Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00179
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: February 16, 2007
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00179
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text








Funeral
Rules Help

Consumers

Editorial, Page 4


Preventing,
Thawing

Frozen Pipes

Story, Page 8


Rotary
Sandbaggers
Classic March. 5

Story, Page 10
II


Amanda Monroe

Named Student
Ambassador

Story Page 12


Friday Morning


Monticello


139TH YEAR NO. 13, 50 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007


County Seeks Coordinator


Salary Range For Job

Is $60,000 To $82,000


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Commissioners last week
took a big step toward redefin-
ing how they will conduct
business in the future by creat-
ing the position of a county co-
ordinator.
Commissioners stopped just
short of approving the
position, given the rule that
workshops won't allow the tak-
ing of official action. Even so,
they reached consensus on the
issue, which was scheduled for
approval Thursday evening.
A committee -- consisting of
Extension Officer Director
Larry Halsey, Mayor Julie
Conley, and Grants Director
Roy Schleicher -- drafted the
job description, after consult-
ing with various sources and
meeting with department
heads.
Last Thursday, the commit-
tee presented its finding, with


Halsey the designated spokes-
person.
Halsey began by distin-
Sguishing between county
managers and county coordi-
nators.
The former, he made clear,
were more appropriate for
larger and more complex
counties.. Managers, he pointed
out, had the right to direct all
county operations, and not
necessarily with the board's
approval.
"Essentially, he is the CEO
(chief executive officer) and
the county commission is like
the board of directors," Halsey
said. "If the board doesn't like
the way the manager is operat-
ing, they can fire him."
Coordinators weren't as pow-
erful as managers, he said.
They couldn't, in other words,
usurp board authority. Rather,
they served at the pleasure and
direction of the board, he said.
"But they put a level of pro-
fessionalism between the de-


apartment heads and the board
as the county grows," Halsey
said.
The committee's recommen-
dation, he said, was' for the
creation of a county coordina-
tor position, with specifically


assigned duties and responsi-
bilities.
Halsey divided the proposed
responsibilities into six broad
categories, relating to: policy
and operations; budget and fi-
nances; agenda preparation;


personnel; community rela-
tions; and miscellaneous du-
ties.

The coordinator, he ex-
plained, would occupy a place
just below the board on the or-


LARRY HALSEY, director of the Extension Office, reports the findings of the commit-
tee to the Board of County Commissioners last week. Halsey and the committee
spent weeks researching and crafting a jobsdescription for the position of county co-
ordinator. (News Photo)


ganizational chart, and would
function as a link between the
board and the department
heads and the board and the
other constitutional officers.
Such a setup, however,
would not prevent department
heads or constitutional officers
from directly approaching the
board if need be, he said.
Rather, it would streamline
the process, particularly for
budget preparations and other
routine matters, making for a
more efficient overall opera-
tion, he said. It would also fa-
cilitate the resolution of many
management and financial is-
sues at the basic level, he said.
"It will help move the board
toward a more businesslike ad-
ministration of the county in a
big way," Halsey said. "The
county, in its growth, and the
state of society in general, de-
mand more and more com-
plexity, and you as part-time
leaders of the county take a lot
of time and effort that perhaps
dilutes your ability to construct
and implement policy."
(See Coordinator, Page 2)


Planners Give Green


Light To Horse Arena


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Planners last week recom-
mended for approval the site
plan for the horse arena and
associated structures, if with
stipulations intended to satisfy
the concerns of nearby prop-
erty owners.
Those stipulations call for
the installation of a secure
fence to ensure that large-sized
animals don't wander into ad-
jacent properties and the erec-
tion of a dense, bushy
evergreen buffer between the
facility and the adjacent prop-
erties to obstruct visibility.
At least four adjacent prop-
erty owners voiced concerns
last Thursday about the arena,
which is slated to go on a 20-

-& m I1


acre parcel that was formerly
part of the University of Flor-
ida research center property
off US 90, about 3.5 miles
west of town.
These property owners ex-
pressed concerns about light
and noise pollution from the
arena, the facility's impact on
their property values, possible
environmental harm to the
wetlands and endangered spe-
cies in the area, and the inap-
propriateness of such a facility
in a residential neighborhood.
The neighboring property
owners also questioned the fre-
quency, nature and time peri-
ods of the events that the arena
would host.
Whomf exactly was the facil-
ity going to benefit, local
youths or "high-end" animal
owners, one adjacent property


owners asked. And how late
would the events run? Would
participants be required to
carry insurance? Would alco-
holic beverages be sold or con-
sumed on the premises? Who
would monitor the situation?
Halsey attempted to answer
the questions to the best of his
ability. He expected that the
arena would host several horse
shows and three or four rodeos
a year, among other educa-
tional programs, he said. He
expected that the noise level
would be reasonable.
"We don't expect rock con-
certs or loud noises other than
the audience enjoying itself,"
Halsey said.
As for alcohol consumption,
it would be prohibited, same as
(See Horse Arena, Page 2)


-ii : lllni' -
BILL TELLEFSEN, left, planning official, talks to Extension Office Director Larry
Halsey and Engineer Leland Smith just prior to the Planning Commission's review of
the site plans for the horse arena. The planners approved the plans with a few stipu-
lations. (News Photo)


. "


S. A




FOG rises from the Wacissa River on a recent cold morning. County leaders continue
their efforts to secure funding from the Legislature so that the property at the river's
headwaters can be purchased and preserved in its natural state. (News Photo)


Money Sought For Health Study


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

County officials have given
their approval for the pursuit
of a $15,000 grant that will
help the community evaluate
its health care system.

Rural Health Works is de-
scribed as a community en-
gagement process that not only
assists counties in evaluating
their health care systems, but
also generates "county-specific
data on the importance of the
health care sector to the local
economy."

According to paperwork pre-
sented by Commissioner Jerry
Sutphin, who promoted the
pursuit of the grant, the Na-
tional Association of Counties
(NACo) will select a limited
number of counties to receive
technical assistance awards on
a competitive basis.


Each selected county, ac-
cording to the literature, will
receive four distinct reports.
The first will be an eco-
nomic impact report describing
economic activity both in
terms of dollars and jobs pro-
duced for the local economy
by the health care sector.


The second will consist of a
directory of health and human
services provided in the local
service a rea.
The third will be a survey of
the health services utilization
patterns of the community and
the reasons for these patterns.
(See Health-Care, Page 2)


Pearl Street To Be One-way


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

First it was Dogwood Street
that city officials converted
into a one-way going west.
Now officials are looking to do
the same on Pearl Street.

The idea originally was to
convert the small section of
Pearl Street between Mulberry
and North Jefferson streets
into a one-way going east.
The post master supposedly


had signed off on the idea and
had expressed a willingness to
move the mail boxes on Pearl
Street to Mulberry Street, at
the rear of post office.
But last week, city officials
suggested converting Pearl
Street'into a one-way going
west, same as Dogwood Street.
City officials reasoned that
reversing the traffic flow
would allow for the creation of
more parking spaces on the
street, the ultimate goal of the
(See Pearl St., Page 2)


I I


I









PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 16, 2007


GIRL SCOUT Troops #407 and #187, led by Lisa Starling and Melodie Hamilton are
giving the memorial site at face lifting by landscaping, painting, and raking.


Coordinator Sought For County


(Continued From Page 1)
The committee recom-
mended as minimum qualifica-
tions that applicants have five
years of applicable govern-
ment experience, with at least
two years of management or
supervisory experience and a
Bachelor's Degree or better.
The recommended salary
range is between $60,000 and
$82,000, which the committee
considered an adequate range-


to attract qualified individuals
looking for a step-up position.
It will require a super major-
ity (four of five votes) to hire
the individual, but a simple
majority (three of five votes)
to dismiss him or her.
A few years back, the
county had a coordinator who
didn't quite work out. In fair-
ness to the individual,
however, officials at the time
didn't really take the time to


clearly define the job descrip-
tion upfront.

Instead, they allowed the po-
sition to be defined randomly
over time, with the result that
more and more responsibilities
were added to the job until the
load ultimately overwhelmed
the individual's capabilities,
among other problems. It's a
scenario that officials want to
avoid this time around.


Horse Arena Plan Gets Green Light


(Continued From Page 1)
any other county facility, he
said.
He didn't see where the facil-
ity would depreciate surround-
ing property values, he said.
But he did expect participation
from residents of surrounding
counties. That, however, was
to be expected, given that
horse people from this county
regularly participated in events
in those counties, he said.
The goal was for the facility
eventually to be able to stable
up to 100 animals for a couple
of nights at a time, he said. But
he did not expect semi-trucks
would drive the animals onto
the property. Rather, the ani-
,mals would be transported on
long trailers.
Had the county conducted a
study to determine the eco-
nomic feasibility of such a fa-
cility, one of the neighboring
property owner wanted to
know.


This individual pointed out
that one of the county's stated
justifications for the arena was
that the facility would produce
a rippled effect on the local
economy, in terms of lodgings,
food and gasoline sales. But
had a feasibility study actually
been conducted?
Halsey conceded that no
study had been conducted to
his knowledge.
"So it could be a losing ven-
ture," the neighboring property
owner made his point.
Another neighboring property
owner said that he had visited
with people in Taylor County
who lived near an existing
arena and none of those inter-
viewed had expressed a posi-
tive view about the arena.
Rather, they had all com-
plained .about noise and light
pollution and increased traffic,
he said.
It was better to put the fa-
-cility in an area that already


Health-Care Study Funding


(Continued From Page 1)
And the fourth will be a
compilation of secondary data
regarding the community.

The latter report will include
health data, such as the local
leading causes of death, com-


pared to the state; the infant
mortality and related data; and
local disease issues. It will also
include other demographic
data, including rates of incar-
ceration, graduation and such.
Commissioners were glad to


suffered from such problems,
this neighboring property
owner suggested.
The planners were sympa-
thetic to the residents'
concerns, to the degree that
they imposed the fencing and
screening stipulations. But oth-
erwise, they accepted the site
plan as recommended by Plan-
ning Official Bill Tellefsen.
A $200,000 legislative ap-
propriation is paying for the
project, which is to consist of
an open arena (eventually to be
roofed over and enclosed),
bleachers, a half-mile riding
and walking trail, picnic
tables, and rest rooms, among.
other amenities.
The arena and ancillary
structures are seen as the first
step in what community lead-
ers envision will ultimately be
a multiple-use agricultural
complex and park, provided
the state funding becomes
available.

Sought
hear that the county did not
have to contribute matching
funds to qualify for the grant.

The Health Department will
serve as the lead agency on the
project, if the funding is
awarded.


Tammie's Sweets & Deli


Opens Today On Cherry St.

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Tammie's Sweets & Deli-


will hold a Grand Opening 7
a.m. 5 p.m. Thursday, Feb.
22, at 227 North Cherry
Street.
Owners are Tammie and
Gregory Peck.
Tammie relates that she has
always loved baking and serv-
:ing others. She once worked
at a bakery in South Florida,
she really enjoyed the work
there.
In the past few years she
has prepared her famous New
York Style Cheesecake spe-
cialty for a number of local
establishments.
Greg worked a number of
years in a Hollywood Chinese
restaurant, where he gained
cooking experience.
The bakery will be open
from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Saturday.
Their menu will carry some
breakfast items such as toast
and bagels, and the lunch
menu will be comprised of 13
salads, and some hot items
such as Jamaican beef patties,
hot dogs, Polish dogs, and
quesidillas.
Bakery items will include
cakes, coffee rings, croissants,
muffins, cookies, Danish, and
Krispy Kreme doughnuts.
Cakes half sheet size, and


TAMMIE PECK displays a freshly baked cake. (News
Photo)

smaller, will be baked to or- the answer."
der, after the second week of- The Peck's came to Monti-
business after which all the cello about five years ago
necessary equipment will from Ft. Lauderdale, where
have arrived, they were born.
Fountain drinks, coffees, They have two daughters
and a "coffee of the week" Autumn and Cinnamon who
will be made available, attend Monticello Christian
The shop will also sell items Academy.
such as Tupperware. The phone number for Tam-
"God is guiding our hands mie's Sweets & Deli is 997-
and our hearts in this venture, 1181, or fax orders to
so we will always be playing 997-1101. Cakes require 48
Christian music from 88.1 hour notice.
Way FM within these walls" A comfortable dining area
Tammie explains, will allow one to enjoy a
"We will always have free snack or to visit, and curb-
to read and/or to take away side service will be available.
Chic Tracts. Those curious Just call and honk.
about the Lord, may pick a Tammie's will hold a "soft"
tract that can help them find opening 7 a.m. today.


AKEl K, VMoJR.'&X. KF&URI'MANDII I B


Pearl St. Slated To Be One-way


(Continued From Page 1)
change.
Officials batted the idea back
and forth and finally decided
to have the street committee


meet with the post master on-
site to determine if the latter
was amenable to the new idea.
The result of the committee


FMB Breaks Ground

On Tallahassee Bank


Farmers & Merchants Bank
broke ground on its sixth Tal-
lahassee office Feb. 9, at The
Vineyard Center, East Mahan
Drive, at I-10.
The bank officials, FMB em-
ployees, and Allstate Con-
struction Company were
excited to bring the first full
service bank to this eastside lo-
cation.
In keeping with Farmers &
Merchants Bank's 100 years of
customer service, the bank of-
ficials realize the importance
of meeting the demands of
growth and bridging the Mon-
ticello and Jefferson County
communities to metro Talla-
hassee with a full service loca-
tion with easy access.
At FMB, we never forget
that we must earn your trust,
through high levels of dedica-
tion and personal service to
each individual customer.
Farmers & Merchants Bank
expects to name the manager
within the next two months,
and predicts the new bank to
pen in late summer, 2007.
At present, Farmers & Mer-


chants bank operates eight
branch offices serving Monti-
cello, Tallahassee, Greenville,
as well at Thomasville, GA.


and post mater's discussion
likely will be reported to the
full council at its next regular
meeting March 6.






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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 16, 2007 PAGE 3

Presenters Thanked For

Black History Festival


;1. -'
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*. i~ - ''
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CUMI ALLEN discusses Women's Health issues with Shirley Washington, during the
recent Black History Program sponsored by the Health Department at the Opera
House.


-- -"',-~- r '


BILL GUNNELS, Foundation Community President, presented Matt McKibbin, pro-
gram Director for Community in Schools of Florida, with a check for $2,500 on behalf
of the Foundation. From left, Phil Barker, superintendent of school, Gunnels, McKib-
bin. (News Photo)


Communities In Schools

Receives $2,500 Check


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Capital City Bank Founda--
tion Community President
Bill Gunnels recently pre-
sented a check for $2,500.00
to Matthew McKibbin, direc-
tor of program services for
Communities In Schools
(CIS) of Florida, on behalf of
the Foundation.
The mission of CIS is to
champion the connection of
needed community resources
with schools to help young
people successfully learn, stay.
in school, and prepare for life.


Got A Cute
Photo?


Send It To Us
And We'll
Share It With
Our Readers!


Kids Dogs *
Strange stuff,
etc.


Monticello
News
P.O. Box 430
Monticello,
FL 32345


"You Can't Be
Without It"


CIS believes all children
need and deserve:
*A personal, one on one re-
lationship with a caring adult;
*A safe place to learn and
grow;
*A healthy start and a
healthy future;
*A marketable skill to use
upon graduation;
*A chance to give back to
peers and the community.
CIS serves students in 17
counties and approximately
208 schools and sites in Flor-
ida.
CIS utilizes diverse strate-
gies and models: case man-


agement, alternative schools,
after school programs,, in
school classes, and parent
programs.
t: .' '.. ~ ~i?., '{,T .


Coordinator Cumi T. Allen-
on behalf of the County
Health Department Black His-
tory Month Festival expresses
her thanks to all who weath-
ered the storm and partici-
pated in the "Community
Black History Program" ear-
lier this month at the Monti-
cello Opera House.
A Health Fair opened the
program. Vendors participat-
ing included: Deveda Bel-
lamy, State Health Office,
HIV/AIDS; Donna Melgaard
and Jackie Guyton, County
Health Department, blood
pressure; Agnes McMurray,
Tish Miller, and Gloria Cox-


Boyd TO
Host Ag
Summit
Congressman Allen Boyd,
will host an Agriculture Sum-
mit to discuss the drafting of
the 2007 Farm Bill and the
needs of farmers in North
Florida, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Saturday, Feb. 24 at Simpson
Nursing Packing House, just
off Highway 19, south of
Monticello.
Boyd will be joined by US
House of Representatives Ag-
riculture Committee Chairman
Collin Peterson, Florida Agri-
culture Commissioner Charles
Bronson, Florida Farm Bureau
President John Hoblick, and
University of Florida's Insti-
tute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences Vice President Dr.
Joe Joyce.
"This year, passing the Farm
Bill must be and will be a top
priority for Congress," said
Bovd.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Jones, Big Bend Rural Health
Network, diabetes;
Bonnie Mathis, County
Health Department, physical
fitness;
Jennifer Brown, County
Health Department, Healthy
Start Program;
Heidi Copeland, County
Cooperative Extension
Office, nutrition;
And, Cumi Allen, County
Health Department, women's
health.
Tequila Hagan followed by
leading a group of women in
physical fitness exercises, and
taught them the correct ways
to warm-up before a workout.
Anthony William began the
evening with an opening song
"A Change is Gonna Come."
He continued with "A Negro
Mother," by Langston
Hughes, and ended with "I'm
Still Here."
The audience was moved by
Dr. Flossie Byrd's inspiring
speech about the history and


NOTICE OF ROAD
CLOSURE
Beginning Mon. Feb. 5th Ebenezer
Rd. in Jefferson Co. Florida will be closed
for a period of 45 days for Bridge
Replacement.
Storm Reconstruction Services, Inc.



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Bank Member FDIC


Your Friendly Hometown
Bank
Will Be Closed

Monday, February 19th

In Observance
of

Presidents' Day

And will Resume
Regular Banking Hours
on

Tuesday, February 20th
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Classifieds


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growth of education in the
black community of the
county.
She presented pictures of
the old school buses used by
blacks throughout the county,
and she talked about the
"hand-me-down" books that
were commonly used.
This left a special apprecia-
tion for where we are today.
Attendees were informed
about the lack of transporta-
tion in many areas. She told
of how she and her brother
walked six miles one way to
school each day.
Byrd also showed pictures,
and talked about, local black
leaders such as Mamie B.
Scott (the first black
principal;) and Myles Groo-
ver (the first black county
agent;) and Gertrude Canty
(an excellent teacher.)
"Our hats are off to Dr.
Byrd for a wonderful speech
and a powerful history pres-
entation," says Allen.


small )USi-neSS







PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 16, 2007


Monticello News
(ISSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
A Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly Ex-
cept for the weeks of July 4th, Thanksgiving, Christmas,
& New Years. Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post
Office. Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




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Opinion & Comment


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the funeral that must be made
quickly and often under great
emotional stress.
What kind of funeral should
it be? What funeral provider
should you use. Should you
bury or cremate the body, or
donate it to science?
What are you legally re-
quired to buy? What about the
availability of environmentally
friendly or "green" burials?
What other arrangements
should you plan? And, practi-
cally, how much is it all going
to cost?
Each year, people grapple
with these and many other
questions as they spend bil-
lions of dollars arranging fu-
nerals for family members and
friends.
Many funeral providers of-
fer various "packages" of
goods and services that make
up different kinds of funerals.
The Federal Trade Commis-
sion, the nation's consumer
protection agency, wants you
to know that when you arrange
for a funeral, you have the
right to buy goods and services


Ten million Americans
consider starting a business
every year, yet only 6 million
actually do. If you're among
those who have pondered the
idea of starting a business,
there's no time like the present
to turn your dream into a real-
ity.
Starting a business can seem
complex and intimidating but,
with proper planning, it does-
n't have to be that way. Fol-
lowing these five tips will
help you feel more confident
and prepared to start the busi-
ness you've always imagined.
Put it on paper. Writing
a business plan requires you to
think about every possible sce-
nario. -
It helps identify any current
and potential competitors as
well as key industry informa-
tion. Going through this proc-
ess and having it on paper will
help you stay on target and is
required to apply for
financing.
Ask questions. Getting
expert advice is essential to
successfully starting and grow-
ing a business.
Local support and training
are available through
government-funded small-
business programs and com-
munity college business
classes.
Create a structure. What
are the advantages of a sole
proprietorship over a partner-
ship? You'll need to answer
this question for tax and legal
purposes.


separately.
That is, you do not have to
accept a package that may in-
clude items you do not want.
The Funeral Rule, enforced
by the FTC, makes it possible
for you to choose only those
goods and services you want
or need and to pay only for
those you select, whether you
are making arrangements after
a death occurs or in advance.
The Rule allows you to
compare prices among funeral
homes, and makes it possible
for you to select the funeral ar-
rangements you want at the
home you use.
You have the right to
choose the funeral goods and
services you want (with some
exceptions).
The funeral provider must
give you a general price list
(GPL) that states your right to
choose the goods you want in
writing.
If state or local law re-
quires you to buy any particu-
lar good or service, the funeral
provider must disclose it on
the price list, with a reference
to the specific law.
The funeral provider can-

(See Funeral, Page 5)


Your business structure is
important because it deter-
mines how much liability pro-
tection you'll need and how
much paperwork you'll have
to do.
Get a personality. The
right business name and logo
will help attract customers. So
get out a pen and a pad of pa-
per and start writing down
ideas. Ask friends and family
what they think. Put yourself
in the shoes of your customers.
Spread the word. Get-
ting the world to beat a path to
your door requires more than
just a great idea.. Marketing is
one way to turn a great idea
into a moneymaking business.
Create a marketing plan.
It should include a profile of
the people who are most likely
to buy your products or serv-
ices and the best way to reach
them, such as local
newspapers, industry publica-
tions and radio.


By RON CICHON
Publisher


The Jefferson Legislative
Committee is doing good work
on our behalf. The committee
is made up of committed and
knowledgeable people who
have raised the profile of our
county at the Legislature and
Governor's office. Members
include: Julie Conley, Skeet.
Joyner, Emily Anderson, Kim
Barnhill, David Frisby, Larry/;
Halsey, Curt Kiser, Dick Bai-
lar, Ron Smith, Ed Vollertsen,
John Culbreath, Mary Frances
Gramling, Roy Schleicher, and
David'Ward.
If you love animals, you
don't want to miss the Bless
the Beast Benefit 6:00 p.m.
Saturday at the Opera House. _


This is a major fundraiser for
the Humane Society... FMB
broke ground Friday for a new
Tallahassee branch at the
Vineyard Center, Mahan Drive
at I-10. This will be the sixth
Tallahassee office for the
Monticello based bank.
The Governor's plan to raise
homestead exemption to
$50,000 will cause serious
budget problems for small
counties... The other day Presi-
dent Bush said he respected
Congressmen and Senators
who disagreed with his poli-
cies and doesn't question their
patriotism. This is an amazing
thing for him to say after the
White House has spent six
years demonizing anybody
who disagreed. Of course,
now the President has to deal
with a Congress which is no


longer a rubber stamp so his
attitude has changed.
Nun Bingo Saturday was a
hoot with monies raised going
to Altrusa and the theater
group... The usual length of
Daylight Savings Time, from
the last Sunday in April to the
last Sunday in October, was
lengthened in 1974 January 6
to October 27, and the next
years February 23 to October
26 to conserve energy.
Quotable quote: "Life can't
be all bad when for 10 dollars
you can buy all the Beethoven
sonatas and listen to them for
10 years." William F.
Buckley, Jr.
Massage therapist Jennifer
Ellis says she's closing her
Perry facility because her cli-
ent base has grown so much
here... Tammy Peck is busy__


What Do Words Really


By DENNIS FOGGY
'Columnist

There should be some logi-
cal and formal process re-
quired before words can be
easily added to a language or
changed in meaning. Unfortu-
nately, our English language is
changing out of control all the
time. Some words are newly
invented while others gain or
lose their meaning or defini-
tion.
I suspect because of some
twisted desire to make others
feel we are more knowledge-
able, we attempt to impress
them by inventing or modify-
ing words thereby creating a
sense of elevated intelligence.
I learned the other day that
there are actually no bartend-


ers. Those folks making and
selling alcoholic drinks are in
actuality mixologistss". Some
years back, janitors became
"custodians" and even in the
military, the place where sol-
diers routinely gathered for
years to eat, stopped being the
"mess hall" and became the
"dining facility'!
Someone please give me a
sentence where the word "use"
ever has to be replaced with
the word "utilize". I want to
take the word "myself" com-
pletely out of the dictionary
and our language because it is
constantly misused 99 percent
of the time as an incorrect sub-
stitute for "me" or "I". Sena-
tors Brown, Smith and myself
went to Iraq-- no, no, no,--
Senators Brown, Smith and I
Sent to Iraq!


This freelance misuse and
changing of the English lan-
guage has been around for
centuries. By example, the
word "cunning" simply meant
"knowing" but was allowed to
expand into mean, sinister or
crooked.
Sly once meant skillful and
to be crafty meant an individ-
ual was an expert at their craft.
Counterfeit was a noble Eng-
lish word meaning to model
after a worthy ideal or cause
and coyness once only meant a
genuine shyness.
Today, however, these words
connotate evil and dishonest
undertakings.
Remarkably, the word "sue"
originally meant to "follow",
In one translated version of
Matthew in the New Testa-
ment, Christ tells the rich man


Growing National ID


surgeries, dental problems and
By TOM DeWEESE medications.
Columnist If would be a matter of com-
fort for parents to know that, if
Technology can be a won-_their child was kidnapped or
derful thing. From our garage wandered off, a chip could be
door opening automatically on activated to pinpoint where
a rainy day to being able to they are. The same is true in
find a lost pet, to quickly pay- locating a lost pet.
ing for an item by slapping a It would be helpful for police
card over a "Pay Pass" reader, and fire departments to have
technology can make our lives instant access to fingerprints
better, more organized and and other personal identifying
safer .. _- -. .. I. _


There is no question that it
would be a marvelous use of
technology to be able to carry a
copy of all your medical re-
cords, in case you fall ill or get
hurt. Then the hospital will
know all about your health
condition including allergies,


features of every single Ameri-
can. Then they really could
solve cases in about in hour,
just like on CSI.
Those are the wonderful vi-
sions promoters of the technol-
,ogy are using to sell their
wares. The reality may create a


on our ability to move about
and live our lives in a free
manner. For that reason, today
in the age of such marvelous
technology, Americans must be
more vigilant and protective of
their freedom than any time in
our history.
As technology develops, data
banks of personal information
are being collected on every-
thing from medical records, to
financial and employment his-
tories, to school records, to
buying habits at the super mar-
ket.
The government is building
data banks on farm animals.
Our cars have little black
boxes, which record data on
our driving habits. In addition,


world of Big-Brother controls--the uses of video cameras,


getting her bakery up and go- .
ing next to the Rare Door on
Cherry Street... Dottie Miller's
Bush Baby has been in opera- i
tion for 25 years. She's added
a used book store which is do- )
ing well, Miller reports.
Word is the University I
Chevrolet sale last weekend at
Jefferson Square was success-
ful, I understand the company
plans to return in 4 or 5 g
months... Riley Palmer's
Crooked. Creek subdivision is, :
taking shape with .paving on,
tap...Recent study showed ath-
letes who took 5.4 grams of
omega-3 fatty acids daily had j
an 80 percent improvement in .
lung capacity, a benefit for
athletes with exercise induced
asthma. Theory is Omega-3--
(See Takes, Page 5)




Mean?
o give all he has to the poor *
and then "come and sue me".
The modem day meaning has
been transformed to restrict the
follow" exclusively to mean
going into a court of law.
Resentful was once an ex-
:lusive expression of gratitude
nd now means indignation.
To be "peculiar" originally
neant "belonging exclusively
o" but now refers to being odd
Dr uncommon. Even the word
strange" itself only meant
foreign", but is now used to
mply uneasiness and a sense
if something out of the ordi-
ary or wrong. Words
when applied to women over
he years have also changed in
meaning. The word "foxy" was
nee exclusively used to de-
cribe a smart or sly man. It ',
11


(See What Do, Page 5)



Trap
computer chips and biometric
screening to monitor our ac-'
tivities are growing rapidly.
Step by step, using a wide
variety of good excuses,
Americans are allowing them-
selves to be fingerprinted, their
eyes scanned, computer chips
inserted under their skin, pro-
viding DNA, and more.
The most important question
one must ask before relying
completely on available tech-
nology is "who's in control of
it?" We can create technology
to do literally anything. But
should we?
The question is important
because some of the same
technology that will make our
(See Growing, Page 5)


From Our Photo File
















Si i



Certifircat



TUTORS were honored as Tutors of the Year by the Literacy Volunteers of America,
Jefferson County, for their work in the Literacy Program, in Nov., 1991. From left,
Ruth Newcomb, Horry Baylor, and Dianne Westbrook. (News File Photo)


SShort Takes & Other Notions


Business Dreams Can

Become Realities








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 16, 2007 PAGE 5


Letters Growing I
L t e r .,. continuedd From Page 4)
Slices better can, in the wrong

Making Physicalands, make our lives a living
Making Physical ActiVithell.


Dear Editor:
SI was pleased to see the re-
pbrt on "Projects Fighting
Obesity," in Friday's paper.
i It described the obesity-
ghting efforts of several Pre-
vention Research Centers
(PRCs) throughout the
country.
,Unfortunately, it failed to il-
lustrate the work' of our own
Florida PRC, based at the Uni-
versity of ,South. Florida in
Tampa.
I have been fortunate to-have
worked with the Florida PRC
on the "VERB Summer Score-
card" Project.
VERB is national social
marketing campaign devel-
oped by the Center for Disease
Control, and Prevention to pro-
mote physical activity among
tweens (youth between 9-13


(Continued From Page 4)
carries quite a different mean-
ing when applied to a woman.
Men could be envied as being
shrewd, but for women being a
shrew came to mean having a
violent :temper or,
temperament.
I grew up thinking that "gay"
was to be happy as in the
"Flintstones" cartoon song
"we'll have a gay old time" or
in reference to the WWI song
of, feeling gay when Johnny
Comes Marching .Home and
when used in the Deck the
Halls Christmas Carol line--


Americans have a new way
to salute the men and women
who have earned Purple Hearts
defending the nation.
The National Purple Heart
Hall of Honor was recently
opened and now receives
nearly 100 visitors a day.

Thet Hall is the first of its
kind in the nation to recognize
the 'more than 1.7 million
Americans wounded or killed
in action while serving in the
United States military. It will
become the nation's sole re-
pository of soldiers': stories of
sacrifice.

Over 300,000 stories from
individuals who earned the
Purple Heart are stored at the
Hall of Honor. However, only
about 5,000 have been edited
and are now. available to be
viewed by the public.

"Please give us time to cata-
log and edit those thousands of
stories," said Don Hughes, a
retired Air Force three-star


years) by making physical ac-
tivity seem "cool, fun, and
popular."
With the help of the Florida
PRC, several communities
throughout the country have
linked the popular VERB
brand to their own version of
a physical activity scorecard.
In Sarasota, FL, local organi-
zations provided free or low-
cost activities for youth who
had a scorecard. Each time the
teen participated in physical
activity, his/her scorecard was
stamped.
After obtaining 24 stamps,
the teen could redeem their
scorecard for a cool prize. Per-
haps the greatest success of the
scorecard program in Sarasota
was getting programs that nor-
mally did not offer opportuni-
ties for youth to be physically


"now we dawn our gay
apparel". What were those
people thinking?
If you think that I am not
being "nice", well the word
nice comes from the Latin
"nescius'" or,"ignorant" previ-
ously used to denote a deroga-
tory state. Somehow over time,
it flipped and today refers to,
something pleasing.
I've decided that I am tired
of being just a "columnist" and
I am going to demand that Ron
Cichon and the staff at the
Monticello News start refer-
ring to me as a
"Columnologist".


.general and one of the persons
responsible for creating the
Hall of Honor. "We are work-
ing to solve the problem." __

The Hall of Honor, located
in New Windsor, New York,
includes a 7,500-square-foot
facility with a reception area,
gallery, exhibit hall, learning
and education ',center-. for
school groups and .a presenta-
tion room.

Through historical photo-
graphs, documentary films,
and videotapes by veterans, the
Hall will provide a multimedia
show, exploring .the spirit of-
the American fighting man or
woman in times of crisis.


Families who would like to
share their story or materials of
Purple Heart recipients to be
considered for exhibition
should contact the National
Purple Heart Hall of Honor,
P.O. Box 207, Vails Gate, NY,
12584 or call (845) 561-1765.


Fun, Helps Fight


Obesity
active (such as public libraries)
to incorporate physical activity
into their youth programming.
Unfortunately, the national
VERB campaign has been de-
fended by the federal govern-
ment, despite early evidence of
its success.
Those communities that cre-
ated VERB Summer Scorecard
Programs plan to continue to
provide opportunities for
weens to be active, and hope
that the scorecard programs
can survive without the back-
ing of the national marketing
campaign.
It was clear froi the "Pro-
jects Fighting Obesity" report
that the community engage-
ment is a necessary component
in the fight against obesity.
I encourage local businesses
to think about the role they can
play in creating a healthy envi-
ronment for the citizens of
Monticello and Jefferson
County.
Perhaps we should be high-
lighting the efforts of those
who are already doing so.
Sincerely,
Jen Nickelsen, MS, RD, LD/N




Takes
(Continued From Page 4)
found in fish oil may reduce
inflammation so lungs dilate
more easily.
Funny thing is so many long
for immortality but don't know
what to do with themselves on
a rainy afternoon...Medical
authorities say smoking can
take years off a person's life
and add years to their appear-
ance. Sounds like a double
whathmy to mhe...Statistics
show 43 percent of Americans
spend mior0e 'than they' earn,
about $1.22 for every dollar
they bring home.
Didja know eating smaller,
more frequent, meals and
snacks, is bne way to keep the
metabolism revved up all
day?...Did you remember your
Sweetie on Valentine's
Day?...Some 9 million folks
typically buy gifts for their
pets on Valentine's Day..,Busi-
ness Coach Mark Raciappa re-
ports his client base is
growing. Mark will be sharing
ideas with business folks at the
March 13 meeting of the
Chamber.
Each year, more than $152
billion in financial aid is
awarded from the Federal gov-
ernment, states, colleges and
universities to help students
and families pay for college...I
appreciated Mary Ann Frisby's
recent column in the Democrat
about spouses and families of
law enforcement officers and
the stress they deal with. We
simply take our law enforce-
ment officers for granted and
forget they are our first line of
defense. '


:Did Y









SINCE 1934





FLORAL DESIGNS


I


In 1996, Congress passed
three major bills; The Welfare
Reform Act, The immigration
Reform and Immigrant Re-
sponsibility Act and the Medi-
X cal Care Reform Act.
Unknown to most in Con-
Sgress, each of these bills car-
ried certain identical language
called Section 656, which laid
Ste foundation for the creation
Sof a National ID. The laws set
Sa deadline of October 2000.
..In 1998, privacy advocates,
including The American Pol-
Sicy Center, began to sound the
alarm. In 1999,: Snator Rich-
Sard Shelby (R-AL) quietly In-
troduced legislation to rescind
Section 656 and effectively
kill the National ID.
All of that effort was lost
on September 11, 2001. Since
then, the government has been
energized to action. Not since
Lyndon Johnson's "Great So-
ciety" have the forces of Big
Brother beenso determined to
build the size and power of
government.
First came the new Home-
land Security Department with
170,000 employees from 22.
combined departments, includ-
ing the U.S. Border Patrol,
Coast' Guard, Secret Service,
Federal Emergency Manage-
'm'ent Agency, Transportation
: Security Administration, Im-
'migration and Naturalization
Service, Customs Service,
Animal and Plant Health In-
spection Service, Federal Pro-
tective Service, FBI's National
Domestic Preparedness, Fed-
eral Computer Incident Re-
sponse Center, plus several
lesser agencies of the same
type.
All of these agencies come
under the control of one man-
ager, the Secretary of Home-
land Security.
Under the rashly conceived
Patriot Act, that one Cabinet
Secretary has the power to
send federal law enforcement
into private homes without a
search warrant.
Records and materials may
be taken from private homes,
computers records searched,
phones tapped, and e-mail
monitored, without the knowl-
edge of the suspect.


* Built Locally ........
i-E'" -----_ "-- li, -'2-"-_2-2" ".
All Wood
Any Color Finish
Installed On Time i
Custom Countertops '
Our prices are competitive, Maple, Oak,
estimates are free, quality Cypress and
guaranteed more...
S 4FrdCb esn M r,*
Liese0nd A~e


)u Know?
Monticello has over 90
websites! View them all at
www. gelli ngsflowers. cor
Click: Monticello Links
Have a website in
Jefferson County?

Get a FREE LINK....
Only at Gellings!
190 E Dogwood Street 850.997.2015


Department of Neurology
Ricardo Ayala, M.D.
Winston Ortiz, M.D.
Leonard DaSilva, M.D.
J. True Martin, M.D.
(850) 878-8121


Department of Neurosurgery
Mark Cuffe, M.D.
Albert Lee, M.D.
Christopher Rumana, M.D.
(850) 877-5115


Department of Pain Management
Vildan Mullin, M.D.
Joshua Fuhrmeister, M.D.
L_ (850) 558-1260 -4


JEFFERSON COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY, INC.

PRESENTS


BLESS THE BEAST BENEFIT


2007

JOIN US FOR HOR'S DOEUVRES AND COCKTAILS
AT
THE MONTICELLO OPERA HOUSE

SATURDAY
FEBRUARY 17, 2007
6:00 PM
LIVE AUCTION SILENT AUCTION
CASH BAR
ENTERTAINMENT
TICKETS $25.00 PER PERSON
ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE
JEFFERSON COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY, INC.
FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TICKETS CALL (850) 342-0244 OT (850) 264-5927


National I
As part of the Homeland Se-
curity effort, but not part of the
Patriot Act, is a new Pentagon
program called the Information
Awareness Office.
It may use military intelli-
gence to spy on domestic citi-
zens.
This one program seeks to
combine government and busi-
ness data banks to monitor
American's cash withdrawals
from banks, airline ticket pur-
chasing, rental care transac-
tions and purchase of firearms.
In addition, it monitors credit
card purchases, books pur-
chase, every movie rented or
bought, almost ever action un-
dertaken by private American
citizens.
In 2005, Congress passed
the Real ID Act, a "counter-
terrorism" measure recom-
mended by the 9/11 commis-
sion.
The act sets national stan-
dards for driver's licenses. The
bill requires states to link data-
bases containing sensitive per-
sonal information such as So-
cial Security numbers.
State databases must con-
tain a digital image and a pa-
per copy of each birth certifi-
cate and other identifying
documents.
Although issued by the
states, through the Department
of Motor Vehicles, the Real ID
is a national identification
cared system. States must
comply with federal guidelines
by May, 2008. If states fail to
meet that deadline, then
driver's licenses from non-
complying states will not qual-
ify as official identification
and so cannot be used to get on
airplanes or obtain services


Kitchen Cabinets


What Do Words Mean?


Purple Heart Hall
H, rs.., .. ev


Amp--,


ALLAHAS SEE

NEUROLOGICAL


C


Is pleased to announce
their participation with BCBS of Florida

- Effective February 1, 2007 -


j


II


~gpa~i$
(I


.,-


N I


ID Trap
from the federal government,
including medical care.
Without authorized federal
identification, access to voting
booths may be denied. Many
states now use computerized
voting machines. In those
states, a voter's name is now
issued a bar code and perma-
nent identification numbers on
registration lists. Unless every-
thing matches up, one can't be
allowed in the voting booth.
As the Real ID Act is fully
implemented, the driver's li-
cense will be essential for one
to be a full participant in
American society.
Failure to have it will liter-
ally shut one out from opening
a bank account, getting a loan,
gaining employment, marriage
license, medical care and pur-
chase of firearms.


Funeral.
(Continued Froni Page 4)
not refuse to handle a casket or:
rn you bought elsewhere or
charge you a fee to do that.
A funeral provider who of-:
fers cremations must -make al-.
ternative containers available.
A funeral provider can't
charge for embalming you did-
n't authorize unless embalm-
ing is required by state law.

The many

faces

of caring
Find out what you can do. Contact us
at 1(800) 899-0089 or www.voa.org
V \Olunteers
of America*


Made to Order
















PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 16, 2007 ife s ty le


Jake's restaurant, at the
Courthouse Circle, is plan-
ning a Food Safety Class in
the near future.
Keep watch for the time and
date in.the News, or ask Dee
Pope about it next time you
dine at the establishment. She
tells me this class is especially
useful for those working in
the food industry. Certificates
of Completion will be distrib-
uted after the class.
If you missed Nun Bingo
Saturday evening, you missed
a chance to see the priest and
nun impersonators at their
best, making for an evening
of unending hilarity.
Librarian Angela Scott sure
does know how to keep those
free computer classes full of
"anxious to learn students.
On average, she teaches two
classes per month and former
students have been pleased
with what they learned be-
cause of her methods.
Farmers & Merchants
Bank Relay for Life team will
hold their Chili Cookout
1lam-2pm today at the FMB
Annex parking area.
I visited with Dot Inman-
Johnson at the Chamber meet-
ing this week. She tells me
that Capital Area Community
Action Agency will host their
5th annual Masked Benefit
Ball 8pm until midnight on
Saturday, March 3 at the FSU
University Center Club.
Proceeds will benefit low
income families served by the
Agency. She may be con-
tacted at 222-2043 for more
information. She says it's a
"must attend" event.
Gretchen Avera relates that
the Youth Leadership Pro-
gram is coming along just
fine with 14 high school stu-


OLIVER EDWARDS
Oliver Edwards Jr., 76, died
Thursday, February 8, 2007 in
Tallahassee.
Mr. Edwards was a native of
Jefferson County and lived
most of his life in Jefferson
County. A number of years
was spent in Massachusetts
and in 1978 he returned to
Monticello. He was a Dry Wall
Finisher, and a member of Mt.
Zion AME Church Monticello.
Funeral services will be at
1:00 pm Saturday, February
17, 2007 at Memorial Mission
Baptist Church, Rev. Clarence
Little officiating. Interment
will follow at Thompson Val-
ley Cemetery.
He is survived by his wife
of 55 years, Jessie Mae Wat-
kins Edwards; nine children,
Minnie Pearl Greene (Wash-
ington), Aaron (Bertha), Bon-
nie Walton all of Monticello,
Barbara Banks of Arizona,
Shirley Deby of California,
Sharon Ellis (Larry) of Massa-
phusetts, Oliver III (Katuria) of
Monticello, Petrina Johnson of
'North Carolina, Terry (Fre-
drica) -of Tallahassee; one
brother Robert of Ft. Myers;
three sisters Doris Steel, Ruth
Jones (Ben), Carrie Guyton all
of Rochester, New York;
twenty four grand children,
fourteen great grand children
and a host of relatives and sor-
rowing friends.
BERNICE WILLIAMS
Bernice Florida Williams,
97, died Monday, February 12,
2007 in Perry, FL after a brief
illness.
Mrs. Williams was born and
reared in the home of a Bap-


Sc4a YY/'f-53O

dents attending the most re-
cent workshop. The students
spent the greater part of their
day learning about job oppor-
tunities in Law Enforcement,
Sheriff David Hobbs met up
with them and had them
brought to the county jail,
where they toured the facility
inside and out. Then the
prison bus picked them up
and took them to the Jefferson
Correctional Institution for an
inside and outside tour. She
says the children especially
enjoyed the ride back to
school in the prison bus.
They thought that was "real
cool!" Healthcare will be the
topic presented at the next
workshop. Anyone interested
in helping her to put together
a good program for the stu-
dents is welcome to contact
her.
Dick Bailar invites the com-
munity out to the Opera
House 6pm on Tuesday, Feb.
20 to join the local Legislative
Committee in greeting a few
of our state representatives.
They will be available to
hear our differences and opin-
ions, and maybe offer a few
good ideas.
Committee Budget Issue
Request forms, or CBIR's,
will be discussed.
Eleanor Hawkins mentions
the After Hours event hosted
recently at the GCapital City
Bank was very successful.
She adds that Jack Carswell
will host the upcoming event
on March 27. Attendees will
tour the new Gadsden Square
and the Cherry Commons
Street offices. The After
Hours are open to the public,
and are a great way to net-
work your business and meet
new people and seasoned
friends.


tist Pastor and served her Lord
as an active member of local
Baptist churches as long as her
health allowed. In her senior
years she spent much time and
energy praying for her family
and friends.
The family will receive
friends at the Joe P. Burns Fu-
neral Home, 1400 Johnson
Stripling Rd, Perry, FL on
Thursday, February .15, 2007
from 6:00 8:00 pm. The fu-
neral services will be held at
10:00 am on Friday, February
16, 2007 at Joe P. Burns Fu-
neral Home with Dr. Charles
A. Williams officiating. Inter-
ment will be at Roseland
Cemetery in Monticello, FL at
1:00 pm.
Memorial contributions may
be made directly to Alz-
heimer's Association, 225 N.
Michigan Ave., FL or through
a local civic group that sup-
ports Alzheimer's research.
Mrs. Williams is survived
by six children; four daughters,
Gwen Faulkner and Jean Ed-
wards of Perry, FL., JoAnn Pe-
ters of Seneca ,SC and Ina Ree
Littlepage of Alexandria, VA
and two sons Frank Williams
(Barbara) of Mableton, GA
and Charles A. Williams
(Georgia) of Jacksonville, FL;
eighteen grandchildren twenty
six great grandchildren, and
tree great-great grandchildren
and many nieces and nephews.
She is preceded in death by
her parents Rev. Ashley V.
Pickern and Annie Pickern, her
youngest son, John B. Wil-
liams and her husband B.F.
Williams.


Healthy Start To Host

Community Forum


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Healthy Start Coalition
of Jefferson, Madison, and
Taylor Counties will hold a
community forum 9:30 a.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 27 in the con-
ference room at the Public Li-
brary.
A light breakfast will be
served.
The program "State of the
Jefferson Community" will be
an insight into the picture of
health and well-being for


KUPERBERG

Guild To
Celebrate
Black History
The Virginia West Lane
Guild #25, Heroine Templar
Crusaders of Monticello, will
observe Black Histoty Month
with an African Nubin Tea
Fellowship 4 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 17 at The Learning Cen-
ter (Amaryllis Garden Club
house) on Marvin Street.
The community is invited to
join in the celebration.


Bethel AME
To Sell
Fish Dinners
Bethel AME Church will sel
fish dinners, fish sandwiches
and chili, 11 am. to 3 p.m.,
Saturday.
Fish, potato salad, baked
beans, dessert is $6.
Fish sandwiches or chili are
$5.

Agency To
Meet Feb. 22
The Area Agency on Aging
for North Florida will hold its
Board of Directors meeting
10:30 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 22
at the Area Agency on Aging
for North Florida, 2414 Mahan
Drive, Tallahasse.
An agenda is available upon
request.


R~1 sIEO]RU -

ABO


L AIRFORCE


Vet AA aePe sota

A' epy n zO


DANELLA POTTER sews a pillow in her Elite Sewing
Class.


county in terms of child hun-
ger, infant mortality, transpor-
tation, and prevalence of
substance abuse.
The Coalition will also col-
lect donations of disposable
diapers and infant's clothing,
for those in need.
Donna Hagan may be con-
tacted at 948-2741 for more
information.
The Coalition is a conglom-
erate of local agencies work-
ing together for the
betterment of the people of
the county.

NEW ARRIVAL
Jill and Lee Kuperberg an-
nounce the birth of their
daughter, Madison Marie.
She was born Feb. 8, 2007
and weighted 7.4 pounds and
was 20.5 inches long.


Church News
Mt. Ararat AME Church
celebrates Black History
Month 11 a.m. Sunday.
Speaker is Vincent T.
Edwards, Elder of Watson
Temple, Tallahassee. Theme is
"Being Successful as.an Afri-
can American.
***
Ford Chapel AME Young
Adult Choir celebrates its an-
niversary 7:30 p.m. Saturday
and at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, with
surrounding choirs and groups.
Gospel Messengers of Faith,
of West Palm, and Gospel Mi-
racalettes of Tampa will sing.
***


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 16, 2007 PAGE 7


SENIOR LIVING


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF


HEALTH[
Jefferson County Health Department
1255 W. Washington St. Monticello, FL 32344
(850) 342-0170
WE ARE PLEASED TO
OFFER THE FOLLOWING FREE
SERVICES TO OUR SENIORS

* FREE BLOOD PRESSURE CHECKS
* INFORMAL NUTRITION EDUCATION
SERVICES
* FREE DIABETES CARE COORDINATION
EDUCATION
* FREE DIABETES NUTRITION EDUCATION
MONTHLY DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP
* PODIATRIST FREE FOOT CARE WITH
YOUR MEDICARE CARD


Support These Firms That

Take Care of Our Seniors


* Nurse on duty 7 days
a week
* 24-hour staffing/security
* Three delicious meals
served restaurant style
in the dining room
* Choice of studio or one
bedroom apartment
* Locally owned and
operated


Jimmie Fay Griffin, Exec. Director;
Martha Scott, Assoc. Director; and Annie
Jones, Resident Care Coordinator
welcome your visits and the opportunity
to show you our community.


850-875-1334
1125 Strong Road
Quincy, FL 32351


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Full-time medical directors
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SCare regardless of ability to pay
SNot-for-profit, charitable organization
JCAHO-accredited
1545 Raymond Diehi Rd., Suite 102
Tallahassee
(850) 575-4998
wwwcovenanthospice.org
Fdces of Life. a book of inspirational stores andi
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When choosing a health care center for yourself or a loved
one, there is comfort in knowing that someone will be there
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rehabilitation services following an illness or injury or for
long-term elder care services, you can take comfort in
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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 16, 2007


IN MEMORY
Ben Washington Jr.
Jan. 22,1955 Jan. 11, 2004
William Washington
Jun. 17, 1953-Mar. 26, 2005.

We thought of you today,
but that is nothing new. We
thought of you yesterday, and
the days before that too.
We think of you in silence,
and often speak your name.
All we have are memories,
and your picture in a frame.
In life we loved you dearly,
in death we love you still. In
our hearts you hold a place no
one ever will.
It broke our heart to lose
you. You did not go alone.
For parts of us went with you
the day God called you home.
We love you and we miss
you.


Your Father Ben Washington
Sr., Sisters Mary and Sallie,
Nephew and Niece Jarvis and
Britt, Children Ailsha and Re-
shard, Grandchildren Alantev,
Amantev, and Artev.
IN MEMORY
In memory of Mother Flow-
erzell Saffo who passed away
on Thursday, January, 17,
2005.
Still sadly missed by family
and friends but we know you
are in a better place where
there is no more pain and suf-
fering.
The children, grandchildren,
and great grandchildren will
come together this weekend
February 17 and 18 to share
memories of Mother Saffo.
With a memorial at her
,grave site on Saturday, and


church attendance at St. Rilla
Missionary Baptist Church on
Sunday, the church where she
grew up.
The children would also
like to thank the many friends
for your prayers and support
during the illness of our dear
sister Altamease.
We ask for your continued
prayers and may God richly
bless each of you.
Her Children


Gospel Sing
Set Feb. 24,
First Methodist Family Min-
istries Center at 325 West
Walnut Street will hold a Gos-
pel Sing Along 6:30 p.m. Sat-
urday, Feb. 24.
Admission is free and dona-
tions will be accepted to bene-
fit Relay for Life.
A night of singing favorite,
old hymns and sharing fellow-
ship and audience participation
is planned. Refreshments will
be served.
Musicians will include Lissa
and Bill Moon, Sallie and Sam
Worley, Frank and Mike Pur-
vis, Andy Jerger, Laura
Powell, Becky Stoutamire,
Megan Finlayson and Rex
Ware.


Advice On Preventing,

Thawing Frozen Pipes
Chris Floyd, Emergency there are pipes in the garage. may also be wrapped around
Services Director for the Capi- *Open kitchen and bathroom pipes to help thaw.
tal Area Red Cross advises cabinet doors to allow warmer *Do not use an open flame
residents how to prevent and air to circulate around plumb- of any kind.
thaw frozen nioes. ing. *Apply heat until full water


Floyd notes that pipe freez-
ing is a particular problem
here, in other warmer cli-
mates, where pipes often run
through uninsulated attics or
crawl spaces.

To help prevent freezing,
follow these recommenda-
tions:
*Drain water from swim-
ming pool and sprinkler supply
lines.
*Remove, drain, and care-
fully store hoses used
outdoors, and close inside
valves supplying outdoor fau-
cets.
*Open outside faucets to al-
low water to drain out of the
lines.
*Consider installing products
made to insulate pipes, such as
pipe sleeves, or UL approved
heat tapes.
*Keep garage doors closed if


MONTICELLO

NEWS
YOU CAN'T BE WITHOUT IT!!


*When it is very cold, let
cold water drip from a faucet
served by exposed pipes.
*Keep the thermostat set to
the same temperature during
the day and night. This may
incur a higher heating bill but
can prevent costly repair bills
from burst pipes.
*Set thermostat no lower
than 55 degrees when away
from home for long periods.
To thaw frozen pipes safely:
*Keep the faucet open. As
pipe is thawed, water will be-
gin to run and hasten thawing
process.
*Apply heat to a section of
the pipe, using an electric heat-
ing pad, wrapped around the
pipe, an electric hair dryer, or
a portable space heater.
*Towels soaked in hot water


Pressure is restored. If the fro-
zen area cannot be reached,
call a licensed plumber.
*Check all other faucets to
determine if other pipes have
frozen.
Preventative measures to
take:
*Consider relocating exposed
pipes to provide protection
from freezing.
*Add insulation to attics,
basements and crawl spaces, to
maintain higher temperatures
in these areas.

Help us cure
neuromuscular diseases.

Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717 www.mdauso.org


STOP LEG CRAMPS ,
BEFORE THEY STOP YOU. ClCet
Triple Calcium
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stop low calcium leg cramps. Just ask your pharmacist. -

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Support These Firms That

..Take Care of Our seniors


:';7:.'-': .,' d "- .

PhilbertJ. Ford, M.D.
x Southeastern Center for
Infectious Diseases, P.A.

SBoard Certified
Infectious Diseases


Dr. Philbert J. Ford is pleased
to announce the opening of
Southeastern Center for
Infectious Diseases, P.A.


Providing *npa- t ':e ** -.
Providng oupatint ervcesin a P


1213 TMH Court Suite A
Tallahassee, Florida 32308


A GENTIVA
great healthcare has come home
Nursing
Physical, occupational and speech therapy
Cardiac and respiratory care
Disease and pain management
for more information, call 850-878-2191
or visit www.gentiva.com


Phone: (850) 942-2299 Fax: (850) 942-0322


Michael J. Ford, M.D. & Staff
are pleased to welcome to our practice
Michael A. Stickler, M.D.

Dr. Stickler joins us after serv-
ing as chief resident in the
division of dermatology and
cutaneous surgery at the
University of Florida Shands
Hospital ih Gainesville.

He is currently accepting new
patients for general, surgical,
cosmetic dermatology.
Dr. Stickler is a provider for
most medical plans, including
CHP.


(850)422-3376
2040 Fleischmann Rd.
Tallahassee, FL


'1 I RI T V t
De r ia t o (o


Jefferson Nursing Center
"Serving the residents of Jefferson County since 1950"

Endless Possibilities is
"Aging with Change"


Jefferson Nursing Center is a 60 bed skilled nursing facility
offering rehabilitative services, extended care, hospice care,
and respite care.


Rehabilitation Services
* Physical Therapy
* Speech Therapy
* Occupational Therapy
* Out Patient Therapy


Special Services
* Post Stroke
* Neurological Disorders
* Cognitive Function
* Hospice


For Further Information or a Personal Tour
Please Call


850-997-2313


BEN WASHINGTON
WILLIAM WASHINGTON


EMERGENCY HOME ENERGY

ASSISTANCE

FOR THE ELDERLY

The Area Agency on Aging for North Florida a announces the availability of
Emergency Home Energy Assistance for the Elderly Program (EHEAP) funds for
eligible households in Jefferson County. To be eligible, an individual who is at least
sixty years of age must reside in the applicant household, a bill that indicates an
immediate disconnection date if payment is not received by the utility company (this
includes propane and electric), and the household income must be at or below 150%
of the Federal Poverty Income Guidelines.

Please contact Terrie Mihan (850-342-0271) to schedule an appointment or to
request more specific information about the Emergency Home Energy Assistance
Program.

The Emergency Home Energy Assistance for the Elderly Program is funded by the
State of Florida Department of Elder Affairs and is administered by the Area
Agency on Aging for North Florida, Inc.


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SDorts


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 16, 2007 PAGE 9


Tim Ford Reminisces About


His Pro Boxing Experiences


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

County native Tim "The
Jacksonville Flash" Ford, 66,
was a self-taught professional
boxer who had a 47-7-2 re-
cord during his pro career.
"I've wanted to be a profes-
sional boxer from the time I
was young," said Ford. "I
used to walk a mile to listen
to boxers like Joe Lewis, Max
Milan and Judge Jersey Joe
Walker on the radio for Fri-
day Night Fights, and I re-
member when I was young
and we would watch TV box-
ing, I would tell my cousins I
could beat those guys, and I
always felt that I could."
At the age of 18, after
graduating from Howard
Academy in 1957, he began
training to become a boxer.
Ford ordered a boxing illus-
trated instruction book and
began practicing his moves.
"When I began practicing, I
was working at Mahan Pecan
and I would run a mile to
meet the truck to take me to
work every morning," said
Ford. "After I was dropped
off after work, I would run
that mile all the way home, I
considered it part of my train-
ing."
In late 1958 or early 1959,
after working on his skills for
about one year, he advised his
family that in ten years, he
would be the World Cham-
pion boxer, and he moved to
Jacksonville to pursue his
dream.
S "When I got there, I asked if
they had any boxing matches
3'in the area and I was sent to
the AAU (Annual Athletic
Union) where they had a gym
set up in the basement," said
Ford.
"After they saw me in the
ring, they thought I had been
boxing all the time, and were
impressed with me."
He said that an AAUTour-
nament was conducted once


TIM FORD, "Jacksonville Flash," local native, is a self taught boxer who was 47-7-2
in his professional career. (News Photo)



Local Boys On #3 Team


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Magic
Team, with local players, is


#3 in the Thomasville YMCA
boys basketball league for
athletes 12 and under.
Coach Mac Finlayson re-
ports that the youth stand 2-2
on the season, playing all four


Tigers Fall To Altha,

Sneads Pre-season


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School varsity baseball team
didn't play well during the
,Quincy pre-season tourna-
ment last week.
Coach Jim Norton said the
Tigers lost to Altha, 10-0 and
were slammed by Sneads, 21-
0.

"We only had nine players
and four of them haven't
played baseball before," said
Norton. He added that most of
the Tigers had committed to
play in the District finals over
the weekend, and could not
participate in the baseball
tournament, so he had to
throw a team together for the


event.
"We didn't look so good,"
said Norton. "In those two
games, we had about 20
strikeouts, and I told the boys
that you can't make a baseball
game when a catcher makes
all of the outs. You have got
to play the ball to win:. -- -

"You have got to do better,"
said Norton. "When you go
out there, you go out there to
fight and win, and if you're
not going to give it your best,
you might as well stay home
and call in the score of a 21-0
loss." .

Norton vowed, "We will get
better before the end of the
season, no doubt about that!"
The schedule will be final-
ized and the roster determined
before the end of the week.


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other teams in the league dur-
ing the first half, and suffer-
ing their two losses, each by
one point.
He noted that the league
contained good, and evenly
matched competition.
In the season opener, the
Magic downed The Heat, 26-
19.
Zak Steele led the score
with 13 points; Jay Finlayson,
eight points; and Jacarre Wat-
kins and Anthony De La
Torre, each scored two points.
The Magic down d the
Kings, 23-21.
Steele led with 13 points;
Lenorris Footman, nine
points; and Watkins, one
point.
In the third game, The Clip-
pers shaved The Magic,
18-17.
Steele, and Footman each
scored seven points and Wat-
kins, three points.
The Celtics inched by
Magic 21-20.
Steele, 12 points; Watkins,
six points; and Finlayson, two
points.


per year, and in his first night
of competition, he fought two
matches and won. He ldst the
winner determining third
match.
"The Navy had a boxing
team and our team would get
with them and we would box
each other," said Ford. "In
my first match, I beat the
Navy guy."
In his final match before go-
ing professional (age 21 or
22), he went against one of
the Air Force boxers, Scream-
ing Eagles Ray Owens, and
lost by one point. He had
only had ten matches by then.
"After that, I originally
wanted to go to the Olympics,
but I would have had to wait
another four years, and. I
would have been too old then.
Boxers have a tendency to
age rather quickly."
Manager Johnny Rushing
took Ford to Miami to fight in
the Little River Boxing Asso-
ciation.
After 3-4 weeks, Ford had
won his first 11 consecutive
matches, then he fought boxer
Sugar Cliff, and lost.
A rematch of the two was
set in Jacksonville, but Ford
said he slipped and Sugar
Cliff knocked him down to be
determined the winner of the
match by one point.
From 1962-1967, Ford
boxed as a professional, then
he suffered an injury to his
right eye.
'The doctor said I had a de-
tached retina, but it didn't
come from suffering a blow
he said it was probably
caused by a glove lace hitting
me in the eye, or someone's
thumb," said Ford. The in-
jury required surgery and
Ford recuperated over the
next three years.
"The doctor told me if I
ever went back into boxing,
there was a 50/50 chance it
could reoccur."
In 1970, Ford returned to the
ring. "By that time, I had lost
all my contacts so I began to


manage and promote myself,"
said Ford.
He said that at that time,
Andy Griffin was the World
Champion and Manny Gon-
zalez was the number one
contender for the title.
"I was in a match with Kid
Bad Boy in Louisville, KY
and a promoter had me sign a
contract to fight Gonzalez in
my next fight. With him be-
ing the number one
contender, that would have
put me in the spot light," said
Ford.
But during the match, he
suffered a second occurrence
of a detached retina in the
right eye. "That's when my
world came to and end. I re-
quired two more surgeries, so
I gave up boxing."
Over the years, Ford made
his profession in computers as
a programmer and after 38
years, he retired and came
home to Monticello.
"I really missed boxing, and
sometimes I felt like I really
missed out. I know I would
have been the World Cham-
pion if not for this injury,"
said Ford.
"When I was reading the
Monticello News and I read
about the boxing gym open-
ing up, I thought, A boxing
gym in Monticello? So I con-
tacted David Collins to see
about helping to coach some
of the kids."
Ford now is at the Cherry
Street Gym every night it is
open, to work with the youth
of the community and pass on
his knowledge of the sport.
"It feels good to be able to
pass on what I know and be
able to help these kids," said
Ford. "It helps me remember
my days as a boxer and feel
young again."


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 16, 2007

Rotary Sandbaggers Golf


Classic Set March 5


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Annual Rotary Sand-
baggers Golf Classic is slated
for March 5, with tee time 1
p.m., at the Country Club.
Golfers are asked to be pre-


sent at 12:30 p.m. for check
in.
Past President James
Muchovej said that spaces for
additional golfers are still
available.
The tournament will be a
shotgun start with a best ball
format, as usual for the four-


person teams competing.
The entry fee is $50 per per-
son and $200 per team, and
includes 18 holes of golf, a
golf cart, the Rotary's famous
10-ounce rib eye steak din-
neis with all the trimmings,
and door prizes.
Hole sponsorships are also


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Coach Frank Brown reports
his Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy junior varsity softball
team were looking good dur-
ing the scrimmage game Sat-
urday.
"All of the players looked
good and it was a good scrim-
mage game," said Brown.
"Because the varsity and jun-
ior varsity teams are so large
this year, we were able to
split both teams in two and pit
them against their own, so
each would be on equal
ground.


"I saw a lot of good solid
hits, pitching, and base run-
ning, and II still have to deter-
mine who is going to be on
the starting team this Thurs-
day in our first game. I have a
few good players in each field
position."

He said he was very fortu-
nate this year because his
Lady Warriors have two
pitchers and two catchers, and
as usual, he will have the girls
practicing and focusing on
their base stealing techniques,
which have very often proven
to be the difference between
winning and losing.


available for $100, and spon-
sors will have their names
-placed on a particular hole on
She golf course.
Trophies will be awarded
for Last Place, Low Gross,
and Low Net.

"We are always looking for
someone new to take the big-
gest and coveted Last Place
trophy," said Muchovej.
Last years event saw over 30
golfers and raised more than
$1,800.
The Last Place trophy went
to the team of Fred Golden,
DeWayne Freeland, Ken Fos-
ter, and Rosemary Turner.
The Low Gross trophy went
to Lee Maupin, Russ Beggs,
Jason Beggs, and Grant
,Nichols.

The Low Net trophy went to
the team of North Florida Ab-
stract, John Gebhard, Rhen
.Gebhard, Don Anderson, and
SMelissa Foster.
All proceeds will go to
benefit Rotary Youth Camp
and local service projects.
For further information con-
tact any Rotarian or
Muchovej at 997-6508.


JCHS Loses To Maclay

In District Action
The Jefferson County High Anthony Johnson, four
School varsity boys basket- points, eight rebounds. ..
ball team was slammed by Jordan Blair, four points.
Maclay 78-42 in District
Coach Quinton Adams re- -______-a
ports the Tigers had 27 turn-
overs but he was proud of
their efforts.
Tim Crumitie led the Tigers
with 11 points, three
rebounds, one steal, one
block.
Lucius Wade, ten points, :-
one assist.
LaMarcus Bennett, eight
points, two assists, two steals.
Jon Dady, five points, one B
assist.


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'W-.h n "*ff 'r, rrir,!o n 3


The BALL is passed between Brittany Hobbs and Caitlin Murphy during District ac-
tion for the Lady Warriors. (Photo by Lynne Saunders)


ACA Girls Fall To


Gainesville 48-26


The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy varsity girls basketball
team lost to Gainesville Rock
48-26 in the Regional finals
over the weekend.
The Lady Warriors stand
17-10 on the season, and 16-8 -
in regular play.
"We did not do well during
that game, but overall, we did
have a good season," said_
Coach Daryl Adams. "We're
just going to strive to do
much better next year."
He added that it was tough
for the Lady Warriors to re-
cover from the loss of last
year's team MVP, Mallory


Plaines, who was out for the
second half of the season due
to an injury.
Bethany Saunders led the
score with nine points, two re-
bounds, three steals.
Lindsey Day, seven points,
11 rebounds, two blocks,.
Nicole Mathis, four points,
six rebounds.
Brittany Hobbs, three
points, two rebounds, three
assists, three steals.
Lisa Bailey, three points, 13
rebounds, three steals, one
block.
Caitlin MurphyT.fve re-
bounds, two assists.


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FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Athletes from Aucilla
Christian Academy and Jef-
ferson County High School
have been named Big Bend
Leaders in basketball.
In boys rebounding, Ste-
phen Griffin is $6, with 180,
an average of 9.0.
In assists, Griffin #12, with
67, an average of 3.4.
In steals, Wade Scarberry,
#3 with 69, an average of 3.3.
Kyle Barnwell #5 with 65,
an average of 3.1.
Griffin #8 with 51, an aver-
age of 2.6.
In blocks, Griffin #3 with
60, an average of 3.0.
In girls scoring, Lindsey
Day is #16 with 266 an aver-
age of 10.2.
In Rebounds, Kandice Grif-
fin #4 with 130. an average
Sof 10.0.
Day at #6 with 227, an av-


erage of 8.7.
Donna Ransom #9 with
105, an average of 8.1.
Lisa Bailey #13 with 180,
an average of 6.9.
In assists, Bailey is #14
with 66, an average of 2.5.
In steals, Bailey is #10 with
78, an average of 3.0.
Brittany Hobbs #11 with
74, an average of 2.9.
Ransom #12 with 36, an
average of 2.8.
In blocks, Ransom is #1
with 46 and average of 3.5.
Day is #6, an average of
1.6.



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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 16, 2007 PAGE 11


N~7


If It Happens In Our County
You'll Read It In
Your Local Newspaper


Order


Your


Subscription


Today!


In State.....................$45.00
Out Of State.............$52.00
Extensive Coverage of Jefferson County
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Mail Your Check To:
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Monticello, Florida 32344


Monticello


News


'You Can't Be Without It'








PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 16, 2007


Amanda Monroe Named


Student Ambassador


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Amanda Monroe has been
nominated by one of her
teachers to serve as a student
ambassador to Europe.
She is the youngest daugh-
ter and middle child of Su-
zette and Stan Monroe of
iVaukeenah.
: She is in the 10th grade at
llorida State University
schooll in Tallahassee.
SMonroe said that when her
oldest sister, Lydia, was cho-
en two years ago to travel
vith the program, she was
3ery happy for her, but never
reamedd that she might some
Pay have a similar opportu-
fity.
, The People to People Stu-
tent Ambassador Program
avas founded by Dwight D.
tisenhower in 1956.
He believed that if people
trom different cultures could
;ome together in peace and
friendship, 'so eventually
Would countries.
SHe dreamed of developing
pnore unity in the world com-
munity.
"Maybe I can help," she
comments.
Once nominated, prospec-
tive People to People Student
Ambassadors are carefully in-
erviewed and evaluated be-
fore they are accepted into the


MONROE


program.
As an Ambassador, Monroe
can earn high school and col-
lege credit because of the
many educational elements
that are built into the
program.
She believes this trip will
increase her knowledge of
what is going on in other
countries.
Having family members in-
volved in Christian missions
in several countries has
piqued her desire to learn
about various people and their
cultures.
By making this trip Monroe
will have the opportunity to
experience new places, and
increase her understanding of
the world.
Her departure date is June


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18. She will be visiting sites
in England, France, Belgium,
Holland, Germany, and Swit-
zerland.
The balance of her program
tuition is due on April 1.
Her baby-sitting funds are
not adequate to cover this en-
deavor, and she could use
some financial help.
Her People to People repre-
sentative explained to her that
part of the experience is also
in the fundraising and the
managing of the money that is
contributed.
Financial contributions may
be made directly to her, for
anyone interested in helping
her with this endeavor.
Your gift will help her to
share in this wonderful educa-
tional and cultural experience.
Whether financially or
through prayer Monroe appre-
ciates all support.
She can be reached at 997-
1159.
Monroe is an active mem-
ber in the Waukeenah United


SMethodist's youth group, and
is"'-becoming active in the
'Linied Methodist Women's
.;porgram.
She is involved in Florida
iHgh's Orchestra program,
,ard has been for five years.
SSome of her hobbies in-
clude horseback riding, writ-
ing poetry and short stories,
reading, cross-stitch, and
working on jigsaw puzzles.
"'"Ambassador means repre-
sentative, and I pledge to do
.my very best to make those
helping me proud," Monroe
states.


Got A Cute Photo?

Send It To Us And
We'll Share It With
SOur Readers!

Kids Dogs *
Strange stuff, etc.

_Monticello News
P.O. Box 430
Monticello, FL
32345

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600 franchise offices in the United States and Canada. ;..
Homebuyers in the Tallahassee area face a dilemma. "In order to purchase a bigger.
more expensive home, most need to keep as much equity as possible when selling their
current residence," said 1 ilton Hightower. ---
One option is the time intensive "For Sale By Owner" strategy, but the pitfalls and aggravations are seldom worth the
effort.' And as most people know, using a traditional real estate company can mean forfeiting five or even six percent of the
total siles price in agent commissions. There is another choice. Assist-2-Selli: offers home sellers a "Direct-To-l1uyer"T'
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"Don t let the name fool you. This is not a do-it-yourself concept. Under Assist-2-Selli's marketing programs. sellers-
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The Tallahassee Assist-2-Sellk franchise serves home sellers and homebuyers in Tallahassee and the surrounding area
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 16, 2007 PAGE 13


Questions,
Anyone?
Get the answers you can
trust about government
programs, benefits, and
services from the Federal
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Center.
Just call toll-free:
1-800-FED-IjFO
(That's 1-800-333-4636)
Mon-Fri 8am-8pm ET
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Wt Yro(eroOLVECOMP PROBLEMS. (850) 536-7236 Lit Backhoe Service 339 Alexander Rd
SAME DAY' NEXT DAY ONSITE SERVICE Clearing & Driveways 3 A erR
*Diagnosis Repair *Upgrades *Installations *Consuhations 3845 N. MONROE ST office (850) 948-40.19 Lamont, Fl. 32366
:Tutorials'*Removal of-Viruses, Adware, Spywate TALLAHASSEE, FL RAYMOND HERNDON Mobile (850) 570-0458 ph: 997-5536 cell: 933-3620


Register, 's Mini-Storage B & M Tractor Service -r
R-egister S IMini-Storagy e Specializing in Food Plots, BushHogging, AneicagHeartt
Liming & Fertilizing, Spraying, and Fencing As'ociationt
315 Waukeenah Hwy. It keeps ^ Keaton Tire Repair
(1/4 Mile Off US 19 South) more than "Service Is Our Business on and off the Road"
Brad McLeod menmgi. es -
"[ fa 1. [ Cell: (850) 210-2942 Mack McLeod .. EDO KEATON 850-997-0903 Shop
Cel997-2: 53550 545-2325 Cell: (850) 50-0346 TRAVIS KEATON 850-264-6871 Cell
10534 South SaIl Rd, Lamont, FL. 3233 54 Capps Hwy 850-997-0937 Fax
Lamont, FL 32336 850-997-5443 Home









PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 16, 2007


LEGAL
description and application may be
obtained in the Office of the Clerk
of Circuit Court, Room, 10, County
Courthouse, Monticello, Florida
Salary range is $25,000 to $40,000.
Minimum education and experience
requirements are: A bachelor's
degree from an accredited college or
university with a major in
accounting, finance, or business
administration. Four (4) years


Upcoming Auctions!

Ag & Construction Machinery, Farm Equipment,
Trucks, Trailers, ATV's, much more

"llth Annual Winter Auction"
Sunbelt Ag Expo Site
Moultrie, GA
Saturday, February 17, 2007 9:00 am

"5th Annual Winter Auction"
Iron City, GA
Saturday, February 24, 2007 9:00am

Don't miss these opportunities!
Call now to consign!
Turn your surplus equipment into Sold!


Mobile:
229-891-1832
Phone:
229-985-4565


Terry DeMott, Sr.
1894 Sylvester Highway
Moultrie, GA 31768
www.demottauction.com


2 ADVANCED GUTTER & METALS>


100% SEAMLESS GUTTERS 5" x 6"
SEAMLESS GUTTERS GUTTER SCREENS


* FREE ESTIMATES (24 HRS)
* ALL WORK 100% GUARANTEED!
* OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE


MIKE OCHAT
850-728-4874 C
850-728-4876 C

LICENSED & INSURED


Cars
Under
$5,000.


:ELL
)FFIc


Notice of Job Opening: Jefferson
County Clerk of Court is accepting
applications for a Budgeting and
Payroll Administrator. Job



Monticello News
Keeping You Informed


L 04 S -


LEQ
e pcrienln in ounlliug,
budgeting, and payroll processing in
either the governmental sector or
private sector. Applications will be
accepted until 5:00 p.m. February
26, 2007 at the Office of Clerk of
Circuit Court. Equal Opportunity/
Affirmative Action Employer. Drug
Free Workplace. Drug testing is a
required part of the
pre-employment physical.
Applicants with a disability should
contact the above office for
accommodation.
2/7, 9, 14, 16/07c
Jefferson County Planning
Commission will hold its regular
monthly meeting and workshop on
March 8, 2007 at 7:00 P.M. The
meeting will be held in the
Courtroom of the Jefferson County
Courthouse located at the
intersection of US Highway 19 and
US Highway 90 in Monticello, FL.
The meeting may be continued as
necessary. Information concerning
the meeting is available at the
Jefferson County Planning
Department, 445 W. Palmer Mill
Road, Monticello, FL 32344,
Telephone 850-342-0223. From the
Florida "Government in 'the
Sunshine Manual", page 36,
paragraph c: Each board,
commission, or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision
thereof shall include in the notice of
any meeting or hearing, if notice of
meeting or hearing is required, of
such board, commission, or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the
board, agency, or commission with
respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she
will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings, is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be
h sed.
RI 2/16/07c
Jefferson County Land Auction 700
acres, starting @ 1,200/ac
Owner/agent March 10th
www.700Acreauction.com
RID 2/7,9,14,16,21,23,28 3/2,7,9
/2007,c


eritag The donation is tax deductible.
B ick-up is free.
or theBliWe take care of all the paperwork.


:ee :u, .6:q^


FL Lic #060000120218


Hav Yof u r T axes Prepar~~ '~ii4ed ']on IS
*Ifpplid a prt r al f yur ow Pam!


Cars
Under
$10,000.


WE MAKE IT EASY TO SHOP ONLINE AT WWW.TIMBERLANDFORD.COM
Special APR WAC through FMCC/Rebates in lieu of Special APR. All vehicles plus tax, title, tag and $299. Dealer Fee.

Lz: vwwvwv- - -wvwwvvwvZ^^


familiarity with
Monticello/Jefferson County
area a must. A Class D Florida
Driver's License will be
required. This is a
Safety-sensitive position which
requires substance abuse testing
per FTA/DOT. Position is
located in the BBT Jefferson
County (Monticello) office
days/hours of work are typically
Monday through Friday, 8:00
am to 5:00 pm. Send
Letter/resume to Big Bend
Transit, Inc. 290 West Dogwood
St., Monticello, FL 32344
2/7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, c


In accordance with FL Statue
713.78: Public Auction March 10,
2007 1986 Mere Vin#
1MEBP9230GH68705, 1991 Ford
Vin# 1FACP52UIMG247309
March 24, 2007
1980 Buick Vin# 4E35AAH131924
1989 Pont. Vin#
1G2AF51WOK6258087 To Be Sold
as is for towing and storage charges.
Conditions & Terms at Auction.
Dave's Towing 7261 East Wash-
ington St. Monticello, FL 32344
(850) 342-1480
02/16/07c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 07-45 ca IN RE:' The
Marriage of JOSEPHINE
MORRIS, Wife/Petitioner, and
SIDNEY MORRIS,
Husband/Respondent NOTICE OF
ACTION To: SIDNEY MORRIS
Address Unknown YOU ARE
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it, on
MICHAEL A. REICHMAN,
petitioner's attorney, whose address
is P.O. Box 41, Monticello, FL
32345, on or before April 6, 2007,
and file the original with the clerk
of this court either before service on
petitioner's attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition. Dated on February 12,
2007 KIRK REAMS Clerk of Court
As Clerk of the Court Jerie B.
Pearson Deputy Clerk
2/16, 23/07, 3/2, 9/07,c

HELP WANTED
Operations Assistant: For
paratransit Company in
Monticello/Jefferson County.
Scheduling, routing and
dispatching of daily
transportation services. Prefer
experience in passenger
transportation service,
knowledge of Windows-based
computer operations, and


I


FOR SALE
FULL-SERVICE TRAVEL AGENCY
CRUISES, FLIGHTS, RESORTS,
BROADWAY, THEME PARKS,
AND SPORTING EVENTS,
EVEN FLOWERS!
UNDER $1,000 TOTAL
ALOHA TRAVELS AND CRUISES.COM
850-514-9900



Quality Crane, LLC
Quality service guaranteed

John Morris, Owner
Grady Foster, Operator

P.O. box 495
735 East Washington Street
( 112alty ra Monticello, FL 32345

V ONTICEUiD.R' )
50) 997-8500 Phone: 850-997-8500
Cell: 850-545-2243

We set trusses, A/C units, etc.

We are available whenever, and

wherever, you need us. We are home-

town friendly, and guarantee our service.
Locaaly owned and operated.

We appreciate your business!


For Sale by First United Methodist Church 2400 sq.
ft. home at 895 West Washington Street. This former
Methodist Parsonage with split floor plan has 4 bed-
rooms and 3 1/2 baths, refinished hardwood floors.
New tile floors in kitchen, laundry and baths, carpet
in the family room and master bedroom. Bathrooms
newly renovated. Wood stove insert in fireplace.
Large lot landscaped with magnolias, camellias, crepe
myrtles and azaleas. Large deck and screened porch.
$259,500. For more information
call 997-5545


Southern Forestry Realty
www.soforest.com
83+ac, W Jefferson Co. -
15-20 yr old loblolly, natural
pines & hardwoods. 5 ponds,
great fishing & hunting tract.
Power available. $2750/ac.
58+ac, Madison Co. 30 ac
12-yr old planted pines,
frontage on Aucilla River &
Hwy 90, beautiful oaks, road
system. $5172/ac.
199+ac, Jefferson Co. 35
min. E of Tallahassee. Natural
upland pines & hardwoods. Full
of turkey & deer, ponds w/fish
& ducks. Power available.
$3250/ac.
11l+ac, Jefferson Co. 18-
20 yr old planted pines, 50 ac
hardwood bottom. Nice rolling
topography, 35 min to Tallahas-
see. Full of game near Aucilla
River. $5000/ac.

Rob Langford
850-556-7575
Many more investment opportu-
nities available in North Fl,
South GA, and Southeast AL.


_


FOR SALE
* OLDIE BUT GOODIE, 2
BDRM, 1 BTH, pine flooring,
fireplace insert, det. workshop
storage, 1/2 ac. lot, $100,000
* OLD FARMSTEAD, 50
Acres, $7500 p/a, some pines,
mostly pasture, isolated
* TWISTED & TWINED
GRAPEVINES, drape cen-
tury old oaks, 5.34 acres, very
secluded
SIS 19 NORTH L' ires
zone ^ ^OP chicle'
iraj\e, t .P ..g ae or clr,

* GAS & GROCERY, plus
manager's home, borders US 27,
potential for seafood market and
coin laundry
* AIRSTRIP, home and
hangar bordering 6000 ft. long
grass strip, fun place to live, no
pilots license required, $269,000
* TWO HOMES, 5 ac., hand-
icap ramps, decks, porches, must
be relative in order to keep 2nd
home (per assoc. rules), 1 mile
form headwaters of Aucilla
River, $234,000
* FIXXER .on US
90 djo OV, ello, 2 Bd,
1 Bid 2 $9.i ii

* CORN FED deer walking
around like yard dogs, 180 acres
+/-, mostly pines, thickets and
thistle, $4500 p/a, will divide,
seller financing


/\\\=-933-6363
All Realty Services
Big Bend -Florml
ONJU$IRMON
i11R
-*


I~rbOC~

SI~IGS!








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 16, 2007 PAGE 15


To Place Your Ad




997-3568
I


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...S9.00
Each Additional Line....$1.25
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


HELP WANTED
Cleaning service needs people in
Monticello area after 5 pm. 3
days a week part time work
must be able to pass a back
ground check. Only serious
minded inquires only. Call
Karen at 850-942-6200 or
850-926-7029.
2/7,9,14,16,21,23,28 c
Part time janitorial- Aucilla
Call 681-3148
RID 2/9, 14,16,21
Cox Auto Trader is currently
seeking drivers to deliver our
magazines in the Tallahassee
FL, Madison, FL and
surrounding areas. Computer
knowledge helpful, requires
reliable vehicle, good driving
record, valid drivers license &
insurance. One day a week -
Thursdays. Pick up magazines
in Madison. Call 386-590-1255
1/24,26,31,2/2,7,9,14,16,21,23,28
,3/2,c
AVON! Start the year with a
new career,, earn 50%, only $10
to start! 570-1499
R/D1/31,2/2,7,9,14,16,21,23,28,p
d
Cashier- Capital City Travel
Center. Experience necessary.
This is a Drug-Free Workplace.
322-6600, 997-3538
R/D 2/14,16,21,23c
Need cleaning assistant to clean
offices in the evening, in
Monticello. Please call
850-894-6254 or Fax
850-894-6224.
2/16,c




Stanley Home Products- Buy or
Sell or Hold a Fundraiser! Call
Lilly Mae Brumbley @
997-3339
R/D 2/16, 23 pd

SERVICES
Lightning will NOT strike if you
enter our door. We've tested
with the sinners we already have
here. Christ Episcopal Church,
three blocks N of the
courthouse. Sunday services at
8:30 and 11:00 AM. 997-4116
2/16,c
D & J Soft Wash- Brick, Siding,
Stucco, and More. Free
estimates and great work for a
low price. Owner operated,
850-210-3906.
R/D 2/16,21,23,28,pd
Marie's House Cleaning Service
Don't have time to clean like
you need. Reasonable Rates
reference's upon request call
850-445-5636 or 997-5940.
2/16,21,pd
I build sheds, decks, handicap
ramps, exterior carpentry work,
window/door replacement. Call
Bob 242-9342
R/D1/10,12,17,19,24,26,31,2/2,7,
9,14,16,21,23,28,3/2,7,9,14,16


SERVICES

If you have a child attending
FSU/FAMU high schools, and
carpooling is not working, for
an affordable fee, you have an
option. Call Freeman Davis
510-5162, 421-8060.
R/D/17,19,24,26,31,2/2,9,14,16,2
1,23,28pd
Childcare Services- infant to 3
years old. In my home. Call
997-5498 reasonably low prices.
11/1,TFN,c
Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
new menopausal products.
Jackson's drug store.
5/12 tfn
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn

Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quick responses.
6/22, tfn

FOUND
Greyhound- Dark color female
w/red collar on North Jefferson
Street. Call Marcie 997-2988
R/D 2/9, 14,16,21 n/c

FREE
Water Bed Frame only, no liner,
Queen size, golden oak w/lighted
head board. Perfect Condition.
556-4831
R/D 2/14,16n/c


GARAGE SALE
Royal Mini Storage 3 Unit Yard
Sale Hwy. 19 S. Sat. & Sun. 17th
& 18th 9:00 AM Until
2/16,pd
Yard Sale Fri. & Sat. 8 Until
3153 Waukeenah Hwy., Fax,
Laptop, Toys, Dishes & misc.
2/16,pd

AUTOMOTIVE
1996 Ford F350 Diesel Crewcab
No calls after 9:00 p.m. please
251-2237
1/10,tfn,nc
1996 Ford Ranger XLT
Supercab 2 wd 4.0 V6 127K AC
AT Toolbox. Needs some minor
work, but driveable now. $3,000
251-0763 8am 8pm
R/D 9/27,tfn ,nc

FOR SALE
Specialized feed for Alpacas &
Lamas. Call. Marcy
850-421-2403
R/D 2/9,14,16,21,23,28 3/2,7
For Sale You Move Merritt 54 x


Quiet, Private Living In Downtown Monticello!
Riley Palmer Built in 06, 3 BR/2 BA, 1440 sq ft, on N. Cherry
Court, brick & Hardie board exterior, oversized one car
garage, large tiled kitchen, raised panel cabinets, solid surface
counters, wood floors, vaulted living room ceiling w/crown
molding, screened back porch, prewired for security and data.

$229,500 Ken Foster Palmer Properties 544-5040






RETAIL ASSISTANT MANAGER
MONTICELLO, FL
FRED'S, a retail discount chain with locations throughout
the mid-South, continues to expand, offering excellent
opportunities for career oriented individuals who are
interested in Retail Management.
Offering:
Annual salary starting at $23,660
Competitive Benefits
401(k) Retirement Plan
MEDICAL AND DENTAL INSURANCE
Individual Training
The successful candidate will have:
2 YEARS RETAIL EXPERIENCE
Interested candidates should send their resumes or
letter of qualifications to :
FAX # 901-202-7539
E-MAIL gpricer@fredsinc.com


24 DW 3-BDR. 2-BTH
w/fireplace. 997-3318 or
544-7785 no calls after 9:00 pm
please.
2-16,TFN,nc
Mobile Home For Sale- 1991
Destiny double wide, metal roof,
1672 sq.ft., 4Br, 2 full bath,
fireplace, good condition.
Available MAY/JUNE Price
$9,500. You pay to move.
997-1276 or 242-9248
R/D 2/14,16,pd
Life Gear workout walker by
Brenda DyGraf. Like new
condition. Workout video
included. Asking $75.00
Call 997-2893
R/D 2/14,16 pd

$150 Queen Pillow-top Mattress
Set. New in Plastic with
warranty. 850-222-7783
12/1,tfn,c
SOLID WOOD Cherry sleigh
bed- BRAND NEW in box,
$250. (850) 545-7112
12/l,tfn,c
LEATHER SOFA &
LOVESEAT. NEW, lifetime
warranty, sacrifice $795.00. (can
deliver). (850) 425-8374
12/1,tfn,c
SOLID WOOD DINETTE SET,
table & 4 chairs- $149.00 NEW
IN BOX (850) 222-9879
12/1,tfn,c
BEDROOM: New complete 6
piece set still boxed, $599, can
deliver. (850) 222-7783
12/1,tfn,c


4 BR, 2 BA $750.00 Month
Call 251-7708
2/9,14,16,21,c
Spacious 2/1 and 1/1 apts, also
office space, near Monticello
center. Section 8 OK Call
850-491-8447
1/24,tfn,c
Jefferson Place Apts., 1 & 2 BR,
HUD Vouchers Accepted 1468
S. Waukeenah St. Office 300,
Monticello. 997-6964. "This
institution is an Equal
Opportunity Provider and
Employer".
9/6,tfn, c

REAL QSTA1^ XT
House- 3 Bedroom, 2 /2 Bath, in
ground pool, on 6 fenced acres.
1 '/2 miles from Monticello City
limits, on Old Lloyd Road. Call
after 5 pm 997-2063, 322-3767.
R/D 2/16,21,23,28,pd
Newly Renovated 2 BD/ 1 Bath
$69,900 Info. Call 212-3142
R/D 2/14,26,21,23,28,pd

CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots,
Land! We Make
Mortgage Loans,
Reverse Mortgages!
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc
878-3957


S-=A pPriced for quick sale!
Sellers Motivated!
343 Attatulga Road,
C Lamont Area
Custom 2004 Home on
5.66 acres. All brick,
built in 2004, 3 BR/2
BA split plan, 2 car
garage. Hardwood,
tile & carpet flooring.
All appliances
Dianne Spooner, Broker, Hill Spooner & included. Like new.
Company Inc. 850-508-1846 Move-in-ready.
$279,000

MONTICELLO'S PECAN HILL
ONE DAY SALE EVENT
FEB. 17th 10 am 5 pm
20 100' x 110' building lots
$50,000 Each (W/infrastructure)
1st five sold ... $4000 rebate
Next 15 sold ... $2500 rebate
2 AWESOME MODELS OPEN
Stuart $192,400 Curtis $189,900*
*Hospice Fundraiser Lender on site
VIRGINIA G. BLOW
850.509.1844
COLDWELL BANKER
KELLY & KELLY PROPERTIES
EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED



ADVANCED



SALES
RESIDENTIAL/COMMERCIAL
MFG.HMs. WrITH LAND
ACREAGE/LOTS
MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE -
No FEE TO LIST -
FREE MARKET ANALYSES -
YOU NAME IT, WE'LL FIND IT!
READY TO SELL IT, IT'S SOLD!
1 50 W. WASHINGTON STREET
(IN -rHE COURT HOUSE CIRCLE)
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
CALL US OR STOP BY TODAY
850-997-1691






Exeiec inWr


.......... Eu..... EUEk~rrx

Housing Vouchers

*, We accept all vouchers "
I1 2/2 $615 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 $50 dep.

:i Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571
1im-i --- ll -- _-lll-iA


--w


REALTOR


(850) 997-4340


Property Manaqement Services!!!
Great Rentals
2/1 1/2 bath mobile home east of
town on 5 acres $500/month


S Wooded Tract 2.09 hillside acres east
of town on graded County Road $30,400

Just Listed!! 3 bedroom 2 bath delightful log
cabin with front and back screened porches,
board fence pasture, double carport and out
building on 4.07 acres $385,000

Lloyd Acres on a wooded hillside a 3 bedroom
2 bath modular home with oak floors, fireplace
and lots of very nice extras including shop for
$87,500

Historic Budd House built ca 1882 by commu-
nity leader of the day for his family. Lovely wood
work, high ceilings, spacious rooms, grand fire-
places, marvelous porches, currently 4 bedrooms
and 2 baths $355,000

Waterfront Home!! Like New, roomy, 3 bed-
room 2 bath home with big carport, nice Shed with
5 acres on very nice lake near 1-10 and US 19
$385,000 See it at www.TimPeary.com

Amazing Buy!!! Mixed Use Property 12
plus partially cleared acres on US 19 south land
use designation permits 4 houses per acre near
Dennis' Trading post only $36,500 per acre

New Listinq Contract Pending 13.29 acres
some wooded some open $5,000 per acre

Terrific Location 3 bedroom 2 bath doublewide
with fireplace, big porch, garage, shed, above
ground pool, with big trees, fence paddocks, on
county maintained paved Cherry Tree Lane now
$127,500

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly


wooded acres Only $36,500


Pasture and Pecans 5-10 lovely acres on
paved road $15,500 per adre Very nice property,
good deed restrictions

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Great Opportunity!!! Comfortable 4 bedroom
3 bath home on five fenced acres with guest cot-
tage w/bath, 2 car garage, big shop, pasture 100
pecan trees and a nice pool Only $365,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Wooded Acreaqe 5.35 acres on private road
off Paul Thompson Road $128,500

Waukeenah Highway 27.99 acres good
home site fenced pasture $545,000

Aucilla Shores 5 level wooded acres $75,000

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath double-
wide with nice deck, fenced yard on 1 acre
$73,500

Investment Property Choice lot on the
Ecofina River 20 minutes to the Gulf, State
property on 3 sides, septic tank on property,
paved road only $195,000



Realtor Tim Peary

850-997-4340
See all our listings at
www.TimPeary.com

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!
II p p p a P~ t~ afI L L'P' L


qmrwrq


NW








PAGE 16, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 16, 2007


Citizens Urged To Prepare


For Thunderstorms


Chris Floyd, emergency
services director of the Capi-
tal Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross, stresses
the importance of resi-
dents being prepared for se-
vere thunderstorms and
lightning.
Thunderstorm are our most
common experience of severe
weather. The typical thunder-
storm is 15 miles in diameter
and lasts an average of 30
minutes. Despite their small
size, thunderstorms are dan-
gerous.
Each thunderstorm produces
lightning, which kills more
people each year than torna-
dos, and heavy rain from
thunderstorms can result in
flash flooding.
Strong winds, hail, and tor-
nadoes are also dangers asso-
ciated with some
thunderstorms.
Lightning occurs with all
thunderstorms. It averages 93
deaths and 300 injuries year.
It also cause several hundred
million dollars in damage to
property and forests annually
Flash floods and general
flooding cause some 140 fa-
talities each year. Most flash


flood deaths occur at night
when citizens become trapped
in automobiles.
Straight-line winds are re-
sponsible for most wind dam-
age associated with
thunderstorm
Winds can exceed 100 mph.
One type of straight-line wind
that can cause extreme dam-
age is a downburst, a small
area of rapidly descending air
beneath a thunderstorm.
Downbursts can reach speeds
equal to that of a strong tor-
nado and can be extremely
dangerous to aviation.
Hail causes nearly $1 bil-
lion in damage to property
and crops annually. Large
hail stones can fall at speeds
faster than 100 mph. The
costliest US hail storm oc-
curred in Denver, CO, in July
1990. The total damage was
$625 million.
Lightning is perhaps the
most spectacular phenomenon
associated with thunderstorms
Most lightning deaths and in-
juries occur when people are
caught "outdoors, most often
in the summer months and
during the afternoon and early
evening.


When conditions are fa-
vorable for severe weather to
develop, a severe thunder-
storm watch is issued.
When severe weather has
been reported by spotters or
indicated by radar, a severe
thunderstorm warning is is-
sued.
Warnings indicate imminent
danger to life and property to
those in the-path of the storm.
Before the storm:
*Check weather forecasts
before leaving for extended
periods outdoors.
*Watch for signs of ap-
proaching storms.
*Postpone outdoor activities
if thunderstorms are
imminent. .
When a thunderstorm ap-
proaches:
*Remember, if you hear


thunder, you are close enough
to the to the storm to be
struck by lightning. Go to
safe shelter immediately.
*Move to a sturdy building
or car. Do not take shelter in
small sheds, under isolated
trees, or in convertible auto-
mobiles.
*Get out of boats and stay
away from water.
*Avoid using the telephone
or any other electrical appli-
ances. Use the phone only in
an emergency.
*Do not take a bath or
shower.
*Turn off air conditioners.
*Get to higher ground if
flooding is possible. Aban-
don cars and climb to higher
ground.
If caught outdoors and no
shelter is nearby:
*Find a low spot away from
trees, fences and poles. Make
*If you are in the woods,
take shelter under smaller
trees.
*If you feel your skin tingle


or your hair stand on end,
squat low to the ground on
the balls of your feet.
Place your hands on your
knees with your head between
them. Make yourself the
smallest target possible to
minimize your contact with
the ground.


MDA covers America with the
most complete range of
services for people affected
by neuromuscular diseases.
IMW
Muscular Dystrophy Association
Jerry Lewis, National Chairman
1-800-572-1717


School Menu
Monday
HOLIDAY
Tuesday
Corn Dog, Potato Wedges,
Fruit Choices, Orange Juice,
Milk
Wednesday
EARLY RELEASE
MANAGER'S CHOICE
Thursday
Salisbury Steak, Creamed Po-
tatoes, Mixed Vegetables,
Fruit, Hot Roll, Milk
Friday
Taco Meat over Chips,
Lettuce, Tomato, Cheese, Sour
Cream, Salsa, Whole Kernel
Corn, Fruit Choices, Oatmeal
Muffin Square, Milk


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