Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00178
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: February 14, 2007
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00178
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text








Tax
Credit
Overlooked

Editorial, Page 4


JCHS TO HOSt
Will Host Talent,
Fashion Show

Story, Page 6

Io o


Youth Soccer
Program Wraps
Up At Park

Story, Photo, Page 8


Clean up
At Park
Work Of Many,

Story, Photos,Page 14


Wednesday Morning


Monticello


139TH YEAR NO. 12.50 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


3wS
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14,2007


Officials




Identify




Priorities


ROAD CREWS from Anderson-Columbia Construction
Company began improvement work on Old Lloyd Road
this week. The county secured a $2.2 million grant
from the Department of Transportation for the widening


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

City officials unhappy with
a perceived lack of progress on
the water meter repair and re-
placement project vented their


frustration last week.
The venting followed the re-
port from City Council mem-
bers Tom Vogelgesang and
Luther Pickels that their recent
committee workshop had pro-
duced little, given the many
meters that yet remained to be


MAYOR JULIE CONLEY, among other city officials,.is
ready to pursue sanctions to get the water meter situa-
tion resolved. (News Photo)


and resurfacing of the road from US 90 on the north
end to SR-59 on the southwestern end in Lloyd. The
project is expected to take several months. County offi-
cials have pursued this project for years. (News Photo)
*.- .


County Officials Eye Impact


Charges For Roads,


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

With the fire and ambulance
impact fees more than a year
in place and doing relatively
well, commissioners are once
:again eyeing the possibility of
implementing other impact
fees.


Specifically, Commissioner
Skeet Joyner suggested re-
cently that the board again
consider the implementation of
a transportation impact fee.
Joyner suggested that the
board contact the firm that
helped the county craft its fire
and ambulance impact fees
and explore the feasibility of a
transportation impact fee.


Monies raised from such a
fee, which would only apply to
new developments, would help
the county finance road im-
provement projects necessi-
tated by growth.
"We need to be ahead of the
curve as we were with the fire
and ambulance impact fees,"
Joyner said, noting that three
major subdivisions are pres-


Policing
ently going up within close
proximity of each other in his
district alone.
"I'd like to get serious about
the transportation impact fee
so that we're not behind when
we get a growth boom," he
said.
Commissioner Jerry Sutphin
recommended that the board
might also want to explore a
law-enforcement impact fee,
given that growth was putting
a burden on the Sheriffs De-
partment.
It's not the first time that
commissioners have discussed
the imposition of transporta-
tion and law-enforcement im-
pact fees. The consideration, in
fact, is one that has cropped up
periodically since the imposi-
tion of the fire and ambulance
impact fees in June 2005.
What's more, commissioners
noted in their recent discussion
that 2007 was the year for re-
evaluation of the fire and am-
bulance impact fees, to deter-
mine if these are adequate or
(See Impact, Page 2)


repaired or replaced.
"We really didn't. accomplish
anything, because the meters
are still not fixed," Pickels
said.
Adding to the council mem-
bers' frustration, City Clerk
Emily Anderson reported that
city crews had yet to inspect
the water meters in two of five
books, or corresponding water
districts.
Two weeks earlier, when the
committee met with City Su-
perintendent Don Anderson,
three of the five books re-
mained to be checked. The
committee at that time in-
structed Anderson to have the
remaining three books checked
by Tuesday.
Anderson was not present at
Tuesday night's meeting. That,
however, did not stop the
council members from voicing
their frustration.
Vogelgesang suggested that
the council possibly would
have to make the repair and re-
placement of the water meters
a mandate.
"It just absolutely has to be
made a priority," Vogelgesang
said.
Mayor Julie Conley agreed.
(See Frustration, Page 2)


Works Add

To Millions

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

City and county officials
have identified the list of prior-
ity projects for which they will
seek state funding in the com-
ing legislative session.
For the county, the four pri-
ority projects, in order of rank-
ing, are: continuation of
construction on the agricultural
and community center; repair
or replacement of a function-
ally obsolete bridge; extension
of water, sewer, and roads to
the industrial park; and com-
pletion of phase one of the en-
gineering design for the
countywide sewer system.
For the city, the two priority
projects, are: conversion of the
existing wastewater facility for
restricted reuse; and extension
of potable water mains.
Projects identified as being
of continuing high priority are:
completion of a government
center complex, construction
of an emergency operations
center (EOC), purchase of the
headwaters of the Wacissa
River, creation of a prisoner
work camp at Jefferson Cor-
rectional Institution (JCI), and
the continued funding of fis-
cally constrained counties.
.County officials are seeking
$1,750,000 for construction of
a county agricultural and com-
munity center to go near the
horse arena that is soon slated
to go up west of town on the
former site of the UF research
station.
The facility will house the
offices of county, state and
federal agencies serving the
agricultural community. The


facility will also serve for ex-
hibitions, demonstrations,
trade shows and other agricul-
tural related activities.

Officials are looking for
$800,000 from the state (the
county will contribute
$100,000) for the repair or re-
placement of a bridge on CR-
142, also known as Lake
Road.
The 52-year-old bridge is
one of 18 bridges identified as
needing repair or replacement
in the county. Officials call the
condition of the bridge a criti-
cal safety issue, saying the
structure's deck is sagging and
the guard rails are substandard.
"The closure of this bridge
through condemnation will
cause a 33-mile detour (66
miles round trip) for eastbound
traffic to county schools and
employment, and a 17-mile
(34 miles round trip) detour
westbound," officials say.
"The detours would force traf-
fic onto dirt roads, posing ad-
ditional safety issues,
especially in inclement
weather."
County officials are seeking
$325,000 in state funding (the
county will kick in another
$75,000) for infrastructure and
utilities upgrades at the indus-
trial park.
"The 56-acre industrial park
is one of the county's best tools
for economic development,"
states the official line. "The
County Commission can pro-
vide long-term leases and
other options to prospective
clients. However, the park has
specific needs that must be met
to be competitive ... Complete
infrastructures -- including ex-
tended water, sewer and roads
-- is necessary to attract busi-
nesses and industrial partner
tenants."
(See Priority, Page 2)


COUNTY OFFICIALS have set priority projects for the coming legislative session and
are also looking at the feasibility of implementing additional impact fees to deal with
expected growth. From left, Commissioners Danny Monroe, Skeet Joyner and Junior
Tuten. (News Photo)


City Council Vents Frustration

Over Slow Progress On Meters


I


1 A A. A--.,











Retired Educators Exceed


Their Goal In Book


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Re--
tired Educators exceeded
their goal in the number of
books they collected in their
recent drive.
The goal was to solicit do-
nations of 315 books, and the
group collected some 522.
Spokesperson Mary Madi-
son reports that the books


Priority
(Continued From Page 1)
Further states the official lit-
erature: "This project will give
Jefferson County a first-class
industrial park to market
throughout the Southeast. It
will provide the springboard to
attract new businesses to the
state... The economic impact
of new jobs and sellable com-
modities will be huge."
Priority number four for the
county is the countywide
sewer system. County officials
are seeking $400,000 from the
state for an engineering design
study, with the county contrib-
uting $60,000. A $30,000 fea-
sibility study has already been
completed.
"This project deals with en-
vironmental issues. of septic
tanks and poor water quality in
the Lloyd area, commercial de-
velopment in the vicinity of I-
10 interchange #217 and US
27, and growth management
issues incumbent with zoning
and densities necessary to pro-
vide sewer and water availabil-
ity," states the official
literature.. .. .


Projects
For the city, the number one
priority is the water reuse pro-
ject, for which the city already
has $1,750,000 committed and
for which it is seeking an addi-
tional $500,000 from the state.
Total cost of the project is pro-
jected to be $2,250,000.
The city wants to construct a
facility that assists in the con-
version of its existing waste-
water treatment plant into a
"restricted access" reuse facil-
ity. Among the project's bene-
fits, according to officials:
conservation of water, devel-
opment of alternate water sup-
ply sources, and water quality
improvement.
Priority No. 2 for the city is
funding for the extension of
the potable water main along
US 19 North, eliminating four
private water systems in the
process. This request is for
$750,000.
The benefits of the extension,
according to city officials: It
will conserve water, consoli-
date wells, improve water
quality ahd reduce th'e poten-
tial-ofpublic health risks.


Cited
Additionally, under the head-
ing of "Ongoing Projects of
High Priority", the county is
seeking, among other funding:
$1,000,000 for acquisition of
the headwaters of the Wacissa
River; a yet-to-be-determined
amount for the construction of
a prisoner work camp at JCI;
and the continuation of the an-
nual $600,000 that was allo-
cated to the county last year
for a 10-year period as a fis-
cally constrained county.

Not on the list of priorities
but sure to be a major topic of
discussion when local officials
meet with legislators is Gov.
Crist's proposed property tax
reductions. The governor is
proposing a doubling of the
homestead exemption and a
three-percent cap on busi-
nesses' property taxes, among
other changes.
The governor's proposed
measures, if approved, will
come close to bankrupting
small counties, local officials
are already saying.


Impact Fees For Road, Policing
(Continued From Page 1) new construction and are due compensatory tool that allows
require adjusting because of at the time that the building local governments to recoup a
changed conditions. permit is pulled, portion of the costs that they
incur to provide the additional
The impact fees for fire and By definition, impact fees services demanded by an in-
ambulance are $220.04 and are one-time charges levied creasing population.
$123.72 respectively for every against new construction -- Impact fees, moreover, are
new residential unit. The im- both residential and commer- considered politically
pact fees for commercial, in- cial -- to help governments pay palatable, since they princi-
dustrial and institutional struc- for increased service demands pally affect people who are not
tures are figured on a per foot- caused by growth. yet part of the community and
age basis. so can't take out their outrage
Expert testimony attests to on current officer holders.
By law, monies collected the actual and potential de- It is not correct to think that
from impact fees must be kept mands that new construction impact fees never affect cur-
in separate accounts and can imposes on government serv- rent residents, however. In
only be used for capital im- ices, as well as adding to traf- fact, current residents who
provement projects associated fic congestion and increasing build new houses or add to
with growth, wear and tear on roads. their. existing houses are sub-
Impact fees apply only to Impact fees, as such, are a ject to the fees.


were beautifully wrapped, and
labeled according to reading
levels.
They were then turned
over to Gladys Roann for dis-
tribution.
Members collecting the
books included: Willard
Barnhart, Dorothy Barnhart,
Flossie Byrd, Margaret Jones,
Flossie Buggs, Maggie
Stokes, Martha Hall, Beatrice
Sloan.
Josephine Perry, Louisa


Library To Offer

Computer Classes


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Library will offer Digi-
tal Bridge Computer Classes
10 a.m. 12 p.m. beginning
Feb. 8 through Feb. 28.
Class #1- Beginning Com-
puters will meet every Tues-
day and Wednesday during
the weeks of Feb. 13 28.
This class is designed for
users with little or no prior
computer experience.
Participants will learn about
the basic computer hardware
such as the CPU, keyboard,
mouse, printers, scanners, and
other peripheral devices.

Participants will also learn
how to perform basic com-
puter operations, including
using the mouse, launching
programs, manipulating Win-
dows, working with the desk-
top, and saving files.
Class #2- Internet Basics
will meet every Thursday and
Friday during the weeks of
Feb. 8 -23.
This is an introductory class
on navigating the Interneti
SParticipants will learn how
the Internet works, learn to
*use Microsoft Internet Ex-
plorer 7.0 and Mozilla
Firefox, and get an introduc-
tion to basic search tech-
niques.
In addition, participants will
learn how to open an e-mail
account using yahoo Mail,
send, save e-mail messages,
and set up an address book.
Finally, participants will
learn how to increase their
searching proficiency on the
Internet and get the results
they are looking for.
A prerequisite for these
classes is that the students
must be able to use a mouse,
and only serious applicants
need sign up for classes.
Computer classes are free to
JCPL card holders. Cards
may be applied for at the cir-


culation desk.
A $10 fee per class will be
charged for supplies and lit-
erature.
Participants who are already
attending classes will be
given preference to other
classes.
Space is limited to 10 par-
ticipants per class. Contact
Angela Scott at 342-0205 or
jcplearn@jefferson.lib.fl.us

JCHS/HMS
FCAT Blitz
Saturday
FCAT Blitz Prep will be
held 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.,
Saturday, at Jefferson County
High/Howard Middle School.
Bus transportation and lunch
will be provided for students
who attend.
Students who dornot ride the
bus will need to be picked up
by parents promptly at 1 p.m.


Drive
Larry, Lillia Seabrooks,
Mathye McCloud, Mary
Madison, Emma Stokes, Phe-
nah Warmack, Willa Seab-
rooks, Carolyn White, Syble
Lynch, Elias "Jim" Norton,
-Henry Mitchell, Judy Jones,
Elzora Saunders, and the
Simpkins, Dora, Terry, and
Gail.
During a recent meeting of
the educators JES Principal
Kay Collins and county native
Dr. May O. Clemons were
special guests.
Collins was presented with
a wall plaque for outstanding
performance in leading teach-
ers, staff and students in rais-
ing the school'average.
Following her remarks, the
group sang a song dedicated
to her, led by Jo Perry.
Clemons was proud to ac-
knowledge that she is a How-
ard Academy graduate, and
has published a book entitled,
"Florida's Forgotten Legacy-
Segregated Black Secondary
Schools."
She gave remarks and
signed available books. Pro-
ceeds will go toward scholar-
ships.
Retired individuals inter-
ested in joining the JCREA
group may contact any mem-
ber, or join them at their next
monthly meeting, 10 a.m.,
March 13 at Greater Fellow-
ship MB Church, located at
690 Cypress St.


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Frustration is Vented Ovc
(Continued From Page 1) man Brian Hayes put it.
"It seems like it doesn't mat- "It is unacceptable," Conley
ter that we say it has to be said.
: A t, :..


done," Conley said. 31X
weeks go by and it doesn't get
done and we don't do anything
about it."
Others voiced similar frustra-
tion. They pointed out that the
council had authorized over-
time for the water department
to accomplish the task; but still
the job wasn't getting done,
they said.

Yet when they offered to
hire an outside contractor or
additional city personnel to
help get the work done, Ander-
son declined the offers for one
reason or another, they said.

"It's not our job to do the
work," Conley said. "We pro-
vide the tools. But the job is
still not getting done. I'd like to
say, do this by such and such a
day or there will be sanctions."
"It's unacceptable," Council-


Hayes suggested that the
council should take the bull by
the horns and hire an outside
contractor.
"An option is to hire ABC
contractor out of Tallahassee
to do it," Hayes said.
"I agree," Vogelgesang said.
"We need a time dated plan."
Pickels suggested that per-
haps it was time to bring in
Anderson and the entire water
department and talk the issue
out.
"Let them tell us why they
can't do it," Pickels said.
The council agreed that their
Feb. 20 workshop will be dedi-
cated to resolving the issues of
the water meters and
personnel.
The reason that city officials
are anxious to get the water
meter situation under control is
that they can't proceed with the
formulation of a new rate


Br Meters
structure until all the meters
are working properly.
City officials implemented a
new rate structure in Decem-
ber, but had to rescind it two
months later because of multi-
ple problems and the public
outcry. Among the more glar-
ing technical problems to sur-
face was the malfunction of
the water meters.

Ever since, officials have
been trying to get city crews to
replace or repair the malfunc-
tioning water meters so that
the rate structure issue can be
revisited.
Exacerbating the situation,
officials prepared the budget
based on expected revenues
from the new, higher rates.
Absent the implementation of
those new rates, however,
council members worry that
the city will soon face a budget
shortfall.
The Feb. 20 workshop is
scheduled for 4 p.m. in the
council chamber at City Hall.


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tip #16

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Providing an affordable health plan that
emphasizes preventive care can help.

If you do not currently offer your employees health
benefits, you may be eligible for a 40% premium savings
for Capital Health Plan coverage through the Capital
Health Partnership.


Learn more. Find out if your small business qualifies by
calling 523-7333 or go to:
www.capitalhealthpartnership.com.


| Capital

Health

Partnership


IAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 14, 2007


W.W. (BILL) Gunnels, Jr., executive vice-president and community executive for Capi-
tal City Bank Foundation, presents a check for $1,000 to Bobbie Krebs, director of
the local Senior Center, on behalf of the Foundation (News Photo)


YOU HOME CAN AUSWIEAS ANYGEEHUS ASESASACR
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 14, 2007 PAGE 3


Bird Watchers Tour


Dixie Plantation


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Early Saturday morning
some 23 local and out of town
bird watchers met at the Dixie
Plantation for a wagon tour of
the estate and view of its
feathered friends.
Bird Guide and Ornitholo-
gist Marvin Collins was on
hand to guide the tour, an-
swering questions and point-
ing out particular birds, and a
deer or two along the way.
Driver Pettis "Toot" Bright
pulled the wagon to all the
"good" spots with the very
best view of birds, trees, and
wildlife.
Toot has been with the
Plantation going on 47 years.
He says that he pulls the
wagon for many tour groups,


and enjoys talking with the
visit ors.
About an hour into the tour,
the wagon kicked up a flock
of 20 wild turkeys, to the ex-
citement of the bird watchers.
Towards the end of the ride
Toot took the wagon full of
onlookers up to the main
house, and told a little about
it's history and the owner, as
he remembered it.
After the tour ended, many
in the group had decided to
carpool to the Greenville area
where they would attempt a
search for Sand Hill Cranes.
This excursion was planned
by the County Tourist Devel-
opment Board.
Anyone interested in joining
upcoming tours and adven-
tures with this group are en-
couraged to contact Merry
Ann Frisby at 997-4212.


MY NAME is Sporty. I am a three year old, small breed
longhaired dog, neutered, and have all my shots.
Please help me find a good home. (News Photo)


THIS TRIO stopped to chat before beginning the bird watching tour Saturday at Dixie
Plantation. From left, Driver "Toot" Bright, Organizer Merry Ann Frisby, and Guide
Marvin Collins. (News Photo)



Tickets Going Fast For


Bless The Beast Saturday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Tickets are still available for
the Humane Society Bless the
Beast fundraiser, 6 p.m., Sat-
urday, at the Opera House.
Tickets are $25 each and,
include heavy hours
d'oeurvres. A cash bar will be
available.'
A homemade cake auction
is planned, along with the an-
nual miscellaneous auction,
with Charlie Ward as auc-
tioneer.
Among items to be auc-
tioned are: art and collector'
pieces, trips and vacations, lo-'
cal art work, furniture, and'
tickets for events and concerts


at the Moon in Tallahassee.
Fresh flowers and table
cloths have been donated by
Ericka Imbrunone, owner of
Gelling's arid Brenda Car-
swell of the Moon.
Leroy Milligan-of Shell
Oyster Bar in Tallahassee
again this year has donated
the seafood for the
fundraiser.

The menu will include fried
shrimp, oyster and grouper
fingers with cocktail sauce
and tarter sauce, sliced beef
tenderloin served with Parker.
house rolls and horseradish
sauce, fresh fruit skewers
served with cream cheese dip,
hot Charleston cheese dip


topped with bacon and chives
served with wheat crackers,
fried green tomato BLT
crostini with herb
mayonnaise, goat cheese with
roasted red bell pepper and
asparagus crostini, chicken
salad and egg salad sandwich
fingers donated by the
Hilltop, Blue Belle continen-
tal caramel ribbon, chocolate
and cherry ice cream, donated
by .Blue Belle, and hand made
brownie bites made by An-
gela Henderson,
Capital City DJ has donated
the DJ and entertainment for'
the evening.
For further information, or
to purchase a ticket, contact
Carswell at 997-4000.


Local Drummer At Super Bowl With FAMU 100


New GIS

Maps Help

Police

The Monticello Police De-
partment (MPD) and the
County Property Appraiser's
Office have joined forces to
improve the delivery of police
services and make the City a
safer place to live and work.
Until recently, MPD commu-
nications staff had to rely on
printed maps to locate streets
and intersections.
Chief David Frisby and
Property Appraiser David
Ward realized that rapid
growth of the City would soon
-make printed maps
impractical.
The Property Appraiser's
Office had already mapped the
city using GIS technology.
Johnnie Abron, GIS Coordi-
nator, for the County, came to
the Police Station and installed
electronic, maps 'on. specified
departmental computers, and
trained staff to use the elec-
tronic maps.
When a call comes into
MPD, the communication offi-
cer now clicks a button and
types in the street name, and
the screen displays. the
location.
The officer can quickly de-
termine if the location is in the
City.
The electronic map also as-
sists the officer with directions
and establishing, perimeters,
should the need arise.
Through inter departmental
cooperation, this new service
is being provide at no addi-
tional expense.
City Police and the Property
Appraiser's Office recognize
the Sheriffs Department for
its continuing contributions.
The GIS road centerline
identification project was
funded through a grant form
the Sheriffs Department and
the Emergency 911
Operations:


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer ....

Quantez "QB" Burke, a
2006 graduate of Jefferson
County High School, was one
of the FAMU Marching 100
who attended the Super Bowl
in Miami, and performed with
Prince during the half time
show.
"It was a thrilling experi-
ence that I'll always remem-
ber," said Burke. "Something
I'll one day tell my kids, and
they will someday tell their
kids," Burke said.
He said that the reality of
performing in the Super Bowl
half time show didn't really
hit the Marching 100 until
they actually stepped on the
field, and they were on cam-
era.
"We knew we had a job to
do and we had to get it done
right. Getting on that field,
knowing that the entire world
practically comes to a halt and
watches the Super Bowl half
time show, we knew we had
to stay focused" said Burke
"It kind of makes you feel
important, just like a
celebrity, and that's how they
treated us."
Burke said that on Super
Bowl day, limo after limo
came by, dropping off impor-
tant people.
He noted that when he
stepped on the field, he began
to feel like he had butterflies,
but they were soon gone.
"I was just so excited, a kid
from a small town like Monti-
cello, standing here, on Bowl
field, realizing that at my age,
not many people have that op-
portunity," he said.
"When we got to the field, I
looked around and I was able
to see Dan Marino, Kanyea
West and a couple of basket-


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ball players, before they took
us in the back to start getting
ready for the show, but I
heard that everyone big was
there."
It rained during the entire
game and throughout the half
time show, and when Prince
began to sing, "Purple Rain",
it began to pour.
"Playing our instruments
and performing our routine in
the rain is nothing new for us,
but our uniforms were getting
heavy with water and I was
'getting a little nervous be-
cause of the lights and power
packs we were wearing in our
uniforms.
"I was afraid 1 might get
burned" said Burke. "Some
of us did get bitten by elec-
tricity, but it was nothing ma-
jor." ,
Burke plays the tenor drum
and has since playing since he
has about four or five.
"Ever since I could pick up
drum sticks, I played the


drums:.I: always dreamed of:
plVj,iigi iih the,- Marchingli
100, ...
"Everyone always encour-
aged me. Now they tell me I
have to encourage younger
people to reach fot their im-
possible dreams too."
He said his parents were so
proud of him and his accom-
plishments, especially, his
mother.
"Not only for performing in
the Super Bowl, but for being
the first person in our family
to ever go to college," he
added.
SPrince decided that he.
wanted the FAMU Marching
100 in his half time show
when he saw some' of them
performing in the Grammies.
"We had a routine worked
out, but when he saw it, he
didn't like it and made. us
change it, so we practice eve-';.
ryday for two weeks 7:30 un-.,
til 11 a.m. and 3:35 until .6'.*
p.m., reworking the routine, to
what he wanted and it took us
that two weeks to get it down
pat."
(The Marching 100 pre-
pared a show of the type for
which they are known, and
Prince reportedly wanted
more of a stage band type of
performance.)
Burke hopes there will be
other opportunities in the fu-
ture for him to venture to the
Super Bowl with the March-
ing 100, but realizes that


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lnothliligi. will ever be able to
top. hs, first appearance there..,
"What I thij n I find most
memorable is that half time
show itself," said Burke. "I'll
always be able to do the rou-
tine;,nbw and hear the music
and see and feel the moves."
Burke who is majoring in
music, aspires to become a di-
rector of music. He is.the son
of Rhonda and Scottie Brock-
man of Monticello.


NOTICE OF ROAD'

". "CLOSURE
Beginning Mon. Feb. 5th Ebenezer
Rd. in Jefferson Co. Florida will be closed
for a period of 45 days for Bridge
Replacement.
Storm Reconstruction Services, Inc.


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should maximize your IRA contribution every year. Fortunately, you still
have time to make your 2006 IRA contribution before the April 17 deadline.
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Edward Jones IRA and begin receiving the face-to-face advice you deserve.
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850-997-2572

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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 14, 2007


Monticello News
(ISSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
p Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly Ex-
cept for the weeks of July 4th, Thanksgiving, Christmas,
& New Years. Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post
Office. Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net





Health Savings


Accounts Grow


A growing number of con-
sumers believe Health Savings
Accounts-- also known as
HSAs-- offer the right pre-
scription for comprehensive
health coverage.
A recent survey of 1,000
Americans suggests potential
growth for HSAs, providing
more Americans become
aware of the new accounts.
Established by the federal
government in 2003, HSAs
make it possible for an adult
who is already covered by a
high deductible insurance ac-
count to save for qualified
medical and retiree health ex-
penses. Money contributed to
an HSA account is saved on a
pt-etax basis.
SAccording to the U.S. Treas-
ury Department, money con-
tributed to an HSA belongs to
the account holder and is com-
pletely portable. Funds in the
account can .grow tax-free
through in vestment earnings,
just like an IRA.
Funds distributed from the
HSA are not taxed if they are
used to pay qualified medical
expenses.
Because an HSA may re-
quire time to grow to pay out-


of-pocket expenses, consumers
will sometimes turn to other
types of insurance to supple-
ment as HSA.
For some, voluntary insur-
ance policies are the, missing
piece in their coverage. Those
products, can help strengthen
primary health plans by pro-
viding cash benefits directly to
the policyholder to cover out-
of-pocket costs such as de-
ductibles and loss of earning
power.
HSA-compatible products
benefit a consumer in a num-
ber of ways such as:
Alleviating concerns that
the HSA may not have enough
money to cover out-of-pocket
expenses such as' 'deductibles,
co-payments and-other costs
Giving the policyholder the
option of not dipping into the
HSA, thereby maximizing its
benefits and allowing. the ac-
count to grow for future needs
Providing money that is
paid directly to the policy-
holder, enabling'him or her to
choose how best to use it (e.g.,
living expenses such as mort-
gage, etc.)
Improving employer rela-
tions and retention.


From Our Files


U:j


Campa

We are well in to the Presi-
dential Sweepstakes with some
folks announcing they are run-
ning and others forming "ex-
ploratory committees" to de-
termine if they should run.
Truth is, this is kind of like a
dance with lots of moving and
swaying.
I always chuckle when
would-be candidates say they
haven't made up their minds
yet. That's on Thursday and
then they announce on Friday.
Of course, they've already
traveled the country making
contacts and getting pledges of
financial support and may
have even hired some cam-
paign staff members. '
It's a peep show that repeats
itself every Presidential elec-
tion cycle. Political junkies
and the news media love it.
What with the 24-hour cable
networks having a lot of time
to fill, speculation about who's
in and who's thinking about
getting in is rampant.
There are serious contenders
and not so serious contenders.
There are one issue candidates.
Front runners stumble and fall
to second or third tier status.
Somebody catches fire and
surges ahead of the pack.


)pinion & Comment I:



ign 'Dance' Underway


Publisher's


Notebook


Ron Cichon


Hillary Clinton made one
visit to Iowa and surged .20
points in state polls. Hereto-
fore, former Senator John Ed-

wards was the frontrunner. The
race is a little fluid, wouldn't
you say?
On the Republican side,
frontrunners are Sen. John
McCain and former New York
Mayor Rudy Guiliani. That's
what polls show today but they
haven't faced primary voters
yet. It remains to be seen how
Guiliani's liberal views play
out with the conservative Re-
publican base. After all, this is
the guy who moved his girl-
friend home to the chagrin .of
the then Mrs. Guiliani. He's
for choice on abortion and sen-


sitive to gay rights.
.Then there's the matter of
experience. Some have it and
some don't. New Mexico Gov.
Bill Richardson has a wealth.
of experience having served as
a Congressman, Ambassador
to the UN, Energy Secretary,
and now chief executive.of a
state. He's nowhere in the
polls while Sen. Barak Obama,
with just two years in national
office, is riding high in the
polls.
Another issue in the mix of
speculation is to what degree
being a new face or veteran
helps or hurts. Some pundits
say voters have had enough of
old hands like Hillary and
McCain while Obama is the


fresh face free of scar tissue
from old battles. If that is the .
case, how come Hillary
appears at an Iowa event
expecting 500 people and 2700
show up? ,
This cycle we have a few,
Congressmen promising to
run. There's Dennis Kuchinis,
on the Democratic side and
Tom Tancredo and Duncan
Hunter on the Repiblican side.
Typically, Congressmen are in ,
* the race to make a statement
but rarely win.
When George Bush raised
and spent $100 million in,
2000, that wias a first. Now ex-
pectations are that a candidate
may, have, to raise as much as .
$500 million to get through the
primaries and general election. -
So there's a scramble for fi-
nancial commitments com-
pounded by the fact there are
so many candidates.
The contest is wide open ,
since there is no sitting'Presi- I
dent or Vice President running
and promises to be one of the
most exciting primary seasons :
in both parties. If anybody pre-
dicts winners at this date,
they've been drinking some-
thing stronger than orange
juice.


TEN YEARS AGO
February 12, 1997
Commissioners and Public
Defender Nancy Daniels came
to an agreement last week con-
cerning the related issues of
the proposed conversion of the
old jail into office space and
the county's funding of Dan-
iels' operation here.
A representative of a local
nursing home approached the
commission on Thursday in
the hope of persuading offi-
cials to retreat from the re-
cently implemented policy of
having the ambulance service
charge for the non-emergency
transportation of nursing home
patients.
A one vehicle accident left
one incapacitated and one with
minor injuries 9:12 a.m., Feb.
2, on 1-10, milepost 231.
With the retirement of Carol
Pickel as Director of Nursing
at the County Health Depart-
ment, Community Health
Nurse Supervisor Becky Baker
mnow wears two hats as she as-
sumes Pickel's duties.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
February 11, 1987
While admitting to some
personal doubt as to its effec-
tiveness in actually alleviating
fire response problems in the
county, Property Appraiser
Stephen Walker assured Ro-
tary Club members last week
that the recently passed fire tax
will be collected.
Jefferson County received
9.19 inches of rain in January,
making the month one of the
wettest on record and pushing
river levels to flood stage. Ac-


cording to Suwanreee River
Management District officials,
average rainfall for January
measures around 4.12 inches.
County unemployment per-
centage saw a drop from No-
vember of last year to Decem-
ber.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
February 10, 1977
Work has begun on the roof
of the Monticello Opera House
with George Folsom as the
contractor. The work is ex-
pected to take 30 to 45 days.
If the student absentee rate
continues the Jefferson County
School System could lose al-
most $500,000 in state funds.
Jefferson County Sheriff
James Scott was elected Vice-
President of the Florida Sher-
iffs Association at their regu-
lar mid-winter meeting re-
cently in Lakeland.
FORTY YEARS AGO
February 10, 1967
Miss Kathy Hunter, a stu-
dent at Emory University in
Atlanta, spent the weekend
here with her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Hunter.
Miss Lynn Shiver, a student
at FSU, spent the weekend
here with her grandfather,
W.W. Scruggs Sr. and her
mother, Mrs. C.R. Rankin.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
February 10, 1957
No information available.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
February 10, 1947
The regular session of the
Monticello Ministerial Asso-
ciation was held at the First
Baptist Church, Monday, Feb-
(See Files, Page 5)


Call Prompted State Action


By DUANE BRADFORD
Columnist

This is about something that
went right.
Journalists, especially inves-
tigative reporters, seem to have
a penchant for writing about
everything that has gone
whacko with the world. That is
because, of course, people
want to know if something is-
n't going properly so it can be
corrected even though they'll
be bored reading about the
happy version. So we reporters
seem to dwell on the wrong at
the expense of failing to tell.
what's right. Mea culpa.
But give a cheer at how your
government at least in Flor-
ida can do something right on
your behalf.
I was driving into Tallahas-


see from my rural home near
Monticello a couple years ago
when something ahead caught
my eye. As I drove onto Inter-
state Highway 10 where it
joins U.S. Highway 90 east of
Tallahassee, I immediately no-
ticed a stark change of scenery
alongside the south right-of-
way of I-10.
Someone had chopped down
a cluster of six or seven tall
pine trees. Why? That was
easy. There just over the
boundary fence of private
property beyond where the
stand of stately pines had
stood, a huge new advertising
signboard had been erected.
The pines would no longer
obstruct the view of motorists.
Westbound drivers would now
learn that-a Holiday Inn was
11 miles ahead.
How could this happen?


Could the state have granted
permission for such a wanton
act of destroying public prop-
erty?
I called the Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation's state
outdoor advertising adminis-
trator for verification. No, said
Lynn Holschuh, she knew of
no such thing, but she would
check into it.
When she did, she found that
a Texas outdoor advertising
firm, RTM Media of Houston,
had, without permission, cut
down the public's trees so it
could profit fiom its huge new
sign board. Hearings were
held. RTM Media was fined
and paid $10,600 as mitigation
for that act.
The conclusion, thiiughli was
bitter-sweet, I had understood
earlier that the iiigiin
would require the !rl.ilii i of


new pine, trees in the same
spot, but apparently the
$10,600 was viewed as miti-
gating, and the case ended.
I suggested to Ms. Holschuh
that the penalty would proba-
bly be well served -- and well
understood by the advertising
industry -- if a tiny sliver of
that $10,600 could be used to
plant new trees there. But no
trees were planted at the right-
of-way. The company simply
chalked up the fine as a cost of
doing business. It would not be
surprising to learn that the fine
ended up being an income tax
benefit for the company.
Companies should under-
stand that they cannot inten-
tionally destroy public
property to enhance their profit
and see penalties simply as a
cost of doing business. Re-
(See Action, Page 5)


Overlooked Tax Credits


By this tax season's April
16 filing deadline, an esti-
mated $1 billion in credits and
deductions will have gone un-
claimed by Americans who
were eligible for them.
For the 75 percent of taxpay-
ers who received refunds last
year, the $2,400 average
amount could have been more.
What's more, the taxpayers
who missed out on refunds
might have avoided owing


anything had they capitalized
on all possible credits and de-
ductions.
Overpaying the IRS is noth-
ing new -- taxpayers tend to do
it every year.
"There are simple things you
can do to maximize your po-
tential of receiving a refund,"
said Maggie Doedtman, a tax
advice manager for iH&R
Block.
"This year, claiming a refund


is as easy as owning a phone.
You can also get a credit just
for saving some of your own
money."
Committing a few tax topics
to memory could improve your
long-term financial future and
might' even be the difference
between owing the govern-
ment and getting some cash
back this year.
Long-distance telephone
tax refund: As many as 165


million taxpayers -- anyone
who has owned a land-based
or mobile telephone at any
point since March 2003 -- are
eligible for an automatic $30
to $60 standard refund.
The refund is available be-
cause the federal government
has agreed to return three
year's worth of revenue col-
lected from an excise tax that
had been around since 1898.
(See Overlooked, Page 5)


From Our Photo File


JES VOLUNTEERS got the Math Superstar Program off to a good start in Nov., 1991.
Front row, L-R: Connie Swigard, Jody Hart, Wendy Faglie; back row, then Superinten-
dent Bill McRae, Naomi Branch, Dorothy Higdon, Terry Vickers. (News File Photo)


o'





























SIr"
I-
.- 'M -

PAYOR JULIE CONLEY, and Mark Fenton, former member of the US National Race-
walking team, led the noon walk around the newly dedicated walking path at the Rec-
reation Park during the Step Up Florida activities.


Overlooked Tax Credit


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 14, 2007 PAGE 5

JEFFERSON COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY, INC.


PRESENTS


BLESS THE BEAST BENEFIT


2007

JOIN US FOR HOR'S DOEUVRES AND COCKTAILS
AT
THE MONTICELLO OPERA HOUSE

SATURDAY
FEBRUARY 17, 2007
6:00 PM
LIVE AUCTION SILENT AUCTION
CASH BAR
ENTERTAINMENT
TICKETS $25.00 PER PERSON

ALl PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE
JEFFERSON COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY, INC.
FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TICKETS CALL (850) 342-0244 OT (850) 264-5927
-*


(continued From Page 4)
Taxpayers can claim more
lian the standard refund if they
lept long-distance phone bills
from March 2003 to July 2006,
enabling them to report the ac-
tual amount of excise taxes
they paid.
Incentives to save: The IRS
continues to reward eligible
taxpayers simply for socking
away some of their own
money.
Qualified taxpayers can
claim the Saver's Credit for up
to half of what they contribute
to an IRA or other eligible re-
tirement plan, while taxpayers
who are late to the savings
game are eligible for other in-
centives related to saving for
retirement later in life.



Action
(Continued From Page 4)
planting on this instance would
have sent a clear, fair state-
ment of Florida's desire to pro-
tect its natural resources. This
looked' like a natural message-
for thie National Arbor Day
Foundation to send, but it
begged off for lack of funds.
The National Arbor Day
Foundation apparently does
not understand the value of
good public relations. But an
agent of Florida government,
Lynn Holschuh, gets a good
star on the fridge for her ster-
ling Work in your behalf just
the same.



Files
(Continued From Page 4)
ruary 3.
D.B. Folsom, who resides
three miles east of Monticello,
was attacked while in the yard
of his home Monday night
about 8:30 by a wild fox, be-
lieved to have been a victim of
rabies.
Mrs. Ophelia Wells, county
school supervisor, had been as-
signed to the Exhibits Commit-
tee of the annual supervisor's
council by Colin English, state
superintendent 'of public in-
struction.
Honoring Mrs. Richard
Ridgeway on her 80th
birthday, 'her son and
daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs.
Emerson Ridgeway, enter-
tained Monday evening with a
rook party in the family home
on East Washington Street.


It isn't too late to make con-
tributions count for this year's
tax return, either. Taxpayers
have until the April 16 filing
deadline to contribute to their
retirement plans and qualify
for the benefits this tax season.
Go green, get green: Cer-
tain hybrid vehicles and
energy-smart home improye-
ments help the environment,
and the IRS is providing incen-
tives to encourage taxpayers to
do their part.
A taxpayer who purchased a
new hybrid vehicle in 2006 is
eligible for a tax credit of $250
to $2,600, depending on the
make and modej of the car. A
one-time credit of $500 is also
available for taxpayers who
purchased certified, energy-
efficient windows, doors, fur-
naces and air-conditioners dur-
ing 2006.
Changes for charitable
contributions: Tougher rules
concerning the documenting of
contributions could affect tax-
payers who routinely deduct
charitable donations. Use
checks or credit cards for do-
;Inatjns s6 paper'prdof of the'
donation is available.
Donated clothing and house-
hold items must be in "good
used condition" and cash do-
nations of $250 or more now
require documentation from


the organization or a bank re-
cord, such as a canceled check,
to be deductible.
Remember the EITC: As
many as 7.3 million Americans
who were eligible for the
Earned Income Tax Credit in'
2006 didn't claim it, according
to the IRS. The complexity of
the credit and a lack of aware-
ness about it are' among the':
most common reasons why
taxpayers don't claim this
benefit.
Claiming the EITC can make
a significant difference for
low- and moderate- income
working families. The average
credit is worth up to $1,800
and even taxpayers without de-
pendents could qualify for
more than $400.
Split your refund and save:
More than half of Americans
live from paycheck to pay-
check at least from time to
time, according to a govern-
ment study. For households
with incomes of less than
$20,000, the percentage is
close to 80 percent.
To 'give taxpayers :greater'
coiitiol .l'-' ilc.i tax refunds, 'the
IRS "tls year is allowing re-
funds to be direct deposited
into as many as three bank ac-
counts.
The IRS hopes this new op-
tion will encourage taxpayers
to save. (NAPS)


You Can Survive

Valentine's Day
nity to tix problems in a rela-
By BRYAN GOLDEN tionship. Issues don't pop up
overnight nor can they be
Valentine's Day can either fixed that way. If you antici-
be an enjoyable occasion or pate repairing a relationship in
stress filled with high expecta- one day, you will be disap-
tions and disappointment. If pointed.
you have that special relation- Don't get caught up in the
ship, Valentine's Day can be a commercialization. Relation-
time to show love and affec- ships portrayed in advertise-
tion. For singles, the day can ments don't necessarily reflect
be a reminder of loneliness or reality.. You can show you care
a missing relationship. with the use of your heart and
Even people who do have imagination. Do simple things
significant others can wind up that say, "I'm thinking of
hating Valentine's Day. The you."


problem is that Valentine's
Day often comes with a prede-
termined set of expectations.
Someone may expect a certain
gift, a special night out, or
some other gesture. Disap-
pointment results whenever
expectations are not met.
Surviving For Couples--
Valentine's Day isn't a day
of amnesty or a single opportu-


Don't rely on your partner to
read your mind. If you have
specific desires, share them.
Give without expecting any-
thing in return. Small, thought-
ful gestures mean a lot, don't
overlook them.
Not everyone gets enthusias-
tic about Valentine's Day. If
your partner isn't that excited,
don't read too much into it. Do
(See Survive, Page 14)


Flowers Today...




Fireworks Tonight!
ie o HM,


The Jefferson County Recyclinq Program


accepts


the following items for recycling:


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes, i -
laundry detergent-boxes7 shipping boxes, etc. ..

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?






Additional items acceptedat the collection sites:

Household garbage.

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
;dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.




Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


850.997.2015















PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 14, 2007L ife s t le


V Bill Moon Speaker

ee At Womans Club

SO cd ite explaining how Jeffeison Arts
SDEBBIESNAPP came about in 1997 with a
SSeed e ,e.,eco. t dce Staff Writer small group of concerned art-
SSeoda e4 wz Wm to *V i'sts getting together with the
I Members and friends of the School Board about leasing
i Vi V UV 'U 'W'' WW'"'W Monticello Woman's Club the building.


CARROT CAKE

2 cups all purpose flour
3 cups sugar
2 tsp. baking soda
2 tsp. cinnamon
1 tsp. salt
1 1/2 cup Wesson oil
4 eggs
3 cups carrots grated
1 cup nuts chopped

Icing:
1 large pkg. cream cheese
1 stick butter or margarine
softened
1 box confectioners sugar
1 cup pecans chopped
2 tsp. vanilla extract

Sift and mix dry ingredients.
Add Wesson oil and stir well.
Add eggs, one at a time, and
beat well after each addition.
Add carrots, nuts and blend.
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Pour batter into two 9" greased
and floured cake pans and
bake about 25 minutes.
Icing: Cream softened butter
and cram cheese. Add sugar,
vanilla and nuts. Spread
between layers, and on top and
sides of cake.

Harrriette Cuyler
Library Cookbook

APPLE CRISP

4 cups apples, sliced
1 tbs. lemon juice
S, 1 cup^ilour, sifted
'licp rolled oats
1'/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. cinnamon
1/3 cup shortening butter or
margarine melted

Place apples in greased bak-
ing dish. Combine dry ingredi-
ents. Add shortening and mix
until crumbly. Sprinkle over
apples. Bake at 315 degrees
for 30 minutes, or until tender..


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Boys and Girls Club of
tue Big Bend announces a se-
ries of activities planned for
Black Hisotry Month.
Programs will showcase
the rich culture and historical
contributions of past and pre-
sent African Americans.
Students will participate in


S DEBBIE SNAPP
S Staff Writer

La Leche League of Monti-
S cello will meet 10 a.m. on the
S third Monday of each. month
in the community room at the
* Public Library.
The February 19 meeting is
" the first in this area for the
S Big Bend Chapter of the La
S Leche League.
S La Leche League is a non-
S CARD OF THANKS
S The family of Sister Ellen
S Ross Walker sincerely thank
S each and every one for what-
ever you may have done to
, make this transitional period
in our lives a little brighter.
Mere words do not convey
our heartfelt deep apprecia-
S tion of the many acts of kind-
0. ness and thoughtfulness you
' have shown, and continue to
display.
May God bless and keep
you in or prayers.


Yields 6 servings.

Helen Gleasman
Library Cookbook

CHICKEN AND RICE CAS-
SEROLE

2 10 oz pkg. frozen, chopped
broccoli, thawed
3 cups cooked chicken diced
1 med. onion diced
1 8 oz can water chestnuts
drained and diced
1 4 oz can mushrooms sliced
1 10 3/4 6an condensed
chicken and mushroom soup
1 cup mayonnaise
1 6 oz. box long grain rice,
cooked
1 cup cheddar cheese grated.
Saute onion in oil. Mix all
ingredients together and pour
into a greased 3 qt. casserole
dish.
Bake uncovered at 350 de-
grees 30 to 40 minutes or until
it is bubbly.

Sandy Weilbacher
Library Cookbook

CHOCOLATE MOUSSE

6 sq. unsweetened chocolate
1 cup butter
6 eggs separated
1 cup sugar
1 tsp. vanilla extract

Separate eggs. Beat whiles
with 1/2 cups sugar until peaks
form. Melt chocolate '.a ith but-
ter. Mix resi of aar *.*.nh egg
yolks until ItL n) Add
melted chocolate and butter to
egg yolks. Add egg whites un-
til well mixed. Pour into a
mold and refrigerate at least
two hours. This very rich des-
sert could be topped with
whipped cream, or served
alone.

Isabelle de Sercey
Library Cookbook


dialog and discussion, movies
depicting African Americans,
and field trips to provide the
students with visual accounts
of historical moments in the
lives of African Americans.
Anyone interested in par-
ticipating in any of these
events may contact Zandra
Gilley, area director for the
Jefferson County Clubs at
997-4226, or Sabrina Wil-
liams, membership .coordina-
tor.


profit group dedicated to edu-
cating and supporting mothers
who want to breast-feed.
Help and information are
available at 552-3948.


met at the clubhouse for their
regular monthly meeting Bill
Moon was the guest speaker.
Moon gave an update about
Jefferson Arts and all it has to
offer county residents and the
surrounding communities.
The goal of the Jefferson
Arts is to provide essential
support for cultural and visual
art activities in the commu-
nity.
This in done by providing
classroom, studio and gallery
space for locally generated
visual art; Florida artists' ex-
hibitions; local school exhibi-
tions; and by sponsoring
school outreach programs; art
classes; and other cultural
programs.
Moon began his program by


The building was leased to
the Arts for a period of 25
years.
Renovations were done with
the funds generated by having
many yard sales, and through
generous donors.
The Arts building now has a
gift shop, a gallery show-
room. and workshops.
There are some 100 paid
members, and 22 active
artists. There are several
membership categories in-
cluding: Student, Supporter;
Patron /Family; Contributor;
Sponsor; and Benefactor.
Moon is the vice president
of the Jefferson Arts, Inc. and
is an artist who carves wild-
life in wood.


JCHS Sr. Class To Host

Talent, Fashion Show


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
S-nool senior class, and
Mainstream Productions, are
sponsoring a Talent and
Fashion Show and Concert, 6
p.m., Feb. 17, at the JCHS
Auditorium on Water Street.
Tickets are $5 at the door
and student advance tickets


are $3.
Talent will include: singing,
performing music, dancing,
poetry, Rap and Skits.
Fashion modeling catego-
ries include: club wear, for-
mal wear, casual wear.
Special live performances
are also planned.
For additional information
contact Deion Ulee or Tierra
Thompson at JCHS, 997-
3555.


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Monticello News


Clubs Plans Black

History Month Events


LaLeche League To Meet


11105:7


, Y,















JOHN BRUMBLEY
S John David Brumbley, 62,
Died Saturday, February 10,
S2007 in Monticello, FL.
S Mr. Brumbley lived all his
Life in Jefferson County, was a
r self employed well driller,
' served in the United States
SMarines and was a member of
Wacissa Methodist Church.
S Services will be at 2:00 pm
Wednesday, February 14,
2006, at Cody Pentecostal Ho-
liness Church with burial at
Beth Page Cemetery. A visita-
r tion was at Beggs Apalachee
Chapel from 6:00 8:00 pm
Tuesday, February 13, 2007.
He is survived by his wife,
SPatsy Brumbley of Wacissa;
Sone son, John D. Brumbley Jr.
Sof Wacissa; two daughters,
' Melissa Bramlett of Wacissa
and Shelia Porter of Orlando;
Five brothers, Danny, Donald,
SDoyle, Dennis and Dale Brum-
bley all of Wacissa; three sis-
" ters, Debbie Joyner of Talla-
Shassee, Deloris Flowers of
" Perry and Diann Roberts of
Thomasville; thirteen grand-
children and two great grand-
children.
SROBERT BUTLER
Robert Olen Butler, Sr., 87,
died Wednesday, February 7,
2007 in Thomasville, GA.
Mr. Butler was native of
Granite City, Illinois, and a
former resident of Monticello,
Tallahassee, FL and Lake
Charles Louisiana. He lived in
Thomasville, GA since July
2006. He lived most of his life
in Granite City Illinois. Mr.
Butler was a wonderful Actor
and a renowned Theatrical Di-
rector. He was chairman of the
Theater Department at Saint
Louis University. Mr. Butler
served in WWII Army Infantry-
under General Patton and was
a Lieutenant Colonel. He was
of Catholic faith and a member
of St. Margaret's Parish.
The service was held 11:00
A.M. Tuesday, February 13,
2006 at St. Margaret's Catho-
lic Church, 1565 E. Washing-
ton Hwy., Monticello;
4 internment followed at Oak-
field Cemetery. In lieu of
, flowers you can make dona-
tions to your local hospice cen-
ter.
He is survived by his wife of
70 years, Lucille F. Butler; one
son, Robert Olen Butler (Eliza-
beth Dewberry) of Capps, FL
and one grandson Joshua Rob-
ert Butler of Los Angeles, CA.
JETTIE GREEN
Jettie E. Green., 84, died
Thursday, February 8, 2007 in
STallahassee.
Jettie was born and raised in
Tallahassee and resided in the
area his entire life. He gradu-
ated from Leon High School
and the Florida State Univer-
sity with a bachelor's in Busi-
ness Administration. Jettie was
recently inducted into the Leon
High School Football Hall of
Fame.
S Funeral services were held
,* at 2:00 pm on Sunday, Febru-
Sary 11, 2007 at Graveside,
' Oakland Cemetery
Tallahassee.
Survivors include two
daughters, Clifton Skipper of
Tallahassee; and Susan Mixon
(Adrian) of Gainesville, GA;
and two grandchildren, Randy
Skipper of Tallahassee; and
Anna Skipper of Gainesville,
FL.
He was preceded in death by
his wife, Alice Green; and a
sister, Virginia Green.
The family would like to
thank the Brynwood Center for
,their care and kindness.

ROBERT JONES
Robert E. Jones, Sr., 62,
died Monday, February 12,
2007 in Tallahassee.


Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL
32308.
Survivors include his wife,
Nancy Jones of Waukeenah;
three sons, Robert E. Jones, Jr.,
Kristopher Jones, and Daniel
Jones all of Waukeenah; one
daughter, Zandol Whited of
Jacksonville; mother, Dorothy
McCochum of Houston, TX;
one brother, John Jones of Ft.
Lauderdale; two sisters, Betty
Boles of Ft. Walton Beach and
Rose Jones of Houston; and
eight grandchildren.
NETTIE RITTER
Nettie Roberter Ritter, 87,
died Monday, February 12,
2007 in Monticello, FL.
Mrs. Ritter was a native of
Georgia and had lived in Mon-
ticello since 1930. She was a
homemaker and was of Meth-
odist faith and a member of
Sardis Memorial United Meth-
odist Church.
The service will be at 2:00
pm Wednesday, February 14,
2007, at Beggs Funeral Home
Monticello Chapel; 485 E.
Dogwood Street, Monticello,
interment, will follow at Sardis
Memorial United Methodist.
Church Cemetery. Visitation
will be one hour prior to the
service at the funeral home. In
lieu of flowers you can make
donations to your favorite
Charity.
Mrs. Ritter is survived by
one son James "Jim" Ritter
(Martha) and one daughter An-
nie Bell Wickham (Richard) of
Monticello, two grandchildren,
six great grandchildren, and
one great great grandchild.
Mrs. Ritter was .preceded in
death by her husband Milton
"Buck" Ritter.
SAMUEL SURLES
Samuel "Sammy" Surles,
65, died Monday, February 12,
2007 in Tallahassee.
A native of Cherry Lake, FL,
he lived most of his life in Tal-
lahassee. He retired as a elec-
trical estimator, was an avid
fisherman, gardener, loved fi\-
ing things, an Air Force vet-
eran and was a member of
Concord Baptist Church.
Funeral service will be held
11:00 am Thursday, February
15, 2007 at Beggs Funeral
Home Apalachee Chapel Tal-
lahassee. Visitation will be
held 6:00 8:00 pm Wednes-
day, February 14, 2007, Beggs
Apalachee Chapel, interment
will follow at Tallahassee
Memory Gardens, Tallahassee.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to
the American Heart Associa-
tion, 2851 Remington Green
Circle, Suite C, Tallahassee,
FL 32308 or the American
Lung Association of
Florida/Big Bend Region, 539
Silver Slipper Ln, STE A, Tal-
lahassee, FL 32303.
Sammy is survived by his
wife, Pat Surles; one son,
Wesley Surles (Pam) of Talla-
hassee; two daughters, Valerie
Davis (Rocky) of Crawford-
ville and Mary K. Surles of
Tallahassee; five
grandchildren, Cody, Avery,
(See Homes, Page 14)




Planning
is your f
all the sign
Let Us
Allow Plastic Sul
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lines and wrink
..... happy, non-si
Bridi


"PRIESTS" and "Nuns" conducted the Nun Bingo fundraiser at the Opera House Sat-
urday. From left: "Father" Jack Williams, "Father" Colin Rolfe, "Sisters" Catherine
Arnold, Lisa Reasoner, Jan Rickey, and Candi Parker. (News Photo)


MELINDA COPPER recently promoted her latest book "Simon and Willie." The book
can be purchased at Jefferson Arts during operating hours, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Wednesday and Saturdays. (News Photo)


Got A


Tables were filled with
Bingo devotes Saturday night
at the Opera House, as the
Nun Bingo fundraiser got un-
derway.'
A variety of gifts were do-
nated by local individuals and
businesses to be awarded to
winners.
At the fundraiser for Al-
trusa of Monticello, and the
Opera House Stage Company,
snack foods and drinks for
sale were donated by mem-
bers.
In addition to Bingo card
winners, there were other op-
portunities to win prizes.
These included a door prize,
a 50/50 drawing, and the pur-
chase of tickets for drawings
for special gifts.
Proceeds from this event
\iIll benefit community non-
profit organizations.
Total funds raised from this
event were not available at
press time.



FMB Team

To Conduct

Chili Cookout

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Farmers & Merchants
Ba.ik Relay for Life team will
conduct a Chili Cookout to
benefit the American Cancer
Society 11 a.m. 2 p.m. on
Friday at the FMB Annex
building parking lot and
around the courthouse circle.
Lunch will be $5 and dona-
tions, are welcome.


Cute Photo?


Sent It To Us Arid We'll Shai~e 'f'
With Our Readers


Kids Dogs Strange Stuff, etc.

Monticello News
P.O. Box 430
Monticello, FL 32345


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Mr. Jones was a native of
San Francisco, he had lived in
Waukeenah since 1990.
The services will be 11:00
am, Wednesday, February 14,
2007, at Waukeenah United
Methodist Church. Fairchild
Funeral Home (386-8686) is
handling the arrangements. In
Slieu of flowers, memorial con-
tributions may be made to Big
Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 14, 2007 PAGE 7

Nun Bingo

Draws Good

Turnout

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


---------
-


;e















PAGE 8. MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 14, 2007


Mood Swings To Face

Capital City Deuces


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Mood
Swings, the women's A-
league tennis team, won four
of six matches against the
Swinging Volleys last week
to secure their second place
slot in the league for one
more week.
Captain Patty Hardy said
that all other teams in the
league decided to split points
with their opponents due to
the threat of rain, but the
Mood Swings and Swinging
Volleys played all the same.
Team #1, Katie Brock and
substitute Sylvia Hahn, lost
its.sets, 4-6 and 0-6.


Team #2, Patty Hardy and
Cindy Wainright, won its sets,
6-1 and 6-4.
Team #3, Angie Delvecchio
and Laura Kirchhoff, lost its
sets, 5-7 and 5-7.
Team #4, Susan Goodwin
and Trisha Wirick, won its
sets, 7-5 and 6-2.
Team #5, Lindsey Taylor
and Susan Scarboro, lost the
first set, 6-7, won the second,
6-3, and though it began to
sprinkle, the ladies went on to
win the tiebreaker, 7-5.
Team #6, Maxie Miller and
Jennifer Ellis, won its sets,
6-0 and 6-1.
The Mood Swings were to
face the Capital City Deuces
9:30 a.m., Thursday, at Tom
Brown 'Park.


Youth Soccer Wraps

Up Saturday At Park


The Y"outh Soccer Program
at :he Recreanon Park wrapp-
ped up its season Saturday.
"'All of the young athletes
received a trophy for partici-
pation and that proved to gen-
erate a lot of excitement,
particularly for the younger
kids," said Coach Phil Barker.
Barker said that he was
really pleased and impressed
with the fourth through eighth
grade players and their using
their passing skills more
often. "They're are learning


to stay spread out oi he field
to better have opportunities
for the goal shots."
"The kids were doing great
in the goal keepers box," said
Barker.
Commenting about the sea-
son, Barker remarked: "I
really appreciate all the sup-
port of the parents and the
kids, and I tip my hat to all of
my volunteers: Dan
Nennstiel, Matt Stafford, Ka-
trina Walton, and student
Matthew Smith, who was
there the entire season.


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CATHY NEAL, left, of the Mood Swings ladies tennis team, and Laura Kirchhoff in re-
cent doubles play.


Mood Swings Win


5 Of 6 Matches


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Mood-
swings, ladies A-league tennis
team, played their best of the
season, winning five of six
matches against the Capital
City Deuces last week.
Team captain Patty Hardy
said the ladies have very
likely maintained their second
ranked slot in the league for
the fourth consecutive week.
Team #1, Katie Brock and
Lisa Jackson, lost its sets, 1-6
and 3-6.
Team #2 Patty Hardy and
Cindy Wainright, won its sets,
6-2 and 6-2.
Team #3, Angie Delvecchio
won its sets, 6-1 and 6-4.
Team #4, Susan Goodwin
and Trisha Wirick, won by
forfeit/
Team #5, Lindsey Taylor
and Susan Scarboro, won its
sets, 6-2 and 6-2.
Team #6, Maxie Miller and


Jennifer Ellis, won its sets,
6-4 and 6-1.
The Mood Swings will face
the Bainbridge Different
Strokes, 9:30 a.m., Thursday,
there.


Warriors
Drop 2
The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy varsity baseball team
dropped both games last week
during the pre season Quincy
Tournament.
Coach Ray Hughes said that
statistics were not kept be-
cause it was pre season play.
"We played a lot of differ-
ent people from bigger
schools with younger kids,"
said Hughes. "We made
some good plays, but we did-
n't look particularly good out
there, overall."
The main purpose behind
the pre season play is to
knock the yearlong rust from
the Warriors.


"I am particularly impressed
when a student like that
comes out to help," he said of
Smith.
He added that kudos also go
to Kevin Aman, for having
the program run so smoothly
and doing his usual topnotch
job.
"It was good to have the
newcomers this year and to
see so many returning from
last year," said Barker
"These six weeks always go
so fast that I'm already look-
ing forward to next year."


ACA Girls

Hold

Srimmage

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy varsity softball team en-
joyed a good scrimmage
game among themselves Sat-
urday.
Coach Roslyn Bass reports
that she saw some good hits,
pitching and base running out
of her Lady Warriors, but
they still had along way to go
to get into proper shape for
the season.
"My basketball players are
still a little rusty on the field,
but they're getting back into
the swing of things," said
Bass.
Following the scrimmage
game, a cook out was enjoyed
and a parent meeting held.
The Lady Warriors were
slated to play Hamilton
County, 4 p.m., Tuesday,
here.

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YOUTH SOCCER at the Recreation Park wrapped up Saturday, with players all receiv-
ing trophies for participation. The six week soccer season is an annual event
coached by Phil Barker and volunteer assistant coaches. (News Photo)


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Jones Receives

Full Scholarship


Monticello resident Desrick
Jones signed a full scholar-
ship last week to play football
for the University of Cumber-
lands in Williamsburg, KY.
Though Jones had offers of
scholarships at six different
colleges, he chose to go to
Cumberlands as a running
back.
"This school is number one
in Kentucky and has a great
business program," said
Jones. He intends to see how
far football will take him in
the future, and attain a busi-
ness degree.


"It took a lot of hard work,
but it paid off," said Jones.
His Brookwood Coach
Shane Boggs added, "This ac-
complishment is due to his.ef-
forts both in the classroom
and on the field."
Attending the signing cere-
mony last week were Boggs,
Jones' brothers Devondrick
Nealy and Ramez Nealy, and
his dad, Robert Nealy.
His mother is Gloria Nealy.
Jones attends Brookwood
School in Thomasville this
year, but played as a line
backer at JCHS last year.


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 14, 2007


SENIOR LIVING


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF )


HEALTH]
Jefferson County Health Department
1255 W. Washington St. Monticello, FL 32344
(850) 342-0170
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ONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 14, 2007 PAGE 11-


Wa,


TALLAHASSEE Memorial Monticello Relay for Life team member Debbie Kinsey was
out bright and early Saturday morning to set baked goods for the team event in front
of Advance Auto. Bob Seibold looks over the items. (News Photo)


LEGAL
Notice of Auction to the
Highest Bidder: Under the
authority of the Self-Storage
Facility Act, Section 83:805,
the described below has been
seized for non-payment of
rent and other incurred
expenses: Unit # 54 Lornell
Brantely, SR. Household
goods Auction Date: Febru-
ary 17th, 2007 Time: 10 am
Place : Monticello Mini Stor-
age, corner of York & Rail-
road Streets, Monticelle, FL
02/14/07,02/16/07,c
The Annual Report of
Healthyways, Inc. for the year
ending December 31, 2006 is
available at its principle office,
555 N. Jefferson St. Monticello,
FL 32345 for inspection during
regular business hours with 180
from today.
2/14/07,c
Notice of Job Opening:
Jefferson County Clerk of
Court is accepting applications
for a Budgeting and Payroll
Administrator. Job description
and application may be
obtained in the Office of the
Crk of Circuit Court, Room,
10, County Courthouse,
Monticello, Florida Salary
range is $25,000 to $40,000.
Minimum education and
experience requirements are: *
A bachelor's degree from an
accredited college or university
with a major in accounting,
finance, or business
administration. Four (4) years


LEGAL **-


experience in according,
budgeting, and payroll
processing' in either the
governmental sector or private'
sector. Applications will be
accepted until 5:00 p.m.
February 26, 2007 at the Office
of Clerk of Circuit Court. Equal
Opportunity/ Affirmative
Action Employer. Drug Free
Workplace. Drug testing is a
required part of the


pre-employment
Applicants with


physical.
a disability


should contact the above office
for accommodation.
2/7, 9, 14, 16/07, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY CIVIL
DIVISION: 21 MORTGAGE
CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs
TIMOTHY D. LONG, SR.;
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
TIMOTHY D. LONG, SR.; IF
LIVING, INCLUDING ANY
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID
DEFENDANT (S), IF
REMARRIED, AND IF
DECEASED, THE
RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN
HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND
TRUSTEES, AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH
UNDER OR AGAINST THE
NAMED DEFENDANTSS;
UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendants) case No 06-369-CA


LEGAL


NOTICE OF SALE Notice is
hereby given that, pursuant, to
a Final Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in the
above-styled cause, in the
Circuit Court of Jefferson
County, Florida, I will sell the
property situate in Jefferson
County, Florida, described as:
COMMENCE AT A LIGHTER
WOOD POST MARKING THE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF
SECTION 16, TOWNSHIP 1
NORTH, RANGE 5 EAST,
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH
00 DEGREES 14'43" EAST,
ALONG THE WEST
BOUNDARY OF SAID
SECTION 16, 1177.76 FEET
TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE FROM
SAID POINT OF BEGINNING,
CONTINUED SOUTH 00
DEGREES 14'43" EAST
ALONG THE WEST
BOUNDARY OF SAID
SECTION 16, 933.50 FEET TOd
A POINT ON THE
NORTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF
COUNTY ROAD 158;,
THENCE RUN SOUTH. 54e
DEGREES .00'09" 'EAST
ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE 410.00
FEET TO A POINT THENCE
LEAVING SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE RUN
NORTH 00 DEGREES 14'43"
WEST 1174.19 FEET TO A
POINT; THENCE WEST
330.68 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING. To include a:


zUU4 KL.tEGEI Y IVMUOSIL
HOME VIN N19386A
90520114, 2004 REGENCY
MOBILE HOME VIN N19386B
90520219, 2004 REGENCY
MOBILE HOME VIN N19386C
90520297 A/K/A 2665 Aucilla
Rd. Monticello, Fl 32344 at
public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, At the
North Door of the Jefferson
County Courthouse, Monticello,
Florida at 11:00 a.m. on March
2nd 2007. DATED THIS 31
DAY OF JANUARY, 2007. Any
person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens,
must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale. Witness, my hand
and seal of this court on the 31st
day of January 2007. CLERK
OF CIRCUIT COURT. Law
offices of Daniel Consuegra,
9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa,
FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for
Plaintiff. In accordance with the
American with Disabilities Act
of 1990, persons needing a
special accommodation to
participate in this proceeding
should contact the ASA
Coordinator no later than seven
(7) days prior to the
proceedings. If hearing
impaired, please call (800)
955-9771 (TDD) or (800)
955-8770 (voice) via Florida
Relay Service.
2/7/07, 2/14/07, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA CAPITAL CITY
BANK, Plaintiff, vs. WILSON
F. BRITT AND ALISON K.
BRITT, individually and d/b/a
ALISON BRITT
SEWPURLATIVES, SCORE
FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
AND UNKNOWN TENANTS)
,Defendants. CASE NO.
05-290-CA NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE is given pursuant to a
Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated January 30, 2007, in Case
No. 05-290-CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Second Judicial
Circuit, in and for Jefferson
County, Florida in which
CAPITAL CITY BANK is the
Plaintiff and WILSON F.
BRITT and ALISON K. BRITT,
individually and d/b/a ALISON
BRITT SEWPURLATIVES,
SCORE FEDERAL CREDIT
UNION and UNKNOWN
TENANT(S), are the
Defendants, 1 will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash
at the west front door of the
Jefferson County Courthouse in
Monticello, Jefferson County,
Florida at 11:00 a.m. on March


-~"
:3.; ''
Tk~C;3 : ;'
~F I1
r


2nd, 2007, the property set forth
in the Partial Final Judgment of
Foreclosure as to Third
Mortgage and more particularly
described as Follows: A
PARCEL OF LAND SECTION
18, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH,
RANGE 5 EAST JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA BEING A
PORTION OF A PARCEL
DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 36 PAGE
142 AND OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 122, PAGE
217 OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA, MORE
PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF LOT 21 OF
SPRINGDALE PECAN
PLANTATION SUBDIVISION,
AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF, RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK "A" OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND SAID POINT
BEING ON THE NORTH
BOUNDARY OF NOW
CLOSED FIRST (1ST)
STREET, AND THENCE RUN
SOUTH 37 DEGREES 59
MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST
83.41 FEET TO A POINT ON
THE WESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF
COUNTY ROAD 149 THENCE
SOUTH 35 DEGREES 55

MINUTES WEST (BEARING
BASE) 346.96 FEET, ALONG
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE
TO A POINT ON THE NORTH
BOUNDARY OF AN
EXISTING DIRT ROAD
THENCE ALONG THE
NORTH BOUNDARY OF
SAID DIRT ROAD -S
FOLLOWS; NORTH 52
DEGREES 46 MINUTES )2
SECONDS WEST 34.85 FEET
TO A POINT ON A CURVE
CONCAVE TO THE SOUTH,
THENCE ALONG SAID
CURVE HAVING A RADIUS
OF 57.61 FEET THROUGH A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF 68
DEGREES 11 MINUTES 40
SECONDS, FOR AN ARC
LENGTH OF 68.57 FEET
(THE CHORD OF SAID ARC
BEING NORTH 86 DEGREES
52 MINUTES 22 SECONDS
WEST 64.59 FEET TO A
POINT, THENCE SOUTH 59
DEGREES 01 MINUTES 48
SECONDS WEST 57.00 FEET
TO A POINT, THENCE
LEAVING SAID ROAD RUN
NORTH 01 DEGREES 16
MINUTES 19 SECONDS
WEST 344.67 FEET TO A
POINT ON THE SOUTH
BOUNDARY SAID LOT 21
AND THE NORTH


BOUNDARY OF SAID
CLOSED FIRST (1ST)
STREET, THENCE NORTH 88
DEGREES 41 MINUTES 30
SECONDS EAST 301.3 FEET,
ALONG SAID NORTH
BOUNDARY TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING. DATE
January 31st, 2007 Kirk Reams
Clerk of the Circuit Court.
Garvin B. Bowden: Gardner,
Wadsworth, Duggar, Bist &
Wiener, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood
Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32308.
2/7/07,2/14/07,c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 2nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION CASE NO.
07-02-CA MELVIN WILLIS,
Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN
SPOUSES, LINEAL
DESCENDANTS, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, :
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES,
AND ALL OTHER -
CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST TURNER W. ,
KINSEY, deceased;
Defendants. AMENDED
NOTICE OF ACTION TO:
Defendants UNKNOWN
SPOUSES, LINEAL
DESCENDANTS, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES,
AND ALL OTHERS
CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST TURNER W.
KINSEY, DECEASED.
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN:
You are hereby notified that an
action to quiet title to the
following real property in
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA: All that property in
the Northeast Quarter of the
Northwest Quarter of Section 7,
Township 1 North, Range 6
East, Jefferson County, Florida
lying North of U.S. Highway 90
(State Road 10). LESS AND
EXCEPT the following
described property: (OFFICIAL
RECORD BOOK 252, PAGE
81) Begin at the 'center of a
cement culvert located on the
Northerly side of U.S. Highway
90 as the Point Of Beginning,
the same being station 351+45
on the State Road Department
survey map, and run thence
North to the Northerly right of
way boundary of said Highway
90, run thence Easterly along
said Northerly boundary of said
Highway, a distance of 85 feet
for the POINT OF
BEGINNING of the lands
herein described; from said


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EMERGENCY HOME ENERGY


ASSISTANCE


FOR THE ELDERLY


The Area Agency on Aging for North Florida a announces the availability of
Emergency Home Energy Assistance for the Elderly Program (EHEAP) funds for
eligible households in Jefferson County. To be eligible, an individual who is at least
sixty years of age must reside in the applicant household, a bill that indicates an
immediate disconnection date if payment is not received by the utility company (this
includes propane and electric), and the household income must be at or below 150%
of the Federal Poverty Income Guidelines.


Please contact Terrie Mihan (850-342-0271) to schedule an appointment or to
request more specific information about the Emergency Home.Energy Assistance
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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 14, 2007


LEGAL .
Point Of Beginning run Easterly
along the Northerly right of way
of said Highway 90, a distance
of 315 feet, thence Northerly
and perpendicular to said right
of way, a distance of 210 feet,
thence run Westerly and
parallel with said Highway 90, a
distance of 315 feet, thence run
Southerly to said Highway '90
right of way boundary,
containing 1 V acres, more or
less. ALSO LESS AND
EXCEPT the following
described property: (OFFICIAL
RECORD BOOK 405, PAGE
265) Beginning at a point over
the Western most culvert in
Section 7, Township 1 North,
Range 6 East, where the same
crosses U.S. Highway 90 (also
known as State Road 10) and in
the center of said highway,
thence running Southerly and
along the center of said
Highway a distance of 564 feet
thence running Northerly and
perpendicular to said Highway
to the Northerly right of way
boundary of said Highway for
the POINT OF BEGINNING of
the land herein conveyed; and
from said Point Of Beginning of
the land herein conveyed run
thence Northerly and
perpendicular to said Highway
center, a distance of 210 feet,
thence run Southeasterly and
parallel with said Highway
center 420 feet, thence run
Southwesterly and
perpendicular to said Highway
center 210 feet and to the
Northerly right of way


boundary of said Highway,
thence run Northwesterly and
along said Northerly right of
way boundary, a distance of 420
feet, more or less, and to the
POINT OF BEGINNING of the
lands herein conveyed. ALSO
LESS AND EXCEPT 200 foot
right of way of U.S. Highway 90.
ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT the
following described property:
(NEW PARCEL) COMMENCE
at the Southwest corner of the
Northeast Quarter of the
Northwest Quarter of Section 7,
Township 1 North, Range 6
East, Jefferson County, Florida
and run North 89 degrees 38
minutes 22 seconds East 789.52
Feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING, thence from said
POINT OF BEGINNING
continue North 89 degrees 38
minutes 22 seconds East 191.63.
feet to a point, thence North 59
degrees 12 minutes 00 seconds
West 163.97 feet to a point,
thence South 30 degrees 48
minutes 00 seconds West 99.16
feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING, containing 0.19
acre, more or less has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
CHARLES F. OTTO, ESQ. of
the law offices of STRALEY &
OTTO, P.A., whose address is
2699 Stirling Road, Suite C-207,
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33312,
on or before APRIL 2, 2007,
and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before


LEGAL
service on Plaintiffs attorney or
immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this court this 8th day of
February, 2007. Clerk of Court
By: LSL CERTIFIED TRUE
AND CORRECT COPY KIRK
B. REAMS CLERK OF
CIRCUIT COURT
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA By: NLW, D.C.
2/14/07,2/21/07,c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA PROBATE
DIVISION File Number:
06-141-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF
NORVELL COE COLEMAN,
Deceased. NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION The
administration of the estate of
NORVELL COE COLEMAN,
deceased, File Number
06-141-PR is pending in the
Circuit Court for Jefferson
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Jefferson County Courthouse,
room 10, Monticello, Florida
32344. The name and addressof
the personal-representative and
of the personal representative's.
attorney are set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS




Ir;;\p~~


LEGAL
ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All
persons on whom this notice is
served who have objections that
challenge the qualifications of
he personal representative,
venue, or jurisdiction of this
Court are required to file their
objections with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THEIR FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All
creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice is served within three
months after the date of the first
publication of this notice must
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THEIR FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All
other creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or
demands against the estate of
the decedent must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER


4iam sOfeedinI I Tracts
Homsie eveopen


Altha, Calhoun County, Florida Saturday -:-March 3 -:- 10:00 a.m. F
* Great Development Location Farm 2 238 Acres- Farm 4 30 Acres CR 274
* Excellent Cropland Troy McCroan Rd Zoned Mixed Use (2:1)
221 Acre Cotton Base Zoned Ag (1:10) Excellent Homesite
D than Soil
* 161 Acre Peanut Base 1800 SF, 2 Bed, 1 Bath Framed Home
Farm 1 150 Acres CR 69-A Farm 3 40 Acres CR 274
*Zoned Mixed Use (2:1) *Zoned Mixed Use (2:1) Selling from Farm 1
* Paved Road Frontage Road Frontage on 2 Sides For Complete Details Call
Rowell Realty &Auction Co., Inc. 800-323-8388
Buyers Premm AU 479 A 296 MyersJacksonCA CES AARE Auction Coordinator
A@I',4i A iTS3 T R dwatir e


r


WE TAKE THE
DC'NTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


LEGAL


LEGAL


THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED. The date of the first
publication of this Notice is
February 14, 2007. Attorney
For Personal Representative: T
BUCKINGHAM BIRD P.O.
Box 247 Monticello, FL 32345
850-997-3503 FL Bar ID #
0006176 GWEN T. BEAT 1796
Seven Bridges Road Monticello,
Florida 32344
2/14/07,02/21/07,c
Jefferson Co. Land Auction 700
acres, starting @ 1200/ac
owner/agent/March 10th www.
700AcreAuction.com
2/4/07,3/10/07,c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA CASE NO. 07-41-CA
IN RE: the matter of the
Adoption of CHARLES LANCE
KELLY, NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Unknown Father Address
Unknown YOU ARE
NOTIFIED that a Petition for
Adoption has been filed and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
it, on. MICHAEL A.
REICHMAN, petitioner's


attorney, whose address is P.O.
Box 41, Monticello, FL 32345,
on or before March 28, 2007,
and file the original with the
clerk of this court either before
service on petitioner's attorney
or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition. DATED on 02/09/07
KIRK REAMS as Clerk of the
Court Norm L. Wilkins Deputy
Clerk
R/D 2/14/07, 2/21/07,c

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surrounding areas. Computer
knowledge helpful, requires
reliable vehicle, good driving
record, valid drivers license &
insurance. One 'day a week -
Thursdays. Pick up magazines
in Madison. Call 386-590-1255
1/24,26,31,2/2,7,9,14,16,21,23,28
,3/2,c
Operations Assistant: For
paratransit Company in
Monticello/ Jefferson County.
Scheduling, routing and
dispatching of daily
transportation services. Prefer
experience in passenger


100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work Frame Straightening





1630 E. Jackson St
(Located behind Langdale Auto Mall)


.Business





Directory


CALL TO ADVERTISE
YOUR BUSINESS


997-3568
'f''^p^pWT~fimBfm^^nr'iTY^


of Madison, Inc.
Certified Electrical Contractor
We have a Bucket Truck available to set poles and
other applications





850-509-7914 850-933-8167
Licensed & Insured EC-13001894


Herndon Trucking
Truck Rental Custom Hauling
Sand Gravel Refuse
Backho.e Service
Light Clearing & Driveways
Office (850) 948-40.19
RAYMOND HERNDON Mobile (850) 570-0458


Kessler

Construction LLC

Repair; Remodeling & New Construction
Licensed and Insured
states Mark Kessler

Phone: 850-997-4540 ,
CRC1329001


I U


MvalCrodchet


Melanie Mays
Private lessons, lessons from beginning to advanced in
crochet and knitting board. Call for class times. Crochet
club forming, call for information.


850-997-6026 home office


850-321-0036 cell


www.oldfashionedknittingboard.com
www.divacrochet.com
Certified crochet teacher, F.I.T. in New York


Comfort Commercial FLINT RIVER BURNETTE PLUMBING & Bell Mobile Home
STRME Residential ServiceRI RU ETB lo
~n Sales TIMBER COMPANY WELL SERVICE Transor & Se
Installation 4 Transport& Setup
BUYERS OF PINE AND Family Owned Since 1902 a
M HT HARDWOOD TIMBER Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled Fixtures- Relevel ~ Tie-downs ~ Permits
L U ( r, SPECIALIZING IN PINE Faucets Pumps Replaced Sewer & Water
*' '"'w"'TS ,waICE PULPWOOD THINNING Connections Tanks Replaced Water heater Call For FREE Estimates
FREE ESTIMATES Repairs- All Repairs Kevin Bell 850-948-3372
TIM HUNT State License CACo 52439 John Sanders Dave Dumas ..,, .Bell 4 72
Phone 850-877-4136 2840- Indusrial Plazahn T. Sanders Dave Dumas
Fax. 850-656-1275 Tallahassee. Florida 32301 (850)643-7575 (229)224-4331 E ISTALL METAL ROOFS
Mobile: 850-251-4308 ,E-mail. thunl@centralheatingconsullants.com



Castaneda ^ Anhr Northside Mower and Register's
S.......... .Small Engine Repair -* e
MIasonar.y, LLC ,- rust For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub i St ag
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL P-OV rti-S Cadet, Snapper, Murray & More, 315 Waukeenah Hwy.

(850) 508-6396 220 nt Warranty, Repairs for all makes & models. 1/4 Mile Off US 19 South
g 220 'rentf St. S' Steinhiatcliee, JL 32359
Lic. & Ins. 352-498-7770 TolCClree 877-498-7770 Pickup & Delivery Service Available 997-2535
Pam Wessels Mark Rebin Larry Nichols 562-2962
Brick & Block Realtor/Broker RealtorAssociate Reallor Associate


Sister Fay GULF COAST M & M Transmission
Palm Reader & Advisor PROFESSIONAL ROOFING METAL Foreign & Domestic
Are you Unhappy? Worried? Sad? Roof Inspections, new roofs, ROOFING es
Have you been Disappointed? re-roofs, & repair specialist. RO FINAll Types Front Wheel Rear Wheel
Give me a call and let me help you. CCC#1325926 Of Metal Full Drive Train
Serving Leon County for 50 years Folsom Constructing, LLC.850-566-6504 Full lne of Roofing Differential
We Do Parties! Tarot Cards*Palm Readings*Astrology II J '" accessories in stock 178 NE Duval Ave.
Call in for 2 free questions ecial Flashings MadeAll Types WarrantedMetal Available Madison, FL 32340
Mon.-Fr Licensed by County 29 Mahan Drive Cut to your desired lengths deliveryy Service Available 850-973-4516
Mon.-Fri 10a- Sun-5pm, 1729 Mahan Drive 80 t i 973-
(850)878-9327 Call Toll-Free 888-393-0335 352-498-0778 Horseshoe Beach, FL


North Florida Cabinets AF T R

& More LLC 864NWUS 221
Greenville, Fl. 32331
Kitchen CabinetS, Counter Tops, Pond* Land Clearing* Demoli-
and Vanities. Pond* Land Clearing* Demoli-
and Vanities. Help us fight amyotrophic Phone: 850-948-7891 tion* Hauling* Site Prep*
Built to last, quality guaranteed. lateral sclerosis, better known Cell: 850-973-7135 FreeEstimates and Consultatio n
Licensed/Insured 1-800-USA-NAVY as Lou Gehrig's disease. Fax: 850-948-2482
850-264-3391 wwwnavyjobs.com 1D1W E-mail: Joe Reams, Jr.
850-264- .,Muscular Dystrophy Association joeballreams@msn.com Owner
1-800-572-1717* www.mdausa.org


I--


- I~f ~F


~C~
'~rsCt'









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 14, 2007 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED

Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday.,.S9.00
Each Additional Line....$1.25
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


HELP WANTED
transportation service,
knowledge of Windows-based
computer operations, and
familiarity with Monticello
/Jefferson County area a must.
A Class D Florida Driver's
License will be required. This is
a Safety-sensitive position which
requires substance abuse testing
per FTA/DOT. Position is
located in the BBT Jefferson
County (Monticello) office
days/hours of work are typically
Monday through Friday, 8:00
am to 5:00 pm. Send
Letter/resume to Big Bend
Transit, Inc. 290 West Dogwood
St., Monticello, FL 32344
2/7, 9, 14, 16, 21, c
Cleaning service needs people in
Monticello area after 5 p.m. 3
days a week part time work
must be able to pass a back
ground check. Only serious
minded inquires only. Call
Karen at 850-942-6200 or
850-926-7029. *
2/7,9,14,16,21,23,28, c
AVON! Start the year with a
new career, earn 50%, only $10
to start! 570-1499
R/D
1/31,2/2,7,9,14,16,21,23,28,pd
Cashier- Capital City Travel
Center. Experience necessary.
This is a drug-free workplace.
322-6600, 997-3538
R/P 2/14.15,20,23c
Part-tiine Janitorial Aucilla
Call 681-3148
R/D 2/9,14,16,21

SERVICES
I build sheds, decks, handicap
ramps, exterior carpentry work,
window/door replacement. Call
Bob 242-9342
R/DI/10,12,17,19,24,26,31,2/2,7,
9,14,16,21,23,28,3/2,7,9,14,16,pd
If you have a child attending
FSU/FAMU high schools, and
carpooling is not working, for
an affordable fee, you have an
option. Call Freeman Davis 510-
5162, 421-8060.
R/D2/9,14,16,21,23,28,pd "
Child Care Services- infant to 3
years old. Reasonably low
prices. In my home. 997-5498
11/1,TFN,c

Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
new menopausal products.
Jacksoi's Drug Store.
5/12,tfn, c


SERVICES
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd, 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/i, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
TFN

FREE
Water Bed Frame only, no liner,
Queen size, golden oak w/lighted
head board. Perfect Condition.
556-4831
R/D 2/14,16nc

FOUND
Keys on green key ring found
Sunday 11/26/06 on Lake Road
near Tecumseh Rd. Call Debbie
at 997-3568 11/29.1 2/1,6,tfn,nc
Greyhound- Dark color female
w/red collar on North Jefferson
St. Call Marcie @ 997-2988
R/D 2/9,14nc

AUTOMOTIVE
1985 Chevy Capris Station
Wagon $800.00 342-1486,
509-1942
R/D 2/9, 1.1
1996 Ford F-350 Diesel
Crewcab. No calls after 9:00 pm
please 251-2237.
1/10,TFN,nc
1996 Ford Ranger XLT
Supercab 2wd 4.0 V6 127K AC
AT Toolbox Needs some minor
work, but driveable now. $3,000
251-0763 8am 8pm
9/27,TFN,nc
FOR SALE
Queen pillow-Top Mattress set.
Brand new in plastic with
warranty. $150. 850-222-9879
. -12/6,TFN,e -
SOLID WOOD Cherry sleigh
bed BRAND NEW in box,
$275. (850) 545-7112
12/6,1 fn,c
SOFA & LOVESEAT. Brand
NEW LEATHER, still wrapped,
lifetime warranty, sacrifice
$795. (delivery available). (850)
425-8374
12/6,Tfn,c


Upcoming Auctions!

Ag & Construction Machinery, Farm Equipment,
Trucks, Trailers, ATV's, much more

"llth Annual Winter Auction"
Sunbelt Ag Expo Site
Moultrie, GA
Saturday, February 17, 2007 9:00 am

"5th Annual Winter Auction"
Iron City, GA
Saturday, February 24, 2007 9:00am
Don't miss these opportunities!
Call now to consign!
Turn your surplus equipment into Sold!


Mobile:
229-891-1832
Phone:
229-985-4565


Terry DeMott, Sr.
1894 Sylvester Highway
Moultrie, GA 3t768
www.demottauction.com


M M S
Rea EsateAucio


Odomd Vaee 4,d W"


198+ acres
Cultivated land
Good soil types
Pond site
Natural hardwoods
Metal shelter
Cabin
Paved Road frontaal


Directions: At caution light on Hwy 84 in Boston go North on Pavo Road. Travel
approximately 1/4 mile. Turn left on Salem Road. Look for auction signs.
Terms: 10% buyers premium on all sales. 20% down day of auction, balance due
in 30 days at closing.




Stehe F*Brtlon-ree.Relt


FOR SALE
NE%\ QUEEN POSTER
bedroom set bed, dresser,
mirror, chest, 2 night stands.
$4000 value, must sell $1500.
850-545-7112.
12/6,tfn.c
DINING ROOM Beautiful
cherry table, 2 arm & 4 side
chairs, lighted china cabinet.
Brand new in boxes, can deliver.
Must move, $799. 850-545-7112.
12/6,tfn.,c
Mobile Home For Sale 1991
Destiny double wide, metal roof,
1672 sq.ft., 4/Br, 2 full bath,
fireplace, good condition.
Available MAY/JUNE Price
$9,500.00 You pay to move.
997-1276 or 242-9248
R/D 2/14,16,pd

Life Gear workout Walker by
Brenda DyGraf. Like new
condition. Workout Video
included. Asking $75.00 Call
997-2893
R/D2,14,16,pd
Specialized feed for Alpacas &
Lamas. Call Marcy
850-421-2403
R/D 2/9,14,16,21,23,28 3/2,7c


FOR RENT
House 4/Br, 2/Bth. Prefer HUD
Housing Qualified. 544-6688
R/D 2/9, 14c
4/Br, 2/Ba $750.00 Month
251-7708
R/D 2/9,14',16,21pd
Spacious 2/1 and 1/1 apts, also
office space, near Monticello
center. Section 8 OK. Call
850-491-8447
1/24,tfn,c

REAL ESTATE

For Sale by Owner/ Newly
Renovated 2/Br, 1/Ba $69,900
Info. Call 212-3142
R/D 2/14,16,21,23,28pd


HELP WANTED

Martha's Bouncing
Babies

is looking for
Experienced Day
Care Workers Call

850-997-5730


RETAIL ASSISTANT MANAGER
MONTICELLO, FL
FRED'S, a retail discount chain with locations throughout
the.mid-South, continues to expand, offering excellent
opportunities for career oriented individuals who are
interested in Retail Management.
Offering:
Annual salary starting at $23,660
Competitive Benefits
401(k) Retirement Plan
MEDICAL AND DENTAL INSURANCE
Individual Training
The successful candidate will have:
2 YEARS RETAIL EXPERIENCE
Interested candidates should send their resumes or
letter of qualifications to :
FAX # 901-202-7539
E-MAIL gpricer@fredsinc.com


For Sale by First United Methodist Church 2400 sq.
ft. home at 895 West Washington Street. This former
Methodist Parsonage with split floor plan has 4 bed-
rooms and 3 1/2 baths, refinished hardwood floors.
New tile floors in kitchen, laundry and baths, carpet
in the family room and master bedroom. Bathrooms
newly renovated. Wood stove insert in fireplace.
Large lot landscaped with magnolias, camellias, crepe
myrtles and azaleas. Large deck and screened porch.
$259,500. For more information
call 997-5545









Surplus trucks, vehicles, & equip.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17: 9AM
TALLAHASSEE: North Florida Fairgrounds
*Dump trucks & road tractors *(7)Bucket trucks
*Cat & Deere dozers, loaders, rollers, scrapers
*Ford & Deere farm tractors *misc. equipment
*Sheriff Crown Vies and late model Luminas,
Interpids, etc. *Numerous pickups & SUVs
These items are from : Leon Co., Leon Sheriff,
Wakulla Sheriff, Gadsden Co., Hamilton Cp.,
Colquitt Co., Talquin Electric, Mitchell EMC,
City of Chattahoochee, Taylor Co. Sheriff
DON'T MISS THIS OPPORTUNITY!!
PREVIEW: Friday, Feb. 16: 9am 4pm
TERMS: All items sell AS IS *5% BP *Cash or Cashier check
OK, others with bank letter of guarantee only
800-519-6402 www firstcoastauction corn
FIRST COAST AUCTION au286 abl50
P.O. BOX 7878 Jacksonville, FL 32238


Housing Vouchers

SWe accept all vouchers
S2/2 $615 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 $50 dep. m

Pool & Youth Activities


'IN.


575-6571 U
W W W W 5 5 5 5 5 5 "


(850) 997-4340


Property Management Services!!!
Great Rentals
2/1 1/2 bath mobile home east of
town on 5 acres $500/month


~. ;:

h V


Wooded Tract 2.09 hillside acres east
of town on graded County Road $30,400

Just Listed!! 3 bedroom 2 bath delightful log
cabin with front and back screened porches,
board fence pasture, double carport and out
building on 4.07 acres $385,000

Lloyd Acres on a wooded hillside a 3 bedroom
2 bath modular home with oak floors, fireplace
and lots of very nice extras including shop for
$87,500

Historic Budd House built ca 1882 by commu-
nity leader of the day for his family. Lovely wood
work, high ceilings, spacious rooms, grand fire-
places, marvelous porches, currently 4 bedrooms
and 2 baths $355,000

Waterfront Home!! Like New, roomy, 3 bed-
room 2 bath home with big carport nice shed with
5 acres on very nice lake near 1-10 and US 19
$385,000 See it at www.TimPeary.com

Amazinq Buy!!! Mixed Use Property 12
plus partially cleared acres on US 19 south land
use designation permits 4 houses per acre near
Dennis' Trading post only $36,500 per acre

New Listing Contract Pending 13.29 acres
some wooded some open $5,000 per acre

Terrific Location 3 bedroom 2 bath doublewide
with fireplace, big porch, garage, shed, above
ground pool, with big trees, fence paddocks, on
county maintained paved Cherry Tree Lane now
$127,500

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly
wooded acres Only $36,500

Pasture and Pecans 5-10 lovely acres on
paved road $15,500 per acre Very nice property,
good deed restrictions

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Great Opportunity!!! Comfortable 4 bedroom
3 bath home on five fenced acres with guest cot-
tage w/bath, 2 car garage, big shop, pasture 100
pecan trees and a nice pool Only $365,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Wooded Acreaqe 5.35 acres on private road
off Paul Thompson Road $128,500


Waukeenah Highway 27.99 acres good
home site fenced pasture $545,000

Aucilla Shores 5 level wooded acres $75,000

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath double-
wide with nice deck, fenced yard on 1 acre
$73,500

Investment Property Choice lot on the
Ecofina River 20 minutes to the Gulf, State
property on 3 sides, septic tank on property,
paved road only $195,000


Realtor Tim Peg

850-997-4340
See all our listings at
www.TimPeary.com

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real EU
Simply the Best!


ary






state!


ffl, - - - - - - qwqwq


-r-r-r-r~~~~~~~~~---- -- - -'









PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 14, 2007
a ,m, 'il


FOUR YEAR OLDS Tristan Craig and Hunter Thomton
paint a dugout with Angie Craig supervising.


DAKOTA ELY uses a paint sprayer as he paints a fence
under the supervision of Scott Brantley.


Clean Up Project At Park


Result Of Many
have been completed.
FRAN HUNT The clean up project f
Staff Writer on painting, cleaning,
ing and raking, .towa


The Community Clean Up
Project at the Recreation Park
recently, was a huge success.
Many community residents,
groups and organizations par-
ticipated in the project.
Michele Brantley, health
educator for the Jefferson and
Madison Counties, noted that
many community volunteers
had been working throughout
the month of January, on park
projects and without theiref-
forts, the projects would not


goal of a facelift for the
The improvements inc
painting of the dugouts,
ings, office, picnic
restroooms, both insic
out, and fences.
The color of the pai
changed from oran
green, which matches
new color of the Bab
concession stand; rakir
limb removal, dead tr
moval, and clearing


Survive Valentine's DU


(Continued From Page 5)
whatever feels comfortable
and be ok with it. You don't
:have to do anything you are
:uncomfortable with. Simply
'saying, "Happy Valentine's
Day. I love you." sends the
-message that you are thinking
of your partner.
Surviving For Singles--
Accept your emotions. If you
are sad and lonely, it's ok. You
feel what you feel. Just be-
cause you may not happen to
be in a relationship for Valen-
tine's Day does not mean there
is anything wrong with you.
Be social. Organize a group
of other singles for dinner out
or some other social activity.
You may not be involved ro-
mantically, but you have more
'people in your life who care
about you than you realize.
Treat yourself. Buy or do
something special. Splurge a
little. Rather than fixating on
not being in a relationship at
the moment, be thankful for
what's good in your life. Ironi-
cally, singles spend a lot of
time hoping for a relationship,
while many in a relationship
lament the freedom of their
single days.
Valentines' Day is as com-
mercialized as Christmas.
Look at all the money and
stress you saved by not being
caught up in the frenzy. Im-
merse yourself in other activi-
ties. If you are busy, you won't
even notice Valentine's Day.
Help others in need. When you
do, you will also feel better.
If you want a relationship, be
proactive. Don't wait for a re-
lationship to find you, go out'
and look for one. Stay upbeat.
-A happy person is much more


attractive than someone with a
perpetual frown. No one wants
to spend time with a person
who is bitter or resentful.
If there is someone you are
interested in, take the
initiative. Invite them to get to-
gether with you. Stay sociable.



Homes Of

Mourning
(Continued From Page 7)
Courtney, Katelyn and
Abigail.
BENNY WARD
Benny Ward, 6, died Tues-
day, February 6, 2007 in Ox-
ford, he was born in Jefferson
Co., FL.
Funeral service were held at
1:00 pm on Saturday, February
10, 2007 at the Jersey Baptist
Church with the Reverend
Ikey Loggins officiating. Inter-
ment followed at Jersey Bap-
tist Church Cemetery.
Meadows Funeral Home, Inc.
was in charge of arrangements
P.O. Box 1232 Monroe, Geor-
gia 770-267-9406.
Surviving are daughter: Amy
Bellew (Tom) of Simpsonville,
SC; step children: Teresa Har-
bert, C.E. Guthrie, Jeff
Guthrie, and Debbie Ellis all of
Loganville, and David Guthrie
of Monroe; sisters: Ivialee
Roberts of Greenbriar, TN,
Judy Griffin of Valdosta;
brothers: John Ward of Valdo-
sta and Sammy Ward of Ox-
ford.
He was preceded in death by
parents Sam Andrew Ward and
Margaret Evelyn Ward; and
sisters Eva Mayville and
Nancy Wager.


Citizens
the base of trees; landscaping
focusedd around the new Babe Ruth
plant- filed and the memorial site;
rds the and installing new park signs.
park. "It is important for the com-
cluded: unity to know that the im-
build- provements made will benefit
tables, everyone," said Brantley.
de and "The park and its facilities
are open from dusk to dawn
for the community to enjoy.
int was Everyone is invited to come
ge to and take advantage of the
ed the newly resurfaced tennis
e Ruth courts, walking path, and fit-
ig, tree ness equipment, or take time
ree re- to have a picnic at the pavil-
around ion. The park is a family
place for everyone to use." .
She said that special thanks
3y go to all the people, groups
and organizations that partici-


pated in the beautification
project.
Those participants included:
Fred and Rob Beshears from
Simpson's Nursery, for donat-
ing the plants for the land-
scaping around the Babe Ruth
Field.
Winston Lee, for designing
and landscaping around the
Babe Ruth Field and Rusty
Hamerick for finalizing the
landscaping plans.
JCI Warden Richard Dug-
gar for allowing inmates to
help with the project, "And
what a job they did," said
Brantley.
Dave Harvey and Jeff Cru-
mity from the County Road
Department, for all of their
hard work on the park im-
provements.
Pickney Hill Plantation,
Grubbs Petroleum, and Emily
Walker for donating funds for
the improvements.
Doug Stiff, from Doug's


Lawn and Tree Service, for
his tree limb removal and
stump grinding service.
Randy Wheeler, from Geor-
gia Bark and Mulch for do-
nating a truck load of bark.
Billy French from Monti-
cello Nurseries for donating
rose bushes.
Stephen Thomas for donat-
ing his paint sprayer.
Girl Scout troops #187, and
#407, led by Melodie Hamil-
ton and Lisa Starling, for
landscaping around the me-
morial site, park office and
painting.
Boy Scout Troop #8-03, led
by Steve Registei, for paint-
ing the pavilion.
Commissioner Junior Tuten
and George Willis for digging
the holes around the Babe
Ruth Field for the plants.
Kevin Aman, park director,
for all of his extra energy and
time donated toward, the pro-
ject.
The Chamber of Commerce
Junior Leadership Club, for
painting a dugout.
Scott Brantley and Dakota
Ely for their month long ef-
forts of painting, raking and
planting.
Citizens of the community,
for all of their hard work on
all required projects also.
"Everyone who worked on
the park projects worked hard
and gave 100 percent effort,"
said Brantley.
"All those who participated
are anxious to make their park
the best it could be, and this
goal was accomplished."
She concluded, "Together,
we did make a difference."



Freedom of

the, Prss is

Everybody/ s

F reedola
L.~Ra"


CINE A7




NIGHT AT THE
MUSEUM
(PG)
Fri. 4:10-7:30-9:55 Sat. 1:10-
4:10-7:30-9:55 Sun. 1:10-4:10-
7:30 Mon. Thurs. 4:10-7:30
EPIC MOVIE
(PG13)
Fri. 5:10-7:25-9:45 Sat. 1:00-
3:05-5:10-7:25-9:45 Sun. 1:00-
3:05-5:10-7:25 Mon. Thurs.
5:10-7:05
NORBIT
(PG13)
Fri. 4:35 -7:05-9:35Sat. 1:40-
4:35 -7:05-9:35Sun. 1:00-4:35 -
7:05Mon. Thurs. 4:35 -7:05-
NO PASSES
STOMP THE YARD
(PG13)
Fri. 4:30-7:20-10:10 Sat. 1:20-
4:30-7:20-10:10 Sun. 1:20-4:30-
7:20 Mon.-Thurs. 4:30-7:20
THE MESSENGERS
(PG13)
Fri. 5:25-7:35-9:40 Sat. 1:05-
3:15-5:25-7:35-9:40 Sun. 1:05-
3:15-5:25-7:35 Mon.- Thurs.
5:25-7:35
NO PASSES
BECAUSE I SAID SO
(PG13)
Fri. 4:05-7:00-9:20 Sat. 1:25-
4:05-7:00-9:20 Sun. 1:25-4:05-
7:00 Mon. Thurs. 4:05-7:00
NO PASSES
DREAMGIRLS
(PG13)
Fri. 4:25-7:15-10:05 Sat. 1:30-
4:25-7:15-10:05 Sun. 1:30-4:25-
7:15 Mon. Thurs. 4:25-7:15

/ All new high-
back seats and
more renova-
tions on the
way.


Blueprint To Your Dreams!
At Pennyworth Homes we can make building your
dream home a reality. p

Serving North Florida p
& South Georgia
since 1977
& SOthiiRBoBrB'ia


* Award Winning '.
Home Designs
& Service
* Biilr P..rd
I-,. 8 ,, ,,,.I




Pennyworth H O

tf LaAtdA? Let'sB8
9335 W. Tennessee St. '
Tallahassee, FL 32304 ,_ .


S'.t'I I -


Many Sizes
Galvanized
Steel Framework
Locate Doors
Anywhere
Ships in 10 Days


3 Men Can Install
in 4 Dayst
Car Lift
Compatible
Drop Ceiling
Compatible


JCKC POKER ROOM & DOG TRACK

Now 0 ew


(850) 997-2561


Monday-Saturday Monticello, Florida

Poker Room: 12 Noon to 12 Midnight

TEXAS HOLD'EM OMAHA HI/LOW 7-CARD STUD

Know when to hold'em & know when to fold'em!

Dog Track: 7pm-llpm

Turf Club Great Food & Beverage

How Can You Win if You Haven't Been?


BoaB'Angel


FREE 2-NIGHT VACATION!
Donate Car Boat RV Motorcycle
1-800-227-2643
www.boatangel.com




Lihw hffoy to build!


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Pro.-t1l Metal Buildings by
www.AtlasMetalBuildings.com S R
1-800-346-9902NDUSTR
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