Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00177
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: February 9, 2007
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00177
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text








Campaign
Urges Folks
To Give

Editorial, Page 4
II


Assembly
Hosts Black
History Program

Story, Page 7


Willis HMS
Teacher of year
Nominee

Story Page 9


JCHS Posts
Academic
Honor Rolls

Story, Page 16


Friday Morning


Monticello


139TH YEAR NO. 11, 50 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews.


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9,2007


Plans OK'd

For 2 New

Businesses

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Acting on the recommenda-
tion of the Local Planning
Agency (LPA), the City Coun--
cil on Tuesday night approved
the site plans for two commer-
cial developments.
The first was for a new
building for CVS Pharmacy,
which is relocating to the for-
mer site of Better Built Homes
on US 19, just north of Jeffer-
son Builders Mart.
The site plan calls for con-
struction of a 13,225 sq. foot-
building with 68 parking
spaces, which is significantly
larger than the present facility
opposite the Winn Dixie.
City officials stopped short
of insisting that the new busi-
ness install a sidewalk on the
driveway that will cut through
the parking lot, connecting US
19 with Waukeenah Road. But
they strongly encouraged it.
City officials did, however,_
incorporate the recommenda-
tion of the LPA that the busi-
ness include a bicycle lane
alongside the driveway and
two speed humps to calm po-
tential through-traffic.
The engineers for the project
could not say when construc-
tion would start. But they sug-
gested that it would be either
in May or October.
The second site plan ap-
proved was for the Splash-N-
Dash Car Wash on US 19
South near the intersection of
Waukeenah Road.
Again, the council acted on
the LPA's recommendation
with little discussion.
The site plan calls for con-
struction of a 2,706 sq. foot
building with 10,459 sq. feet
of parking and driving area on
a near one-acre triangular par-
cel opposite the county's recy-
cling center.
As represented, the facility
will hold one automatic bay
and three self-serve bays and
be equipped with state-of-the-
art equipment. It will also be
(See Business, Page 2)


City Adopts


Large Land


Use Change


CITY OFFICIALS acted on three growth-related issues Tuesday night, adopting a
large-scale Comprehensive Plan Amendment that paves the way for a 450 unit resi-
dential subdivision and approving the site plans for two new commercial buildings,
one for CVS Pharmacy and the second for a state-of-the-art car wash. (News Photo)



Residential Construction


Off-To Good Start in Jan.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

City and county issued per-
mits for residential construc-
tion and repairs rose
significantly in January, com-
pared with the same month last
year: 58 to 44 respectively.
More significant, however,
was the increase in the monies
generated by the permit fees
during the two comparative


months: $41,286.61
ary versus $24,65
January.
Building Inspecto
Bullock attributed t
revenues to increase
permit fees as we
higher values of the
homes being built.
Indeed, the value
home permits for Ja
$2,181,132, versus
last January.
"We have a trend


WALLACE BULLOCK, building inspector, re
commissioner last week that January was a gc
for the issuance of residential building perm
Photo)


this Janu- people building larger homes
5,78 last in Jefferson County," Bullock
told commissioners last week.
r Wallace "People are building their
:he higher dream homes. One house be-
3es in the ing build is 11,000 sq. feet,
11 as. the and that's only for one person.
residential It's not unusual. The average
house being build is 3,800 sq.
.ation of feet. That is the smallest home
nuary was that we're seeing."
$933,104 The valuation of commercial
permits, on the other hand, was
id toward zero, compared with $242,633
last January.
"We're off to a good start,"
Bullock told commissioners.
"But so far, it's still a residen-
tial market this year."
He said the valuation of
other permits, including addi-
tions, re-roofs and nonresiden-
tial structures was also up for
January, $622,656 versus
$193,670 last January.
--. He attributed the increase to
the higher costs of building
materials.
A breakdown of the revenues
realized by the city and county
shows that city permits gener-
.. ated $8,522.95 this January
versus $6,033.02 last January,
ported to while the county generated
ood month $32,763.66 and $18,622.76 re-
its. (News (See Residential, Page 2)


SLAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The City Council on Tues-
day night approved a large-
scale Comprehensive Plan
amendment rezoning 420
acres, despite expressed objec-
tions by the Department of
Community Affairs (DCA).
In proceeding with the ap-
proval, city officials reasoned
that the DCA had misinter-
preted the information submit-
ted by the developer. They
also relied on the representa-
tions of Alan Saucier, the de-
veloper's representative, and
Darin Taylor, the city's con-
sultant planner.
Saucier pointedout that the,
DCA's objection missed the
point, in that the agreement be-
tween Monticello Plantation,
Inc., and the city limited the
number f houses to 450 maxi-
mum. Absent the agreement,
the developer could have put
in excess of 770 houses on the
property, he said.
In its review, the DCA had-
missed the stipulation and
based its objection on a maxi-
mum development of the prop-
erty, Saucier said.
Actually, the DCA objected
to the city's alleged failure "to
adequately address the impacts
to its facilities and services."


According to the DCA, the
city conducted its analysis of
water, sewer and transporta-
tion needs based on the pro-
posed limit of 450 dwellings.
"Since the analysis was not
done at the maximum density,
however, the true impact on
the LOS .(levels of service)
standards and available capaci-
ties are unknown," the DCA
report stated.
Additionally, the DCA found
that the city used the wrong
methodology in its transporta-
tion analysis and expressed
,concerns about the amend-
ment's potential impact on the
area's hydrological and wet-
lands resources.
Saucier said the developer
had-,addressed all the DCA's
concerns. He urged the council
to approve the project and put
the burden of proof on the
DCA.
"If you passed the amend-
ment, the DCA's hand is
forced," Saucier said.
Taylor concurred. He said.
the developer had revised the
transportation and utilities
methodologies to make them
acceptable to the DCA.
"I don't see where the DCA
will find noncompliance,"
Taylor said.
Council members Tom Vo-
gelgesang and Luther Pickels
voiced concern about the capa-
(See Land-Use, Page 2)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

County officials last week
transferred to the city two
small parcels of county road
right-of-way to allow for the
construction of two wastewater
lift stations.
The two parcels, each ap-
proximately 15 by 35 feet, are
located just off the paved por-
tions of Cooper's Pond Road
and Spring Hollow Drive.


The pump stations to be con-
structed on the two sites are
part of the wastewater collec-
tion system that the city is in-
stalling in the Cooper's Pond
-and Spring Hollow subdivi-
sions. The project is being
funded with a legislative ap-
propriation.
"We are pleased to finally
have the resources available to
complete this project, which
includes abandonment of sep-
tic tanks, installation of a cen-
(See Small Parcels, Page 2)


Resurfacing Work To Begin


On Boston, Old Lloyd Roads
with the drainage improvement resurfacing and widening
LAZARO ALEMAN work, a necessary component ject.
Senior Staff Writer of the project. "He's been involved in
"He should begin the resur- behind-the-scenes prep
Improvement work on facing within a week to 10 tions," Harvey said.
county roads 149 and 158A is days," Harvey said. He said Anderson-Colun


"in progress and going along
normal as it should be", in the
words of Road Department Su-
perintendent David Harvey.
"In the next days and
weeks, people should begin
seeing paving equipment out
there," Harvey said last week.
He said that Peavy and Sons
Construction Company -- the
contractor on the Boston High-
way, also known as CR-149 --
is 80 to 90 percent complete


The Department of Trans-
portation (DOT) awarded the
county a $1.2 million grant for
the resurfacing of the Boston
Highway from US 19 to the
Georgia state line.
Harvey said that Anderson
Columbia Construction Com-
pany -- the contractor on the
Old Lloyd Road, also known
as CR-158A -- has been stock-
piling materials and mobilizing
equipment for the start of the


pro-

the
para-

nbia


should begin on the drainage
improvement work in the next
week or so. In fact, the com-
pany late last week began set-
ting out alongside the road the
corrugated pipes for the drain-
age improvement work.
The DOT awarded the
county $2.2 million for the
widening and resurfacing of
Old Lloyd Road from US 19
on the north end to SR-59 at
(See Resurfacing, Page 2)


ONE CONTRACTOR has begun laying out pipe on Old Lloyd Road for the drainage im-
provement work, preparatory to widening and resurfacing the road. A second contrac-
tor, meanwhile, has about completed the drainage improvement work on the Boston
Highway and is ready to begin the resurfacing work. (News Photo)


County Transfers Small Parcels

To City For Sewer Lift Stations


a,


c~o








PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 9, 2007


Advanced Real Estate Sales

Monticello New Businesses


MARK VOLLERTSEN recently opened his real estate office on the Courthouse Circle
He has sold real estate since 1996. (News Photo)


Businesses' Site Plans Approved
(Continued From Page 1) .. ,, A o;.o .-p n..irp T ,,.i.
l dpr thra ch-d ianted Develoner J T S ilp~


capable of accommodating
boats and recreational
vehicles.
City officials' only concern
was that the developer fol-


IUWe troUUg ues ognal
landscaping. Too many. times
in the past, they been burned
by developers who didn't fol-
low through on their promises,
the officials said.


p-ij V up-t i. -Lur es
vowed to make the business a
destination point that would do
the community proud.. He said
construction would begin right
away.


Land-Use Change Adopted By City


(Continued From Page 1)
ability of city roads adjacent to
the new subdivision to handle
the increased traffic.
Taylor told them that issue
was better addressed later in
the process, when the devel-
oper submitted site plans for
the subdivision.


The affected property con-
sists of two parcels. One
parcel, which was already in
the city, is made up of 89.53
acres. The second parcel,
which was annexed several
months ago, is made up of
329.85 acres.
The council recently rezoned


the combined property to resi-
dential low density, which is
lower than its earlier zoning
designation.
The combined property ex-
tends from near Willow Road
on the north, to Cooper's Pond
Road on the south, and to Wa-
ter Street on the east.


[REAL~sTA
1~3cR~aI


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Advanced Real Estate Sales.-
is among the newer busi-
nesses in Monticello.
Advanced Real Estate Sales
is located at 150 W. Washing-
ton St., at courthouse circle,,
right next to Jake's, and is
open 9 a.m. until 6 p.m.,
Monday through Friday, 9
a.m. until 3 p.m. on Saturday
and by appointment on Sun-
day.
Resident Mark Vollertsen
has beem selling residential
homes since 1996, and has
.help hundreds of families in
and around Tallahassee, find
that perfect home, sell their
home, negotiate fair prices
and provide guidance about
financing purchases.
"I see my profession as a
way to help others buy and
sell real estate, which they
don't do every day," Vollert-
sen explained.
He said he takes the no-
pressure approach and looks
for ways to make clients ex-
perience the fun and excite-
ment that buying and selling
real estate should be.
"I know the value of refer-
rals. and repeat business, so
honesty and fair dealing is
imperative in all of my busi-
ness transactions," said Vol-
lertsen.


He added that Advanced
Real Estate Sales is doing its
part as a full service real es-
tate service provider.
"As a member of the Talla-
hassee Board of Realtors,
Florida Association of Real-
tors, Advanced Real Estate
and the National Association
of Realtors, Advanced Real
Estate Sales provides its cus-
tomers with full exposure to
the properties available in all
market areas, said Vollertsen.
"Unfortunately for real es-
tate buyers and sellers, the
memberships I mentioned are
not required for Florida real
estate licensing.
"This is a major missing
link in real estate sales, and
the public just does not real-
ize the importance of Realtor
participation."
"With today's technology,
buyers often shop MLS (Mul-


Resurfacing Work To Begin on Two Roads
fC(ontinued Fronm Pa r 11


-'untr inueu r ruin rag i
Lloyd on the south end.
County roads 149 and 158A-
were funded under the Small
County Road Assistance Pro-
gram (SCRAP) and the Small
County Outreach Program
(SCOP) respectively.
SCRAP and SCOP represent-


two of several programs that
the DOT administers expressly
to help small counties with
their road improvement pro-
jects.
Since commencement of the
two programs, the DOT has
awarded the county more than
$10 million for road'improve-


ment projects, resulting in the
upgrade of five county roads.

The county presently has
several more road on the list of
potential SCRAP or SCOP
projects, including the Ash-
ville Highway, Rabon Road,
and West Lake Road.


mall --usiness
sma


Small Parcels Transferrred For Lift Stations


(Continued From Page 1)


told county officials in re-
questing the transfers.


surveys of the parcels, as well
as all other costs associated


tral sewer system, and most She said the lift stations with the transfer, she said
importantly, elimination of would in no way impede traf- County officials approve
pollutants loading the ground- fic on the road. The city, transfer unanimously wi
water," Mayor Julie Conley moreover, would pay for the tle discussion.

Residential Construction Off To Good Start In Jan
(Continued From Page 1) January versus last January: $1,391.88; and develop
Some other fees and the EMS impact fee, $2,226.96 permits, $16,245.47
amounts they generated in versus $2,988.48; Fire Rescue $8,670.66.
spectively.impact fee, $1,348.48, versus










1WCTVi e


d.
ed the
th lit-



pment
versus


WCTV Meteorologist Rob Nucatola forecasts weather
from the Courthouse Circle Wednesday. (News Photo)


County Democrats To

Meet February 13


The County Democratic Ex-
ecutive Committee will meet 7
p.m., Tuesday,. Feb. 13. at the
library.
This is the first meeting of
2007, and plans for the year
will be discussed.
A representative from the
Florida Democratic Party has
been invited to speak.
Refreshments will be served.
Democrats are planning their


third annual St. Patrick's Day
Dinner, 7 p.m., March 15, at
Gerry Hall at Christ Episcopal
Church.
State Chief Financial
Officer, Alex Sink, will be the
speaker, and a traditional Irish
dinner will be served.
For tickets and information,
contact Eleanor Hawkins,
997-2863, or Beth Davis, 997-
0259.


tI)










II
Q
*

*

*

*
S

S

U

U

U


tip #37
Offering an affordable health plan to your
employees can boost your employee retention.


If you do not currently offer your employees health
benefits, you may be eligible for a 40% premium savings
for Capital Health Plan coverage through the Capital
Health Partnership.

Learn more. Find out if your small business qualifies by
calling 523-7333 or go to:
www.capitalhealthpartnership.com.




Capital

Health

--Partnership


Honors Gary Wright
with the F. Wilson Carraway, Sr. Award


T he 2006 F. Wilson Carraway, Sr. Award
for Excellence and Community Service
was recently awarded
L. Gary Wright, to L. Gary Wright,
resident/CEO, President/CEO, Farmers
Farmers & & Merchants Bank.
Merchants The award recipient is
Bank chosen for his or her
dedication to Farmers &
Merchants Bank goals,
commitment to the
community, religious
and value-building
activities and continuing
education.
Mr. Wright joined
Farmers & Merchants
Bank in 1974 and was
elected President/CEO
in 1977. Under his
leadership, FMB was
the first Florida bank to
acquire a bank outside
the state of Florida, and
in 1991 opened its first
office in Tallahassee,
where the company now has five offices. Mr.
Wright has led FMB from a small community
bank with $17 million in assets to one with
over $390 million in assets and eight offices.
He led the initiative to develop ,FMB"


NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL WORKSHOP
The Monticello City Council will conduct a workshop
on' Tuesday, February 20, 2007 at 4:00 p.m. at City
Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Street. The purpose of the
meeting will be to discuss the water meter
replacement project, other operations of the
water/sewer departments, and personnel
and budget matters.
,4 -~-


9Jau.onJiwetewi JoNwewapaps

Mon1ticello News


Tal9ahassee / M 7
Tallahassee / Monticello


p


I


Banking Corporation, FMB Title Insurance,
FMB Insurance Services and FMB Mortgage
Services.
The banking community has been well served
by Mr. Wright as Chairman of the Florida
Bankers Association in 1992-93 and was
honored as Florida Banker of the Year in 2003.
He currently serves as Chairman of the Board,
BancServ, and Florida Bankers Association.
Upon his retirement as President/CEO of
Farmers & Merchants Bank in March 2007, he
will continue to serve on the Bank's Board of
Directors.
Mr. Wright currently serves Tallahassee
Memorial Healthcare Foundation as
Chairman-elect and is a Healthways Board
Member and Past Chairman (Monticello).
Service to additional community
organizations include:' Christ Episcopal
Church, Monticello, Founder and
Coordinator for the Jefferson County
Community Prayer Breakfast, Marzuq
Shrine Tallahassee (Potentate 1991), Hiram
Masonic Lodge #5, Monticello, Jefferson
County Seminole Boosters (Past President),
Monticello Kiwanis Club (Past President), and
Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce (Past
President) and the Tallahassee Chamber of
Commerce.

0 850-997-2591
20Member FDIC
le/Thomasv2007
Greenville /Thomasville


SThe Jefferson County
SHIP Advisory Board Meeting
-will be held on,
Monday, February 12, 2007
1:30 PM

County Grants Office,
445 W. Palmer Mill Rd.,
Monticello, FL,
The public is welcome


c


tiple Listing) systems on line
before hitting the streets look-
ing.
"Potential buyers should
investigate the services that
will be provided to them, and
educate themselves before
hiring a realtor.
"If you do not know real
estate, you should know and
trust your Realtor."
Vollertsen moved to Mon-
ticello from Tallahassee with
his family, about 15 years
ago.
Today, Vollertsen and his
wife, Christie, and two sons
Bradley and Brian, live here
and enjoy being part of the
community.
Vollertsen invites residents
to call 997-1691 or stop by
for their free market analyses
and a current list of proper-
ties on the market.


I c


I








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 9, 2007 PAGE 3


Jan. Haunted Tour

Draws 20 Attendees


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Approximately 20 people
attended the January haunted
tour and ghost hunt in the old
1827 cemetery, hosted by the
Big Bend Ghost Trackers.
"Everyone enjoyed it," said
BBGT founder Betty Davis.
"Most reported feeling a little
bit eerie."
She said that one female
said it felt like someone
touched her in the cemetery,
near the Confederate soldier
grave sites, and photos were


ELEANOR HAWKINS, chairperson of Chamber After Hours, visits with Capital City
Bank staff members Judy Adams, left, and Carol Conine, right, during last week's/
Open House at the Bank. (News Photo)


Rare Door Restaurant


Under New Management


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Rare Door Restaurant
on Cherry Street is open un-
der new management with Zo
Rudd and daughter-in-law,
Tara Lynn Rudd seeing to the
every day operations, with-
their families just a call away
to help as needed.
The restaurant is open 5 to
10 p.m, Monday though Sat-
urday, with the option of eat-
ing in or taking the food out.
The phone number is 997-
3133.
Zo explains that she and
Tara have wanted to get into
the restaurant business to-
gether, for some time, and
when the opportunity came
about to open the Rare Door,
they jumped at the chance.


With Tracey !Jackson help-
ing them with the arrange-
ments, they were on their
way.
The Rudd's /are offering
"good ole' home cooking' at
it's best, with good, service in
a friendly atmosphere."
This is a local, family oper-
ated business. The decor is
nostalgic, with the walls
adorned with family heir-
looms, and the tables topped
with handcrafted oil lamps,
and fresh flowers strategically
placed.
The walls are painted in
Zo's favorite colors of.green,
and white wooden-like blinds
cover the windows. The over-
head lighting is such that it
can be dimmed or brightened
at the request of the individ-
ual customer.


"We want people to feel like
they stepped into their own
homes when they come
through the door, and to enjoy
food like it was prepared at
home." Zo said.
The menu is a combination
of family recipes. It offers a
variety of dinner entrees such
as New York Strip and
Ribeye steaks; pork chops and
chicken; whole catfish, grou-
per, and shrimp; meatloaf and
pork chops.
All are served with a wide
variety of side items to com-
pliment the meal.
There are soups, salads, ap-
petizers, a children's menu,
and a menu filled with a vari-
ety.of hot sandwiches.
Weekend specials will be
offered.
Homemade desserts are lim-
ited, "but sure to be wonder-
ful!" exclaim Zo and Tara
Lynn. These will include
Chocolate Sin Cake, Key
Lime Pie, Cheesecake, and
Coconut Creme Pie.


taken of ectoplasm on the
porch of the Wirick-Simmons
House, orbs were seen at the
John Denham House and an
orb on the sidewalk in front
of the Daffodale House.
Davis said the group would
not conduct a February
monthly tour due to a con-
flicting schedule.
"We usually hold the tour
and ghost hunt on the third
weekend of the month, but
Feb. 16, 17, and 18, we will
be conducting the haunted ho-
tel weekend and workshop at
the Windsor Hotel in Ameri-
cus, GA.


S NOTICE OF ROAD
CLOSED

Beginning Mon. Feb. 5th Ebenezer
Rd. in Jefferson Co. Florida will be closed
for a period of 45 days for Bridge
Replacement.
Storm Reconstruction Services, Inc.


She noted that anyone wish-
ing to make an appointment
for a private group tour, may
call 508-8109.
"We'll make arrangements
for them," said Davis. "We
try to accommodate
everyone."

The Jefferson
County Utility
Coordinating
Committee

will meet at 9:00 a.m.
February 14, 2007,
at the

Jefferson County
Extension Office,
275 North Mulberry
Street.



The many



of ca!lig
Find out what you cahndo. Contact us
at 1(800)899-0089 orww.voa.org ,
i Volunteers
Sof America-
I l l [ Jmm~r m l K~n [I J A [l~ lMlll


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Vwww. gstl S 4foiiwv rgs
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SINCE 1934 r
r


190 E Dogwood Street


850.997.2015


ZO RUDD, standing right, and Tara Lynn check on an
item for their Rare Door menu. (News Photo)


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by Embarq Communications, Inc. terms and conditional embarq.com. Usage for Directory Assistance, EMBARQ"'Calling Card service, operator services, and calls to 900, 986, 555, and 700 NPAs excluded. One plan per qualifying residential access line
and not available in student housing associated with edUcational institutions. If EMBARQ determines that usage is not for person-to-person conversations or voice messages, EMBARQ may assess a data usage fee or disconnect service. U.S. residents
in EMBAROQ' local territories only with dial-1 service qualify. Includes one phone line. No pro-ration of any monthly recurring charge for partial bill when customer cancels service. Local toll and intematonal rates vary, and surcharges may apply, including
surcharges on residential calls made to foreign mobil ones. Call 1-866-421-7935 for local toll and interatonal rates. Operator-assisted calls and toll-free/calling card calls made from payphones in the U.S. will be assessed a surcharge All rates subjectto
change. Wireless service: Coverage not available evitilhere. Terms and conditions apply, see store or embarq.com for details. May not be combined with other offers. Device subject to availability. $75 (1-yr term) or $150 (2-yr term) early terminallon and,
if not an EMBARQTO wirellne customer, a $35 activation fee applies per line. A deposit may be required Unused plan minutes do not carry forward. Partial minutes are charged as full minutes. Overage charges apply Equipment credit: Requires purchase
and new service activation by 2/28/07. Applied at polin,1 sale or on initial invoice depending on purchase location. Not available on accounts that received equipment credits associated with renewal or activation within the last 12 months. Cannot exceed
customer's actual purchase price of devicess. For buy-ine-get-one-free offer, both phones must be purchased at the same time in one transaction. Activation at lime of purchase required for instant savings. Phone features: Customer must subscribe to
EMBARQ~ Wireless Internet or voice-activated dialing'o tons to utilize phone features. C 2007 Embarq Holdings Company LLC. All rights reserved The name EMBARQ and the jet logo are trademarks of Embarq Holdings Company LLC EMB1-06-1685


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 9,2007




Monticello News
(ISSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly Ex-
cept for the weeks of July 4th, Thanksgiving, Christmas,
& New Years. Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post
Office. Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net





Campaign Urges .


Folks To Give


HOMECOMING Royalty at HMS in Nov., 1991
ter,) with Anna Brantley, first attendant, left,
dant. (News File Photo)


includes: Ann Hill, Miss Howard (cen-
and Ebony Webb, right, second atten-


Opinion & Comment


The horrific events of the
Tsunami and Hurricane Ka-
trina brought the nation dra-
matic images of people who
desperately needed help.
In the weeks that followed,
one organization was inspired
by the generosity of the
American people and won-
dered how it could sustain that
level of giving and volunteer-
ing after the compelling im-
ages faded from the news.
Born of its ongoing work
with those who responded to
Hurricane Katrina, the Ad
Council developed the Gener-
ous Nation campaign to stimu-
late volunteering and giving.
The unprecedented cam-
paign includes the call to ac-
tion "Don't Almost Give.
Give." and encourages indi-
viduals to visit
www.DontAlmostGive.org, a
new comprehensive Web site
created and developed pro
bono by Tribal DDB. The Web
site connects visitors to thou-
sands of nonprofit organiza-
tions.
The campaign is designed to
inspire Americans to translate
their everyday compassion and
good intentions into action by
giving more often.
"History has proven that


Americans are compassionate,
committed people who help
others in tangible ways, both
large and small, particularly in
times of crisis. However, as
generous as we are, sometimes
instead of giving, we almost
give," said Peggy Conlon,
President & CEO of The
Advertising Council.
"This poignant campaign
will inspire and motivate peo-
ple to act on their best inten-
tions to help those in need."
At the campaign Web site,
www.DontAlmostGive.org,
individuals can find ways to
make a donation, search for
volunteering opportunities in
their community or get in-
volved in a charity that aligns
with their interests.
Visitors are linked to non-
profit organizations represent-
ing a breadth of causes,
including the American Red
Cross, United Way of
America, Big Brothers Big Sis-
ters of America, and Habitat
for Humanity.
The Ad Council has histori-
cally been known as the adver-
tising industry's "Gift to
America." For the first time,
they have created a campaign
that benefits the entire non-
profit community.


South Dakota Takes

On Abortion Issue


By REX M. ROGERS
Columnist

South Dakota's new law ear-
lier this year banning abortion
in all cases except to save the
life of the mother appeals to
my theology and my philoso-
phy even if my instinct for re-
alpolitik questions the strategy.
Gov. Mike Rounds signed
the bill earlier this week, set-
ting up a showdown with
Planned Parenthood and other
pro-abortion organizations that
may take the pitched battle all
the way to the United States
Supreme Court.
According to a FOX news
poll this week, 83 percent of
Americans defend abortion
rights if a pregnancy places the
mother's life at risk. Some 62
percent still think abortion
should be a legal choice if the
mother's mental health is at
risk (How does one define
mental health?). The poll re-
vealed that about 49 percent of
Americans say they are pro-
choice and 41 percent say they
are pro-life.
So, given the tenuousness of
American outlook on the sub-
ject, while my pro-life per-
spective applauds South Da-
kota's new law, I wonder
whether this all or nothing ap-
proach is the best way to chip
away at abortion "rights."
Going for the political jug-
gler may appeal to the idealists


and ideologues among us, but
it may not get us the result we
ultimately want. I especially
don't want a re-energized pro-
choice movement.
Recently I've been a little
encouraged, primarily because
the pro-choice movement is
discouraged. In an article enti-
tled "Reality Check for 'Roe,'"
in its March 6, 2006 issue,
Newsweek reported that about
two out of three Americans fa-
vor some kind of restrictions
on abortion.
And the same article written
by Martha Brant and Evan
Thomas actually stated that, lo
and behold, "anecdotal evi-
dence is growing that women
have moral qualms about any
abortion, even if they feel
compelled to have one,"
In a nod to the morally clue-
less, Brant and Thomas quote
abortion clinic operator Peg
Johnston for noting that her
patients were using words like
"killing" and "babies." John-
ston said, "I started really tun-
ing in to my patients and I re-
alized, 'She really feels that
way." Did you get that? John-
ston is actually perplexed
maybe amazed that a mother
believes she is carrying a baby
and that abortion is killing.
Johnston needs to catch up
with the times. Even Hillary
Clinton is now calling abortion
a "tragic choice," so the pro-

(See Abortion, Page 5)


By RON CICHON
Publisher


Bless the Beast event set for-
Feb. 17 at the Opera House
promises to be a fun evening
with proceeds benefiting the
Humane Society... When the
Legislative delegation holds
its annual public hearing Feb.
20, it will be the first time one
of the members will be a Re-
publican. This is a result of
Will Kendrick switching par-
ties some months ago.
Pat Kraft has joined our edi-
torial page columnists and
comes with a good newspaper
background and an interesting
take on" the passing scene. I
think you'll enjoy her
columns... Nun Bingo on tap at
the Opera House Saturday
night. Altrusa Club and the
Opera House Stage Company


have teamed up for this event.
Florida Trend reports visitors
at hotels and motels around
Florida will no longer find
Disney brochures among dis-
plays of the state's attractions.
Disney World ordered all of its
brochures removed because
the brochures did little to at-
tract visitors... Rotary Club
will hold its annual golf tour-
nament March 5 at the Country
Club.
According to the Center for
Disease Control, the most im-
portant thing people can do to
help prevent illness is to wash
their hands... Every hour,
someone is newly diagnosed
with multiple sclerosis... Old
Spanish Proverb says the belly
rules the mind.
Didja know the Star Span-
gled Banner was designated
the national anthem by an Act


Wal-Mart Flap


By DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

What's with the ongoing na-
tional flap over Wal-Mart ? If
you haven't heard, there is an
unnamed national movement
going around out there to bring
down the retail giant.
There are complaints about
low wages, inferences about
health coverage and implica-
tions of poor working environ-
ments. Even the likes of Hil-
lary Clinton have chimed in
pointing an accusing finger at
the company as a diabolical
thorn in the side of legitimate
businesses.
This movement has gone to
court in several instances, at-
tempting to stop the construc-


tion and/or opening of a new
Wal-Mart store in some com-
munities. Understandably in
such cases, long time small lo-
cal business owners, who here-
to-for have enjoyed having a
lock on the purchasing power
in their communities, can see a
serious drop in revenue by los-
ing shoppers to this giant dis-
count retailer.
SIn most cases, their legal ef-
forts have failed and they have
learned to live with this major
competitor in their neighbor-
hood.
Nearly every conceivable le-
gal tactic has been used to stop
the expansion of Wal-Mart
Stores. An ongoing legal action
popped up after the 62,000
square foot store was finished
and stocked and employees


of Congress in 1931? This was pulitzel
117 years after it was written... and he
According to the American forward
Society of Landscape Archi- scored
tects, sustainable design is big- Olen I
ger than ever and building summe
owners are looking to utilize chairs 1
outdoor spaces even more.
Rela
Quotable quote: "I doubt ting 1
whether the world holds for county
anybody a more soul stirring cancer
surprise than the' first adven- beat th
ture with ice cream." Heywood before
Broun. and co
folks.
President Bush's new budget folks
under fire in the Congress by Cat
Republicans and Democrats. the Ch
Cuts in aid to seniors and chil- is rece
dren are not going down well... member
Duane Bradford, a retired jour- preside
nalist, favors us with a column Comm
- from time to time. He spent an out
some time with me recently school.
and I really enjoyed him. tain ha
Ran into Dr. Bob Butler, the ment eN




Ongoing
were hired and ready to go to to stop 1
work. Th
The city council alleged that Associa
building permits were in error ganizati
and are currently holding that domina
new facility and its employees paper
(many of whom quit lower how th
paying jobs) in limbo, fected
Another facility planned in percent
the small community of Her- cent we
cules California is being de- ping 6
played while the local planning negative
commission explores the use Wal-Ma
of eminent domain to seize the vertiser
property that Wal-Mart pur- As fi
chased to build the new store. pie are
Across the entire country surveys
from Washington to Massa- peatedl:
chusetts and New York, every- marks.
thing from sexual harassment, So
state and federal labor, laws, attack c
antitrust laws and poor product Can
quality have been called upon (See W


r prize winning author,
Said he was looking
d to the Rotary spon-
"Evening With Robert
Butler" planned for the
r. Rotarian Wes Scoles
the event.


y for Life activities get-
underway across the
SMonies raised go for
research. Each year we
he total raised the year
thanks to the hard work
mmitment of so many

herine Arnold produces
amber newsletter which
ived by more than 250
ers... Morris Steen,
nt of North Florida
unity College has been
standing leader for the
The retired Navy Cap-
.s a wealth of manage-
xperience.





the retail juggernaut.
he National Newspaper
Ition surveyed its or-
ion and found a pre-
nt negative attitude by
owners. When asked
ley felt Wal-Mart af-
their community, 13
were positive, 25 per-
ere neutral and a whop-
62 percent answered
e, (primarily due to
art being a stingy ad-
).
ar as the American peo-
concerned on numerous
, over 80 percent re-
y give Wal-Mart good

why the overwhelming
on the discount retailer?
you say "Organized
al-Mart, Page 5)


Projects Fighting Obesity


If you're tired of hearing
people talk about the obesity
epidemic but not doing any-
thing about it, there's good
news.
People around the country
are fighting obesity by work-
ing alongside Prevention Re-
search Centers (PRCs), aca-
demic centers that study
chronic diseases and are
funded by the Centers for Dis-
ease Control and Prevention.
The projects in these
communities may inspire you
to:
Start a walking trail in your
neighborhood.
Residents of Albany, N.Y.,


found that walking outside was
not always easy. A lack of
sidewalks, uneven terrain and
cold weather kept people in-
side on their couches.
The community teamed up
with the SUNY Albany PRC
and a state not-for-profit group
to find a new place to walk -
public schools. The team pro-
motes walking on trails in
summer and in school build-
ings in winter to achieve year-
round walking, and the resi-
dents are reaping the health re-
wards.
Get healthy lunches in
schools.
In Douglas, Ariz., on the


U.S. Mexico border, a com-
munity committee concerned
about health issues and work-
ing with the University of Ari-
zona PRC learned that its
"school district was considering
new nutritional guidelines for
school lunches. So they wrote
the guidelines themselves.
The committee researched
successful efforts elsewhere
and submitted guidelines that
call for reduced-fat milk,
whole wheat bread and plenty
of fruits and vegetables. The
superintendent was so im-
pressed, the guidelines were
adopted almost word for word.


The district's new nutrition co-
ordinator, Beverly Jackson,
joined the committee. "It helps
to have people support you,"
Jackson said.
Farmer's markets are full of
fruits and vegetables.
The Black Belt of Alabama,
a rural region once known best
for its rich soil, has become
better known for its poverty
and lack of resources.
Farm-fresh fruits and vegeta-
bles became scarce as small
farmers went out of business.
Community leaders worked
with the PRC at the University

(See Fighting, Page 5)


1 Short Takes & Other Notions












Diabetes Education Classes

Ipt n t vtpncinn Office


;%%%N %0 ia A% 0 E Eo m % 0w


'FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Take Charge of Your Diabe- -
tes (TCYD) classes will be
conducted on a weekly 5:30
p.m. to 7 p.m., from March 5
through April 30, at the Ex-
tension Office.
The classes are in conjunc-
tion with the Extension Office
and the County Health De-
partment geared towards
i adults 21 years' old and older
with type 2 diabetes..



Fighting
:(Continued From Page 4)
of Alabama at Birmingham
:and the Alabama Farmers Mar-
ket Authority to have fresh
produce brought in to several
Small towns.
Put healthy food right in
the grocery stores.
In Keokuk County, Iowa,
the obesity rates are higher
than the national average. The
University of Iowa's PRC
helped mobilize an entire com-
munity eager to be rid of that
distinction. Restaurant owners
are supplying healthy menu
options and grocery store own-
ers offer healthy food demon-
strations and label foods certi-
fied by the American Heart
Association.
Make the outside environ-
ment safe for exercise.
In New Orleans, community
members are working with the
-Tulane University PRC to
make neighborhoods safe for
physical activity by consider-
ing changes such as adding
streetlights to deter crime,


Participants will receive in-
formation and motivation to
help them adapt to positive
lifestyle changes, and the pro-
gram has been successful in
helping participants improve
blood glucose control, which
reduces long term health
risks.
Classes will also help im-
prove participants hemoglo-
bin A1C, lower their blood
pressure, create a healthy
meal plan that works for that
individual. They learn how to
check their feet, and take


Obesity
eliminating liquor stores and
improving sidewalks. Simi-
larly, community members
around Sumter County, S.C.,
are asking the University of
South Carolina PRC to help
them convince local decision-
makers to support policies for
new and safer parks and rec-
reation.
Support your friends and
neighbors.
In many communities, resi-
dents help each other in the
battle for health. In Chicago,
lay health advisors offer an in-
tensive weight-loss program at
churches, schools, work sites
and health care facilities.
In North Carolina, women
Sin a rural community conduct
HOPE Circles for other
women who learn to manage
stress, prevent.and control obe-
sity and overcome barriers to
change. They also exercise and
prepare healthy foods together.
Both communities have
worked with their state's PRC
to learn supportive skills.


Wal-Mart Flap


(Continued From Page 4)
Labor"? Not v. ith.ianding the
fact that local competitive
businesses don't like
Wal-Mart, it is in actuality the
big workers unions, with am-
ple money and a frustration
with Wal-Mart for using non-
union workers in achieving
great success.
.They can see millions of
dollars in union dues from
Wal-Mart employees slipping
through their greedy fingers
every month. Accordingly,
they will pull out any and all
stops to get their big foot in the

I Got A Cute Photo?
Send It To Us And
We'll Share It With
Our Readers!

Kids Dogs *
Strange stuff, etc.

Monticello News
P.O. Box 430
Monticello, FL
32345
"You Can't Be Without It"


door to organize these retail
workers.
If that should happen, the
whole benefit for Americans to
purchase products at a com-
petitive and reasonable dis-
counted price will be out the
window.
All the costs of elevated
wages and huge benefit pack-
ages will be -passed on to us
through much higher prices.
Greed is one of the seven
deadly sins and workers un-
ions need to stop feasting on
the common employees, (and
customers), to fill their bloated
coffers.


charge of their diabetes.
Lesson topics include: What
is diabetes; keeping track of
blood glucose; diabetes medi-
cations; nutritional manage-
ment of diabetes;
carbohydrate counting; exer-

cise and physical activity;
standards of medical care;
cardiovascular disease; foot
care and setting goals; and
follow-ups of a class reunion,
and the grand finale.
Health screenings pro-
vided to participants, include:
height (in the first screening
only), weight, and blood pres-
sure.
These will be conducted be-
fore the-first class, after the' fi-
nal class and three months
following the last class.
Class participants will also
receive three half-hour ses-:
sions with a registered dieti-
tian.
The registration fee is $75,. .,
and the classes will be held:
March 5, 12, 19, 26, April 2,
9, 16, 23, and 30.
Class size is limited so reg-
ister now.
For more information or to
determine eligibility to par-
ticipate, contact the Extension
Office at 342-0187.

Abortion
(Continued From Page 4)
abortion movement is on a bit'
of a defensive.
Abortion is a tragic choice.
It's tragic because it does not
have to happen and because a.
human life is snuffed out. It's a,
choice because individuals are
making a conscious decision to
do something their moral cen-
ter tells them is wrong.
Our culture has tried euphe-
misms it's a fetus. We've
tried straw woman arguments
it must be legalized so we can
stop back alley coat hanger
abortions. We've argued abor-
tion is about privacy and a
woman's right to choose it's
about men and women not
owning their moral responsi-
bilities to abstain from sex that
leads to pregnancy, or to take
appropriate birth control steps
to prevent pregnancy, or to as-
sume parental obligations their
actions have produced or
should I say reproduced?
So, yes; my pro-life wishes
are encouraged, and I salute
the South Dakota pols who had
the political will to do what
they. did. I hope it works.


WALK-IN

BATH TUB,






IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY

DIAL 911.


JEFFERSON COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY, INC.

PRESENTS


BLESS THE BEAST BENEFIT


2007

JOIN US FOR HOR'S DOEUVRES AND COCKTAILS
AT
THE MONTICELLO OPERA HOUSE

SATURDAY
FEBRUARY 17, 2007
6:00 PM
LIVE AUCTION SILENT AUCTION
CASH BAR
ENTERTAINMENT
TICKETS $25.00 PER PERSON
ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE
JEFFERSON COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY, INC.
FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TICKETS CALL (850) 342-0244 OT (850) 264-5927


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 9, 2007 PAGE 5



NUN BINGO IT'S BACK!


Altrusa of Monticello and the Opera

House Stage Company Present

NUN BINGO

Saturday, Feb. 10th

Door Open @ 6:30 PM


$10 Person (includes 2 Cards)


Callfor Reservations -997-4242

Proceeds to benefit community

non-profit organizations.


The Jefferson County Recyclinq Program accepts


the following items for recycling.


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes, ,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping Boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?'


Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

i*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of thd
facility and not just dropped off.




Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other-items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


i i: '


I ,















PAGE 6. MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 9, 2007


U


Lifestyle


TABLES
$0 1 095a, s


~aA a ~oe G~ ea& 1 997-3569


Merry Ann Frisby reminds
professional and amateur bird
watchers of the community,
about the Saturday morning
wagon ride and tour of Dixie
Plantation.
Contact Frisby at 997-
4212 for more information.
Gerrold Austin was asked to
speak at the Monticello New
Life graduation ceremonies
this week.
A Bake Sale takes place 8
a.m. 10 p.m. Saturday morn-
ing in front of the Advance
Auto Parts store from 8 10
a.m. Funds raised by the Tal-
lahassee Memorial Monticello
team will go towards the
County Relay for Life event
in April.
Attendees at the Lloyd Lions
Club Bingo last Saturday had
a grand time relates June
Campbell. There was lots of
tasty treats to snack on, and
lots of great gifts to win.
The Ballroom Dance classes
hosted by the County Health
Department, have been a big
success, with both classes
filled to capacity every week.
Ballroom Dancing is en-
dorsed by the Health Depart-
ment as part of the '"Just
Move" program through a
grant.
With regular exercise one
will feel better, burn calories,
sleep better, and exercise
one's heart. Participants are
learning the Waltz, Foxtrot,
Swing, Cha Cha, and the
Rumba.
The Woman's Club served
a delicious spaghetti lunch
Tuesday at their recent
monthly meeting. The sauce
was a combination of all the
sauces prepared by members
of the Club.
The club is seeking new
members. Contact President


Jan Wadsworth at 997-4440
for more information.
Scrappers will gather at the
First United Methodist
Church to work on their
scrapbooks, from 5 10 p.m.
on Thursday, Feb. 15.
Bring your photos and
,ideas. Contact the church for
more information. I'm told
you don't have to be a mem-
ber of the church to partici-
pate in any of their events.
The Rare Door will be open
Valentine's evening, and will
be offering a special some-
thing for your sweetheart.
Also celebrating Valentine's
Day with special events are
the Jefferson Nursing Center,
with a Sweetheart Dance at 2
p.m., and First United Meth-
odist Church Monticello, with
a Sweetheart Dinner and En-
tertainment at 5:30 p.m.
Diabetes education classes
for adults over 21 with type 2
diabetes will be held at the
Extension Office, in conjunc-
tion with the County Health
Department.
Class size is limited so regis-
.ter now. Call the Extension
Office at 342-0187 for more
information.
The'library is conducting
basic computer classes in Be-
ginning Computers and Inter-
net Basics. Call the library at
342-0205 for more informa-
tion.
Parents of students in speci-
fied grades in county schools
will receive free DVDs cre-
ated by DOE to help parents
support their children educa-
tionally.
County Democrats plan a
St. Patrick's Day Dinner 7
p.m. March 15 at Gerry Hall
at Christ Enisconal Church.
Call Eleanor Hawkins for
tickets and information at


RYAN FLYNT AND ALISON CHAMBERS


Alison Chambers To

Marry Ryan Flynt


Sukie and Charles Cham-
bers, of Monticello, FL. an-
nounce the 'engagement of
their daughter Alison Cham-
bers to Ryan Flynt, son of
Kim and Thomas Chancy of
Monticello.
The bride-to-be is the
granddaughter of Phyllis and
Charles Chambers of Cairo,
GA., and Betty Rondeau and
the late Roland Rondeau of
Marathon, FL.
Chambers received her As-
sociates of Science degree in
Radiological Technology
from Keiser University in De-
cember 2006.
She is currently pursuing
her degree in Diagnostic
Sonography at the Institute of
Ultrasound Diagnostics.
The groom-to-be is the
grandson of Mr.' and Mrs. Jo-
seph W. Grabill of Tallahas-
see; Sarah Wynne and the
late Claude W. Flynt of
Washington, GA.; and Willie
G. Chancy and the late Buck
Chancy of Wacissa, FL.
Flynt is a graduate of Au-
cilla Christian Academy.
He is co-owner of C&F
Fencing located in
Monticello.


The couple will be married
on Saturday, April 14, 2007 at
the Jefferson Country Club in
Monticello.

1st Baptist
Relay Team
Breakfast
The First Baptist Church
Relay for Life team will hold
an "All You Can Eat" Pan-
cake and Sausage Breakfast
7-11 a.m. on Saturday, Feb.
17 at the Fellowship Hall.
Arlene Young may be con-
tacted for more information at
342-1188.

Relay Team
Bake Sale
Saturday
The Tallahassee Memorial
Monticello Relay for Life
team is holding a Bake Sale
fundraiser 8 a.m. 12 p.m.
Saturday in front of Advance
Discount Auto Parts, located
at Jefferson Square.
The team is raising money
for the American Cancer So-
ciety and for cancer' research.


Questions,
Anyone?
Get the answers you can
trust about government
programs, benefits, and
services from the Federal
Consumer Information
Center.
Just call toll-free:
1-800-FED-INFO
(That's 1-800-333-4636)
Mon-Fri 8am-8pm ET
Or visit
www.pueblo;gsa.gov/call
U.S. General Services Administration


997-2863. -


-' W7,Call today
Legion Post 251 SetS and reserve your

Awards Banquet Feb. 17 ICouleS Valentine Masage
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Members of VFW Post 251 need to support them by at-
will recognize their Outstand- tending the annual Commu-
ing Law Enforcement Officer, nity Awards Recognition
Firefigher, EMT, Paramedic, Banquet."
and teacher of the year, 7 A $12 donation is requested.
p.m., Saturday, Feb. 17, at
Jefferson County High Y
School.
They will also be recogniz- is toi
ing middle and high school Eio y
students with the Patriot Pen
Award and the Voice of De-
mocracy Award.
Middle school students .
must write an essay on the
topic: Citizenship in America, h
and high school students must
write an essay on the topic: Ladis D r F r
Freedom's Challenge." LadiesDesigner FootwearFeaturin
Awards will be given to the J. Renee, Kenneth Cole New York,
top three in each category. JLO b Jennifer Lopez and More!
"It is a pleasure to recognize
these individuals," says Ned' .. S. "
Hill, Post Commander. "We ,,s o .h



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Central
Church of
Christ
US 19 South at
Coopers Pond Rd


Now at
Central:

A Study of Old
Testament
Literature,
Sunday Eve.
6p.m.

Sunday:
10 AM Bible
School
11AM Worship
Hour
6 PM Evening
Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible
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Church News Notes


Harvest Center presents
"The Way Out," by Recording
Artist Douglas Passmore 11
a.m. Sunday.
The group will also minister
at Monticello New Life 2-4
p.m., Sunday.
***
Mt. Pleasant Choir in Capps
will celebrate its 16th anniver-
sary, 6 p.m. Saturday with a
musical presentation, continu-
ing 3 p.m. Sunday, with Minis-
ter Annie Byrd and the Cru-
mity Gospel Singers.
***
Mt. Ararat AME Church in
Waukeenah will celebrate its
annual Evening in White 5
p.m. Sunday. Speaker is Rev.
Raphael Campbell of Galilee
AME Church in Woodville.
***
New Bethel AME Church
will observe its annual Choir
I & 2 anniversary 6:30 p.m.,
Saturday with a musical pro-
gram, and again at 11 a.m.
worship service Sunday.


Speaker is Minister Regnald
Bennet of the Holy Ghost Re-
vival Center and its choir.
***
The Quincy District's Foun-
ders Day worship service takes
place 3 p.m. Sunday at New
Bethe AME Church.

Casa Bianca MB Church
will celebrate Pastor Tobbie
Berrian III 27 years in the min-
istry and 10 years at the
church, Sunday.
Sunday School is at 9:30
a.m. and worship service at 11
a.m. and fellowship lunch to
follow. Evening service is at 3
p.m..
Pastor Willie Manning and
Springfield MB Church, Talla-
hassee will be in charge of the
morning service and Pastor
Kendrick Gardener and Chris-
tian Love Ministries, Valdosta,
will. be in charge of the eve-
ning service.


Rfe flnIyaI mlRfrriiz B r Datre


Jessica Leigh Dalzell and
Kyle James Peters were mar-
ried on Friday, February 2,
2007 at Dorothy Oven Park,
i-' in Tallahassee.
.i Dalzell is the daughter o.f
Leigh and Stewart Dalzell,
) and sister of Elliot and Jamie-


Youngblood

Celebrates

90 Years
Friends and family of Leila
Connell Youngblood cele-
brated her 90th birthday on
Saturday, Jan. 27, 2007 with a
surprise party at the Cody
Pentecostal Holiness Church
Fellowship Hall.
Some 150 well wishers
came from in and out of town
to help Youngblood celebrate
her special day.
She was crowned with a
sparkling pink tiara, and her
guests took turns reminiscing
about activities they shared
with her.
The party was catered, with
a large tiered cake of pink ic-
ing and decorative flowers
surrounded with gifts, and nu-
merous photos were taken.
Youngblood was born Jan.
30 to Annie and Johnny Con-
nell, and lived all her life in
the county.
She raised three children:
Billy Jones, Lillie Mae Brum-
bley, and Margie Miller, all
who grew up in the Cody
Church, and today live in and
around the county.
She has three brothers liv-
ing locally: Artis, Edgar, and
John Butler Connell.
And, several grandchildren,
great grandchildren, and
great-great grandchildren.


I NIC Iwl rI I I
son Dalzell of'Monticello.
Peters is the son of Annette
and Mike Peters, and brother
of Karry Sutterfield of Talla-
hassee.
Dalzell and Peters attended
Aucilla Christian Academy.


* UG O












Y.,

YOUNGBLOOD


OUR LIFELINE

ISTOLL-FREE

Grab the line and
let us help you.

THE VOICE OF HOPE

1-800-572-1717
Is Musuar ystrophy
M Association


FRED HEIVILIN, VP of Raw Material Development for
Oil-Dri in Oklochnee, GA., spoke to the Kiwanis Club
recently about Global Warming. (News Photo)


Fred Heivilin, vice presi-
dent of Raw Material Devel-
opment for Oil-Dri in Okloch-
nee, GA., was the guest
speaker at the Jan. 31 Kiwanis
Club meeting.
As a certified geologist and
mining engineer, he presented
a program on Global Warm-
ing to the group.
He explained that there
have been between five and
seven glacial events, periods
where global temperature
drops so significantly as to
cover approximately 43 per-
cent of earth's surface with
ice, in the last million years.
He also showed the geologi-
cal placement of three identi-
fiable shorelines in Jefferson
County.
Only 24 percent of the land
mass of the earth, including
Antarctica, has ice on it
today.



Assembly Hosts Annual


Black History Program


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Carrie White Boone Assem-
bly #331 Order of the Golden
Circle hosted it's annual
Black History program on
Saturday, Feb. 3 at Memorial
SMB church.
Loyal Lady Elouise Living-
ston presided.
The music was provided by
the Miller Sisters. They sang
the older black traditional
hymns. "The music was en-
joyed by all attending," com-
ments Loyal Lady Ruler
Carolyn L. Wade.
The congregation added to
the enjoyment by singing.
"Lift Ev'ry Voice and Sing."
The Scripture and Invoca-
tion were given by Rev. By-
ron Barnhart, followed with
the Welcome and Occasion
by the Loyal Lady Dorothy


Benjamin.
Speaker for the occasion
was Dr. Lettie D. White,
PLLP, of the Assembly. She
was introduced by the Mathye
McCloud, ALLR.
Her message was entitled
"From Slavery to Freedom."
It was an inspiring message
and touched the hearts of all
present.
The Carrie White Boone
Assembly #331 recognized
Bro. Thomas E. Saunders as a
"great humanitarian who un-
selfishly gives his time and
energy to help mankind, and
is always willing to impart
words of wisdom to young
people."
Saunders is a member of
the Bethel AME Church
where he is active in all facets
of the church, and in his com-
munity.
He is a member of the Jef-


4-H Fashion Revue,

Clothing Selection

Coming March 29


4-Hers are preparing for
the 4-H Fashion Revue set for
March 29.
Sewing classes began in
January with students busily
sewing garments for the
"Fashion in Flight" to be held
at the old county high school.
The garment to be modeled.,
during the Revue must bei
made by the model.
Models will need to sign up.,
in advance in order to partici-'
pate in the modeling before a.
panel of judges.
The garments will need to
be at the Extension office be-
fore the event and must be
clean and pressed.



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4-H members can also par-
ticipate in the Clothing Selec-
tion, part of the Revue.
If members wish to model
an outfit that they have in
their closet, or to buy an outfit
for the Revue, the may con-
tact Gladys Neely at the Ex-
tension Office, at 342-0187.
There are five categories
members can participate in
for the Clothing Selection.
These include: Active Sports-
wear, Schoolwear, Dressed
for Work, Special Occasion,
and My Choice.
Anyone from 5 to 18 years
of age may enter the Clothing
Selection.


person, Leon, and Thomas
Counties Prayer Band.
He is also a member of the
local Veterans of Foreign
Wars, and a member of.five
Masonic Orders P.H.A.
Closing Remarks were of-
fered by Nancy Benjamin,
PGSLLR, who greeted the
congregation on behalf of the
Fred Alexander Grand State
Assembly, Order of the
Golden Circle, Florida Juris
diction PHA in Jacksonville,
Fl. Her remarks were fol-
lowed by words from James
E. McGollie, District Deputy
Grand Master.
After the Blessing and
Benediction, coffee, hot co-
coa, donuts, and friendly ca-
maraderie was enjoyed.
Anyone interested in be-
coming a member of the
Golden Circle may contact
Wade at 997-0186.


Heivilin also noted that
global temperatures are two to
three degrees cooler for sev-
eral years after a major vol-
canic eruption.
At present, he noted that
ocean levels have been con-
stant, but there have been sig-
nificant changes in ground
cover.
He mentioned that the Sa-
hara Desert was "grassland"
as recently as 2500 years ago.
He stressed the need to use
less fuel and pursue more en-
ergy efficient cars and homes.
Because the ozone layer to-
day does not provide as much
protection from ultra- violet
rays as it once did, increased
cases of skin cancer have
been noted.


Got A Cute

Photo?


Send It To Us

And We'll

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Our Readers!


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Strange stuff,
etc.


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News
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FL 32345


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 9,2007 PAGE 7

Global Warming

Program Presented

SAt Kiwanis Club


MR. AND MRS. KYLE PETERS


Monticello


News


You Can Count On

Us To Find The

t Source!!


1 .1


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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 9, 2007


SENIOR LIVING


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF


HEALTH


Jefferson County Health Department
1255 W. Washington St. Monticello, FL 32344
(850) 342-0170
WE ARE' PLEASED TO
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* FREE BLOOD PRESSURE CHECKS
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HMS Names Regina Willis

Teacher Of Year Nominee


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor
Regina Willis has been
named Howard Middle-
School's Teacher of the Year.
Willis teaches Reading in
grades seven and eight. She
has been at HMS for two
years and has taught a total of
four years in Florida.
For her, professionalism en-
compasses honesty, integrity,
fairness, keeping one's word,
and meeting commitments.
She considers her teaching
goals met, when students learn
and their test scores increase.
She maintains a friendly and
inviting classroom environ-


ment with descriptive posters
on the wall to help students re-
member whet they learn.
HMS Principal Juliette
Fisher-Jackson states of Willis:
"She is a person who makes
a difference in the lives of stu-
dents, and enthusiasm is conta-
gious in her language arts
classroom.
"Willis incorporates a hands
on approach, as her classes
work on projects and apply
standards they have been
taught or are being taught.
"She gives generously of her
time and her work often ex-
tends beyond the school day.
She provides one on one tu-
toring, serves as softball and
volleyball coach and as a


member of the school curricu-
lum committee.
Willis' positive attitude and
love of teaching and children
are reflected in the outstanding
quality of the reading and writ-
ing program she has helped to
design to improve student


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 9, 2007 PAGE 9


achievement at Howard Mid-
dle School."
Patricia Mizell, ESE staffing
specialist observes:
"Willis is well liked by stu-
dents, parents, and other teach-
ers. She is diligent and always
acts in a professional manner.
"While she has high expecta-
tions for her students, she also
has the patience and content
area knowledge to ensure that
her students meet those expec-
tations.
"She is cooperative, enthusi-


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Michael J. Ford, M.D. & Staff
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Dr. Stickler joins us after serv-
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division of dermatology and
cutaneous surgery at the
University of Florida Shands
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He is currently accepting new
patients for general, surgical,
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1213 TMH Court Suite A
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
Phone: (850) 942-2299 Fax: (850) 942-0322


Jefferson Nursing Center
"Serving the residents of Jefferson County- since 1950"

Endless Possibilities is
"Aging with Change"

Jefferson Nursing Center is a 60 bed skilled nursing facility
offering rehabilitative services, extended care, hospice care,
and respite care.


Rehabilitation Services
* Physical Therapy
* Speech Therapy
* Occupational Therapy
* Out Patient Therapy


Special Services
* Post Stroke
* Neurological Disorders
* Cognitive Function
* Hospice


For Further Information or a Personal Tour
Please Call
850-997-2313


EMERGENCY HOME ENERGY

ASSISTANCE

FOR THE ELDERLY

The Area Agency on Aging for North Florida a announces the availability of
Emergency Home, Energy Assistance for the Elderly Program (EHEAP) funds for
eligible households in Jefferson County. To be eligible, an individual who is at least
sixty years of age must reside in the applicant household, a bill that indicates an
immediate disconnection date if payment is not received by the utility company (this
includes propane and electric), and the household income must be at or below 150%
of the Federal Poverty Income Guidelines.

Please contact Terrie Mihan (850-342-0271) to schedule an appointment or to
request more specific information about the Emergency Home Energy Assistance
Program.

The Emergency Home Energy Assistance for the Elderly Program is funded by the
State of Florida Department of Elder Affairs and is administered by the Area
Agency on Aging for North Florida, Inc.


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..~gN-















PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 9, 2007


SDorts


-- ..~ v- -r


Tigers Defeat NFC Eagles

57-51 In Semi-Final Play


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School varsity boys basket-
ball team went into the semi-
finals of District to down the
NFC Eagles, 57-51.
The Tigers overcame an
early eight-point deficit to
; take the victory in the District
S5-2A contest.

Jefferson took their first
Lead of the game in the early
Moments of the second half,
Sand the two opponents would
t trade leads, consistently run-


ning neck-and-neck for most
of the third, and for the win.
The Tigers forced turnover
after turnover with their full-
court pressure defense, and
capitalized on the Eagles mis-
takes.
LaMarkus Bennett led the
Tigers with 18 points, three
rebounds, five assists, two
steals.
Lucius Wade, 13 points,
one assist, three steals.
Tim Crumitie, 12 points,
three assists, one steal, one
block.
Jon Dady, seven points, five
rebounds, two assists.
Harold Ingram, five points,
three rebounds, two. blocks.


Anthony Johnson, two
points, four rebounds.
"I want to say that my boys.
played hard last night," said
Coach Quinton Adams
Wednesday morning.
"We played with a lot of de-
sire because nobody gave us a
chance. I have a great group
of kids that have a lot of heart.
and they believe in each
other."
The Tigers face Maclay, 7
p.m., Saturday, there, for the
District Championship and to
host a playoff home game.
"l encourage everyone to
come out and see the game at
NFC," concluded Adams.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


-;: . -
.
. '. ,..





"LADY WARRIOR Lisa Bailey in District action. (Photo by
Suzane Saunders)


EL _e Warriors Named

TO All-State Team
list, it's an honor," Strip
: FRAN HUNT said.. "The great thing ab(
Staff Writer it is the quarterback and
ceivers are returning nc
Five players from Aucilla year."
Christian Academy were Dobson, a seventh grad
named to the sportswriters was the number two-ral
All-State Football Team. quarterback in the state.
S Matt Dobson, Wade Scar- "Anytime you're in the se
berry, and Kyle Barnwell, enth grade and you get 2,0
made second team All-State yards passing, you're doi

and Daniel Greene made hon- Scarbery, who s graduate
orable mention, All-State. this year, played the positi
S Head football coach Joe of receiver, and Bish
SStriplin said that he was ex- Greene, and Barnwell, all s,
tremely proud of his time as running backs on l
Warriors. field.
S "Anytime you get on the


SAucilla Reports JV

IBaseball Schedule
Aucilla Christian Academy Carrabelle, March 5, he
announces the schedule for its Brookwood, March 9, he
junior varsity baseball team. Madison Academy, Mar
j All games are at 4 p.m., un- 13, here; Florida High,
Less otherwise specified. p.m., March 16, there; NF
S Action begins around the March 27, there; and Macl
: diamond against Maclay, Feb. March 30, here.
15, there; Perry Middle, 5 Madison Academy, April
p.m., Feb. 16, there; Florida there; NFC, April 5, he
SHigh, Feb. 22, here; Lanier Brookwood, April 6, the
County, 3:30 p.m., Feb. 26, and Madison Central, 4:
There; and Madison Central, 5 p.m., April 10, here.
Sp.m., Feb. 27, there. Coaching the Warriors t
SCarrabelle, March 2, there; year is Joe Striplin.


lin
out
re-
ext

der
ted

ev-
'00
ing

ing
on
op,
aw
the


The Aucilla Christian Acad- -
emy varsity girls basketball
team finished second in the
District Tournament Saturday
after their defeat by FAMU,
49-10.
"We got crushed," said
Coach Daryl Adams.
"FAMU is a very tough team
"They totally dominated us
in the third and fourth quar-
ters. We gave it our all, but
we're just no competition for
them."
Caitlin Murphy led the score
with four points, one steal.
Brittany Hobbs, three points,
three rebounds, one assist,
one steal, one block.
Lisa Bailey, two points,
three rebounds, one assist,
three steals.


~' '-..,


. -
" '. "i. : *i
. -


YOUTH Soccer Saturdays
at the Recreation Park
continues to draw good
turnouts. (News Photo)


JV Chelsea Dobson, one
point; Nicole Mathis, three re-
bounds, three steals; Lindsey
Day, two rebounds, two as-
sists, two steals; Bethany
Saunders, one steal; and JV
Miranda Wider, one block.
The Lady Warriors will
compete in the Regional
Tournament, 7 p.m., Thurs-
day in Gainesville against the
Gainesville Rock.
Adams said he didn't know
what to expect of the Rock,
he hadn't ever seen them play
before, but he has heard that
.they are a good, up and com-
ing team.
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FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Despite cool temperature
and crisp winds Saturday, it
was a good day for soccer and
some 100 youths turned out
for the Youth Soccer Program
at the Recreation Park.
Describing the day, Coach
Phil Barker remarked: "We
had some warm-up drills for
the kids, including dribbling,
heading, passing, and trap-
ping, and the fourth through
eighth graders worked more
on their goal keeping skills,
and during play I could see a
lot of the kids putting those
skills into practice."
Barker said that he was
really pleased and impressed
with the fourth through eighth
grade players and their using
their passing skills more
often.
"They're are learning to
stay spread out on the field to
better have opportunities for
the goal shots."
He added that many goals
were made throughout the
day, and that the kids were


doing great in the goal keep-
ers box.
Soccer action concludes Sat-
urday with all players receiv-
ing participation trophies.
Teams three and four play
at 9 a.m.; teams five and six,
10 a.m.; teams seven and
eight, 11 a.m.; and teams one
and two at noon.


Aucilla JV

Baseball

Roster
Aucilla JV baseball roster
includes:
Seventh graders: Levi Cobb,
Marcus Evans, Tyler Jackson,
Cody Kelly, Trent Roberts,
Ben Sadler, Mason Shiver,
Matt Tuten, Alex Gulledge,
and Philip Watts.'
Eighth, graders: Clark Chris-
tie, Kent Jones, Marcus Rob-
erts, and Casey Wheeler.
And ninth graders: Lane
Fraleigh, Daniel ward, and
Joe Mizell.
Coaching the Warriors this
year is Joe Striplin. He is as-
sisted by Stewart Wheeler.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 9,2007 PAGE 11


Apalachicola Downs ACA

68-22 In District Playoffs


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The post season came to an
end for the Aucilla Christian
Academy varsity boys basket-
ball team after a loss to Apa-
lachicola 68-22 Monday in
the District playoffs.
Coach Dan Nennstiel said
the Warriors did not play
nearly as well as he would
have like them to. "Even if
we would have played as well
as I would have liked, we


probably couldn't have beat
them, as they are a very pow-
erful team" he said. "That
loss was very difficult, espe-
cially after two previous suc-
cessful seasons."
Reggie Walker led the War-
riors with seven points, nine
rebounds.
Stephen Griffin, four points,
one assist, five rebounds, one
block.
Kyle Bamwell, two points,
two assists, four rebounds,
one steal.
MichaelKinsey, two points,


four rebounds.
Prateen Patel, two points,
two rebounds; and Rob
Searcy, one point.


"Lisa Bailey won the dis-
trict three-point competition
for the girls and will go to the
regional competition and
Wade is hoping to follow in
her footsteps," said Nennstiel.
He added that though the
season ended on a bad note
for the Warriors, he was look-
ing forward to rebuilding the


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team next year and coming
back twice as strong.
"Reggie, Michael and Kyle
all played solid at the end of
the season and I'm looking
forward to them continuing to
improve, returning next year
and having a much better sea-
son," he concluded.


Aucilla JVs stand 7-15 on
the season.
Tthis was the first year for
the three-point competition in
the state and Scarberry won
second place of the three fi-
nalists.
He traveled to the semifinal
three-point competition Tues-
day.


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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 9, 2007

DOE DVD Helps Parents


Support Student Education


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The Florida Department of
Education (DOE) has devel-
oped an interactive DVD to
share with parents new ways to
involve themselves in support
of their child's achievement.
These will be distributed to
students in specified grades in
county schools.
The DVD is called "Your
Child, Your Public Schools, A
,Virtual Tour." It is aimed at
parents of students in grades
Pre-K, 2, 3, 5, 8, and 9.
t


Through the distribution of
these DVDs, volunteer coordi-
nators are presented a unique
opportunity to discuss school
support one on one with par-
ents.
Students in the above men-
tioned grades will be asked to
take the DVDs home to put
them in the hands of their par-
ents.
Parents will learn ways to
help their children in and out
of the classroom. There is in-
formatioin on everything form
FCAT to school grades, to
homework to high school and
beyond.


Nothings helps children suc-
ceed in school like the involve-
ment of parents and guardians,
and the DVD provides parents
with information about how
they can take an active role in
their child's education.
Technology, accountability
-expectations and continuous
improvement have trans-
formed education. Many par-
ents don't know where to start
to support their students.
Take a virtual tour of Flor- .
ida's 21st century public
schools from the FCAT to
school grades, to graduation
requirements, to planning for a
student's life after high school.


NAP Cov
! USDA Farm Service Agency
alerts all that Feb. 28, 2007 is
the deadline for purchasing
,Non Insured Assistance Pro-
gram (NAP) coverage for 2007
;crops.
Crops include: all beans,
[beets, blackberries, canta-
loupes, carrots, celery, Chinese
bitter melon, chufas, cucum-
'bers, eggplant, gladioli
lowers, grapes (muscadine),



School Menu
Monday
'Fish, Cheese Grits, Cole Slaw, Or-
,ange Smiles, Hushpuppie, Milk
Tuesday
!Hot Dog, Baked Beans, Salad
:Choices, Fruit Choices, Milk
Wednesday
Oven Fried Chicken, Creamed
,Potatoes, Green Ieans, Fruit
'Choices, Hot Roll, Milk
Thursday
,Chili, Peanut Butter of Pi-
mento Cheese Sandwich, Fruit
ofJuice, Cinnamon Roll. Nilk
Friday
Hot Ham & Cheese on Bun,
Oven Fries, Carrot & Celery
Sticks, Fruit Choices, Milk


erage Feb. 28


grass (hay and grazing),
greens, honeydew, lettuce,
millet, okra, onions, peanuts
(green), peas, peppers, peren-
nial peanuts, potatoes, pump-
kins, rutabagas, squash, sun-
flowers, turnips, and watermel-
ons.
The deadline for purchasing
NAP coverage for blueberries
has been changed from Feb. 28
to Nov. 20, therefore the dead-
line has passed to purchase
NAP coverage for blueberries.
Director Mark Demott ex-
plains that this change went
unnoticed, and blueberries
were inadvertently included in
the Jan. 2007 County Office
Newsletter.
All losses or prevented plant-


ing must be related to a natural
disaster that causes cata-
strophic losses.
Notice of loss must be re-
ported to the FSA office within
15 calendar days after the dis-
aster occurrence or date of
damage to the specific crop is
apparent, or the occurrence of
prevented planting, or the end
of the'planting period.

To be eligible to receive as-
sistance for an eligible crop, a
producer shall pay a non re-
fundable service fee in an.
amount of $100 per crop per
administrative county; or $300
per producer per administra-
tive county, but not to exceed a,
total of $900 per producer.


STOP LEG CRAMPS
BEFORE THEY STOP YOU.


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Tel: (850) 577-1300 Ext. 114
Fax: (850) 577-0555
Cell: (850) 528-5758
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850 591 7533 phone
850 893 5004 lax.
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Lesley Putnal
Secretary


Poppell
Putnal & Associate
I AND) SIIRVFVORS R
Terry L. Putnal
President

Walton F. Poppell
Surveyor


SPQ Box 388 180 S. Cherry St, Suite A Monticello FL 32345
Phone 850-997-0005 Fax 850-997-8005
Email putnalinc@earthlink.net


Home Sellers
Can Now Hold Onto More Equity
Assist-2-Sell, the nation's largest discount real estate company has opened its newest office I
in Tallahassee, Florida under broker-owner Hilton Hightower. Known for its innovative "Full
Service with $avings!'" concept, Assist-2-Sellnow boasts more than 600 franchise offices in
the United States and Canada.
Homebuyers in the Tallahassee area face a dilemma. "In order to purchase a bigger, more LD '
expensive home, most need to keep as much equity as possible when selling their current
residence," said Hilton Hightower.
One option is the time intensive "For Sale By Owner" strategy, but the pitfalls and
aggravations are seldom worth the effort. And as most people know, using a traditional real
estate company can mean forfeiting five or even six percent of the total sales price in agent
commissions. There is another choice. Assist-2-Sell offers home sellers a "Direct-To-Buyer'TM
program for a very affordable flat fee, regardless of the selling price of the home. and with no
up-front or hidden fees. Under this program. Assist-2-Sell's team of licensed REALTORSwill
market a home for a flat fee of just $2,495. payable only after the successful selling and closing
of the home. And since Assist-2-Sell is a member of the local MLS, Assist-2-Sell also offers sellers the "MLS For Less"
program. In this program, sellers have an option of placing their home in the MLS system at a total commission of 4%. Best
of all. even if the property is listed on MLS. and Assist-2-Selloproduces the buyer, the seller pays only the flat fee of $2.495
"Don't let the name fool you. This is not a do-it-yourself concept. Under Assist-2-Sell's marketing programs, sellers
receive the full services of professional REALTORS at afraction of what they might normally pay," continued Hightower.
"Customers can't believe how much they save with our programs" These full-service programs includes signs. free
advertising, feature sheets, answering the phone inquiries from buyers, showing the home to perspective buyers, negotiating
the purchase agreement, interacting with inspectors and appraisers, handling all the paperwork, supervising the closing, and
more.
"When people first call us, they're thinking there must be a catch. They can't believe we'll actually sell their home for just
$2,495. But they are pleasantly surprised when they find out we do everything other real estate agents do but for a lot less
money." For example, if you compare $2.495 to a six percent commission, a home that sells for $250,000 will save the owner
more than $12.500.
"Ifyour home is priced fairly, its going to sell. regardless of which real estate company you choose." Hightower said. "The
question is how much do you want to pay to sell it?"
The Tallahassee Assist-2-Sell franchise serves home sellers and homchuyers in Tallahassee and the surrounding area. The
office is located at 1616 Metropolitan Circle. Suite D. For more information, call Ililton Ilightower at 850-422-0008 or visit
www.Homes4Tallahassee.com.


Deadline For Purchasing


Roland S. Hooker
Manager


9,


_







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 9, 2007 PAGE 13


Kitchen Cabinets Made to Order


Grenvll Mii toag
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family reunions, parties Licensed and Insured 0 S
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Suite 101 Title Searches Real Estate Closings 997-2027 Limerock 997 -678
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PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 9, 2007


MONTICELLO


NEWS




Covering

The Growth

Of The

Community!


ar


the Prees s t

Everybay/1s

Freeftmi.,.f


LEGAL
Notice of Job Opening:
Jefferson County Clerk of
Court is accepting applications
for a Budgeting and Payroll
Administrator. Job description
and application may be
obtained in the Office of the
Clerk of Circuit Court, Room,
10, County Courthouse,
Monticello, Florida Salary
range is $25,000 to $40,000.
Minimum education and
experience requirements are: *
A bachelor's degree from an
accredited college or university
with a major in accounting,
finance, or business
administration.* Four (4) years
experience in accounting,
budgeting, and payroll


LEGAL
processing in either the
governmental sector or private
sector. Applications will be
accepted until 5:00 p.m.
February 26, 2007 at the Office
of Clerk of Circuit Court. Equal
Opportunity/ Affirmative
Action Employer. Drug Free
Workplace. Drug testing is a
required part of the
pre-employment physical.
Applicants with a disability
should contact the above office
for accommodation.
2/7, 9, 14, 16/07,c
Jefferson County Board of
Commissioners: Request bids
for plaster coating of the
exterior of the Planning and
Building Department. 445 W.
Palmer Mill Rd., Monticello,
FL. Contractor is responsible
for measurements and submittal
of all specifications. Contact:
Wallace O. Bullock /
Mike Gramling 850-342-0223,
Deadline: 02/15/07 12:00 noon
2/7, 2/9/07, c
Jefferson County Land Auction 700
acres, starting @ 1,200/ac
Owner/agent March 10th
www.700Acreauction.com
R/D 2/7,9,14,16,21,23,28 3/2,7,9
/2007,c


Cox Auto Trader is currently
seeking drivers to deliver our
magazines in the Tallahassee
FL, Madison, FL and
surrounding areas. Computer
knowledge helpful, requires
reliable vehicle, good driving
record, valid drivers license &
insurance. One day, a week -
Thursdays. Pick up magazines
in Madison. Call 386-590-1255
1/24,26,31,2/2,7,9,14,16,21,23,28
,3/2,c
AVON! Start the year with a
new career,, earn 50%, only $10
to start! 570-1499
R/D1/31,2/2,7,9,14,16,21,23,28,p
d
Driver needed 850-528-5218
1/31,2/2,7,9,c

SERVICES '
SHEDS- I build sheds, decks,
handicap ramps, exterior
carpentry work, window/door
replacement. Call Bob 242-9342
R/D
1/10,12,17,19,24,26,31,2/2,7,9,14
,16,21,23,28,3/2,7,9,14,16

sNIA1


SERVICES

Appliance Repairs: washers,.
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quick responses.
6/22, tfn
linini'l' rpiniiii. Call Savanah at

R/I) 1/24,26,31,2/2,pd
If you have a child attending
I.l./lTFMIll high schools, and
corpooliig Is rot working, for
an affordable fee, you have an
option, Call Freeman Davis
510l.s,162, 421-8060.
R/DI/17,19,24,26,31,2/2,9,14,16,
21,23,28pd
Notary Public Documents/
Marriages performed will
Travel. Call Joan 948-2788
R/D 1/26,31,2/2,pd
Childcare Services- infant to 3
years old. In my home. Call
997-5498 reasonably low prices.
11/1,TFN,c b
Have you been taken off your


(E LPW4y


Sl er a The donation is tax deductible.
R Oel Pick-up Is free.
f* tor theB Im d We take care of all the paperwork.


Operations Assistant: For
paratransit Company in
Monticello/Jefferson County.
Scheduling, routing, and
dispatching of daily
transportation services. Prefer
experience in passenger
transportation service,
knowledge of Windows-based
computer operations, and
familiarity with
Monticello/Jefferson County
area a must. A Class D Florida
Driver's License. will be
required. This is a
Safety-sensitive position which
requires substance abuse testing
per FTA/DOT. Position is
located in the BBT Jefferson
County (Monticello) office
days/hours of work are typically
Monday through Friday, 8:00
am to 5:00 pm. Send
Letter/resume to Big Bend
Transit, Inc. 290 West Dogwood
St., Monticello, FL 32344
2/7, 9, 13, 15, 21, 23, c
Cleaning service needs people in
Monticello area after 5 pm. 3
days a week part time work
must be able to pass a back
ground check. Only serious
minded inquires only. Call
Karen at 850-942-6200 or
850-926-7029.
2/7,9,14,16,21,23,28 c
Part time janitorial- Aucilla
Call 681-3148
R/D 2/9, 14,16,21


Upcoming Auctions!

Ag & Construction Machinery, Farm Equipment,
Trucks, Trailers, ATV's, much more

"11th Annual Winter Auction"
Sunbelt Ag Expo Site
Moultrie, GA
Saturday, February 17, 2007 9:00 am

"5th Annual Winter Auction"
Iron City, GA
Saturday, February 24, 2007 9:00am

Don't miss these opportunities!
Call now to consign!
Turn your surplus equipment into Sold!


Mobile:
229-891-1832
Phone:
229-985-4565


Terry DeMott, Sr.
1894 Sylvester Highway
Moultrie, GA 31768
www.demottauction.com


For Sale by First United Methodist Church 2400 sq.
ft. home at 895 West Washington Street. This former
Methodist Parsonage with split floor plan has 4 bed-
rooms and 3 1/2 baths, refinished hardwood floors.
New tile floors in kitchen, laundry and baths, carpet
in the family room and master bedroom. Bathrooms
newly renovated. Wood stove insert in fireplace.
Large lot landscaped with magnolias, camellias, crepe
myrtles and azaleas. Large deck and screened porch.
$259,500. For more information
call 997-5545


these rates ore available only ot participation Authorized Kubola Dealers All fnaning to subject to credit approval and occeptonce by Kuboto Credit Corporotion specifnolly serves the light o teimi teo 01 modily tIhe roles at ony lame WA( on select models See dealer for de ils
South Georgia Tractor S.G.T. Rentals & Sales
1920 Highway 84 E 4017 Woodville Hwy
Cairo, GA 39828 | Tallahassee, FL 32305
(229) 377-1585 Great Parts and Service Department (850) 671-2585


hormone replacement? See our-
new menopausal products.
Jackson's drug store.
5/12 tfn
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn

FOUND. :'
Keys on green ring found
Sunday 11/26/06 on Lake Road
near Tecumseh Rd. Call Debbie
@ 997-3568
11/29,tfn,nc
Greyhound- Dark color female
w/red collar on North Jefferson
Street. Call Marcie 997-2988
R/D 2/9, 14 n/c


Female Mixed Bull & Shar-pei Tan
with some black trim 4 mo's. old,
about 30 Ibs. 16"high wearing red
halter with leash last seen near
Monticello Post Office call Herb
997-3156
R/D 2/9,14


I









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 9,2007 PAGE 15


To Place Your Ad




997-3568


GARAGE SALE F"


Yard Sale Giant Moving Sale
Fri.& Sat. 8:00-12:00 @ 1285
Magnolia Ave. Behind Sage
Resturant 251-5018
R/D 2/7,9

4^JtO1VOW E


1989 International DumpTruck
18 CY. Tandem Axles. $18,000.
251-2437, 997-0901
R/D tfn,S/D 12/6


FOR SALE 1985 Chevy Capris
Station Wagon- $800.00
342-1486, 509-1942
R /D 2/9,14 pd
RV- sleeps 6, 1998, 24', asking
$5,500. 997-0901, 251-1641
1/31,tfn,nc
1996 Ford F350 Diesel Crewcab
No calls after 9:00 p.m. please
251-2237
1/10,tfn,nc
1989 International Dump
Truck. 18 CY. Tandem Axles.
$18,000. 251-2437, 997-0901.
R/D 12/6,tfn,nc
1996 Ford Ranger XLT
Supercab 2 wd 4.0 V6 127K AC
AT Toolbox. Needs some minor
work, but driveable now. $3,000
251-0763 8am 8pm
R/D 9/27,tfn ,nc
FOR SALE
Moving must sell lawn and
outdoor equipment, Patio
furniture, 4500. kw Generator,
42" Scott (by Deere) riding
mower with yard trailer,, 10ft.
John Boat with trolling motor,
Rakes, hoes, weed wacker,
shovels, axes, sledge hammers,
etc. call 997-7113
R/D 2/9,13,16,21 pd
Specialized feed for Alpacas &
Lamas. Call Marcy
850-421-2403


R/D 2/9,14,16,21,23,28 3/2,7
$150 Queen Pillow-top Mattress
Set. New in Plastic with
warranty.. 850-222-9879
12/1,tfn,c
Cherry sleigh bed SOLID
WOOD- BRAND NEW in box,
$250. (850) 545-7112
12/1,tfn,c
LEATHER SOFA &
LOVESEAT. NEW, warranty,
sacrifice $795. (can deliver).
(850) 425-8374
12/1,tfn,c
NEW king POSTER bedroom
set bed, dresser, mirror, chest,
2 nightstands. $4400 value, must
sell $1650. (850) 545-7112
12/1,tfn,c
KING PILLOWTOP Mattress
Set. Brand new in plastic. Must

KELLY AND KELLY
PROPERTIES
SPecan Hill
Subdivision

OPEN SAT & SUN
1:30 pm 4:00 pm

STUART & CURTIS*
$189,900
*Profits from the sale
of this home will go to
HOSPICE
CHOOSE YOUR MODEL ON
LOTS AVAILABLE

VIRGINIA BLOW
Broker Associate
850.509.1844
ErmEnon m. EspI, ono..o.40l>ClI Op


Wednesday, February 14th
Auction Starts @Noon Registration @ 11:00 AM


Several Properties will be Sold Homes. Condos. Land, & WaLertron
Call anytime, or for more information please visit




Sellers Motivatedl
343 Attatulga Road,
Lamont Area
Custom 2004 Home on
5.66 acres. All brick,
built in 2004, 3 BR/2
BA split plan, 2 car
garage. Hardwood,
tile & carpet flooring.
All appliances
Dianne Spooner, Broker, Hill Spooner & included. Like' new.
Company Inc. 850-508-1846 Move-in-ready.
$279,000


ADVANCED



SALES
RESIDENTIAL/COMMIIERCIAL
MFG.HMVIS. WITH LAND
ACREAGE/LOTS
MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE -
No FEE TO LIST -
FREE MARKET ANALYSES -
YOU NAME IT, WE'LL FIND IT!
READY TO SELL IT, IT'S SOLD!
1 50 W. WASHINGTON s -KI.,
(IN THE COURT HOUSE CIRCLE)
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
CALL US OR STOP BY TODAY
850-997-1691














Epc i


CLASSIFIED

Your Community Shopping Center


move, $225. (850) 222-9879
12/1,tfn,c


4 BR,2 BA $750.00 Month
Call 251-7708
2/9,14,16,21,c
House- 4 BR, 2 BA Prefer HUD
Housing Qualified. 544-6688
R/D 2/9, 14, Pd
Spacious 2/1 and 1/1 apts, also
office space, near Monticello
center. Section 8 OK Call
850-491-8447
1/24,tfn,c
Jefferson Place Apts., 1 & 2 BR,
HUD Vouchers Accepted 1468
S. Waukeenah St. Office 300,


HELP WANTED

Martha's Bouncing
Babies
is looking for
Experienced Day
Care Workers Call

850-997-5730


Southern Forestry Realty
www.soforest.com

83+ac, W Jefferson Co. -
15-20 yr old loblolly, natural
pines & hardwoods. 5 ponds,
great fishing & hunting tract.
Power available
58+ac, Madison Co. 30 ac
12-yr old planted pines,
frontage on Aucilla River &
Hwy 90, beautiful oaks, road
system. $5172/ac.
199+ac, Jefferson Co. 35
min. E of Tallahassee. Natural
upland pines & hardwoods. Full
of turkey & deer, ponds w/fish
& ducks. Power available.
111+ac, Jefferson Co. 18-
20 yr old planted pines, 50 ac
hardwood bottom. Nice rolling
topography, 35 min to Tallahas-
see. Full of game near Aucilla
River. $5000/ac.

Rob Langford
850-556-7575
Many more investment opportu-
nities available in North FI,
South GA, and Southeast AL.


Monticello.
institution
Opportunity
Employer".
9/6,tfn, c


997-6964.
is an
Provider


"This
Equal
and


Quiet, Private Living In Downtown Monticello!
Riley Palmer Built in 06, 3 BR/2 BA, 1440 sq ft, on N. Cherry
Court, brick & Hardie board exterior, oversized one car
garage, large tiled kitchen, raised panel cabinets, solid surface
counters, wood floors, vaulted living room ceiling w/crown
molding, screened back porch, prewired for security and data.

$229,500 Ken Foster Palmer Properties 544-5040


Big Bend Hospice, the leader in compassionate care
to individuals with life-limiting illnesses, has the
following position available on our care team

RN Case Manager
Full-time RN Case Manager for Jefferson County.
Current Florida license as'RN required. Plus 2 -3 years
med-surgery experience preferred.

Great benefit package!
Interested candidates can apply in person
1723 Mahan Center Blvd.
Tallahassee, Florida
or by faxing a resume to (850) 575-6814
or

Apply on-line!
at

www.bigbendhospice.org


Big Bend
Hospice
-/ourflmr hompln Itc-nld. n lnol w


EOE/DFWP/ADA
Smoke Free Workplace


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday.;.S9.00
Each Additional Line....$1.25
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


Housing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 $50 dep.

Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571 U
........................!


(850) 997-4340


orP perty Mananement S I


CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots,
Land! We Make
Mortgage Loans,
Reverse Mortgages!
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc
878-3957


FOR SALE
OLDIE BUT GOODIE, 2
BDRM, 1 BTH, pine flooring,
fireplace insert, det. workshop
storage, 1/2 ac. lot, $100,000
OLD FARMSTEAD, 50
Acres, $7500 p/a, some pines,
mostly pasture, isolated
TWISTED & TWINED
GRAPEVINES, drape cen-
tury old oaks, 5.34 acres, very
secluded
US 19 NORTH, 5 acres,
zoned for Recreational vehicle/
travel trailer park, edge of city
limits
GAS & GROCERY, plus
manager's home, borders US 27,
potential for seafood market and
coin laundry
AIRSTRIP, home and
hangar bordering 6000 ft. long
grass strip, fun place to live, no
pilots license required, $269,000
TWO HOMES, 5 ac., hand-
icap ramps, decks, porches, must
be relative in order to keep 2nd
home (per assoc. rules), 1 mile
form headwaters of Aucilla
River, $234,000
FIXXER UPPER, on US
90 downtown Monticello, 2 Bd,
1 Bth, built 1925, $95,000
CORN FED deer walking
around like yard dogs, 180 acres
+/-, mostly pines, thickets and
thistle, $4500 p/a, will divide,
seller financing





.. mma


SWooded Tract 2.09 hillside acres east of town
on graded County Road $30,400

Just Listed!! 3 bedroom 2 bath delightful log
cabin with front and back screened porches,
board fence pasture, double carport and out
building on 4.07 acres $385,000

Lloyd Acres on a wooded hillside a 3 bedroom
2 bath modular home with oak floors, fireplace
and lots of very nice extras including shop for
$87,500

Historic Budd House built ca 1882 by commu-
nity leader of the day for his family. Lovely wood
work, high ceilings, spacious rooms, grand fire-
places, marvelous porches, currently 4 bedrooms
and 2 baths $355,000

Waterfront Homel! Like New, roomy, 3 bed-
room 2 bath, home with big carport, nice shed with
5 acres on very-nice lake near 1-10 and US 19
$385,000 See it at www.TimPeary.com

Amnazinq Buy!!! Mixed Use Property 12
plus partially cleared acres on US 19 south land
use designation permits 4 houses per acre near
Dennis' Trading post only $36,500 per acre

New Listinq Contract Pending 13.29 acres
some wooded some open $5,000 per acre

Terrific Location 3 bedroom 2 bath doublewide
with fireplace, big porch, garage, shed, above
ground pool, with big trees, fence paddocks, on
county maintained paved Cherry Tree Lane now
$127,500

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly
wooded acres Only $36,500

Pasture and Pecans 5-10 lovely acres on
paved road $15,500 per acre Very nice property,
good deed restrictions

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Great Opportunity!!! Comfortable 4 bedroom
3 bath home on five fenced acres with guest cot-
tage w/bath, 2 car garage, big shop, pasture 100
pecan trees and a nice pool Only $365,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Wooded Acreaqe 5.35 acres on private road
off Paul Thompson Road $128,500

Waukeenah Hiqhway 27.99 acres good
home site fenced pasture $545,000

Aucilla Shores 5 level wooded acres $75,000

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath double-
wide with nice deck, fenced yard on 1 acre
$73,500

Investment Property Choice lot on the
Ecofina River 20 minutes to the Gulf, State
property on 3 sides, septic tank on property,
paved road only $195,000


Realtor Tim Peary

850-997-4340
See all our listings at
www.TimPeary.com

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


Great Rentals
2/1 1/2 bath mobile home east of
town on 5 acres $650/month
2 bedroom cabin in the woods $750 mo








PAGE 16, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., FEBRUARY 9,2007


Boyd Calls For Fiscally


Responsible Budget


Congressman Allen Boyd,
leader of the Blue Dog Coali-
tion, and a member of the
House Budget Committee, re-
sponded to the Administra-
tion's Fiscal Year 2008
Budget, calling for a budget
that is honest, realistic and fis-
cally responsible.
The President's budget
leaves out significant expenses
in an attempt to balance the
budget by 2012, a commend-
able goal, but one that can only
be achieved with an accurate
accounting of our govern-
ment's total expenses.
While the President aims to
balance the budget by 2012,
under realistic assumption, his
budget will remain in deficit
over the next five years.
For example, the President's
budget freezes funding for the
Department of Education, the
Department of the Interior, and
Environmental Protection
Agency at 2006 levels.
This would essentially un-
dermine the No Child Left Be-
hind Act, and prevent us from
protecting our national parks.
Also, the President's budget
proposes cutting Medicare and
Medicaid by $100 billion, a
proposal that members of his
own party have soundly re-
jected.
Furthermore, the Admin-
istration only gets the budget
to balance by 2012 by using
the Social Security surplus to
mask the true size of the defi-
cit.
Additionally, the President's


budget fails to provide a long
term fix to the Alternative
Minimum Tax (AMT) needed,
to prevent middle class fami-
lies from facing serious tax in-
creases.
Without providing a lasting
fix to the AMT, Americans
will pay approximately $492
billion more in taxes over the
past 10 years.
"Under pressure from the
fiscal hawks, like the Blue
Dogs, the President is begin-
ning to demonstrate a commit-
ment to cleaning up our fiscal
house, but this commitment
demands that the President
recognize the serious financial
situation that our country is ex-
periencing, one that becomes
increasingly worse with
time,"said Boyd, Blue Dog co-
chair for administration.
"Unfortunately, the Presi-
dent's budget once again omits
our government's total fiscal
exposure, painting a 'best case
scenario' that will be almost
impossible to live up to."
According to the US Treas-
ury Department, the actual fis-
cal exposures faced by the US
government at the end of the
fiscal year 2006 totals $50
trillion.
The Government Account-
ability Office (GAO) Comp-
troller General, David Walker,
has said that to cover such ob-
ligations would cost about
$170,000, for every American
or $440,000 per household.
Congressman Boyd has long


JCHS Reports


Honor Rolls


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County High
School Principal Juliet Jack-
son reports the A/B honor roll
for the second nine week pe-
riod.
Appearing on the roll are:
Amber Weinrich, Shayne
Broxie, Iesha Jackson, Ashley
Mitchell, Marisha Buescel,
Jazmaun Hall, Keyonna Wil-
son, April Bynum, Shaumese
Massey, Angela Scurry, and
Carmen Skipworth.
On the 3.0 honor roll are:
Brandon Deas, Jasmine Fran-
cis, Harold Ingram, LaAshle
Norton, Odom Lena, Eduardo
Barron, Takedral Gilley, La-
toya Henry, Kristin Holt, Am-
ber MacDonald, and Shalin
Pitts,.
Colita Rivers, Breterrica
White, Crystal Bellamy, Jor-
dan Blair, Alana Chambers,
Justin Clark, Alex farmer,
Kayangelia Gadson, Kandice
Griffin, Brittany Harvey,
Kevin Hill, Michelle Keaton,
Tameka Massey, Jamal
Parker, Saunt'e Perry, Donna
Ransom, Keiona Scott,. Tho-
mas Smith, Chevarra Ulee,
and Asia Wyche.


On the first semester honor
roll are: Amber Weinrich,
Shayne Broxie, lesha
Jackson, Ashley Mitchell,
Shalin Pitts, Crystal Bellamy,
Jordan Blair, April Bynum,
and Angela Scurry.
On the 3.0 honor roll for the
first semester are: Harold In-
gram, Keneshia Coates, Ire-
shia Denson, Courtney
Holmes, Masrisa Bueschel,
Jazmaun Hall, Latoya Henry,
Kristin Holt, Alana
Chambers, Justin Clark, Kay-
angelia Gadson, Kevin Hill,
Michelle Keaton, Shaumese
Massey, Tameka Massey, and
Thomas Smith.


MDA covers America with the
most complete range of
services for people affected
by neuromuscular diseases.
MD9
Muscular Dystrophy Association
Jerry Lewis, National Chairman
1-800-572-1717


advocated pay-as-you-go
(PAYGO) spending as a solu-
tion for reducing our national
debt.
Earlier this year, House lead-
ership included PAYGO
spending requirements in the
House rules package, and the
Blue Dog Coalition is commit-
ted to seeing that PAYGO re-
quirements again become law.
"Our national debt is ap-
proaching $9 trillion, and only
through meaningful budget re-
forms will we make some
headway to reduce this fiscal
burden," Boyd said.
"I will be working in the
House Budget Committee to
ensure hat our budget will be
honest and realistic and com-
plete with PAYGO rules and
appropriate spending caps."


Department of Neurology
Ricardo Ayala, M.D.
Winston Ortiz, M.D.
Leonard DaSilva, M.D.
J. True Martin, M.D.
(850) 877-8121


Department of Neurosurgery
Mark Cuffe, M.D.
Albert Lee, M.D.
Christopher Rumana, M.D.
(850) 87-5115


Department of Pain Management
Vildan Mullin, M.D.
Joshua Fuhrmeister, M.D.
L _(850) 558-1260


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904-646-5535


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- Effective February 1, 2007 -


I




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