
tacted at 997-5683 for more
information.


NOTICE OF ROAD

CLOSURE
Beginning Mon. Feb. 5th Ebenezer
Rd. in Jefferson Co. Florida will be closed
for a period of 45 days for Bridge
Replacement.
Storm Reconstruction Services, Inc.



| MONTICELLO

NEWS
YOU CAN'T BE WITHOUT IT!!


II" -', .,,.- ?4!:tL. -' ." -_"'-: '


Business



tip #16

Healthy employees take less sick days off.
Providing an affordable health plan that
emphasizes preventive care can help.

If you do not currently offer your employees health
benefits, you may be eligible for a 40% premium savings
for Capital Health Plan coverage through the Capital
Health Partnership.

Learn more. Find out if your small business qualifies by
calling 523-7333 or go to:
www.capitalhealthpartnership.com.


SCapital

Health

Partnership


$50 entry fee includes 18 holes, cart,
Steak dinner, door prize

Organized by the Monticello Rotary Club
Benefits Rotary Youth Camp and
local service projects


ajjmuchovej@juno.com









s MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 21, 2007 PAGE 3
District Employee Ir3 f

Of Year, Nominees j '

Recognized Monday I .11 ,


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


Tess Knight, District Em---
ployee of the Year, was recog-
nized at the School Board
meeting Monday evening, by
her supervisor, Kay Collns,
JES principal.
JCHS/HIMS Assistant Prin-
cipal Ranston Chandler pres-
neted Gloria Brown, HMS
nominee for Employee of the
Year, with a plaque of recogni-
tion, and also presented a
plaque to JCHS Employee of"
Year Nominee, Issac Manning.
: Transportation Employee of


..... .....


KAY COLLINS, left, principal of JES, presents Tess
Knight with a plaque of recognition as the District Em-
ployee of the Year.

,. ? F


the Year Nominee, Janie Mas-
sey, was not present, but
Transportation Director, Wil-
lie Carr, displayed the plaque
which she will receive.
Maintenance Supervisor.
Don Johnson recognized Lo-
rene Howard as the depart-
ment's Employee of the Year
Nominee.
Each of the four nominees
-for Employee of the Year re-
ceived a monetary award from
Farmers and Merchant Bank,
and the Teachers Credit Union.
In addition, District 3
School Board Member Shirley
Washington presented a mone-
tary award to the nominees.


DON JOHNSON, director of maintenance, presents Lo-
rene Howard with a plaque of recognition as the Main-
tenance Department Employee of the Year Nominee.




\1I q1..


. -


I4


1;
r. ,j'
i'

71
9

i


RANSTON CHANDLER, assistant principal, left, recog-
nizes Issac Manning as JCHS Employee of the Year
Nominee.


WILLIE CARR, director of
Massey as Transportation
Year Nominee.


transportation, honors Janie -i
Department Employee of the, *
RANSTON CHANDLER, assistant principal, honors Glo-
ria Brown, as HMS employee of the Year Nominee.
(News Photos)


Farm Bureau Celebrates


Food Check Out Day


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The County Farm Bureau
recently celebrated Annual
Food Check Out Day. at the


USDA, say Food Check Out
Day is usually celebrated dur-
ing the first week of February
each year.
Tax Freedom Day, is a bit
different. It takes the same
American Family working


Dorothy Lewis, who attended
the celebration this year.
In addition to the luncheon,
for the first time, Florida
Farm Bureau President John
Hoblick attended the celebra-
tion.


flu r l/Vir 1n


Heart Disease
is the Leading Killer of Women

Find Out If You're at Risk


- -1


The Signs & Symptoms
of a Heart Attack


VISITING the Ronald McDonald House to celebrate Food Check out day were: seated,
from left, Dorothy Lewis, Women's Committee Chair, County Farm Bureau, McDonald,
standing: Kathy Richardson, Executive Director of the House Charity of Tallahassee,
Lewis Scott, volunteer for the County Farm Bureau.


Ronald McDonald House in
Tallahassee, by sponsoring a
huge luncheon for more than
50 dignitaries and other
guests.

In addition, Jefferson and
surrounding counties donated
more than $800 worth of
fresh Florida produced meats
and dairy products to the
charity.

Food Check Out Day is the
36th day of the-calendar year
and it designates the total
number of days the average
American family needs to
work, in order to earn enough
money to purchase their fam-
ily groceries for the entire
year.
Statistics generated by


until April, about the 77th day
of the calendar year, in order
to earn enough money to pay
for all federal taxes.
This means that food is a
bargain in the U.S. "Farmers
and ranchers do a great job of
providing a good, wholesome
and abundant food supply for
all Americans to enjoy," said


The Ronald McDonald
House has been the recipient
of the grocery giveaway for
nearly 10 years, said Lewis.
"We like to work with such a
great charity like the Ronald
McDonald House, because
they do a great job for provid-
ing a much-needed service to
families with sick children."



^a^^^^^I


THOMASENA B KEITH.
M Ed,. LMT
S.-.edJi. M1assn.T -g. hIt.iart Ma'sage
200C John Knoy Road. Suite D
850 / 386.7450 850 / 322-5008
kcitl'relaxationmassage cor
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neck or jaw pain women and that these symptoms are often different than
Shortness of breath in men. That's why Tallahassee Memorial has developed
Indigestion or gas-like pain a woman's heart care program designed to increase
Nausea or dizziness awareness of heart disease and encourage women who
Unexplained anxiety, experience heart attack symptoms to seek immediate
weakness or fatigue treatment.
Discomfort or pain between
the shoulder blades At TMH, we're in the forefront nationally for providing
Sense of impending doom rapid, life-saving treatment of heart attacks making your
Irregular heartbeat, cold chance for survival much greater. To learn more about
sweat or paleness women and heart disease and find out if you are at risk,
visit www.tmh.org/womensheart.

Listen to Your Heart.




1300 Miccosukcc Road
J LTallaliassecc FL 32308

Tallahassee Memorial 850.431.2727
Heart & Vascular Center www.tmh.org/womenshleart


i, 2





x i'



BlNE


.~


---- ------ --- -










PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 21, 2007


Monticello News
(ISSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
A Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly Ex-
cept for the weeks of July 4th, Thanksgiving, Christmas,
& New Years. Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post
Office. Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net





Group Watching


For Bird Flu


Many Americans may be
surprised at the coalition cre-
ated to combat avian influenza,
or bird flu, a major concern in
many parts of the world.
Federal, state and municipal
groups are working together
with scientists and hunters to
discover the disease in wild
migratory birds in time to save
human lives.
So far, no Americans are
known to have become ill be-
cause of avian flu in the
United States.
Field specialists and wildlife
disease biologists from the
U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture (USDA), the U.S. Depart-
ment of the Interior (DOI),
state fish and game agencies,
universities and nongovern-
mental organizations collected
nearly 100,000 samples from
wild birds in all four major fly-
ways.
They also collected about
50,000 samples from water-
fowl habitats across the coun-
try. Taking samples provides
an early warning system for
disease.
Waterfowl hunters can help.
Since one surveillance strategy
involves sampling hunter-
harvested birds at hunter check
stations, having hunters' coop-
eration is very helpful. Hunter-
harvested birds provide a
unique opportunity to sample
large numbers of birds without
having to capture them.
Hunters need not worry that
their game is being sampled.
Hunting wild birds is consid-
ered safe as far as avian flu is
concerned. As always, it is rec-
ommended that hunters take
commonsense precaution


when handling, cleaning and
cooking their game. For in-
stance:
Do not handle or eat obvi-
ously sick game.
Wear disposable gloves
when handling and cleaning
game.
'* Wash hands and equip-
ment that have been in contact
with game.
Always be sure to thor-
oughly cook game to at least
165 degrees Fahrenheit to kill
disease organisms, parasites
and viruses, such as avian in-
fluenza.
Another way hunters can
help is to report any large
numbers of dead waterfowl
they might see :,to wildlife
authorities or the USDA by
calling (866) 4USDA-WS. The
USDA and state fish and game
agencies routinely investigate
when groups of wild birds be-
come sick or die.
There are many instances
every year when groups of
birds become sick or die for a
variety of different causes, so
timely reporting helps govern-
ment surveillance efforts.
Meanwhile, you can protect
yourself and your family if
you remember to practice good
health habits, including eating
a balanced diet, exercising
daily and getting sufficient
rest. Three other commonsense
steps to stop the spread' of
germs include:
1. Wash hands frequently
with soap and water.
2. Cover coughs and sneezes
with tissues.
3. Stay away from others as
much as possible if you are
sick.


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
February 19, 1997
Kiwanians recently re-
ceived a briefing on the
origins, workings and goals of
the Department of Juvenile
Justice from District 2 Chief
Administrator Bob Webb.
What would you think of
National Guard units demol-
ishing old, abandoned houses
in the county as part of the or-
ganization's weekend drills?
The issue of letterheads on
official city stationary resur-
facedat a recent City Council
meeting.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
February 18, 1987
David Ward, after serving
one year on the county's plan-
ning commission, says that
most people do not understand
the role of the commission and
the nature of how the county
operates.
The planning commission
serves as a screening body to
take some of the load off the
County Commission's respon-
sibility of enforcing the county
development code. The com-
mission meets monthly to re-


view requests for subdivisions
and residences, as well as ap-
.proved commercial land use
proposals. The commission has
the authority to recommend
land use variances and zoning
changes, Ward, said.
Local attorney Gary Keth-
Cum has been named adminis-
trative assistant of the
Economic Development Cor-
poration (EDC), President
Mike Reichman announced
Monday.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
February 17, 1977
Enough snow fell Wednes-
day in northeast part of the
county for Max Bilinski's agri-
cultural students to make a
snowman at he Bilinski Farm
on the Boston Highway.
Fire broke out in an egg
cooler in the Foodway store
Tuesday night but only minor
damage was done to the store.
The Merchants Committee of
the Chamber of Commerce is
planning a sidewalk sale in the
business district on March 5.
The U.S. Air Force has pro-
moted Richard G. Steinhorst,
(See From Our, Page 5)


banquet


Opinion & Comment




we Love Sleaze, unseemly


The media feeding frenzy
following the death of Anna
Nicole Smith was over the top,
in my opinion. Usually serious
media outlets fell into the tab-
loid syndrome and besieged
readers and viewers with pic-
tures of Smith falling out of
her clothes, reports of-her bi-
zarre life, and elevating her in
death to something she had
never been in life.
Let's face it, Smith was no
bundle of talent and did out-
landish things to call attention
to herself. I don't need to cite
chapter and verse here because
the Smith story has been all
over the media for the past
several days.
What amazes me is the fasci-
nation the public has with the
tawdry, unseemly, and down-
right ridiculous stuff. I'm for-
ever amazed how we elevate
athletes and musicians to hero
status.
We fall all over the latest
country music star, the hottest
college quarterback, the pro
running back ad nauseum.
Coverage of Anna Nicole


Publisher's


Notebook


Ron Cichon

--- ~ I


Smith satisfies our craving of
things bizarre.
.When you turned on your
TV this weekend, you thought
it was Mother Terea' who
died. Of course, Mother Teresa
only devoted her life to help-
ing the poor and sick. That
can't compare to the train
wreck life of Anna Nicole
Smith.

.Chalk up my attitude to my
being a mossback who grew
up at a time when shame was a
powerful influence on people's
behavior. When mother or fa-
ther said "shame on you" that


was heavy. You didn't shame
your team, your class, your
family, your good name.
Much about Anna Nicole's
life would aptly be, called
shameful by the old standards.
So, I wonder what kind of
message we send to our kids
and grandkids by our fascina-
tion with the Anna Nicole's?
Tawdry is good? Outlandish
behavior is good? Infidelity is
good?
What about the folks who
work hard and play by the
rules? What about the volun-
teers who keep our churches
going, coach our kids, lead


Scout troops, volunteer their
time for community
betterment? There will be no
media frenzy when they leave
us.
Of course a life cut short like
Anna Nicole's was is a tragedy.
Some 3100 plus lives have
been cut short in the Iraq war
and these were people who
honored all of us by their
brave service. Sadly, there is
no media frenzy.
While 1 criticize the media
for the frenzied coverage of
Smith's death,'I hasten to add
it is the insatiable desire of the
public for the bizarre that has
the media catering to it! Be
assured if the public didn't
want these kinds of stories, the
media wouldn't air or publish
them.
There's a reason the super-
market tabloids are place at the
checkouts. Headlines scream at
us: "Elvis Lives," "My Dog
Ate My Car," "I Was Visited
By An Alien." We love the bi-
zarre, no question about it.
Call this fascination what
you like, I call it a race to the
bottom.


Writer Muses About Whims


By DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

Way too, many of us have
found comfort in settling for a
daily mundane existence. We
are surrounded by the "daily
routine" we have carefully de-
signed for ourselves and are
too busy dealing with irrita-
tions and heading off vexing
problems to consider opening
any new doors.
I believe whims, (or exciting
impulses to do something out
of the ordinary) are a gift in
disguise, designed expressly to
prevent the stagnation of our
human spirit and daily lives.
A whim may suggest trying
to contact an old friend, re-
reading a favorite book, build-
ing that bird house, going to
see historical St. Augustine or
experiencing Spook Hill near
Lake Wales.


Things like arranging a lunch
date with old friends you have-
n't talked to in a while, buying
a cart full of groceries to give
to some needy family or char-
ity, going to a County Com-
mission or School Board meet-
ing to experience the proceed-
ings, or volunteering to help
set up the next big church
event, are but a very few of the
impulsive "whims" out here
just waiting for someone to
grab hold of to break up their
stale daily existence and rou-
tine.
Beware, however, of the
"Whim Busters"! These are the
practical folks who surround
us at home, work and in our
daily lives.
Whims, by design, break
sharply from the comfortable
established routine and can,
therefore, strike anxiety in the
hearts of these "more sensible"
folks.


I believe this is because peo-
ple tend to confuse routine be-
havior with a sense of effi-
ciency, and breaking from this
norm is certainly upsetting if
not ushering in a road to disas-
ter.
Whim Busters are the ones
who will say, "Gas is too ex-.
pensive to be driving all over
Florida just to see some old
buildings or funny hill." -- or
-- "If your old friend was
thinking of you he would have
contacted you long before
this."
Then there is "Why go to a
County Commission or School
Board meeting, you can't
change anything anyway." --
or -- "Why can't you just buy a,
bird house and save yourself a
lot of time and trouble?"
Yes, you can recognize the
whim busters all around you,
especially if your whim tends
to upset a carefully designed


and controlled family routine
or budget.
Children are the most whim-
sical bunch among us. Maybe
that is why they are so happy
and carefree most of the time
and fun to be around., They
are, of course, all too familiar
with the whim busters.
After all, a frosty or milk
shake an hour before dinner --
are you kidding? Children's
whims are constantly being
shot down by their dreadfully.
logical parents before they
even get a chance to get off the
ground. Maybe we should all
take a step back and learn
some valuable lessons from
these kids.
I think I will contact some of
the nation's'largest pharma-
ceutical companies and see if
there is any ,on~,oin- research
into a whim pill. 1 can't help

(See Whims, Page 5)


Moms Often Sleep Deprived


Today's modem mom, who
often balances work, family
life and household responsi-
bilities, does not get enough
sleep a potentially chronic
problem that can take a toll on
the whole family.
Results from a new survey
reveal that only 14 percent of
moms get a good night's sleep
every day of the week and
more than half say they would
be better parents and be hap-
pier if they got more shut-eye.
Moms are the family CEO,


which means they are "on call"
24 hours a day and juggle a
variety of task. More than just
lacking the time to get a good
night's sleep, many mothers
find themselves lying awake at
night thinking about the next
day's "to dos," stressing about
the family's finances or worry-
ing about family issues.
For those who consistently
cannot fall asleep or remain
asleep, it could be insomnia.
"As a working mother, I
need to get a million things


done in a day. When I get into
bed at night, I'm often kept
awake because my mind is so
busy thinking about my next-
day 'to dos,'" said Debi
Mazar, an insomnia sufferer
for almost 20 years and series
regular on the HBO hit "En-
tourage."
"As I struggle to fall asleep, I
become more agitated because
I know I'll be suffering the
next day."
In an effort to help other
moms struggling with insom-


nia, Mazar has teamed up with
sleep specialist Suranne Grif-
fin, M.D., FAPA, Clinical Psy-
chiatrist, of '.1orgtIXI n I Univ
ersity H1ospital, to lead the
"Sleepless Moms" campaign.
The campaign's goal is to let
sleepless parents know that
they are not alone and to pro-
vide useful information about
sleep hygiene and educational
resources on insomnia and its
treatments.
Many moms do not get the
(See Moms, Page 5)


From Our Photo File


DALE EADE barked out the bids on this painting, at the Ducks Unlimited
and auction held at the Country Club, in Nov., 1991. (News File Photo)


































.


NELLIE,KAY AKINS and her husband Jerome Akins were crowned Valentine's Day
King and Queen at the Senior Center.




Florists, Restaurateurs


Busy Valentine's Day


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Local florists worked long
hours filling orders on Valen-
tine's Day, and restaurants
offered special Valentine din-
ners.
Ericka Imbrunone, owner
of Gelling's Flowers and
Gifts, said Thursday morn-
ing: "I had four delivery driv-
ers, four girls working inside
and we worked for 13 hours
from 8 a.m. until 9 p.m., tak-
ing care of orders, deliveries,
and walking deliveries in the
downtown area, and serving
walk in customers."
She completely sold out of
red, pink and white roses, and
on Thursday morning, only a
few yellow and green roses
were left in the shop.
,"We also!,carried Valentine's
Day Angels made ,from
county wild flowers and tree
bark which sold extremely
well, and sold out of big
teddy bears and only have a
few small ones left.
"We sold all of the balloons
but two, and there is very lit-
tle of our chocolate display
left, so we had a really big
day," she said.
Imbrunone added that there
were deliveries throughout
the entire county, from Lloyd
to Lamont, from Capps to Au-
cilla, and Wacissa to Wau-
keenah, and up to near the
Georgia line.
"We did have a few pro-
crastinators come in the day
after Valentine's Day," said
Imbrunone.
"If the day slips by, one can
usually make it up for it the
day after. It's all about re-
membering your sweetheart
and it was much too cold to
be in the doghouse," she
quipped.
Edy Corley, owner of Mon-
ticello Florist, reports that she
also had a very busy day.
"It was wonderful and eve-


rything went smoothly," said
Corley. "I ordered almost
1,000 roses and they're al-
most gone."
She said the most popular
flowers from her shop seemed
to be mixed arrangements,
and the other most popular
item was teddy bears.
Corley had extra help both
preparing and delivering or-
ders which kept them running
all day long.
"We had a lot of people
wait until Thursday to place
their orders," said Corley. "A
steady stream all day long."
SLocal restaurants also of-
fered Valentine's Day
specials, and business was
booming.
Demetria Pope, CO-owner
of Jake's said that they were


offering a special of rib eye
steak or prime rib dinners,
and approximately 24 couples
came in and enjoyed candle-
light dinners.
"Business was really good,"
said Pope. "It kept our cooks
and waitresses really busy."
The Rare Door also offered
Valentine's Day specials of
steak dinr.,rs, and business
was good.
"All together, we sold about
30 steak dinners and a few
meals from the menu," said
spokesman Andy Rudd.
"We had soft, romantic mu-
sic and the lights were low
creating the perfect atmos-
phere for our customers."
He said that from 5 p.m. un-
til 8:30 p.m., the establish-
ment remained full of
customers.


p.m. at eh clubhouse.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
February 17, 1957
Felix O. Bullard represented
the Jefferson County in the
Jaycee sponsored Outstanding
Farmer competition this week.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
February 17, 1947
Mr. and Mrs. Elias Reese
Lloyd of Monticello were the
recipients on Saturday, Feb. 8,
of the Navy Cross, awarded
posthumously to their son. En-
sign William Reese Lloyd,
USNR.

Whims
(Continued From Page 4)
but believe that the National
Psychological Association
would get very excited about
such a medication.
Can you just imagine your
doctor writing a prescription
for "Whimsical pills", you
know --- "take one or two
"whims" every other day! I
can't help but believe life
would be more grand!


(Continued From Page 4)
son of Mrs. pat Steinhorst, to
the rank of airman first class.
FORTY YEARS AGO
February 17, 1967
Mrs. Carole Jo Oatman,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Al-
bert Odom was the winner of
the oratorical contest spon-
sored by the American Legion
held at the school Monday.
At a meeting of the board of
directors of the Farmers, and
Merchants Bank on Tuesday,
Richard H. Simpson was
elected vice president.
Max Markus is spending the
weekend in New York on busi-
ness.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Jack-
son and family spent the week-
end in Georgia visiting
relatives.
Mr. and Mrs. Wilmer Bassett
have returned home after
spending the week in Umatilla
on business.
The Monticello Woman's
Club will sponsor its annual
fashion show on March 9 at 8


When was


the last


time you


made an


investment


that saved


lives?


SAVER


When you invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
enormous-healthier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. It's a dividend that builds 3
strong community.


307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL 32303 (904) 414-0844


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 21, 2007 PAGE 5


Moms Often Sleep Deprived


(Continued From Page 4)
recommended eight hours of
Sleep per night. In a survey, 71
percent of mothers reported
getting an average of seven or
fewer hours daily.
SAlthough sleep problems are
common among mothers,
many are reluctant to seek


treatment. in fact, four out of
five have never spoken to their
doctor about their sleep prob-
lems, and 82 percent have
never considered using a pre-
scription sleep medication.
"Consistently not getting
enough sleep and lying awake
at night worrying about day-


to-day challenges could be
more than just sleep depriva-
tion- it could be a sign of in-
somnia," said Dr. Griffin.
"Many parents are afraid to
take sleep medications because
they feel they will become ad-
dicted and /or they want to be
alert should their children need
them in the middle of the
night. Sleepless parents should
talk to their doctor to find a
treatment option that is right
for them."
As part of the "Sleepless
Moms" campaign, Mazar and
Griffin are encouraging par-
ents to speak to their health
care providers about, their
sleep problems and are provid-
ing helpful SLEEP tips:
Stick to a sleep schedule.
Go to bed and wake up at the
same time each day, including
weekends.
Lifestyles changes help.
Avoid alcohol and foods and
drinks high in caffeine late in
the afternoon and before bed-
time.
Establish a relaxing bed-
'tirne routine to help you wind
',down from your day before
you get into bed (e.g., take a
warm bath).
Environment that is cool,
sleep environment that is
cool, quiet, dark and comfort-
able.
Prioritize yourday. Avoid
bringing work and responsi-
bilities to bed. (NAPS)


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Rainfall in the County in
January measured 4.79 inches,
more than in any other country
of the Suwannee River Water
Management District.
Comprising the District are
the counties of Alachua,
Baker, Bradford, Columbia,
Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamilton, Jef-.
ferson, Lafayette, Levy, Madi-
son, Suwannee, Taylor and
Union.
The average January rainfall
for the County is 4.87 inches.'
The District received, on av-
erage, 3.95 inches of rain dur-
ing January.
Average January rainfall in
the District is 4.38 inches.
The total rainfall for the past
12 months is 41.30 inches,
with the total long term aver-
age rainfall 55.6 inches.


As of Jan. 31, the District
12 month rainfall deficit was
14:30 inches, making this pe-
riod the sixth driest since
1931. :
The Aucilla River at Lamont
was at 47.46 inches in January,
and the average for this month
is 51.03 inches.
All the same, above average
rainfall is predicted for Febru-
ary.
SThe District continues to rec-
ommend that water conserva-
tion be an ongoing activity for
all water users.
Water is conserved by using
the minimum amount needed
for specific applications, and
by irrigating lawns, plants, and
crops only when necessary,
and in the morning before 10
a.m., and in the evening hours
after 3 p.m., when lower tem-
peratures and wind velocity re-
duce the amount of water, lost
to evaporation


Living Well Week TO Be Observed


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

National Extension Living
Well Week is observed March
11-17. Under the umbrella of
Living Well are raising chil-
dren, eating right and spend-
ing smart.
Extension Agent Heidi


Copeland reports that the goal
of the Living Well campaign
is to provide people with the
education and information
they need in order to achieve
a positive and healthy life-
style.
"Whether you are trying to
manage your money, control


your diabetes through meal
planning and exercise, make a
decision about insurance, or
get tips on effective parenting
techniques, Extension Serv-
ices can help you find a solu-
tion," Copeland said.

For further information con-
tact Copeland at 342-0187 or
stop by the Extension Office.


STammies' Sweets & Deli

i Phone 850-997-1181 / Fax 850-997-1101

a Order Curb Side Service


Breakfast & Sweets Salads
SAll salads except fruit comes with bread.
Crepes ............... ... 200
w/bacon ................. 9 Garden Salad .. .. ... ........ . .... 3.00 V
SWafles I5 iceberg, green leaf, red cabbage, cucs, tomato, U
W affles ... ...... ........ 2.50 green peppers, & carrols.
w/bacon . 3.25 Spinach Salad ......... . .. 3.95
S, Spinach, red cabbage, walnuts, & croutons
S Bagels (everything o plain) Chef Salad ................. . 4.00
w/butter 95 Garden salad plus egg. cheese, ham, and turkey
Sw/cream cheese .. 1.25 Caesar Salad ... .... ............. 4.25 ,
V 1 .. :: Romaine, Parmesan, & Croutons
Croissants ........ ..... . 25 Greek Salad ....... .. . .... . 6.25
V Ronaine, Feta, Red onions, Tomato, Black
S Danishes ........ 1.65 Olives. & Pepperoni
Cheee Ce Tomato Salad . 3.95 3 '.
e Cheese Cake
whole ..... ...... . 18.95 Waldorf Salad ... ......... 4.25
Slice .. ........ ..... 3.00
M omsSalad .. .......... ............ 3.75
Fruit Topped Cheese Cake (Toms Sald un)375
Whole .. 21.95 (Tunamacaroni)
Slice ........ . . . . . 3.50
slice .......... 350Chicken Salad 250

V Brownies ............ . . 1.00 Sandwich . 225

H Pound Cake (Buller, Vanilla, Chocolale, or lemon) Pasta Salad .. .... . . . 3.00 .
U whole ..... ... 795 Tr-color Rotini, Corn, Green peppers, Parmesan '
V slice . 1:50 & Cheese
SFuit Salad
S Big Cookies ... ....... . .95 w/melon . 3 00
S(Chocolale chip, Oalmeal raisin, P-nul buller, w/out melon 2 50
S Snicker doodle, or Sugar)
HoMandann Salad 4 25
SHomemade candies inshop wisweel & our dressing



Hot Foods EMT, Firefighters and Police V
V. Officers get a free soda, coffee or tea v
Hot Dog & Can Soda 1.75 with the purchase of a meal.

Polish Dog & Can Soda ........ 2.75
IV C"hursday is Senior Day. Seniors
Cheese Quesidillas ...... 3.00 get a free soda, coffee or tea with the '

SChicken & Cheese Quesidillas 400 purchase of a meal.

; Jamaican Beef Paltis . 2.25 Saturday is Family Day. Kids .
W (Hot or Mild)
So receive a free doughnut with the
Pizza 4.50 purchase of an adult meal. *
(Personal size)
g *Add chips for .50

9^ Drinks
V
'81 Coca Cola Fountain or Can C
Fruit Juices
SBollied Water
Crystal Light
Sweet & Unsweet Tea

S -3
^(2a~rai^(PQtiQP(PiPSOie?riiiS


Most Jan. Rain Here

Of 14 County District


From Our Files














PAGE 6. MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 21, 2007


Lifestyle


Reeze 6ovme .


se SWca~te4


v SeC~ ade Ae4 6a u'oizi& '.eCde fO d44

v w


STUFFED EGGS

6 hard boiled eggs
5 tbs. plain flour
2-3 tbs. fresh chopped parsley
4 tbs. butter
3/4 cup hot milk
salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
In a pan, melt butter, add flour
and stir over low heat for 2
minutes.
Remove from heat and add
hot milk, stirring constantly.
Bring to boil and simmer 10
minutes or 'until the white
sauce has thickened. Set aside..
Cut eggs in half the long
way. Remove yolks and place
in bowl, Place the empty
whites in a buttered flat baking
dish.
Crush yolks with a fork. Mix
parsley and add enough white
sauce to make the mixture
pasty.
Add salt, pepper to taste and
fill the empty whites with yolk
mixture.
Pour the rest or the sauce
over the eggs and bake for 30
minutes or until the top is
golden brown.

Isabelle de Sercy
Library Cookbook

BLACK WALNUT CAKE

1/2 cup butter softened
1/2 cup shortening or apple
sauce
2 cups sugar
5 eggs separated
1 cup buttermilk
1 tsp. baking soda
2 cups all purpose flour
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1 cup black walnuts chopped
3 oz. flaked coconut
1/2 tsp. cream of tartar
FROSTING:

3/4 cup butter softened
8 oz and 3 oz pkgs. cream
cheese softened, 1 each
6 3/4 cups powdered sugar,
sifted
1 1/2 tsp. vanilla extract
black walnut extract to taste


YOUNG


Distribution

Of Food Set

Saturday


Cream butter and shortening
and gradually add sugar, beat-
ing well at medium.speed. Add
egg yolks, one at a time, beat-
ing well after each addition.
Combine buttermilk and
soda and stir until soda is dis-
solved. Add flour, sifted be-
fore measuring, to creamed
mixture, beginning and ending
with four, and mix well after
each addition.
Stir in vanilla, add walnuts
and coconuts by hand.
Beat egg whites at room
temperature and cream of tar-
tar until stiff peaks form.
Fold into batter. Pour into 3
greased and floured 9 inch
cake pans. Bake at 350 de-
grees for 22 to 25 minutes, or
until wooded toothpick or cake
tester inserted in center come
out clean.
Spread cream cheese frosting
after cake is cooled, sprinkling
walnuts between each layer.
Press walnuts onto sides and
sprinkle some on top.
Cake is best kept
refrigerated.

Kathy Griffin
Library Cookbook

PENUCHE FUDGE

2 cups light brown sugar
1/3 cup milk
1 tbs. butter
3/4 cup chopped nuts
1 tsp. vanilla

Cook mill.. brown sugar, and
butter with as little stirring as
possible, over med-low heat,
until it makes a soft ball (when
a drop of syrup is dropped into
very cold water and it forms a
soft ball which flattens when
removed from the water and
rolled in your fingers.)
Remove from heat and add
nuts and vanilla. Beat until
thick and pour into greased
pan.
Cut into squares while still
warm.

Bud Gleasman
Library Cookbook


TWO YEARS OLD
Martavias Young, son Trink-
ina Benjamin, celebrated his
second birthday, Feb. 19,
2007.
He is the grandchild of Mar-
tha Ivey and James Massey,
and the great grandchild of 01-
lie Mae Benjamin and Janie
Massey.
Godparents are Latmah Mar-
tin and Kat Speed.
Young celebrated his birth-
day with family and freinds.




1-800-USA-NAVY
www.navyjobs.com


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Aucilla SHARE Distribu-
tion is scheduled for 8:30-10
am Saturday at Central Bap-
tist Church, 655 Tindell Road,
Aucilla.
Registration Copies and
Volunteer Service cards are to
be turned in at this time.
Volunteer Service is any-
thing done without pay, for
someone other than family.
As there is no storage facil-
ity, food must be picked up at
distribution time.
Food not picked up will be
forfeited and sold to someone
else.
Cash donations to help pay
for gas expenses are appreci-
ated.


Spring is just around the corner--
It's time to join the volunteers and see
what's coming up...
;. 1
GREEN'IN DIUSTR F 'S
I "N-- T iT U I T E

For Profussional DevBlopment
Join Friends of Green Industries Institute and
be a part of something special.

For more information call Kim Kennedy at
997.4088 ext 28
or e-mail kim@qreenindustries.org


FFGC PRESIDENT Joan Ochs, left, Monticello Garden
Club President Dianne Braren, FFGC President Elect
Cinny O'Donnell.


Garden Club Officers

Attend Big Bend Event


Monticello Garden Club
President Dianne Braren and
Vice President Jan Wad-
sworth attended the Big Bend
Regional Water Conference
and Exposition Jan. 25, at the
Civic Center, in Tallahassee,
which raised $3725.
The event was sponsored by
the Florida federation of Gar-
den Clubs, District III.
Seven counties make up
District III of the FFGC.
The Monticello and Madi-
son Garden Clubs provided
the gift bags for registered at-
tendees.
The bags included dona-
tions from Madison President
Mina Bloodworth, a notepad


and hand book of yard land-
scaping; donations from Mon-
ticello President Dianne Bra-
ren included pens from Kelly
& Kelly Properties, rain
gauges from County Exten-
sion Agent Larry Halsey, and
the bags from the Club.
There were some 20 exhibi-
tors with resource materials
available to inform attendees
about practices toward a
cleaner environment.
A Panel Discussion an-
swered questions from the
floor.
A lunch of grilled chicken
salad, oversized chocolate
chip cookies, and iced tea was
served.


Central Baptist Church

Sets Bakes Sale At PO


The Central Baptist Church
Relay for Life team will hold
a Bake Sale in front of the
Monticello Post Office 8 a.m.
till noon Saturday.
Proceeds from this fund-
raiser will be contributed to
the American Cancer Society.
Relay events help to fund
cancer research, cancer pre-
vention, detection, and patient
services.
Progress is being made. Im-
proved cancer treatment, to-
bacco prevention programs,
health screenings and better
nutrition have lead to a de-
cline in death rates.


The five year survival rate
for all cancers combined is 64
percent.
The National Cancer Insti-
tute estimates that 9.8 million
Americans with a history of
cancer are alive today.


Freedom of

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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 21, 2007 PAGE 7


JOHN GREEN, left, David Ward, Danyale Vogegelsang, Bill Hopkins and Marsa CLAUDETTE McRAE, left, Bill McRae, Polly Brown, and Dr. John Ward.
Jopling were among the attendees of the Bless Beast Benefit, Saturday.


Bless The Beast Benefit


Well Attended Saturday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Opera House was
filled to capacity Saturday
night for the Humane Society
Bless the Beast Benefit.
President Caroline Carswell
estimates that there had to be
more than 250 people attend-
ing throughout the evening.
During the event, several
more tables had to be set up
to accommodate those arriv-
ing later in the evening.
Volunteers, donations and
donors for the event were
plentiful, with many varied
items in the auction, includ-
ingcollector plates, works of
art, throws, stemware, Back-
water Paintball gatherings for
groups of 20, Jack Young-
blood memorabilia.
Many hands from volun-
teers and donors helped make
the event a success.
A variety of heavy hors'de-
voures were enjoyed includ-
ing: mini BLT sandwiches,
fried oysters, shrimp and
grouper fingers, donated by
Leroy Milligan of the Shell
Oyster Bar in Tallahassee.
Mary Hartsfield of Aucilla
Christian Academy organized
volunteers from the school
and Key Club, to work the
event as servers.


"We could not have done
it without the kids," said Car-
swell. "Their work ethic was
unbelievable and they were
real troopers. As a matter of
fact, they were so good and
professional, we'll have to get
them to serve again."
Members of the ACA Key
Club included Luke Sadler,
Taylor Rykard, Will Harts-
field, J. T. Ward, Buddy Vol-
lertsen;, and Angie Steinberg.
Students not belonging to
the Key Club who served,
were Woody Vollertsen,
Paige Thurman, MacCall
Carlson, and Ashley Evans.
Charlie Ward volunteered
to serve as this year's auction-
eer and kept the crowd in
stitches, and kept the bidding
going up on live items.
There was a homemade
cake auction which proved
popular.
Tables were adorned with
fresh flowers and nice table
cloths donated by Ericka Im-
brunone, owner of Gelling's
and Julie Carswell of the
Moon.
Stacey Cornelius, Brenda
Earle and Kennon Buzbee
volunteered to be the bartend-
ers at the cash bar:
Chicken salad and egg salad
sandwich fingers donated hv


the Hilltop, Blue Belle' do-
nated continental caramel rib-
bon, chocolate and cherry ice
cream, Coca-Cola donated all
of the Coke products. Capi-
tal City DJs donated the DJ
and entertainment for the eve-
ning, included Woody Vol-
lertsen and Nick (last name
unknown).
Volunteers also included
Xan Holton-Baker, chief vol-
unteer Wendy Bitner was a
huge help, Angela Henderson
who was in charge of the live
and silent auctions, Teresa
and Mark Kessler, who as-
sisted with the auctions,
Candy (last name unknown),
who sold tickets at the door,
Sherry McClure, Mary Helen
Ringe, Martha Jean Martin,
Denise George, Caroline Car-
swell for food reparations,
and Evelyn Buzbee, who
managed the .cake table and
donated several of the beauti-
ful masterpieces.
"If we forgot anybody, we
greatly appreciate them for
their efforts and apologize for
not mentioning them," said
Carswell.
By press time Monday, the
figure of how much was
raised had not yet been fully
tabulated, but that information
along with a list off all donors
will be forthcoming.


SCHUCK SPRINGER and Gabriella Sacco.





E _7 .t --


CAROL AUSTIN and Martha Jean Martin work the sign in table.


MARY HELEN RINGE, Margaret McMurray collected money and delivered items to
buyers promptly.


BOBBY AND MARSHA PLANES, David Hobbs (News Photos)


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EMERGENCY HOME ENERGY

ASSISTANCE

FOR THE ELDERLY

The Area Agency on Aging for North Florida a announces the availability of
Emergency Home Energy Assistance for the Elderly Program (EHEAP) funds for
eligible households in Jefferson County. To be eligible, an individual who is at least
sixty years of age must reside in the applicant household, a bill that indicates an
immediate disconnection date if payment is not received by the utility company (this
includes propane and electric), and the household income must be at or below 150%
of the Federal Poverty Income Guidelines.

Please contact Terrie Mihan (850-342-0271) to schedule an appointment or to
request more specific information about the Emergency Home Energy Assistance
Program.

The Emergency Home Energy Assistance for the Elderly Program is funded by the
State of Florida Department of Elder Affairs and is administered by the Area
Agency on Aging for North Florida, Inc.














PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 21, 2007


Sports


Cherry Street Gym


Draws Dedicated Boxers


CARNELL COOKSEY, left, and Dustin Matthews square off at Cherry Street Gym.


DAVID COLLINS tapes the glove of Carnell Cooksey, as he shares some pointers with
Cooksey. (News Photos)



Law Impacting School


Opening Affects Sports


The Florida High School
Athletic Association Board
of Directors (FHSAA) or-
dered a halt to all athletic
scheduling for the 2007-08
school year; because major
changes to the athletic calen-
dar, including footballsched-
ules, may be forthcoming.
This, is because of the fact
that the Association has not
adjusted the athletic calendar
to reflect the new starting date
for public schools.
The new law, which takes
effect this fall, prohibits pub-
lic schools from beginning
classes earlier than 14 days
prior to Labor Day. That
date, Aug. 20 this year, is a
full three weeks after the cur-
rent FHSAA calendar permits
pre season practice to begin in
the sports of football, golf,
fall soccer and girls
volleyball.

Association is permit-
ted to start practice one week
before the first permissible
date of classes, the only
changes to the football season
will be that it be completed
before Christmas.
"There are only three op-
tions for making that third
week adjustment," FHSAA
Commissioner John Ste'vart
remarked:
"One is eliminating the pre-


season classic and playing the
first regular season game in
its place; two, cutting the
regular season back from ten
to nine games; or three, cut-
ting one round from the play-
offs by discontinuing the ad-
vancement of the district run-
ner up.

He added, that Its pretty
much a given that all sports
will be impacted by the ad-
justments. Any decision to
eliminate the pre season clas-
sics, cut regular season con-
tests, or discontinue the
advancement of the district
runners up in football, will
have to be reflected in all
other sports.

Aucilla Christian Academy
Principal Richard Finlayson
reported that depending on
the outcome of the Legislative
session, the football
schedules, practices and pre
season games may all to be
reworked, since they were
completed early on.

Superintendent of Schools
Phil Barker added, "All
schools in the state have put a
halt to fall sports for right
now, until more information
is received from the Legisla-
ture.
"If school starts later and
football starts later, there will
be a late start in all fall sports


lor County, March 13, here;
and Maranatha, March 15,
there.
Maclay, March 27, here;
NFC, April 3, there; NFC,
April 9, here; Maranatha
April 10, here; Rickards,
April 12, 5 p.m., there; and
the District Tournament April
16-20, times and locations to
be announced.
Coaching the Lady Tigers is
Earlene Knight. The Assis-
tant Coach is Howard Marx.


throughout the state."
He concluded that addi-
tional information should be
determined by the March
meeting of the FHSAA.


Jefferson County High
School reports schedule for
the varsity softball team.
All games are at 4 p.m., un-
less otherwise specified.
Action begins on the dia-
mond against Taylor County,
4:30 p.m., Feb. 22, there.
Lake City Christian, Feb.
27, here; Robert F. Monroe,
March 1, there; Maclay,
March 6, there; Lake City
Christian, March 8, there;
Rickards, March 9, here; Tay-


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The "No Nonsense" pro-
gram of the Cherry Street
Gym's Founder David
collins, is paying dividends.
"We're getting off to a
somewhat slow start, but
things are different this time,"
said Collins. "I have five to
seven young athletes who are
dedicated, who show up and
train an average of five days
per week."
He added that there are also
about 10 residents who come
in at night just to work out on
the weight equipment.
Since reopening the gym
last month, the workout
equipment inventory has sig-
nificantly grown.
"We've just added some
new state-of-the-art equip-


ment, specifically for boxers
for ages eight through adult,"
said Collins.
The gym is well organized
with weight equipment near
the entrance, the ring in the
center of the room, and heavy
bags and speed bags in the
back of the workout area.
Large mirrors hang from the
side walls so boxers can ob-
serve their form, and signs
have been made from inspira-
tional quotes, along with box-
ing photos (including those of
Collins as a teen boxer), arti-
cles, posters and the like,
hanging throughout the estab-
lishment.
Collins has also set up an
equipment storage area where
all gloves, headgear and re-
lated items, are hung or stored
neatly.
"This is the best boxing
gym north of Orlando," said


ACA, JCHS Athletes


Big Bend Leaders
Day stands at #17, with 273,
FRAN HUNT an average of 10.1.
Staff Writer In rebounds, Kandice Grif-
fin is #4, with 130, an average
Athletes from Aucilla Chris- of 10.
tian Academy and Jefferson Day is #6 with 238, an aver-
County High School were age of 8.8.


named Big Bend Leaders, last
week.
In boys rebounding, Stephen
Griffin is #6, with 180, an av-
erage of 9.0.
In assists, Griffin is #13
with 67, an average of 3.4.
In steals, Wade Scarberry is
at #3 with 69, an average of
3.3.
Kyle Barnwell is #5, with
65, an average of 3.1.
And Griffin is #9, with 51,
an average of 2.6.
In blocks, Griffin is #3 with
60, an average of 3.0.
In girls scoring, Lindsey


Donna Ransom is #10 with
105, an average of 8.1, and
Lisa Bailey is #13, with 193,
an average of 72.
In steals, Bailey stands at
#10 with 81, an average of
3.0.

Brittany Hobbs stands at #
11, with 77, an average of
2.9.
Ransom stands at #12, with
36, an average of 2.8.
In blocks, Ransom stands at
#1 with 46, an average of 3.5.
Day stands at #6, with 44,
an average of 1.6.


Collins.

Long time boxer, Tim
"The Jacksonville Flash"
Ford, whose career record is
47-7-2; and Andy Tellefsen, a
super heavy weight, and the
young boxer who is unde-
feated and has won all of his
matches by TKO, are encour-
aging young boxers.
"We now have a better mix
of boxers and a better quality
of athletes," said Collins.
He added that two young
athletes that he expects will
go far due to their dedication
and determination, are Camell
Cooksey, a light welder
weight at 5'6" and 142 lbs.,
and Dustin Matthews, a wel--
ter weight at 5'11" and 152
lbs.

Collins has not yet deter-
mined what their boxing
names will be, but he is seri-
ously thinking about "Fire"
and "Ice".
He added that residents Tim
Donovan and Tony
Champion, have been a big
help around the gym also.

The donation to utilize the
weight equipment is $20 per
month, and the fee for youth
is $39 per year, which covers
liability insurance and mem-
bership in USA Boxing.

Collins said that the gym is
not open to make money. It is
here for the'utilization of area
residents, and all fees and do-
nations go right back into the
operation of the gym for ne-
cessities such as electricity
and the like.

The gym hours are 4-8 p.m.
Monday, through Friday and
sometimes on Saturday.

For further information con-
tact Collins at 997-8111 or
come by the gym during open
hours.


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Lady Tigers Report

Softball Schedule








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 21, 2007 PAGE 9

x Spring Sports


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy tennis team downed
Holy Comforter Thursday, 5-
2, in the season opening
matches.
In singles action, Kaitlin
Jackson hammered her oppo-
nent, 6-1.
Rebekah Aman stepped in
to substitute for Sarah


The schedule has been re-
leased for the Jefferson
County High School baseball
team.
All game times are at 4
p.m., unless otherwise speci-
fied.
Action begins against Lake
City, Feb. 27, here; Maclay,
March 2, here; Lake City,
March 8, there; Rickards,
March 14, there; NFC, March
15, here; Madison, March 27,
here; Cottondale, 2:30 p.m.,

MCA Girls
Fall To
Tabernacle
The Monticello Christian
Academy girls basketball
team fell hard to Tabernacle
last week, 43-4.
The loss for the Lady Charg-
ers was attributed to Rayne
Baker and Latisha Harris both
fouling out early in the game
and MCA continuing play
with only four on the court.
Kanisha Jordan and Shayne
Bellinger each scored two
points.

MCA BOYS
Down
Tabernacle
The Monticello Christian
Academy boys basketball
team downed Tabernacle last
week, 47-37.
Scoring for the Chargers
were Philip Payne with 21
points; Luke Lingo, 15 points;
lan Morrow, seven points;
and Chip Gallon, four points.
MCA now stands 2-5 on the
season.


Sorensen who injured her an-
kle in the first two sets, and
won, 7-5.
Nikki Hamrick lost her
match, 06.
Whitney Scarberry won her
match, 6-2.
Kalyn Brown lost her
match, 0-6.
In doubles action, Jackson
and Aman won 6-0; and
Hamrick and Scarberry won,
6-3.


CST, there; and Cottondale, 5
p.m. CST, March 29, there.
East Gadsden, March 30,
here; Madison, 5 p.m., April
5, there; Monroe, 6 p.m.,
April 6, there; Maclay, April
10, there; NFC, April 12,
there; East Gadsden, 6 p.m.,
April 17, there; and the Dis-
trict Playoff, 4 p.m., April 23-
27, at NFC.
Coaching the Tigers is Al-
freddie Hightower. The assis-
tant coach is Jim Norton.


Monticello News
Keeping You Informed


B

0

A

T

S

H

O


- ^' y*
*P.., .
.21,


ROSHAWN PARKER and Javonte Jefferson, members of
the St. Phillips Boys and Girls Club, play an afternoon


ACA Boys Split Two

Pre-season Basebal


BILL BROWN

After two pre season game,
not counting on the record,
the Aucilla Warrior baseball
team split the two games.
On Tuesday, against Hamil-
ton at home, the game was
called due to a severe thun-
derstorm.
Thursday, the team jour-
neyed to Maclay and emerged
with a 3-2 win.
Seventh grader Trent Rob-
erts pitched four innings of
the six inning game, which


was called due to darkness.'
He gave up two runs, one
earned, five hits and struck
out seven.
Stephen Dollar worked the
fifth and sixth innings, picked
up the win, and gave up no
runs, no hits and struck out
two.
The Aucilla offense was
anemic, getting only two hits
while scoring three runs.
Hits came off the bats of
Dustin Roberts, with a single
and Matt Bishop, with a dou-
ble.


Signup Ongoing


Recreation Park Direcotr
Kevin Aman, reminds all that
9-11 a.m., Saturday, March 3
is the absolute deadline for
accepting registration for T-
Ball, Coach Pitch Little
League Baseball, and Girls
Youth Softball.
Registration fee is $30 for T-
Ball, Coach Pitch and girls
Youth Softball. Registration
fee for Little League Baseball
is $35.
Parents may pre-register
their children anytime during
the month of February, and
must present a copy of the
child's birth certificate at the
time of registration.
Registrations will not be
taken over the phone.
Aman added that anyone


game of flag football. The club maintains a health and
exercise oriented program for its members.

How TO KEEP
In YOUR KIDS

I Action FREEOFDRUGS.

The team returned to Fin-
layson Field on Friday to
meet Bell, and although the R u le
offense was much better, ac-
counting for seven hits, only
two runs crossed the plate
The big blow was a double
hit by Josh Carswell. Others
hitting safely, all singles,
were; Chad Cannon, Dustin Educate
Roberts, Elliot Lewis, A. J.
Connell, Luke Whitmer, and
Rob Searcy. Your
The Bell offense generated
four runs, two earned, on It's not a matter of
seven hits.
Dustin Roberts pitched the learriing the latest
complete game, giving up
four runs on seven hits, and street talk. It's a mat-
striking out eight. ter of learning why
The 4-2 loss gives the war-
riors a 1-1 record. crack is so dangerous.
Due to the President's day That marijuana can
Holiday and the senior trip,
the next game will be Lanier often lead to hard
County, 5:30 p.m., Feb. 26, :
there, and on March 2, Carra- drugs. That every
belle invades Finlayson Field, illegal drug has the
4 p.m.
potential of causing
catastrophic damage
Baseball to your child. To learn

Schedule more about drugsand
how to talk with your
FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer kids about the subject,
call for a free parent's
Howard Middle School re-
nnrtr a tentative schedule for handbook.


the Bees baseball team.
All game times are at 4
p.m., unless otherwise speci-
fied.
Action begins on the dia-
mond against Shanks, Feb.
20, there; Madison, Feb. 21,
there; Madison, Feb. 26, here;
March 1 is open; and Perry,
March 2, here.
Hamilton, 5 p.m., March 6,
here; March 13 is open; Perry,
March 15, there; Shanks,
March 27, here; March 29 is
open; Hamilton, April 2,
there; and Trinity Catholic,
4:30 p.m., April 5.
Coaching the Bees is Steve
Hall.


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who misses registration will
be put on a waiting list, and
there will be no exceptions.
Players will be given the
choice of playing on the same
teams as last year, if they are
returning to the same league,
or they will be placed into a
draw.
There is one exception. All
girls youth softball players
will be placed in a draw.
T-Ball is for children ages
6-7; Coach Pitch, ages 8-9;
Little League Baseball, ages
10-12; and Girls Youth soft-
ball ages 10-13. Players must
reach the age required in their
specific league by April 30,
2007.
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SEE ALL THE 2007 MODELS IN ONE PLACE


se 13 a;=li = I cr r.

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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 21, 2007


THERE'S NO SUCH THING AS


You Can Find
News Without Favor...
Monticello
News


How TO KEEP
YOUR KIDS
FREE OF DRUGS.


Rule

#10.


Don't

Preach.

One of the greatest
deterrents to drug use
is simply talking with
your kids. But don't
preach or you'll lose
them. Ifa conversation
lasts more than five
minutes, you're
preaching. Better to
have lots of five-
minute conversations.
'Kids have short atten-
tion spans and shorter
memories. To learn
more about how to
talk with your kids
about drugs, call for a
free parent's handbook.

1-800-624-0100


A'
N::~~~
.; S i' s
N.~. ;


SMOKING

ILLNESS ALERT

The Corea Firm, P.L.L.C. is representing Florida
residents, and their survivors, who suffered medical
conditions caused by tobacco products.
You may be entitled to compensation for
smoking related illnesses.

Call The Corea Firm, P.L.L.C. toll-free for a free consultation

1-888-335-2962
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon
advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our
qualifications and experience. Florida Attorney Jeremy R. Wilson, practicing in Dallas,
Texas, is responsible for this advertisement.


:i, brighter future
It's simple. Repi..i: 5 1I-'i .l oith rone:
that have earned the ENERGY STAR
to reduce your home energy use and
make a big difference in the fight
against air pollution.


To learn more, go to energystar.gov.


* I
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Monticello News

997-3568


Classified Ads Work!





a, i- a a* a a* S -a a -


Real Estate and More


ROBERT B. CULVERHOUSEI
State of Florida Certified General Real Estate Appraiser RZ2577

Real Estate Appraisal
3472 Ha'.-.k,_ Hill Trail .. .
Tallahas.ee Fi:-rija 32312 "
0.50 5'1 7533 pri:ne .n r-
c50 892 500-14 ta:, ": -'".|
r bc' ul.'er hriu 5 a' holm r dill iom -,-










ISi-I e J0l4
CASH FORHOUSES


SSteve Walker
.llig S. ,, is ** Realty, LLC
250 S. Jefferson St.,


339 Silver Lake Rd., Monticello
16 Acres $375,000
3BR/ 2BA 2,500 sgft
Completely Refurbished
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Tallahassee, FL 32308
Tel: (850) 577-1300 Ext. 114
Fax: (850) 577-0555
Marianne Arbulu' Cell: (850) 528-5758
President www.alphamortgage.us


Monticello, FL
(850) 997-4061 Office
Come Visit Us On the Web
for more info:
www.SteveWalkerRealty.com


N Poppell
Putnal'& Associates
SI AND n i IRVFYORSI
Terry L. Putnal
Lesley Putnal President
Roland S. Hooker
Secret Walton F. Poppell Manager
Surveyor
PO Box 388 180 S. Cherry St. Suite A Monticello FL 32345
Phone 850-997-0005 Fax 850-997-8005
Email putnalinc@earthlink.net


Home Sellers
Can Now Hold Onto More Equity,1i
Assist-2-SellcR the nation's largest discount real estate comnpan. has opened its newest
police in Tiallahassee. Hlorida under broker-o,'.ner Hlilton llughlto\\ei Kno\n oIr its -' --
imnovative"IFull Service \\itl $a\ings'" r concept. Assist-2-Sell R no\\ boasts more than
60(il franchise offices in the I Inited States aud Canada.. -..
I lonichuyers in the fallahassee' area lace a dilennmma. "In order to p purchase a bigger.
more expensive home. most need to keep Ias much equilt as possible \\lhen selling their .
current residence. said llilton I lighto\\er w i....-
)One .*.1; is the iume intensive "For Sale BHy )\\ncr" strategy. but the pitlllls and aggra\alions are seldom northh the
ellort And,as most people kno\\, using i traditional real estate company can mean I'orfeiung live or even six per-cell of the
total sales pice in agent commissions '['here is another choice Assist-2-SellN o l'lcrs home sellers a I )irect- lo-Iltiyer I"'
program for a \xer* a llordable falt fee. regardless of the selling pnce of the home. and \\ ith no up-fiont or hidden Ifes I lUnder
tis promgam. Assist-2-Sell's team of licensed REiAl.'t RS < \\ill market a home lioi a flatl ee of lust $2.495. pa\able onl\
after the s uccessfil selling and closing of the home And since Assist-2-Sell is a nieniher ol the local MI.S Assist-2-
Sellir also ofll'es sellers the "MI.S For I.ess" r program In this program, sellers ha\c an option of placing their home in
the Ml,.Si's'c tem at a total commission o'f 4"% Best of all. even i the property\ is listed on Ml.S. and Assist-2-SellR
produces the hu er. the seller pa s sonl\ te Ola lee of $2.495
"D)on' let t he name toIol \ou T[lhis is not a do-It-ouuirself concept 1 under Assist-2-Sells's markeIlng programs. sellers
receive tlh lill ser\cces ol' professional RIA ItI)RS s at a i' rctio l of \hat the might normallI pa\." coiilnulCed
I ligltover CuLstomners can't hbeliee ho\\ much the\ sa\e \\ith our programs' Ihese lu'll-sermce programs includes
signs. lirce ad ertising. I'eatur sheets. ans\\entg tie plhonie inquiries from hiucrs, slho\ ng the home to pcrsptccti\c bucirs.
negotiate he plu'chase agreement. interacting \\ insctors and apprsers handlingpto an appracs. Idl all tihe paper \\ork. suplierIsingi tlhe
closing. and more
'Whel people liirst call us. thle\ re thinking there niust be a catch The\ cant belic\e te'll actually sell their homCe lor
Ilst $2.49)5 Btli the\ are pleasantlh surprised \\hlen they 1ind out \ e do e\certhing other real estate agents do but lIor a lot
less money For example. it'oion compare $2.495 to at six percent commission. a home that sells lor $25' ( 0.00) \\ ill s ;\e the
o\ner more than $ 12.500.
"'lf'our. home is priced fairly. It's going to sell. regardless of \\thich real estate company \0ou choose.'" llhghto\\er said
"Thee queston is ho\w much do you want to pay to sell it'"
The [alUlihassee Assist-2-ScllR franchise scnes home sellers and homchuyvers in lallahassce and thle surrounding area
I lie office is located at 1616 Metropolitan Circle, Suite 1) For more information. call Illton lliglhto\el at 850-422-00(08
or visitt w 'w.Homes-ITallahassee.com.
(h-i----,-------


L


r"r :~p a


i' I








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 21, 2007 PAGE 11


City Police Continue
Burglary Investigation


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Monticello Politc are in-
vestigating the burglary of the
home of resident Diane John-
son, located at 625 Palmer
Mill Rd., the weekend of Feb.
10.
Johnson reported to an area
publication that she was at the
funeral of her husband, Tom,


during the robbery in which
she said the ashes of her 92
year old mother were taken.
MPD Investigator Chip
Springer said, "The case is
still under active
investigation, it's too prema-
ture to release any informa-
tion, so we're not at liberty to
discuss it."
Anyone with any informa-
tion concerning the case is
asked to call City Police at
342-0150.


American Stroke
Association.
A Division of American '
Heart Association

fIlm~e arches On
For people over age 55, the incidence of
stroke more than doubles in each
successive decade.
Stroke Warning Signs:
* Sudden numbness or weakness in
the face, arm, or leg, especially on
one side of the body.
* Sudden confusion or trouble
speaking or understanding.
* Sudden trouble seeing in one or
both eyes.
* Sudden trouble walking, dizziness,
loss of balance or coordination.


Lake Oconee

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Ixeiw


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DIVE IN!


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about summer kids' camps, family
support groups, and life-saving research.
*< Muscular Dystrophy Association
o ri1-800-572-1717 www.mdausa.org


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www. navyjobs.com


WE TAKE THE
DENTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


"Familiar
Faces And
Quiet Places"


A Pictorial
And Narrative
History Of
Jefferson
County


By Derelyne
Delp Counts


Available At
The Chamber
Office
And
Leading
Merchants


B us ess CALL TO ADVERTISE
_e YOUR BUSINESS

997-3568

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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 21, 2007


Got A Cute


Photo?




Send It To Us

And We'll

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Monticello

News

P.O. Box 430

Monticello,

FL 32345





"You Can't

Be Without

It"




Ready...Set... Shop...
Monticello News
Classifieds


LEGAL
Job Advertisement County
Coordinator Jefferson County,
Florida Jefferson County is seeking
a County Coordinator. This is a
professional position within
Jefferson County government. The
complete Jefferson County Job
Application, the Job Announcement
and the Job Description can be
obtained through the County Clerk
of Courts Office, Jefferson County
Courthouse, Room 10, Monticello,
FL 32344, by telephone at
850/432-0218 or on the County's
web site hltp://co.iefflrsou.n.t.is. The
completed Jefferson County Job
Application and resume are due in
the Clerk of Courts office by noon,
March 19, 2007. EOE.
R/D 2/21,23,28,3/2,7,9,c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION IN RE:
ESTATE OF CHRISTOPHER W.
JOHNSON Deceased. File No.
07-07-PR Division
NOTICE TO CREDITORS The
administration of the estate of
CHRISTOPHER W. JOHNSON,
deceased, whose date of death was
July 8, 2006; File Number 07-07-PR
is pending in the Circuit Court for
Jefferson County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
County Courthouse, Rm 10,
Monticello, FL 32344. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below. All creditors of the
decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate, on whom a copy
of this notice is required to be
served must file their claim with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM. All other creditors of
the decedent and other persons
having claims or demands against
decedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS
NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN


LEGAL
SECTION 733.702 OF TIHE
FLORII)A PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOT WITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
ABOVE, ANY CLAIMS FILED
'WO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH BARRED, The date of
first publication of this notice is:
February 21, 2007. David M.
Andrews, Esquire Attorney for
Personal Representative Florida
Bar No. 141061 Law Office of David
M. Andrews 125 Nix Bat Yard Road
St. Augustine, FL 323084
Telephone: (904) 826-1987 Fax:
(904) 826-4236 RUTH JOHNSON
Personal Representative 59 Hibbard
Street Amsterdam, NY 12010
RID 2/21,28/07,c
IN HE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA CASE NO. 07-41-CA IN
RE: the matter of the Adoption of
CHARLES LANCE KELLY,
NOTICE OF ACTION TO:
Unknown Father Address Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for Adoption has been filed
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it, on MICHAEL A.
REICHNIAN, petitioner's attorney,
whose address is P.O. Box 41,
Monticello, FL 32345, on or before
March 28, 2007, and file the original
with the clerk of this court either
before service on petitioner's
attorney or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the complaint or petition.
DATED on 02/09/07 KIRK REAMS
Sas Clerk of the Court Norm L.
Wilkins Deputy Clerk
R/D 2/14/07, 2/21/07,c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 2nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
ANI) FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA GENERAL
JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE
NO. 07-02-CA MELVIN WILLIS,
Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN
SPOUSES, LINEAL
DESCENDANTS, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND
ALL OTHER CLAIMANTS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST TURNER
W. KINSEY, deceased; Defendants.
AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Defendants UNKNOWN
SPOUSES, LINEAL
DESCENDANTS, HEIRS,
IEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND
ALL OTHERS CLAIMANTS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST TURNER
W. KINSEY, DECEASED.
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN: You
are hereby notified that an action to
quiet title to the following real
property in JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA: Description:
All that property in the Northeast
Quarter of the Northwest Quarter
of Section 7, Township I North,
Range 6 East, Jefferson County,
Florida lying North of U.S. Highway
90 (State Road 10). LESS AND
EXCEPT the following described
property: (OFFICIAL RECORD
BOOK 252, PAGE 81) Begin at the
center of a cement culvert located
on the Northerly side of U.S.
Highway 90 as the Point Of
Beginning, the same being station
351+45 6n the State Road
Department survey map, and run
thence North to the Northerly right
of way boundary of said Highway
90, run thence Easterly along said
Northerly boundary of said


EGAL ..
Highway, a distance of 85 feet for
the POINT OF BEGINNING of the
lands herein described; From said
Point Of Beginning run Easterly
along the Northerly right of way of
said Highway 90, a distance of 315
feet, thence Northerly and
perpendicular to said right of way, a
distance of 210 feet, thence run
Westerly and parallel with said
Highway 90, a distance of 315 feet,
thence run Southerly to said
Highway 90 right of way boundary,
containing I V2 acres, more or less.
ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT the
following described property:
(OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK 405,
PAGE 265) Beginning at a point
over the Western most culvert in
Section 7, Township 1 North, Range
6 East, where the same crosses U.S.
Highway 90 (also known as State
Road 10) and in the center of said
highway, thence running Southerly
and along the center of said
Highway a distance of 564 feet
thence running Northerly and
perpendicular to said Highway to
the Northerly right of way
boundary of said Highway for the
POINT OF BEGINNING of the
land herein conveyed; and from
said Point Of Beginning of the land
herein conveyed run thence
Northerly and perpendicular to said
Highway center, a distance of 210
feet, thence run Southeasterly and
parallel with said Highway center
420 feet, thence ran Southwesterly
and perpendicular to said Highway
center 210 feet and to the Northerly
right of way boundary of said
Highway, thence run Northwesterly
and along said Northerly right of
way boundary, a distance of 420
feet, more or less, and to the POINT
OF BEGINNING of the lands
herein conveyed. ALSO LESS AND
EXCEPT 200 foot right of way of
U.S. Highway 90. ALSO LESS AND
EXCEPT the following described
property: (NEW PARCEL)
COMMENCE at the Southwest
corner of the Northeast Quarter of
the Northwest Quarter of Section 7,
Township I North, Range 6 East,
Jefferson County, Florida and run
North 89 degrees 38 minutes 22
seconds East 789.52 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING, thence
from said POINT OF BEGINNING
continue North 89 degrees 38
minutes 22 seconds East 191.63 feet
to a point, thence North 59 degrees
12 minutes 00 seconds West 163.97
feet to a point, thence South 30
degrees 48 minutes 00 seconds West
99.16 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING, containing 0.19 acre,
more or less has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on CHARLES F. 01TO'
I;,Q. of the law offices of
STRALEY & OTTO, P.A., whose
address is 2699 Stirling Road, Suite
C-207, Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33312, on or before APRIL 2, 2007,
and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before service

on Plaintiffs attorney or
immediately thereafter, otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint. WITNESS my hand and
seal of this court this 8th day of
February, 2007. Clerk of Court By:
LSL CERTIFIED TRUE AND
CORRECT COPY KIRK B.
REAMS CLERK OF CIRCUIT
COURT JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA By: NLW, D.C.
2/14/07,2/21/07,c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION File
Number: 06-141-PR IN RE:
ESTATE OF NORVELL COE
COLEMAN, Deceased. NOTICE
'OF ADMINISTRATION The


G A L .. .: "* ...
administration of the estate of
NORVELL COE COLEMAN,
deceased, File Number 06-141-PR is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Jefferson County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Jefferson County Courthouse, room
10, Monticello, Florida 32344. The
name and address of the personal
representative and of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below. ALL INTERESTED
PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this notice is
served who have objections that
challenge the qualifications of he
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of this Court are
required to file their objections with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER
OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THEIR FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All
creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a
copy of this notice is served within
three months after the date of the
first publication of this notice must
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THEIR FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM. All other creditors of
the decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is February 14, 2007.
Attorney For Personal
Representative: T BUCKINGHAM
BIRD P.O. Box 247 Monticello, FL
32345 850-997-3503 FL Bar ID #
0006176 GWEN T. BEAT 1796
Seven Bridges Road Monticello,
Florida 32344
2/14/07,02/21/07,c

HELP WANTED
AmeriGas Propane has an
immediate opening for a
SERVICE TECHNICIAN for
our Monticello district which
includes servicing the greater
Tallahassee area. Individual will
install, repair, and maintain
propane gas system, appliances
and equipment- Requirements
include a high school diploma
(or equivalent), a valid class B
CDL with hazmat and tanker
endorsements, a great driving
record and satisfactory
completion of a DOT physical,
drug test and background
check. We offer competitive
wages, medical & denial
benefits, 401k savings plan and
liberal vacation & holiday
policy. Drug free work
environment. EOE. Fax
resumes: Attention: Sales &
Services Manager (850)
997-3854 or call (850) 997-3331.


HELP-WANTED
R/D 2/21,23,28,3/2,c
DRIVERS! ACT NOW! 21
CDL-A Drivers Needed *
36-43cpm/ $1.20pm $0 Lease
NEW Trucks CDL-A +3 mos
OTR (800) 635-8669
2/21,23,fc
Cox Auto Trader is currently
seeking drivers to deliver our
magazines in the Tallahassee
FL, Madison, FL and
surrounding areas. Computer
knowledge helpful, requires
reliable vehicle, good driving
record, valid drivers license &
insurance. One day a week -
Thursdays. Pick up magazines








MUSIC & LYRICS
(PG13)
Fri. 5:40-7:55-10:10 Sat. 1:10-
3:25-5:40-7:55-10:10 Sun. 1:10-
3:25-5:40-7:55 Mon. Thurs.
5:40-7:55
NO PASSES
DADDY'S LITTLE GIRL
(PG13)
Fri. 5:30-7:45-10:00 Sat. 12:55-
3:10-5:30-7:45-10:00 Sun.
12:55-3:10-5:30-7:45 Mon. -
Thurs. 5:30-7:45
NO PASSES
BRIDGE TO
TERABITHIA
(PG13)
Fri. 5:20 -7:25-9:40 Sat. 1:00-
3:05 -5:20-7:25-9:40 Sun. 1:00-
3:05 -5:20-7:25 Mon. Thurs.
5:20 -7:25
NO PASSES
NORBIT
(PG13)
Fri. 4:35-7:05-9:35 Sat. 1:40-
4:35-7:05-9:35 Sun. 1:40-4:35-
7:05 Mon.-Thurs. 4:35-7:05
NO PASSES
GHOST RIDER
(PG13)
Fri. 4:30-7:20-9:55 Sat. 1:20-
4:30-7:20-9:55 Sun. 1:20-4:30-
7:20 Mon. Thurs. 4:30-7:20
NO PASSES
THE MESSENGERS
(PG13)
Fri. 5:25-7:35-9:45 Sat. 1:05-
3:15-5:25-7:35-9:45 Sun. 1:05-
3:15-5:25-7:35 Mon. Thurs.
5:25-7:35 r.sa, ;..-
BECAUSE I SAID SO
(PG13)
Fri. 4:05-7:00-9:20 Sat. 1:25-
4:05-7:00-9:20 Sun. 1:25-4:05-
7:OOMon. Thurs. 4:05-7:00
NO PASSES

All new highback seats and
more renova-
S tions on the
way.


Greenville Mini Storage
"Lowest Rates In The Area"

A Little Out Of The Way,
But Well Worth The Savings.

5x10 $35 per month

10x10 $50 per month

10x20 $85 per month

Call


850-509-1743


If It Happens In Our County
You'll Read It In
Your Local Newspaper


Order Your Subscription Today!

In State.....................$45.00

Out Of State.............$52.00

Extensive Coverage of Jefferson County
Every Wednesday & Friday

Mail Your Check To:
Monticello News
P.O. Box 428
Monticello, Florida 32344




Monticello News

'You Can't Be Without It'

I -, . . .


( He!ritagae *The donation Is tax deductible.
f3irTh I0* Pick-up Is free.
o1r t ilhllI We take care of all the paperwork.


Lihte i ao r l a*toud
* * ii--


I--


,' Many Sizes
r Galvanized
Steel Framework c
4 Locate Doors
Anywhere c
" Ships in 10 Days


3 Men Can install
in 4 Dayst
Car Lift
Compatible
Drop Ceiling
Compatible


30-X-3M0 FU17TRIMM
I-WalkInDoo IL


Pro.tleaT Metal Buildings by
www.AtlasMetalBuildings.com IN TRIES
1-800-346-9902


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LICENSED & INSURED n i.. -o0C IoIe
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I Save $ Thousands!


. i







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 21, 2007 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED

Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...S9.00
Each Additional Line....S1.25
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


HELP WANTED
in Madison. Call 386-590-1255
l,!21,2; ,31,2/i2,7.9,14,lo,21.23,28
,3/2,c
Earn Up to $550 WEEKLY
Working through the
government PT No Experience.
Call Today!! (800) 488-2921 ask
for Department W21
2/21,23,fc
Cleaning service needs people in
Monticello area after 5 p.m. 3
days a week part time work
must be able to pass a back
ground check. Only serious
minded inquires only. Call
Karen at 850-942-6200 or
850-926-7029.
2/7,9,14,16,21,23,28, c
AVON! Start the year with a
new career,, earn 50%, only $10
to start! 570-1499
R/D
1/31,2/2,7,9,14,16.21,23,28,pd
Cashier Capital City Travel
Center. Experience necessary.
This is a Drug Free Workplace.
322-6600,997-3538
R/D 2/14,16,21,23,c
Part time janitorial Aucilla
Call 681-3148
R/D 9,14,1(,21,c
"Can You Dig It?" Heavy
Equipment School. 3 wk
training program. Backhoes,
Bulldozers, Trackhoes. Local
job placement. Start digging
dirt now. Call (866) 362-6497 or
(888) 707-6886
2/21.23,fc
Driver: DON'T JUST START
YOUR CAREER, Start It
Right! Company Sponsored
CDL training in 3 weeks. Must
be 21. Have CDL? Tuition
reimbursement! CRST. (866)
917-2778
2/21,23,fc
Need cleaning assistant to clean
offices in the evening, in
Monticello. Please call
850-894-6254 or. Fax
850-894-6224.
2/16,tfn,c

SERVICES
I build sheds, decks, handicap
ramps, exterior carpentry
work, window/door
replacement. Call Bob 242-9342
R/D1/10,12,17,19,24,26,31,2/2,7,
9,14,16,21,23,28,3/2,7,9,14,16,
Child Care Services- infant to 3
years old. Reasonably low
prices. In my home. 997-5498
11/,TFN,c


SERVICES
iI ou late : chila a lending
FSU/FAMU high schools, and
carpooling is not working, for
an affordable fee, you have an
option. Cal Freeman Davis
510-5162, 421-8060
R/D 2/21,23,28,pd
Marie's Hose Cleaning Service
Don't have time to clean like
you need. Reasonable rates
reference's upon request call
850-445-5636 or 997-5940
2/16,21,pd
D&J Soft Wash Brick, Siding,
Stucco, and More. Free
estimates and great work for a
low price. Owner operated,
850-210-3906.
2/16,21,23,28,pd

Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
new menopausal products.
Jackson's Drug Store.
5/12 tfn, c
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd, 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
TFN

FOUND
Greyhound Dark color female
w/red collar on North Jefferson
Street. Call Marcie @ 997-2988
R/D,2/21,nc

GARAGE SALE
Yard Sale: 'Feb. 24-25 8am -
5pm, Antiques, Appliances,
roll-top desk 90W/ Old Lloyd
Rd South 4 miles to Oaklands
Plantation Rd follow signs
342-1754
2/21,23,pd
BUSH BABY IS HAVING A
GIGANTIC "CLEAN OUT
THE BACK ROOM" SALE.
MAKE OFFERS.
EVERYTHING MUST GO.
SATURDAY 10-5 28 N.
CHERRY ST. ON
NORTHSIDE OF BUILDING.
R/D 2/21,23,C


BRYNWOOD CENTER

RN, CNA
Full-time, and Part-time
Excellent pay PLUS differentials
ACTIVITIES DIRECTOR
Full-time
Dietary
Part-time
Central Supply & Medical Records
Full-time
If you are interested in this GREAT opportunity,
Contact us at:
BRYNWOOD CENTER
1656 SOUTH JEFFERSON STREET
MONTICELLO. FLORIDA 32344
PHONE: 850-997-1800, FAX: 850-997-7269
www.deltahealthgroup.com
Drug Free Workplace EOE/m/f/d/v


WANTED
WANTED: 10 HOMES To
Show Off Our New Lifetime
Exterior Paint. Call Now to see
if your home qualifies. (800)
961-8547. (Lic. # CBCO10111)
2/21,23,fc

AUTOMOTIVE
1996 Ford Ranger XLT
Supercab 2wd 4.0 V6 127K AC
AT Toolbox Needs some minor
work, but driveable now. $3,000
251-0763 8am -8pm
9/27,TFN,nc

FOR SALE
Troy-Bilt Tiller Bronco model
5.5 hp practically new $400.
O.B.O. Call 997-3318 after 6:00
pm
R/D 2/21,tfn,nc
Specialized feed for Alpacas &
Lamas. Call Marcy @
850-421-2403
2/9,14,16,21,23,28,3/2,7,c
FOR SALE you move 93
Merritt 54x24 DW 3 BR, 2 -
BA w/fireplace, 12x10 metal
shed and more included. No
calls after 9:00 pm please
850-997-3318 or 850-544-7785

2/!6,tfninc
$150 Queen Pillow- Top
Mattress Set. New in Plastic
with warranty.. 850-222-7783
12/l:ifn,c
SOLID WOOD Cherry sleigh
bed- BRAND NEW in box,
$250. (853) 545-7112
12/1 .tfn,c
LEATHER SOFA &
LOVESEAT. NEW, LIFETIME
warranty, sacrifice $795. (can
deliver). (850) 425-8374
12/1,.-n,c
SOLID WOOD DINETTE SET,
table & 4 chairs $149. NEW IN
BOX (850) 222-9879
12/Il.fn,c
BE--OO M: new complete 6
piece set still boxed, $599, can
deliver (850) 222-7783
12!i tfn.c

NEED CHILDCARE?
ENROLL TODAY
The Little University Co.,
is now accepting Infants.
Open enrollment for all ages and
sibling discounts. Limited Spaces
for Arbor School Readiness.
Call 997-2970


Gadsden Square 2 3 BR, 2 BA
apartments HW floors, for rent.
4 office spaces ranging from 500
sq ft & up. 850-510-9512
2/21,c
4 BR, 2 BA $750 month
251-7708
2/9,14,16,21,c
Spacious 2/1 and 1/1 apts, also
office space, near Monticello
center. Section 8 OK. Call
850-491-8447
1/24,tfn,c

REAL ESTATE
Jefferson Co. Land Auction 700
acres, starting @ 1200/ac
owner/agent/March 10th www.
700AcrcAuction.com
2/4-3/10,c

Hurricane of a deal! NE
Georgia's best kept secret for
outstanding lake front property.
Visit us at
www.lakerussellproperties.com
or call (706) 213-9318
2/21,23,fc

House 3 Bedroom, 2 / Bath,
in ground pool, on 6 fenced
acres. 12 miles from Monticello
City limits, on Old Lloyd Road.
Call after 5pm 997-2063,
322-3767.
R/D 2/14,16,21,23,28,pd
RARE! NATIONAL FOREST
FRONTAGE & trophy rout
stream. Large acreage parcels
new to market
www.NationalForestLand.com
2/21,23,fc
Newly Renovated 2 BD/ 1 Bath
$69,900 Info call 212-3142
2/14,16,21,23,28,pd


Female Mixed Bull &
Shar-pei Tan with some
black trim 4 mo.'s old,
about 30 Ibs. 16" high
wearing red halter with
leash, last seen near
Monticello Post Office
call Herb 997-3156


Upcoming Auctions!.

Ag & Construction Machinery, Farm Equipment,
Trucks, Trailers, ATV's, much more

"11th Annual Winter Auction"
Sunbelt Ag Expo Site
Moultrie, GA
Saturday, February 17, 2007 9:00 am

"5th Annual Winter Auction"
Iron City, GA
Saturday, February 24, 2007 9:00am
Don't miss these opportunities!
Call now to consign!
Turn your surplus equipment into Sold!


Mobile:
229-891-1832
Phone:
229-985-4565


OOwfed *&'&ded ad' d4 W


For Sale by First United Methodist Church 2400 sq.
ft. home at 895 West Washington Street. This former
Methodist Parsonage with split floor plan has 4 bed-
rooms and 3 1/2 baths, refinished hardwood floors.
New tile floors in kitchen, laundry and baths, carpet
in the family room and master bedroom. Bathrooms
newly renovated. Wood stove insert in fireplace.
Large lot landscaped with magnolias, camellias, crepe
myrtles and azaleas. Large deck and screened porch.
$259,500. For more information
call 997-5545


Terry DeMott, Sr.
1894 Sylvester Highway
Moultrie, GA 31768
www.demottauction.com


198+ acres
Cultivated land
Good soil types
Pond site
Natural hardwoods
Metal shelter
Cabin
Paved Road frontang


Directions: At caution light on Hwy 84 in Boston go North on Pavo Road. Travel
approximately 1/4 mile. Turn left on Salem Road. Look for auction signs.
Terms: 10% buyers premium on all sales. 20% down day of auction, balance due
in ,0n fnvt at rlninn


LEx Eml UNIIIIEU- W L UW W .M E... F'

Housing Vouchers

SWe accept ll vouchers
S 2/2 $615 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 $50 dep. !
* U
S Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571
A01
Afl -- U HUE i fl - n E EE n m- u
wJvv V V V V V V V V V


REALTOR


(850) 997-4340


Property Manaqement Services!!!


'4I~

4<


Great Rentals
2/1 1/2 bath mobile home east of
town on 5 acres $500/month


Wooded Tract 2.09 hillside acres east
of town on graded County Road $30,400

Just Listed!! 3 bedroom 2 bath delightful log
cabin with front and back screened porches,
board fence pasture, double carport and out
building on 4.07 acres $385,000

Lloyd Acres on a wooded hillside a 3 bedroom
2 bath modular home with oak floors, fireplace
and lots of very nice extras including shop for
$87,500

Historic Budd House built ca 1882 by commu-
nity leader of the day for his family. Lovely wood
work, high ceilings, spacious rooms, grand fire-
places, marvelous porches, currently 4 bedrooms
and 2 baths $355,000

Waterfront Home!! Like New, roomy, 3 bed-
room 2 bath home with big carport, nice shed with
5 acres on very nice lake near 1-10 and US 19
$385,000 See it at www.TimPeary.com

Amazing Buy!!! Mixed Use Property 12
plus partially cleared acres on US 19 south land
use designation permits 4 houses per acre near
Dennis' Trading post only $36,500 per acre

New Listing Contract Pending 13.29 acres
some wooded some open $5,000 per acre

Terrific Location 3 bedroom 2 bath doublewide
with fireplace, big porch, garage, shed, above
ground pool, with big trees, fence paddocks, on
county maintained paved Cherry Tree Lane now
$127,500

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly
wooded acres Only $36,500

Pasture and Pecans 5-10 lovely acres on
paved road $15,500 per acre Very nice property,
good deed restrictions

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Great Opportunityll Comfortable 4 bedroom
3 bath home on five fenced acres with guest cot-
tage w/bath, 2 car garage, big shop, pasture 100
pecan trees and a nice pool Only $365,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Wooded Acreaqe 5.35 acres on private road
off Paul Thompson Road $128,500

Waukeenah Hiqhway 27.99 acres good
home site fenced pasture $545,000

Aucilla Shores 5 level wooded acres $75,000

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath double-
wide with nice deck, fenced yard on 1 acre
$73,500

Investment Property Choice lot on the
Ecofina River 20 minutes to the Gulf, State
property on 3 sides, septic tank on property,
paved road only $195,000



Realtor Tim Peary

850-997-4340
See all our listings at
www.TimPeary.com

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


Real Estate Auctio'nn
m
Saturday, February 24th 10 aam
Boston (Thomas County), GA
1 0tio
198+ acres on Salem Road_
9







PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 21, 2007

: :":i r .' .!. ...,.. "


Chamber After 5


DENISE is a female Walker Hound, calm, obedient, with all her shots and spayed.
Won't you give her a good home? (News Photo)


,,.. ... i
7- -.. ,, .
.I '

,-








SState Congress for her Community






i State Congress for her Community


Proves Popular
The Chamber of Com- Other Chamber m
merce After 5, designed to are encouraged to par
showcase local businesses, in the program by hos
has proven to be a popular event.
event. The host(s) receive:
Recently, more than 80
Chamber members and guests
attended the second After 5
on at Capital City Bank.
Bill Gunnels, President, and
Associates at the Bank were
happy to show off the many
renovations and fresh new
look at the Bank. At Ro
Refreshments were catered
by Carrie Ann & Company, 2 7
and door prizes were a hit.
The Monticello News pro-
vided wine, and the First Sui
United Methodist Church pro-Su
vided punch for the occasion. Auto, AC, Po
The next business After 5 Locks, Tilt, C
event will be on South Cherry
Street hosted by Jack Car-
swell and Jodie's Coin Laun-
dry.
Carswell is eager to show
off brand new Gadsden
Square as well as Cherry
Street Commons.
Jodie's Coin Laundry is
close by, and Odie and Joe
Vandenberg want to promote
their, new business.


Got A Cute Photo?
Send It To Us And
We'll Share It With
Our Readers!

Kids Dogs *
Strange stuff, etc.

Monticello News
P.O. Box 430
Monticello, FL
32345
"You Can't Be Without It"
L


exposure to the community,


and can enjoy making con-
tacts in a casual atmosphere.
Committee members assist-
embers ing in the program are Bettie
ticipate Hogle, Katrina Walton, Linda
ting an Benedict, Paula Sparkman,
Diane Freeman, and Eleanor
s direct Hawkins, chairperson.


SNew


With Jim!
y Campbell Chevrolet


'Chevrolet


)urban LS
ower Windows, Power Door
:ruise, Power Seat, CD Player


SSTK# 546U





All vou add iT Tax, Ta and Titlc.
ROy Cmpbell
"I '--e Just Do It"
229-226-3901 206 Moultrie Road
www.roycampbell.com Thomasville, GA

B'W ii- i0il (just past 19 on Hwy 319N)


Altrusa Discusses Ad

Sales For Festival Booklet


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

At a recent meeting of the
Altursa Club, it was decided
to hold a "no baking" bake
sale, in which members do-
nate money, rather than bak-
ing and selling goods.
The monies raised from the
recent Nun Bingo fundraiser
will be added to the treasury,
to help with some of the club
projects.
Ad sales for the Water-
melon Festival booklet was
discussed since Monticello
Printers will no longer be able
to print the book.


A committee will meet with
other local printers to, deter-
mine how much the booklet
will cost.
Since this is the main source
of income for the Altrusa high
school student scholarships, it
was decided that the cost of
ads will increase this year.
The possibility of this hap-
pening has been discussed for
a few years .
A pamphlet with .an over-
view of Altrusa of Monticello
was presented to the member-
ship for review. The pamphlet
will be made available to pro-
spective members.
Catherine Arnold is prepar-


Post Interviews Boys


State Candidates
The American Legion Otto The program is
SWalker Post 49 has begun develop a working
the selection process for its of the structure of
Boys State Representative. and to impress
Candidates for the slot vis- delegate that this
sied the Post and were inter- is what we make it
viewed recently.
The American Legion makes
this Boys State Youth Leader-
ship Program available annu-
ally to promising high school PI
boys who have successfully
completed their junior year,
and have at least one semester
of high school remaining. Alao


Since Boys State provides
an introduction to local and
state government, delegates
have an opportunity to earn
school credit.
This program is a compre-
hensive one week leadership
course that offers youth a bet-
ter perspective of the practical
operation of government, and
shows that the individual is
responsible for the character
and success of government.
Selected delegates who at-
tend this program learn by do-
ing as they progress through
the various phases of govern-
ment.
This leadership action pro-
gram allows for qualified re-
cipients to take part in a
practical government course.


designed to
knowledge
government
upon each
government
t.


ing the pamphlet and asked
members to contact her for
any corrections or
suggestions.
Dianne Freeman noted that
she is updating a new packet
for new members.
In the program Freeman
presented to the group, she
said that Monticello Altrusa
was chartered in 1990 and ex-
tends membership to women
and men in the community
who are recognized as leaders
of the community.
She also, mentioned that
when there is a need in the
community, Altrusa will find
a way to meet that need.
Specific programs of Al-
trusa provide several scholar-
ships; help with the
community food pantry; sup-
port youth baseball; and help
to fund local literacy pro-
grams.
The next meeting will be
held 6:30 p.m. Thursday at
the Chamber of Commerce.
For further information re-
garding the local Altrusa call
997-4785.


planning A Wedding?
Is your face showing
all the signs of stress???
Let Us Help!!!!
w Plastic Sure rv Asccnm- .+ c of


Valdosta to take away all of the fine
lines and wrinkles, and create a
happy, non-stressed looking
Bride to Be!
A Wedding is YOUR big day! Let us help y:...,
create a younger looking you!
Wedding photos airbrushed? No need.
BOTOX" can eliminate fine lines and wrinkl,:-
around the eyes and forehead.
"Bride to Be" Special Bride & Groom Package
One Area: $25 off One Area: $50 of,
Two Areos: $50 off Two Areas: $100 o"
Three Areas: $75 off Three Areas. $150 c"
area per couple)


Plastic Surgery
Associates Of Vatfosta
230 Nortfside Drive
Valdosta, GA 31602
(229) 242-3002
(800) 880-5391


OF*


SAKC All -Breed


I Conformation Show


Sand

Agility Trail.


. f'February 24 & 25th, 2007X


vV I
Ag i I i I., V








W Judging Starts at 8:00 V


\North Florida Fair


Grounds





S......................... L E N L




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CARMEN SKIPWORTH was recognized at the 4-1
Service.


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