Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00176
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: February 7, 2007
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00176
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text









Reichert JCHS
Teacher Of Year
Nominee

Story, Page 3
II


Energy Update
Means
Tax Credits

Editorial, Page 4


Nursing Center
Tells February
Activities

Story, Page 6
II


Aucilla Athletes

Names Big Bend
Leaders

Story, Page 8
II


C Wednesday Morning )







Monticello


1ifl'L v R A DRNO. in 1. 0CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews
WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 7.2007


Shuttle To Get



Small Reprieve


County To Finance

Service Until June


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Notwithstanding overcast
skies and a threatening storm,
a good-sized crowd gathered at
the recreation park noon last
Thursday for the dedication of
the new walking trail -- part of
the Step-Up Florida activities.
Jefferson County, for anyone
who may have missed the fact,
was the kickoff county for the
statewide event, which aims to
promote physical activity and
a healthier lifestyle.
State Representative Loranne
Ausley and Commission
Chairman Junior Tuten, who
were scheduled speakers at the
dedication ceremony, could
not attend. But Mark Fenton, a
former member of the US na-
tional race-walking team, and
Mayor Julie Conley were pre-
sent, as were Commissioners
Danny Monroe, Skeet Joyner,
Eugene Hall and Jerry Sutphin.
Kim Barnhill, director of the
Health Department -- which
contributed the $20,000 for
construction of the trail --
called the trail another step in
the Health Department's con-
tinuing effort to promote
healthier lives here.


Research shows that exercise,
and physical activity can pre-
vent the development of heart
disease, stroke, lung cancer,
chronic obstructive lung and
diabetes -- chronic diseases
that annually account for 40
percent of deaths here.

Aim is To
Promote
Health

Consider: 66 percent of Jef-
ferson County adults are over-
weight or obese; 12.4 percent
have diabetes; 61 percent re-
port not engaging in even
moderate physical activity on a
regular basis; and 77 percent
report not eating the recom-
mended five or more daily
servings of fruits and vegeta-
bles.
Fenton asked the audience to
remember the numbers 30, 25
and 365.
The first represented the
minimum 30 minutes that one
should dedicate daily to physi-
cal activity in order to reduce
health problems and retain
mental faculties, he said.
"This is as close as one can
get to the silver bullet, the-


event was part of the Step-


magical elixir, for prolonging
health," he said.
The 25, he said, represented
the 25 percent of Americans
who actually get the minimum
30 minutes of exercise daily.
And the 365 represented the
estimated 365,000 Americans
who died annually due to ill-
nesses associated with poor
nutrition and lack of physical
activity, he said.
"Only tobacco kills more
Americans annually," Fenton
said. "The good news is that
trails and facilities like these
can make a difference. The an-
swer is not to make people
jocks, but to build activity into
their lives."
Fenton praised the city's de-
sign, with its mix of residential
and businesses uses in close
proximity. He said such a de-
sign promoted walking and
other physical activity. He en-
couraged city officials and
planners to require that new
developments include bicy-
cling and walking paths.
"When you put these things
into place, more than one in
four Americans will get physi-
cal activity," Fenton said.
"I see the signs of growth
here already," he continued.
(See Walking Trail, Page 2)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

SThe shuttle bus, which was
expected to cease operating in
March because of a lack of
funding, got a reprieve of sorts
Thursday.
After a lengthy hearing and
much emotional testimony
from several members of the
community, the County Com-
mission agreed to fund the
service $10,000 to carry it un-
til June 1.
Come June 1, the commis-
sion promised to revisit the is-
sue and decide what to do
next, depending on what the
Legislature does in the interim
concerning the reduction of
property taxes that Gov. Crist
is proposing.
Credit Commissioner Jerry
Sutphin for the last-minute
save of the shuttle.
Sutphin, a longtime cham-
pion of the shuttle, pulled all
the stops Thursday in arguing
for county funding of the serv-
ice.
"Two years ago when I made
a commitment to be a commis-
sioner, it was not only to look
after the business of the
county, but also to look out for
the people," Sutphin said.
He characterized clients of
the shuttle bus as the most
needy and vulnerable in the
community. These were the
elderly and economically dis-
advantaged, folks who de-
pended on the shuttle bus for
their basic daily needs, includ-
ing health care, he said.
His proposal, Sutphin said,
was that the county take part
of the money budgeted for the
still unfilled position of county
coordinator and use that
money to fund the shuttle.
George Hinchliffe, executive
director of Healthy Start and a
leading proponent of the effort
to save the shuttle, told com-
missioners that he had been
diligent in seeking other fund-
ing since last coming before
them in September.
So far, he had received a
pledge of $5,000, Hinchliffe
said. But most people he had
approached, he said, had
stopped just short of making a
commitment, awaiting the
county's leadership.
"I haven't gotten anyone to
slam the door on me,"
Hinchliffe said. 'My read is
that private and corporate in-
terests are waiting to see which
way it goes with the county."
Kim Barnhill, director of the
Health Department, reminded
commissioners that when the
service was initiated almost
two years ago, it represented a
big step forward.
"We have the power to do
something so right for the


community," Barnhill said.
"This is a big component for a
livable community. I appeal to
your sense of community to
give us a year's funding, so
that we can find some other
dollars."


Emotional
Appeals
Are Made

Rev. Dick Bailar, a member
of the legislative lobbying
committee, expressed regret
that he had not gotten involved
with the shuttle's funding ear-
lier.

Because of his personal cir-
cumstances, Bailar said, he
and his wife were in the proc-
ess of selling their house in the
county and moving into town,
where he would likely have
need of the shuttle.
"This is a very special hu-
mane need for the community,
just like fire and police protec-
tion," Bailar said.


Catherine Arnold, of Big
Bend Hospice, also appealed
for continuation of the service,
which she said afforded basic
transportation and a measure
of dignity and comfort to peo-
ple facing life and death
issues.
"It took so much community
effort to get it rolling," Arnold
said. "Let's keep it going."
Rev. Carl Hanks said he had
felt a thump in his stomach
when he read the news of the
possible end of the shuttle.
Like Bailar, he too might have
need of the shuttle in the near
future because of his wife's in-
ability to drive, he said.
S"If you have an emotional
feeling I would encourage
them to come forward and let
it come to pass," Hanks said.
Commissioner Junior Tuten
conceded the emotional inipact
of the appeals. No member of
the board was without compas-
sion or not susceptible to the
appeals, he said.
But the fact was that the
county had limited funding
and he could not in good con-
science agree to the $35,000
that it would take to fund the
_shuttle for a year, he said.
(See Shuttle, Page 2)


THE SHUTTLE BUS will run another three months be-
yond March, thanks to $15,000 in contributions from
the county and a private group. (News Photo)


Lawmakers Scheduled

TO Come Here Feb. 20


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Legis-
lative Delegation will hold its
annual public hearing at the
Opera House 6 p.m. Tuesday,
Feb. 20.

These hearings are intended
to afford citizens an opportu-
nity to meet with the lawmak-
ers, discuss issues of concern,
ask questions, and offer sug-
gestions for the upcoming leg-
islative session.


As part of the proceeding,
the legislators also hear from
local officials on the critical is-
sues facing the city, the
county, and the school district.
The legislators also share
their views on what they think
will be the dominant issues
facing them in the coming leg-
islative session.
Members of the Legislative
Delegation are Senators Al
Lawson and Nancy Argenzi-
ano and State Representatives
Will Kendrick and Loranne
Ausley.


COUNTY OFFICIALS, Health Department representatives and children from the ele-
mentary school on Thursday afternoon took part in the cutting of the ribbon for the


opening of new walking trail at the recreation park. The
Up Florida activities. (News Photo)


New Walking Trail


Dedicated At Park


MARK FENTON, a former member of the US national race-walking team, was on hand
to help dedicate the trail. Fenton led the children and adults gathered at the park in
a warm-up exercises, preparatory to walking the trail. (News Photo)


139TH YEAKINU.~v IU, J3 %-ZIN13









ARY 7, 2007

i Bless Beast Event To

Offer Various Attractions


for $25 each and there is a
goal of selling some 250 tick-
ets.
For further information, con-
tact Carswell at 997-4000.


BILL GUNNELS and Colleen Weber at the Chamber Af-
ter Hours last week at Capital City Bank, featuring the
newly remodeled facility. (News Photo)


Shuttle Gets Reprieve


(Continued From Page 1)
"I think that figure needs ad-
justment," Tuten said, refer-
Sring to the motion by Commis-
sioner Eugene Hall and sec-
onded by Sutphin to fund the
$35,000. "I think the shuttle
people need have the challenge
to keep seeking alternative
funding."
Commissioner Skeet Joyner
likewise resisted the emotional
appeal.
Like Sutphin, he too had
made a commitment, Joyner
said. And that commitment
was to be a responsible money
Chandler for the citizens.
He cited Gov. Crist's pro-
posal to. give property owners
relief by cutting property
taxes. If it came to pass that
"the "Legislature approved the
proposal, it would cut the


county's revenues in half, he
said.
In that case, not only the
shuttle but the library, park
and other county services
would be jeopardized, Joyner
said.
"I'm a supporter of property
tax overhaul," Joyner said.
"But I'm not in support of
starving counties of revenues
that we so desperately need."
He proposed waiting until
after the legislative session to
decide on the funding of the
shuttle.
In the end, commissioners
compromised, committing
$10,000, which added to the
$5,000 private pledge, should
keep the shuttle operating until
June, they said.
"We're going to continue
beating the bushes for other
money," Hinch liffe promised.


Walking Trail Dedicated


(Continued From Page 1)
"The details matter. You need
to be vigilant so that you will
get this right, because it will
matter most for the young peo-
ple growing up here."
Conley said the city was al-
ready engaged in promoting
health, the environment and


the economy. She cited,
among the steps that the city
has taken to promote smart
growth and a livable commu-
nity, the promotion of green
spaces in new subdivisions, the
extension of sidewalks, and the
recent opening of the Ike An-
(See Walking Trail Page 6)


CARY A. "BO"
I~^.-...


HARDEE, III
., ." :-- .
.tl I I : ";.."


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Plans are in full swing for
the Humane Society Bless the
Beast fundraiser, slated to be-
gin at 6 p.m., Saturday, Feb.
17, at the Opera House.
Society President Caroline
Carswell said that this year's
event is expected to be bigger,
better, and smoother, than in
past years.
Charlie Ward has volun-
teered to serve as this year's
auctioneer.
Among the items donated
for the auction are: art and
collector pieces, trips and va-
cations, furniture, and tickets
for events and concerts at the
Moon in Tallahassee.
"There will be a hand made
cake auction," said Carswell.
"About eight or nine cakes
made by the area's very best
artistic bakers will be avail-
able."
The tables will be adorned
with fresh flowers and attrac-
tive table cloths donated by
Ericka Imbrunohe, owner of
Gelling's and Brenda Car-
swell of the Moon.
Stacey Cornelius and
Brenda Earle have volun-
teered to be the bar tenders at
the cash bar.
Leroy Milligan of Shell Oys-
ter Bar in Tallahassee has
again donated the seafood.
The menu will include fried
shrimp, oyster and grouper
fingers with cocktail sauce
and tarter sauce, sliced beef


Got A Cute Photo?
Send It To Us And
We'll Share It With
Our Readers!
Kids Dogs *
Strange stuff, etc.

Monticello News
P.O. Box 430
Monticello, FL
32345
"You Can't Be Without It"


tenderloin served with Parker
house rolls and horseradish
sauce, fresh fruit skewers
served with cream cheese dip,
hot Charleston cheese dip
topped with bacon and chives
served with wheat crackers,
fried green tomato BLT
crostini with herb
mayonnaise, goat cheese with
roasted red bell pepper and
asparagus crostini, chicken
salad and egg salad sandwich
fingers donated by the
Hilltop, Blue Belle continen-
tal caramel ribbon, chocolate
and cherry ice cream, donated
by Blue Belle, and hand made
brownie bites made by An-
gela Henderson.
Capital City DJ has donated
the DJ and entertainment for
the evening.
Tickets are still available


THE JEFFERSON COUNTY
SCHOOL BOARD

Announces the regular school board meeting
to which the public is invited. The meeting
will be held at the Desmond M. Bishop Ad-
ministration Building on Monday, February
12, 2007 at 6:00 p.m.

Agendas may be picked up at the district of-
fice at 1490 W. Washington St., Monticello,
FL. Monday through Friday between the hours
of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. A copy of the
school board packet will be available for
review at the district office.


a -l -usiness
small business


tip #16

Healthy employees take less sick days off.
Providing an affordable health plan that
Emphasizes preventive care can help.


a


I)



I!

I)
S

U

U

U

U

S

S

S
*I


If you do not currently offer your employees health
benefits, you may be eligible for a 40% premium savings
for Capital Health Plan coverage through the Capital
Health Partnership.

Learn more. Find out if your small business qualifies by
calling 523-7333 or go to:
www.capitalhealthpartnership.com.


Capital

Health

Partnership


. 4N
1 7 *1-


J) 100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work Frame Straightening




1630 E. Jackson St
(Located behind Langdale Auto Mall)'


Honors Gary Wright


with the F. Wilson Carraway, Sr. Award


he 2006 F. Wilson Carraway, Sr. Award
for Excellence and Community Service
was recently awarded
L. Gary Wright, to L. Gary Wright,
resident/CEO, President/CEO, Farmers
Farmers & & Merchants Bank.
Merchants The award recipient is
Bank chosen for his or her
dedication to Farmers &
Merchants Bank goals,
commitment to the
community, religious
and value-building
activities and continuing
education.
Mr. Wright joined
Farmers & Merchants
Bank in 1974 and was
elected President/CEO
in 1977. Under his
leadership, FMB was
the first Florida bank to
acquire a bank outside
the state of Florida, and
in 1991 opened its first
office in Tallahassee,
where the company now has five offices. Mr.
Wright has led FMB from a small community
bank with $17 million in assets to one with
over $390 million in assets and eight offices.
He led the initiative to develop FMB
Ab


PERSONAL INJURY & WRONGFUL DEATH

(850) 997-8181
1307 S. JEFFERSON STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
THE HIRING OF A LAWYER IS AN IMPORTANT DECISION THAT SHOULD NOT BE BASED SOLELY UPON ADVERTISE.
MENTS. BEFORE YOU DECIDE, ASK THE LAWYER TO SEND YOU FREE WRITTEN INFORMATION ABOUT THEIR
QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE.


Banking Corporation, FMB Title Insurance,
FMB Insurance Services and FMB Mortgage
Services.
The banking community has been well served
by Mr. Wright as Chairman of the Florida
Bankers Association in 1992-93 and was
honored as Florida Banker of the Year in 2003.
He currently serves as Chairman of the Board,
BancServ, and Florida Bankers Association.
Upon his retirement as President/CEO of
Farmers & Merchants Bank in March 2007, he
will continue to serve on the Bank's Board of
Directors.
Mr. Wright currently serves Tallahassee
Memorial Healthcare Foundation as
Chairman-elect and is a Healthways Board
Member and Past Chairman (Monticello).
Service to additional community
organizations include: Christ Episcopal
Church, Monticello, Founder and
Coordinator for the Jefferson County
Community Prayer Breakfast, Marzuq
Shrine Tallahassee (Potentate 1991), Hiram
Masonic Lodge #5, Monticello, Jefferson
County Seminole Boosters (Past President),
Monticello Kiwanis Club (Past President), and
Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce (Past
President) and the Tallahassee Chamber of

Commerce.


850-997-2591
Member FDIC


1907 0oo7
Tallahassee / Monticello W Greenville /Thomasville


S NOTICE OF ROAD
CLOSER
Beginning Mon. Feb. 5th Ebenezer
Rd. in Jefferson Co. Florida will be closed
for a period of 45 days for Bridge
Replacement.
Storm Reconstruction Services, Inc.



Caminez, Brown &


Hardee, P.A.

JOND. CAMINEZ
BOARD CERTIFIED CIVIL TRIAL ATTORNEY

IAN BROWN


WE TAKE THE
DI NTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


~~. -- ~,___1111__~


.1









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 7, 2007 PAGE 3

Woodturning Exhibition


Set At Jefferson Arts


REV. CLARK EDWARDS, son of Lois Lanier of Lamont delivered the invocation at Gov.
Charlie Crist's inauguration. He is pastor of First United Methodist in St. Pete. From
left, Edwards, his wife Donna, Crist.



JCHS Names Jhan Reichert


Teacher Of Year Nominee


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Jefferson County High_
School has named Jhan Rei-
chert as its Teacher of the Year
Nominee.
She is a graduate of Florida
State University and holds a
Bachelor of Arts Degree with a
major in English.
Reichert taught Reading and
Language Arts at Howard
Middle School for nine years.
During her 21 years at Jef-
ferson County High, Reichert
has taught Reading, English
and has been a Media Special-
ist.
Colleague Nancy Wideman
said of Reichert: "She is an ex-
ceptional teacher. Her greatest


asset is her sincere desire to
motivate her students to
achieve.
"We worked closely to-
gether for six years and I have
seen her take a room of unin-
terested students and through
her creative strategies and in-
novative lessons turn the envi-
ronment to one of excitement
and desire to learn.
"Professional development
is a great concern for Reichert,
and she attends important
workshops and conferences.
She then finds ways to incor-
porate the new information
and strategies into her teaching
for the benefit of her students.

Max Bilinski, retired JCHS
teacher, said of Reichert: "She
demonstrates her leadership


Georgia Men Arrested

Here On Drug Charges
arrived on the scene to assist
FRAN HUNT Tharpe.
Staff Writer The driver, William Hudson
of Thomasville, GA, gave
Two Georgia men were ar-- permission for them to search
rested and charged with pos- the vehicle.
session of marijuana with Tharpe and Boatwright
intent to sell, by Sheriffs searched the vehicle and lo-
deputies last week. cated approximately 140
grams (a quarter of a pound)
Investigator Sally Cole re- of marijuana in a gallon size
ported that on Friday night, bag.
Deputy Kevin Tharpe stopped Investigator Chris Smith of
a vehicle on South Jefferson the Sheriffs Department in-
Street,. and when he ap- terviewed Hudson and pas-
proached the vehicle, he senger Jason Helton of Pavo,
could smell the odor of burnt GA.
marijuana. Both were arrested and
Officer Chris Eades of MPD charged with possession of
and deputy Matt Boatwright marijuana with intent to sell.


skills in whatever activity she:
undertakes.
"At the high school she has
been an energetic addition to
both the students and staff. She
was outstanding with the re-
mediation program that was in
place at that time.
"She was involved with
many student activities and
spent countless hours helping
students and faculty to im-
prove the quality of education
at Jefferson High.
County Extension Director
Larry Halsey states: "Reichert
is a dedicated, competent and
conscientious teacher.
"I know her best for the
contribution she makes to her
students in their extracurricular
activities. She has coached the
Academic Team, and is spon-
sor for the Honor Society.
"Few athletic events take
place at JCHS without her as
fan and spectator. Players of
less attended sports, such as
soccer, volleyball, basketball
and softball, know that a JCHS
cheerleader emeritus will cheer
them.on, win or lose.
"She establishes a positive
rapport with her students
through her good nature, hu-
mor, and fun. She is a team
player and will do whatever is
in the best interest, not only of
her students, but of all the stu-
dents at school."
Reichert defines profession-
alism as acquiring new skills,
which influence her growth as
an educator. She reviews new
ideas and modifies them to fit
her teaching methods.
Her approach is hands on
and she likes to use graphic or-
ganizers and .to incorporate
projects whenever possible.


Robert Dam and Walt Wa-
ger will present an educational
demonstration of woodturning
for the public at Jefferson Arts,
575 West Washington Street,
10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday.
The men are members of the
American Association of
Woodturners and will repre-
sent the local chapter, North
Florida Woodturners.
The two artists will conduct
an exhibition and sale of their
works.
Wager moved from Talla-
hassee to Monticello in 1989.
He is presently a Professor of
Instructional Systems Design
at FSU.
He holds a BS in Industrial
Arts from the State University
of New York at Oswego, and
has taken courses at Indiana
University.
Wager began woodturning
in 2002, and since then has
won a number of awards in
area shows for his pieces.
He has served as the presi-
dent of North Florida
Woodturners in Tallahassee,
and is presently the Newsletter
Editor.
Dam has lived in Monticello



Water District

Board To

Meet Feb. 13
Suwannee River Water Man-
agement District's Governing
Board will meet 9 am, Tues-
day, Feb. 13, at District Head-
quarters, Highway 49 and 90
East in Live Oak, FL.

The purpose of the meeting
is to consider District business
and conduct public hearings on
regulatory and land acquisition
matters.

A workshop will follow the
Governing Board meeting.
All meetings, workshops
and hearings are open to the
public.


for six months. In 2004, he and dent of the Capitol Area


his wife Valerie retired from
their antique restoration busi-
ness of 27 years, in Washing-
ton, DC, and semi-retired to
Key West.

The Dams are currently re-
storing a 1910 house on East
Pearl Street.
As a woodworker, Dam be-
gan on a wood lathe in the
1970's, making and repairing
furniture parts. -
He is a member of the
American Woodburner's As-
sociation, and a former presi-
I


Woodburners.
His work has been shown in
galleries in Washington, DC,
and Key West.

At the Jefferson Arts Exhibi-
tion, Dam will demonstrate his
polymer clay and wood spin-
ning tops.,inspired by turning
icon Bonnie Klein on the Klein
miniature lathe.

Jefferson Arts is open
Wednesday and Saturdays, 20
a.m. to 2 p.m. Private tours
may be arranged by calling
997 3311 or 997-2358.


THINK AGAIN.
Some of the best plans in life are often the simplest ones,
especially when saving for retirement. For example, you can
invest a set amount of money on a monthly basis into an
Edward Jones IRA. This lets you:
i Take full advantage of contribution limits and potential
tax benefits
i Eliminate the worry about investing at the right time
i Add potential growth and diversification to your portfolio
i Keep your long-term financial goals in focus

To learn why it may make sense for you to invest a set amount
of money into an Edward Jones IRA each month, call or visit
your local investment representative today.
Automatically investing each month does not ensure a profit and does not protect against loss in declining markets. Such a plan-
involves continual investment in securities regardless of fluctuating price levels of such securities. You should consider your
financial ability to continue the purchases through periods of low price levels.


Robert J. Davison
205 E. Washington St.
Monticello, FL 32344
850-997-2572


www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC '


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STRICTLY CELLULAR


The Signs & Symptoms
of a Heart Attack

Chest, slc.mch, ba3cl,
neck or jaw pain
Shoriness of breath
Indigestion or gas-like pain
\ lausea or dizziness
Une% planned an.'iet,
v.eakrnes or fatigue
Discomfort'or pain between
the shoulder blades
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PAGE 4, M(ONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 7, 2007


Monticello News
(ISSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
A Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

CLAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly Ex-
cept for the weeks of July 4th, Thanksgiving, Christmas,
& New Years. Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post
Office. Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax, 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net


Energy Updates


Mean Tax Credits


Uncle Sam is ready to
give you credit for the steps
you take to reduce energy
consumption in your home.
The Energy Policy Act of
2005 provides valuable tax
credits as much as $300 to
consumers who purchase
qualified high-efficiency
heating, cooling and water-
heating equipment.
These new tax credits
took effect in January 2006.
Unlike a tax deduction,
which reduces the amount
of income subject to tax, a
tax credit directly reduces
the amount of federal in-
come tax you pay or in-
creases the tax refund you
receive.
The new energy legisla-
tion defines the type of
equipment and the amount
of the credit in this way:
High-efficiency gas, oil
and propane furnaces and
boilers: $150
High-efficiency central
air-conditioning units, in-
cluding air-source and
ground-source heat
pumps: $300
High-efficiency fans for
heating and cooling
systems: $50
High-efficiency water
heaters, including heat
pump water heaters: $300.
Manufacturers and retail-
ers should be able to tell
homeowners whether a spe-
cific product qualifies for a
tax credit. Qualifying effi-
ciencies identified in the bill
include:


Furnaces and boilers:
Annual Fuel Utilization Effi-
ciency (APUE) of 95 or
higher
Air-source heat pumps:
Heating Seasonal Perform-
ance Factor (HSPF) of 9 or
greater, Seasonal Energy
Efficiency Ratio (SEER) of
15 or higher and Energy Effi
ciency Ratio (EER) of 13 or
higher
Central air-conditioning
units: SEER of 15 and EER
of 12.5.
In addition to providing tax
credits, these high-efficiency
products also offer home-
owners lower home energy
bills, increased indoor com-
fort and reduced air pollu-
tion.
That's because this new
equipment employs tech-
nologies that make new
heating systems much more
energy efficient than the fur-
nace or heat pump currently
warming your.home.
The maximum credit for all
taxable years is $500 and is
applicable to other home
energy-efficiency improve-
ments, including the installa-
tion of new windows,
insulation, doors and roofs.
To qualify for the tax cred-
its, homeowners wtl need to
verify the efficiency of the
equipment and the date
when it was placed in serv-
ice.
The equipment must be
installed between January
1, 2006, and December 31,
2007.


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
February 5, 1997
Apalachee Center for Human
Services has just completed its
move to larger quarters on US
19 South which about triples
former space, Program Spe-
cialist Laura Harris said
Thursday.
A reduction in bond was de-
nied Thursday to a youth Ken-
drick Bernard James, 18,
charged with the armed rob-
bery of the Pic-N-Chic con-
venience store on Sept. 27,
1996.
Public Defender Nancy Dan-
iels will try to dissuade com-
missioners on Thursday from
proceeding with their idea of
renovating the old jail to create
office space for her operation
here.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
February 4, 1987
As Agricultural Commis-
sioner Doyle Conner an-
nounced the site of the North
Florida Farmers Market last
week, Senate Agricultural
Chairman Wayne Hollings-
worth pointed out that al-
though the market is located
far eastward of Jefferson
County he expected the new
I


market to be of value to county
farmers as well as farmers in
the northeastern section of the
state.
Mike Reichman, president of
the Economic Development
Corporation, reports that he
met with a realtor representing
Pizza Hut Corporation
recently, and says he feels very
positive about the prospects
for a pizza restaurant to be lo-
cated here.
The poor conditions of some
county roads due to high rain-
fall was the lead item on the
County Commission's agenda
Wednesday, placed there by a
contingent of about 10 resi-
dents of the Thompson
Road/Turkey Scratch Road
area.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
February 3, 1977
Local schools, public and
private, are experiencing a 25
percent student absentee rate
during the cold weather.
The City Council voted
Tuesday to hike rates for city
services and instructed City
Attorney Brain Hayes to pre-
pare an ordinance covering the
increases.
An arts and crafts show and
(See Files, Page 5)


Opinion & Comment


Crist Style Changes Tone


Watching Charlie Crist dur-
ing his campaign for Governor
with his emphasis on "working
for the people," I admit to be-
ing a cynical journalist who
thought of course he's gonna
say that on the campaign trail.
After all, what candidate
would run and say he is not
going to work for the people if
elected.
Then there's the business of
his humility and his gratitude.
I thought that's what candi-
dates do to get elected. In fact,
I thought the humility was
overplayed.
Wednesday 1 had a chance to.
observe our new Governor
close up and came away with
the impression that all this
stuff is genuine. He is deeply
committed to responding to the
needs of the people, genuinely
humble and sincerely grateful
for the opportunity to serve.
He is Clintonesque in that he
works a room like the former
President. He acknowledges
people in the audience, calling
them by name and thanking
them for coming, calls report-
ers by their first names, thanks
his staff for their hard work
and gives credit to both Demo-
crats and Republicans in the
Legislature for getting some-


Publisher's


Notebook





Ron Cichon

Sr


the insurance


thing done on
problem.


Crist has changed the tone in
Tallahassee. After eight years
of Jeb Bush with his "my way
or the highway" attitude, it is
refreshing to hear Crist talk
about bipartisanship and con-
sensus. Senate Democratic
Leader Steve Geller said
Wednesday he had met more
often with Crist in the past four
weeks than he had with Bush
in eight years.

Be assured there will still be
partisan fights over policy; but
we can expect them to be civil
and respectful. If that happens,
maybe our national leaders
could follow suit and the de-
monizing and sliming of oppo-


nents would give way to seri-
ous debate over the people's
business.
With Crist's style, the Legisla-
ture would be unleashed to as-
sert itself as provided by the
Florida Constitution. Bush had
a chokehold on the Legislature
and GOP meinbers dared not
cross him so they marched in
lockstep. Some called it
"drinking the Kool Aid."

Our new Governor is a p"pu-
list. He's got a "Tallahassee
Tuesday" program underway
where groups come over to the
Governor's Mansion to chat
with him. "I need to hear from
people to know their
concerns," Crist said Wednes-
day.


Recently, two reporters were
walking down the street and.
Crist had his driver stop the,
SUV and offer them a ride.-.;
That's gotta be a first.
In facing a roomful of re-
porters Wednesday at an event
hosted by the Associated
Press, Crist admitted his pas-
sion to do the people's busi-
ness ."might sound corny, but
that's what I believe."
Make no mistake, there's
backbone in Crist. I wouldn't
confuse his nice guy demeanor
with weakness. When he was
questioned' by a reporter about
his effort to double the home-
stead exemption and asked
about the ,cost to county, and
city governments, Crist re-
sponded local governments
need to sharpen their pencils
and do a better job of reining
in costs. What with property
values soaring, more monies
were going to the coffers of lo-
cal government, Crist said.
That answer didn't sound
wimpy,to me. Let's see what
happens.
Crist is off to a good start.
Governing at any level is
fraught with challenge so Crist
will be tested on a number of
fronts. The months ahead
should be very interesting.


Columnist Considers Growth


By PATRICIA KRAFT
Columnist

Since Ron Cichon has agreed
to occasionally print my ram-
blings in the Monticello News,
I feel I should come clean. I
am a newcomer to Jefferson
County, not quite 3 years in
residence, having lived the
past several years in St.
Augustine.
I'm a boomtown brat; I move
to a beautiful, quiet place with
lots of trees and water and a
take-it-easy lifestyle and then
bemoan the hordes that always
seem to follow. Bad news for
Jefferson County maybe.
When I moved with my fam-


ily to St. Augustine in 1972,
the town was riding a tiny
wave in a centuries-long set of
economic peaks and troughs. It
had been a garrison town since'
Pedro Menendez landed his
troops in 1565.
Over generations the eco-
nomic base expanded with the
fortunes of sugar plantations,
orange groves, wars and'winter
visitors seeking a warm,
healthful climate in pictur-
esque surroundings. It re-
tracted with freezes and fires,
other wars, and. relocation of
the territorial capitol to Talla-
hassee.
At times the population de-
clined but slowly, overall,
things improved. A second and


third hotel were built toward
the end of the second Seminole
War, and still townspeople had
to take in boarders to accom-
modate strangers, as tourists
then were called.
The old Spanish fort was a
great attraction and the narrow
streets and colorful buildings
reminded people of Europe.
There were serenades, some
dances with a Spanish flavor
(not everyone had embarked
for Cuba when Florida
changed hands). But it was not
an exciting place. Ralph
Waldo Emerson came for his
health and said he amused
himself as the natives did by
rolling green oranges along the
beach with a stick.


St. Augustine surrendered to
the Union a year after the Civil
War began, and was occupied
by Union troops, but this time
there was no building boom.
Many local men had gone off
to fight and die with the Con-
federate Army. Some families
who had moved there returned
north to sit out the war.
At its end an Ohio newspa-
perman reported to President
Andrew Johnson that it was "a
collection of curious little an-
tique houses... a paltry two
thousand inhabitants".
There followed a revival of
orange production, improved
transportation, and new houses
and hotels were built. Wealthy
(See Columnist Page 5)


What Change Is Needed?


By DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

I am somewhat confused,-
(which isn't unusual for me).
According to the Democratic
leadership and all the talking
heads on television,
Americans, in the last national
.election, clearly voted for a
"change of direction" The
question is, what changes?
How one interprets this
change in direction is quite in-
teresting. Regarding just the


war in Iraq, for some politi-
cians, change means to start
immediately withdrawing our
troops no matter what the con-
-sequences, to others it means a
gradual pull out as the Iraqi
forces take :.ver the mission
and still to others it means re-
moving our troops to an "over
the horizon" location to return
Iraq and put out fires as
needed.
Regardless of how the
Democrats, (or some Ameri-
cans), think, President Bush re-
placing the Secretary of


Defense, the troop surge and
putting General Petraeus in
charge, is also a legitimate
"change in direction" from the
previous stagnant operational
policy in Iraq.
Beyond the war, what are
the "new direction for
America" proposals envisioned
by the Democratic party? Un-
employment is at an all time
twenty-five year low, the stock
market is at a new all-time
high, bolstering those all im-
portant 40IK and other neces-


sary retirement


plans for


seniors.
Taxes are, also at a twenty?
year low and inflation is in,
check and also hovering near a
twenty year low.
Additionally, federal income
from tax revenues is at an all
time high, the number of mi-
norities owning their own y
home has jumped dramatically ?
over the past five years and,
there hasn't been another ter-
rorist attack on U.S. soil since.
9/1 1.
The "No Child Left Behind"
(See What Change, Page 5)


From Our Photo File


POLL WORKER Billie Griffin gives instructions to Queen Willis, as the voter drops
her ballot into the box during City Elections held in Oct., 1991. (News File Photo)


I


II
_r.
-~













Columnist Considers Growth


(Continued From Page 4) The Florida
visitors came to stay all winter road's offices
.Standard Oil tycoon Henry shops were
Flagler was one. There was a
Flagler envisioned St. But now if
;:Augustine as the American
came, it was
'Riviera, and so it was, until the o
on the way
:railroad pushed further south beautiful hotel
:to Henry Plant's warmer resort by older, le
jin Tampa. Then Flagler built some said,
hJlis own resort in Palm Beach dressed visit
'.where he didn't have to con- Winter to
;tend with a cantankerous local cine and wo
:government that wouldn't even a long while
,repair the streets he'd laid for bles became
;them.
: WWI, the cit
Locals tried to diversify.
to actively p
,Two cigar factories were built as a summer
,and manned by Cuban immi- t.
tion. There
,grants. The Florida School for
pression and
;the Deaf and Blind expanded.
$ for many ye



What Change
^Continued From Page 4) the mean
/program started holding public across the
:'schools accountable, to the vo- creased ovei
tcal dismay of the National ing the past
Teachers Union. Now they These sil
have to prove via state and na- of Republic
tional student testing that they administration
are adequately educating our tually unnoti
children to function in today's scars of th
world, question is
While new home construc- Democrats s
tion and sales have tapered off tive success
the past few months, overall to head Ame


FILES
(Continued From Page 4)
a fashion show were the main
features of the program at the
Women's Club on Tuesday.
FORTY YEARS AGO
February 3, 1967 ,
The annual meeting of the
Jefferson County Industrial
Corporation was held Monday
night at the Gerry Medical
Clinic with an attendance of 21
stockholders.
Mrs. John Elam was hostess
at a dessert bridge at her home
Monday evening.
The fifth and sixth grade
girls of Monticello met in the
Federal Building on January
30 for the purpose of organiz-
ing a new 4-H Club.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
February 3,1957
The Rev. R. Turner, a native
of Gainesville, has been called
to pastorship of the First Bap-
tist Church in Monticello and
will begin his services here
Sunday.
Coy Marcus Williams of
Waukeenah will graduate from.
Florida State University Satur-
day, Feb. 2. He's a candidate
for the Bachelor of Science
Degree in Psychology.
Mr. and Mrs. Steve C.
Walker Jr. and Mr. and Mrs.
:"Steve C. Walker Sr. attended
. graduation ceremonies in
Gainesville Saturday, where
Mr. Walker received his
bachelor of science degree in
Agriculture. He was given a ci-
tation for high honors and also
initiated into the Phi Lappa Phi
honor society.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
February 3, 1947
Commander W.L. Hunter,
flight surgeon in the Navy,
will receive his discharge
March 15, he is a present head
medical officer on the Aircraft
Carrier Antietam, which is
cruising in Pacific Waters. Dr.
Hunter has completed arrange-
ment for offices here and will
arrive about April Ist to start a
general practice in medicine.


East Coast Rail-
Sand maintenance
located there.
arge fishing fleet.
Sthe very wealthy
for a quick stop
south. Flagler's
els were occupied
;ss affluent and,
inappropriately
rs.
urism was in de-
uld remain so for
e. Once automo-
e common after
y fathers decided
promote the town
vacation destina-
was another De-
another war but
:ars change was


pretty slow and pretty steady.
The push to claim St.
Augustine's place as a national
historic site was started by
Mayor Walter Fraser back in
1936. He and National Park
Service Historian Herbert Kah-
ler persuaded the Carnegie
Foundation to fund their ef-
forts. The Park Service, the
state, and Lawrence Lewis
worked over twenty-some
years to get the Spanish Quar-
ter restoration going.

It was mostly complete in
1972 when leather shop owner
Dan Holiday and the Fraser
family persuaded some artists
at the Palm Sunday Blessing of

the Fleet Arts, & Crafts Show


is Needed?


value of homes
nation have in-
r 200 percent dur-
Four years.
significant successes
ans and the Bush
)n have gone vir-
ced because of the
e Iraq war. The
, can the new
;ustain these posi-
es in their charge
erica into a new di-


reaction. One can not overlook
their party's tendency to pro-
pose initiatives that pick the
pockets of the average Ameri-
can taxpayers.
In actuality, this "take from
the rich and give to the poor"
kind of class warfare ulti-
mately always falls on the
shoulders of the middle class
to fund. At the present time,
only 5 percent of the American
population pay 80 percent of
all federal taxes.

Remember, these are the
folks who create the jobs, con-
tribute to workers' pensions
and health care programs and
pay workmen's compensation
and their share of workers' so-
cial security tax. Targeting
them for increased tax burdens-
only has a downward ripple ef-
fect on the economy and work-
place.

As an example, Senator Hil-
lary Clinton, having an-
nounced her intention to run
for the Presidency in 2008, has
already raised 'the ugly head of
an all encompassing national
social welfare health care pro-
gram as a primary initiative of
her campaign.
The 40 million Americans
without health insurance is a
trick of numbers to garner


sympathy and support from
American voters. It includes
12-plus million adult illegal
aliens, a large group of highly
paid young adults who can af-
ford to pay health premiums
but elect not to because they
feel "invincible", people tem-
porarily between jobs and a
major group of married folks
who are technically uninsured
because they are not covered
by their employers, but do
have health care via their
spouses health policy.
The actual number of unin-
sured legal American citizens,
therefore, is more like two mil-
lion. Granted, there are hard
working citizens who are not
covered by their employer and
must struggle on their small
salaries to pay medical bills.
For those people we defi-
nitely need a national health
plan, 'but we shouldn't be
grouping in any illegal aliens.
We are also obligated to insure
the children born in the United
States to illegal aliens also re-
ceive adequate health care as
they are, by birth, legal Ameri-
can citizens.
If the Democrat's new di-
rection means taxes go up, em-
ployment goes down, terrorists
have a better environment in
which to attack us, federal
revenue drops, inflation goes
up, home ownership goes
down, the stock market (and
economy) go south and 12
million illegal alien law break-
ers are given amnesty under
the heading of "Comprehen-
sive immigration reform" for
thumbing their nose at our
very successful two hundred
year old immigration policy, I
prefer 'not to have any "new
change in direction" for Amer-
ica.


Writer Praises Local

Law Enforcement


Dear Editor:
After reading the article by
our own Merry Ann Frisby, in
the "My View" columii in the
Tallahassee Democrat, Feb. 2,
I wanted the fine people in
Monticello to know what a
jewel we have in her.
As I finished reading the last
three sentences of her story,
with a lump in my throat and a
tear in my eye, I knew I had to
express my appreciation to our
local law enforcement officers.
It's easier for some, hard for
others, to give praise and re-
spect. These men and women


are on the clock 24-7. rain or
shine, and with the leadership
of Chief Frisby, and Sheriff
Hobbs, I know that my family
and friends are safe and
secure.

Thanks for the great job that
you do.
Respectfully,
Mack Barfield


Ready...Set... Shop...
Monticello News
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to colonize the Restorat
Area. My husband Richard a
his.partner set up a glassblo
ing furnace and shop, one
several artists and crafts
who gave it a try.
At the time some consci
tious parents dragged th
-kids to see the old fort and
'restored Spanish Quarter
their funds were limited, a
more often St. Augustine v
bypassed by families w
money headed down 1-75
Disney.
The Casa Monica He
was the courthouse and the
cazar housed a museum a
city offices. There were a f
hundred students at the n
college in what had been t
Ponce de Leon, first of the
three gorgeous Span
Renaissance-style hotels of t
gay 1890s, but their econon
impact was small.
The lucky kids who lived
St. Augustine roamed the n
row streets of their own lit


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED, FEBRUARY 7, 2007 PAGE 5
ion theme park, barefoot and care- creases, so does the percentage
and free with friends and dogs, of people who want to cut out
,w- fished and swam in the surf. for new territory in pursuit of
of Their parents could squeak by. happiness. The rate of change
nen selling art to tourists and tak- took on NASCAR speed.
ing odd jobs in off hours or off St. Johns County passed a
en- season. You could catch whit- few laws to protect historic ar--
ieir ing and cook it on a grill out at eas, limit building height along
the the beach and have a swim af- the beach and control billboard
but terward, the no-swimming-for- fecundity, but there's only so
and an-hour rule having been re- much you can do.
was. voked. Condos and motels line St.
'ith Some locals sported bumper Augustine Beach. Develop-
to stickers, "A Quaint Little ment has spread for miles
Drinking Village With a Fish- north toward Jacksonville and
hotel ing Problem" and there was south toward Palm Coast, even
Al- truth to the fishing part for west toward the little farm
nd sure. A cry of "Mullet on the community of Hastings.
ew beach! emptied the stores and I visited St. Augustine dur-
ew classrooms as it had for a cou- ing the holidays. There is a be-
:he pie of hundred years. hemoth parking garage a block
ose One retailer of casual cloth- form the fort. The downtown
ish ing who lived to fish posted bayfront looked like an anthill
the. his hours: Open When I'm poked with a stick. Some of
nic Here; Closed When I'm Not. those people will move there.
The beaches, the warm sun- If they have enough money.
in shine, the flowers, that sweet Jefferson County, I'm warn-
ar- life, could not be kept secret ing you. This is a very nice
title forever. As population in- place to live. Better get ready.


The Jefferson County Recycling Program accepts
the following items for recycling:


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection.
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?






Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.




Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.




The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


I I


F
















Lifest le
PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 7, 2007 y l


V Angela Dyal Will


SMarry Judah Young

D/ci; 7i DEBBIE SNAPP ftom Tallahassee Community
Staff Writer College in the Spring of 2007.
d a V=U &p = t~o d m She plans to transfer to
'F Florida State University to
Donna Dyal Mahoney and earn her Bachelor's degree in
]'J .lames Harold Dval of Lloyd. Recreation and Leisure Serv-


CROCK POT CHICKEN
CURRY

10 Chicken thighs, skin re-
moved
16 ozjar salsa
1 medium onion chopped
2 tbs. curry powder
1 cup fat free sour cream

, Place chicken in crock pot.
Combine salsa, onions, and
curry powder. Pour over
chicken.
Cover and cook on low for
8-10 hours. Remove chicken
to serving tray and cover to
keep warm.
Add sour cream to crock pot.
Stir until well blended and
serve over chicken.

ICEBOX PINEAPPLE PIE

1 graham cracker pie crust
1 can condensed milk
20 oz. crushed pineapple,
drained
8 oz. Cool Whip

Mix condensed milk, pineap-
ple and Cool Whip together.
Pour mixture into crust and
chill.

CROCK POT BARBECUE
BEAN SOUP

1 pound Great Northern
Beans, soaked overnight,
drained and rinsed.
3/4 cup chopped onion
1/8 tsp. ground black pepper
1 1/2 to 2 lb. beef short ribs
6 cups water
2 tsp. salt, or to taste
3/4 to 1 cup barbecue sauce

Combine beans with onion,
pepper and short ribs in crock
pot.
Cover with water and cook
on low 10-14 hours.
Remove short ribs and cut


ELNOR ALLENDER
Elnor Allender, 77, of
Monticello, died Wednesday,
January 31, 2007 in Tallahas-
see. Service arrangements are.
pending. Fairchild Funeral
Home (386-8686) is handling
the arrangements. In lieu of
flowers, memorial contribu-
tions may be made to BigBend
Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center
Blvd., Tallahassee, Fl 32308.
A native of Elizabeth, West
Virginia, she had lived in
Monticello since 1975. She
was a registered nurse, caring
for patients in convalescent
homes.

Wacissa VFD

Fundraiser

Set Saturday
Wacissa Volunteer Fire Res-
cue will hold a fundraiser, 5 to
7 p.m. Saturday, at the Wa-
cissa Fire Station.
Chicken Pilau is the main
dish, and the event will feature
a cake walk and a cake
auction.
Donation is $7 to eat in or
take out.
Volunteers appreciate the
support of all.


meat from bones. Return meat
to crock pot and stir in barbe-
cue sauce and salt, to taste.
Cover and cook 20 minutes.

EASY CHEESE DANISH

2 tubes refrigerated bread
sticks
8 oz pkg. cream cheese
1/4 cup powdered sugar
1/2 tsp. lemon juice

Separate bread sticks but do
not uncoil. Place on ungreased
cookie sheet.
With your thumb, make an
indention into the tops of each
coil.
In a bowl, mix cheese, sugar,
and lemon juice until smooth.
Place about 1 tbs. of cheese
mixture into identions, and
bake at 400 for 15-20 minutes.

Frosting:
1/2 cup powdered sugar
1-2 tsp. milk

Combine powdered sugar
and milk until smooth. Drizzle
frosting over warm Danish.
Makes 1 dozen.

TRICOLORED SALAD

1 box tri colored pasta
1 bottle Italian dressing with
parmesan cheese
1 small onion, sliced or
chopped
1 cup pine nuts toasted
2 to 3 cups broccoli flowerets,,
steamed a
1 pkg. dried cranberries.

Cook pasta according to
package. Combine dressing,
onion, pine mits, broccoli,
cranberries and refrigerate.
Even better the next day or
leftover.
Serve with toasted French
bread.


Survivors include two sons,
Billy Allender and Rick Allen-
der, both of Monticello, a
brother, Rocky Allender of
Marietta, Ohio, and grandchil-
dren, Taylor Allender, Megan
Allender and Jeremy, all of
Monticello.


Walking Trail
(Continued From Page 2)
derson Bike Trail.
City officials didn't always
get it right or say no to devel-
opments, Conley said. But in-
sisting that new developments
incorporate features that pro-
moted public health was defi-
nitely "the right thing to do."

Following the ribbon cutting,
Fenton led the audience in
warm-up and stretching exer-
cises, preparatory to walking
the newly-opened trail.

The trail circles the newly
created Babe Ruth League
field just east of the recreation
park. The new field is part of
an additional 15 acres that the
county purchased a few years
ago to expand and enhance the
park.


STOP LEG CRAMPS
BEFORE THEY STOP YOU.
Calcet's'triple calcium formula is designed to help
stop low calcium leg cramps. Just ask your pharmacist.


FL. announce the engagement
of their daughter, Angela
Lynn Dyal to Judah Benjamin
Young, son of Sarah Everett
Young of Tallahassee, and
Dan Young of Clarkesville,_
GA.

The bride-elect is a 2004
graduate of North Florida
Christian School.
She will earn her Associates
in Arts degree with honors


ices Administration.
She is currently employed
with the Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection.
The groom-elect is a 2004
graduate of North Florida
Christian School.
He is employed by All Flor-
ida Electric.
The wedding is planned for
Saturday, June 2, 2007, at the
First Baptist Church of Lloyd,
FL.


Nursing Center

Reports Activities


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Jefferson Nursing Center
Activity Director Voncell
Thomas reports February
events at the Center.
Ground Hog Day was cele-
brated on Friday, Feb. 2 on
the grounds.
Residents will attend a Val-
entine's Ball on Thursday,
Feb. 8 at Centre Pointe in Tal-
lahassee.
A King and Queen Sweet-
hearts Dance will be held 2
p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 14.
At 2 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 16
a Soul Food Festival will be
enjoyed by all. Staff and
friends will bring in their fa-
vorite covered dish items for
a buffet style meal.

On Monday, Feb. 19 a trib-
ute to Presidents Day will be


CARD OF THANKS
It is with grateful hearts
that we write this "Thank
You" for the generous out-
pouring we received from the
,Soup Supper, and monetary
gifts for our grandson, Garret
Getch, toward his mission trip
to Burkino Faso.
As of this writing he has re-
ceived more .than, $1500
which is more than one third
of the amount that he has to
raise.
We hesitate to mention
names because we're afraid
we will miss someone.
But we do want to say a
special thanks to several peo-
pie who went above and be-


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paid, followed by a Mardi
Gras on Fat Tuesday on Feb.
20.
A Black History program
will be presented 1:30 p.m. on
Wednesday, Feb. 21.
Washington's birthday will
be celebrated on Thursday,
Feb. 22.
A Chili Cook-Off contest is
set Friday, Feb. 23, with the
resident's doing the judging.
A Resident's Council Meet-
ing is scheduled for 3 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 27.
"Have a Cherry of a Day" is
the theme for Wednesday,
Feb. 28, in recognition of Na-
tional Cherry month.
Other programs and events
held weekly and monthly at
the JNC include: The Camp-
bell's, 1:30 p.m. Sunday; an
exercise program 2 p.m.
Tuesday; and a group from
the Calvary Baptist Church
visit 10 a.m. Thursday.


yond: the Women on
Missions (WMU) of First
Baptist Church and Lynn
Miller, president; the Monti-
cello News and Debbie Snapp
for their publicity; Burger
King and Arby's for furnish-
,ing take-out trays; Violet
Hatcher, Sissy Kilpatrick, Etta
Maude Cooksey, and others
who did most of the cooking;
all the ladies of the church
who baked cakes; those who
came and ate the soup and
salad; and all the others who
very generously gave dona-
tions.
God bless each of you,
Sue and Lewis Getch
Annette, Earl, Garret Getch.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 7, 2007 PAGE 7


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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 7, 2007


Sports


Lady Warriors

Beat Munroe t I


ACA Posts
Baseball
Roster


IRAN HUNT
taff Writer

S Lady Warriors downed
shool rival, Munroe, 47-23
n the District 3-1A semifinal
Basketball playoff, Thursday.
-; Coach Daryl Adams reports
.rough game between the
tady Warriors and the Lady
Vobcats, but Aucilla started to
dull away in the second quar-
Or, leaving FAMU eight
points behind at the half.
The Lady Warriors re-
charged and began playing in
true' winning Aucilla style
:during the second half.
SLindsey Day led Aucilla
,with 18 points and 13 re-
bounds for a double-double,
two assists, two steals, seven
locks.


Lisa Bailey, 14 points, five
rebounds, five assists, three
steals, three blocks.
Bethany Saunders, six
points, two rebounds, two as-
sists, three steals, one block.
Caitlin Murphy, four points,
seven rebounds, two assists.
Brittany Hobbs, four points,
one rebound, four assists,
seven steals.
Nicole Mathis, three re-
bounds, one assists; Courtney
Brasington, one rebound, one
steal, JV Miranda Wider, one
point, Rikki Roccanti, one re-
bound; and JV Chelsea Dob-
son, one rebound.
In related news, Adams said
that Bailey was a finalist and
one of the top f6ir finishers
in the three-point competition,
and she, will travel to the re-
gional three point
competition.


ACA Girls Tennis

Schedule, Roster


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy
has released the roster and
schedule for the girls tennis
;eam.
All matches are at 3:30
p.m., unless otherwise speci-.
tied.
Court action begins against
Holy Comforter, Feb. 15,
here; Suwannee County, Feb.
16, tlicre: Munr.e. Feb. 22,
there. Str annee County, Feb.
23, heile; arid Thomasville,
Feb. 27, here.
NFC, March 1, here; Apala-
chicola, 4 p.m., March 2,
here; John Paul, March 6,
here; .NFC, March 8, there;
I'unroe, March 13, here; John
Paul, March 15, there; Apala-
chicola, 4 p.m., March 26,

JV Lady
warriors
Roster
Aucilla tells the roster for
the junior varsity softball
team.
There are'19 Lady JV War-,
riors on the team, which in-
cludes ninth graders; Macall
Carlson, Ashley Evans, Kayla
Haire, Brooke Stewart, and
Katelyn Watts.
Eighth graders, Taryn
Copeland and Lisa Kisamore.
Seventh graders, Keli Dollar,
Skylar Hanna, and Sunnie
Sorensen.
Sixth graders, Alexis
Burkett, Hannah Haselden,
Brooke, Kinsey, Whitney,
McKnight, Michaela Metcalf,
Hadley Revell, Ashley.
Schofill, Pamela Watt, and
Audrey Wynn.
Fifth grader Kelli Wynn is
the team manager.
Coaching the Lady Warriors
is Frank Brown.


here; Holy Comforter, March
27, there, time to be an-
nounced; and Trinity, March
29, here.
Maclay, April 3, there;
Trinity, April 5, here, and
Maclay, April 10, here.
The District play-offs will
be held April 16-17, times to
be announced.
Five players are returning to
the Lady Warriors this year,
they include eleventh graders
Courtney Connell and Re-
bekah Aman; and eighth grad-
ers Kaitlin Jackson',"'Sarah
Sorensen, and Nikki Hamrick.
New to the team this year
are, eleventh grader Whitney
Scarberry, and eighth grader'
Kalyn Brown.
Serving as coach for the
Lady Warriors is Cathy Jack-
son.


LADY WARRIORS on the basketball court earlier in the
Hobbs, Bethany Saunders. (Photo by Suzanne Saunders)


Aucilla Christian Academy
reports its varsity baseball
roster.
There are 13 Warriors this
year, including Luke
Whitmer, Chad Cannon, Dus-
tin Roberts, Stephen Dollar,
Josh Carswell, Elliot Lewis,
and Will Hartsfield.
Also, Matt Bishop, J. T.
Ward, Rob Searcy, A. J. Con-
nell, Reggie Walker, and Mi-
chael Kinsey.
Coaching the Warriors is
Ray Hughes. Daryl Adams is
the assistant coach.


ACA Athletes Named Big Bend Leaders


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy
athletes were named to the
latest listing of Big Bend
Leaders in basketball.
In Boys' scoring, Stephen


Griffin stands at #23, with
204 points,, an average of
10.2.
Wade Scarberry stands at
#24 with 213 points, an aver-
age of 10.0
In rebounds, Griffin stands
at #4 with 180, an average of


JCHS Tigers Split Final

Games of Season


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Tiger boys basketball team
split its last two games to
stand 3-17 on the season.
The Tigers fell to Lincoln,
83-63.
LaMarcus Bennett, led the
score with 23 points, five as-
sists, four steals.
Tim Crumitie, 18 points,
two steals.
Jon Dady, three points, five
rebounds, two assists, three
steals.
Anthony Johnson, four
points, four rebounds.
Lucius Wade, five points,


one assist, one steal.
Jordan Blair, one point; Har-
old Ingram, two points, two
rebounds; Anthony McDan-
iels, five points.
The Tigers defeated FAMU,
67-62, taking the victory in
overtime.
Bennett led the Tigers with
31 points, four assists, three
steals.
Crumitie, 18 points, two
steals.
Dady, three rebounds, seven
assists, two steals.
Johnson, four rebounds;
Wade three points; Harold In-
gram, 15 points, nine re-
bounds, three blocks.


NUN BINGO IT'S BACK!


Altrusa ofMonticello and the Opera

House Stage Company Present

NUN BINGO

Saturday, Feb. 10th

Door Open @ 6:30 PM


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Proceeds to benefit community

non-profit organizations.


9.0.
Kyle Barnwell stands at #19
with 100, an average of 4.8.
In steals, Barnwell stands at
#5 with 65, an average of 3.1.
Griffin stands at #8 with 51,
an average of 2.6.
Griffin stands at #2 in
blocks with 60, an average of
3.0.
In girls' scoring, Lindsey
Day stands at #15 with 248
points, an average of 10.3.
Bethany Saunders stands at
#28 with 171 points, an aver-
age of 7.1.


Lisa bailey stands at #30
with 164 points, an average of
6:8.
In rebounds, Day stands at
#5 with 212, an average of
8.8.
Bailey stands at-#18 with
172, an average of 7.2.
In assists, Bailey stands at
#8 with 60, an average of 2.0.
In steals, Bailey stands at #8
with 72, an average of 3.0.
Brittany Hobbs stands at #10
with 66, an average of 2.8.
In blocks, Day stands at #6
with 33, an average of 1.4.


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a-


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


season. From left, Brittany


-


0 Iok, n All von adii, Ta\ TiL, and Till


O












JV Lady Warrior Season


Highlights, Personal Stats


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Highlights of JV Lady War-
riors team play and personal
statistics over the season in-
clude:
The girls played 16 games
and shot at 20 percent from
the field accumulating 141
points.


Two three-point shots were
made during the season, one
by Savannah Williams and
one by Jodie Bradford; and
the team 'shot at 38 percent
from the free-throw line sink-
ing 90 of 235 shots and accu-
mulating a total of 378 points
for the season.
There were 72 assists, 255
offensive rebounds and 256
defensive rebounds for a team


ACA Reports Roster

For Varsity Softball


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FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy-
report the roster for the var-
sity softball team.
There. are 17 Lady Warriors
on the team this year.
These include; seniors, Brit-
tany Hobbs, pitcher/infield;
Joanna Cobb, center/infield;
Shaye Eason, outfield; and
Lisa Bailey, outfield.
Juniors, Hannah Sorensen,
infield; Bethany Saunders,
pitcher/infield; Paige Thur-


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man, pitcher/outfield; Nicole
Mathis, outfield/infield; Chel-
sey Kinsey, infield; and Lind-
sey Day, infield.

Tenth graders, Olivia
Sorensen, center/outfield; Mi-
chaela Roccanti, infield;
Katelyn Levine, infield; Erin
Kelly, pitcher/infield; Savan-
nah William, outfield; Mi-
randa Wider, outfield; and
Mallory Plaines, infield.
Roslyn Bass will coach the
team. Assistant coaches are
Bill Saunders and Ginni Joy-
ner.


Aucilla Tells Baseball

Season Schedule


Aucilla Christian Academy
reports the varsity baseball
schedule.
Action begins Feb. 8 and 9
with the Quincy Tournament,
there, times to be announced.
Hamilton County, 4 p.m.,
Feb. 13, here; Maclay, 4 p.m.,
Feb. 15, there; and Lanier
County, 5:30 p.m., Feb. 26,
there.
Carrabelle, 4 p.m., March 2,
here; Apalachicola, 4 p.m.,
,March 6, there; Munroe, 4
p.m., March 8, here; Echols
County, 5 p.m., March 9,
there; John Paul Catholic, 3
p.m., March 13, there;
Maclay, 4 p.m., March 15,
here; FAMU High, 4 p.m.,
March 16, here; Bell, 4 p.m.,
March 19, there;


Apalachicola, 4 p.m., March
27, here; Echols County, 4
p.m., March 29, here; and
Carrabelle, 5 p.m., March 30,
there.
John Paul Catholic, 4 p.m.,
April 3, here; Munroe, 6 p.m.,
April 5, there; East Gadsden,
5 p.m., April 6, there; FAMU
High, 4 p.m., April 9, there;
Branford, 5 p.m., April 10,
there; Hamilton County, 5
p.m., April 13, there; Altha, 2
p.m., April 20, here; Mayo,
4:30 p.m., April 20, NFCC.
Wrapping up the season is
the District Tournament,
April 23-26 at John Paul II,
times to-be announced.
Ray Hughes coaches the
team.


ACA JV Girls Softball

Game Schedule


Aucilla Christian Academy
reports the schedule for the
junior varsity softball team.
All game times are at 4 p.m.
unless otherwise specified.
Action around the diamond
begins against Taylor County,
Feb. 15, here; Maclay, 5 p.m.,
Feb. 16, there; Branford, Feb.
20, there; Madison High, 5
p.m., Feb. 27, there.
Carrabelle, March 2, there;
Carrabelle, March 5, here;
Florida High, March 6, here;


Madison High, 4:15 p.m.,
March 9, here; Madison
Academy, March 13, here;
Taylor County, 5 p.m., March
16, there; Florida High, 5
p.m., March 27, there; and
Maclay, March 29, here.

Mayo, 5 p.m., April 2,
there; Madison Academy,
April; 3,' there; NFC, April 5,
here; Branford, April 10,
here; and wrapping up the
season, Mayo, April 12, here.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 7, 2007 PAGE 9



TALLAHASSEE

NEUROLOGICAL

C L I N I C
Is pleased to announce
their participation with BCBS of Florida

- Effective February 1, 2007 -


Department of Neurology
Ricardo Ayala, M.D.
Winston Ortiz, M.D.
Leonard DaSilva, M.D.
J. True Martin, M.D.
(850) 877-8121


Department of Neurosurgery
Mark Cuffe, M.D.
Albert Lee, M.D.
Christopher Rumana, M.D.
(850) 877-5115


total of 511 rebounds; and
Aucilla had 250 block/steals.
Stephanie Dobson led the
Lady Warriors in free-throws;
made, points, offensive re-'
bounds and total rebounds.
Throughout the season,,
Dobson shot at 25 percent.
from the field, dropping in 50
of 198; and she shot at 35 per-:
cent from the free-throw line,
hitting 24 of 69, accumulating
a total of 124 points.
She had five assists, 89 of-
fensive rebounds, and 63 de-
fensive rebounds for a total of
152. Dobson also had 34
block/steals.
Miranda Wider led ACA in
assists.
She shot at 25 percent from
the field, sinking 25 of 101;
and she shot at 57 percent
from the free-throw line,
dropping in 16 of 28. Wider
has 66 points, 24 assists, 30
offensive and 29 defensive re-
bounds for a total of 59; and
she had 44 block/steals.
Jodie Bradford led in defen-
sive rebounds with 64; added
to 46 offensive rebounds for a
total of 110.
She shot at 17 percent from,
the field, hitting 19 of 112,
and collecting 60 points.
Bradford had six assists, and
43 block/steals.
Dana Watt led the Lay War-
riors in field shot percentage
with 26 percent, hitting eight
of 31. She had one assist,
eight offensive and 15 defen-
sive rebounds for a total of
23; and she had nine
block/steals.
Tiffany Brasington led
ACA in block/steals with 48.
She shot at 15 percent from
the field sinking 11 of 71; and
she shot at 43 percent from
the free-throw line, sinking
six of 14. Brasington had 28
points, seven assists, and 13
offensive and 16 defensive re-
bounds for a total of 29.
Michaela, Roccanti shot at.
14 percent from the field hit-
ting four of 28; and she shot
at 44 percent from the free-
throw line, sinking eight of 18
for as total of 16 points.
Roccanti had 14 assists, 11
offensive and ten defensive
rebounds for a total of 21; and
she had 28 block/steals.
Savannah Williams shot at
15 percent from the field, hit-
ting 11 of 71; and she shot at
43 percent from the free-
throw line, sinking ten of 28
for a total of 51 points.
She had ten assists, 39 of-
fensive and 40 defensive re-
bounds for a total of 79; and
she had 30 block/steals.
Becky Turner hit four of 34
from the field; and she shot at
50 percent from the free-
throw line hitting three of six
for a total of 11 points; She
had three assists, nine offen-
sive and eight defensive re-
bounds for a total of 17; and
she had 12 block/steals.
Angela McCune led at the
free-throw .line in percentage
with 75 percent, sinking three
of four for a total of five
points; She had two assists,
ten offensive and 112 defen-
sive rebounds for a total of
21; and she had two
block/steals.


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(PG)
Fri. 4:10-7:30-9:55 Sat. 1:00-
4:10-7:30-9:55 Sun. 1:00-4:10-
7:30 Mon. Thurs. 4:10-7:30
SMOKING' ACES
(R)
Fri. 7:05-9:35 Sat. 7:05-9:35
Sun. 7:05 Mon. Thurs. 7:05
SNO PASSES
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3:05-5:10-7:25-9:45 Sun. 1:00-
3:05-5:10-7:25 Mon. Thurs.
5:10-7:05
NO PASSES
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Fri. 4:35 Sat. 1:40-4:35 Sun.
1:40-4:35 Mon.- Thurs. 4:35
NO PASSES
STOMP THE YARD
(PG 13)
Fri. 4:30-7:20-10:10 Sat. 1:20-
4:30-7:20-10:10 Sun. 1:20-4:30-
7:20 Mon.-Thurs. 4:30-7:20
THE MESSENGERS
(PG13)
Fri. 5:25-7:35-9:40 Sat. 1:05-
3:15-5:25-7:35-9:40 Sun. 1:05-
3:15-5:25-7:35 Mon. Thurs.
5:25-7:35
NO PASSES
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(PG13)
Fri. 4:05-7:00-9:20 Sat. 1:25-
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7:00 Mon. Thurs. 4:05-7:00
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DREAMGIRLS
(PG13)
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4:25-7:15-10:05 Sun. 1:30-4:25-
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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 7,2007


SENIOR LIVING


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF


HEALTH
Jefferson County Health Department
1255 W. Washington St. Monticello, FL 32344
(850) 342-0170
WE ARE PLEASED TO
OFFER THE FOLLOWING FREE
SERVICES TO OUR SENIORS

* FREE BLOOD PRESSURE CHECKS
* INFORMAL NUTRITION EDUCATION
SERVICES
* FREE DIABETES CARE COORDINATION
EDUCATION
* FREE DIABETES NUTRITION EDUCATION
MONTHLY DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP
* PODIATRIST FREE FOOT CARE WITH
YOUR MEDICARE CARD


tuo caze f de mn4fti u4


Tallahassee Eye Center
S2858 Mahan Drive, Suite 4 e
850-671-3936
Dr. Susan S. Whaley Dr. Suzane E. Smith
Optometric Physician Optometric Physician


At Covenant Hospice, it is our
Spromise-our covenant-to provide
excellence in compassionate care
for all people, to broaden and
fulfill life's journey.
SFull-time medical directors
On-call team
SBereavement and spiritual support
SCare regardless of ability to pay
SNot-for-profit, charitable organization
ICAHO-accredited
1545 Raymond Diehl Rd., Suite 102
Tallahassee
(850) 575-4998
www.covenanthospice.org
Fdces ol Life, a book of inspirational stories and
photos of fife s olrneyu, is available for S29 05 la aon
Covenant Hospice location or wwwcovenanthospice.org.
II


Shaun E. Laurie, ID
Board Certified
ii Internal Medicine


rZLLrrr-.~


"T


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SAdult Primary Care Geriatrics
* Hospital Medicine
* Rch;bilitation and Nursing Facility Care

,Akccprirg c, nevw p tinnt_,


2711 Capital Medical Blvd., Suite 100-A
(850) 309-1331


Marshall Health &

Rehabilitation Center

When choosing a health care center for yourself or a loved
one, there is comfort in knowing that someone will be there
to assist you. Whether the need is for short-term
rehabilitation services following an illness or injury or for
long-term elder care services, you can take comfort in
knowing that we're here for you as long as you need us!


Marshall Health &
,W^ Rehabilitation Center
207 Marshall Drive, Perry, FL 32347 2 M
Phone 850-584-6334 fax 850-838-1801

A Difficult Decision...
SMade Just a Little Easier

I


Plan Ahead...
pre-planning your funeral is a wonderful gift of love.



oe P. Burns

FUNERAL HOME


Serving families at their time of need...and before the need
arises-. P ]~h .i::. .: . --an give your family.
Call lTonrnii\ ,i ... : a;. ;i owski or Leila Allen to answer your questions and
r,.'.'! ..' :R;I" personal portfolio for you and your family.
Mayo Chapel Johnson Rderry Chapel
(386) 294-2658 1400 N Johnson Stnpling Rd* (850) 584-4149


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relieves unnecessarv emotions and
financial burdens for your loved ones.
Eliminates Emotional Overspending...
Decisions are made calmly, together.
withZTrr= JnTrUr--M- e.
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maki
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cost is c t ... 6d ': *,' t b dI ` &:prices
to proteicl'-, r, tate.










Truck Crash Kills

Texas Man On 1-10


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
A crash involving two semi-
tractor trucks in the county
took the life of a Texas man
Monday.
FHP reports that at 7:05
p.m., Raleigh Lee Mcelroy,
47, of Nacogdoches, TX, was
driving a 2005 Freightliner
semi-tractor rig westbound on
1-1.0 at the 226 mile marker.
Hale S, Suggs, 37, of Fur-
man, AL was driving a 2001
International semi-tractor rig
westbound ahead of Mcelroy.


The front of Mcelroy's rig
struck the rear trailer of
Suggs' rig.
Both vehicles came to a final
rest facing west in the west-
bound lanes of I-10, con-
nected together.
Mcelroy was pronounced
dead at the scene and Suggs
sustained serious injuries and
was transported to TMH.
Westbound traffic was
backed up for several hours.
The crash was not deemed
alcohol related. Both men
were wearing their seat belts.
Charges are pending.


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Senior Living


EMERGENCY HOME ENERGY

ASSISTANCE

FOR THE ELDERLY

The Area Agency on Aging for North Florida a announces the availability of
Emergency Home Energy Assistance for the Elderly Program (EHEAP) funds for
eligible households in Jefferson County. To be eligible, an individual who is at least
sixty years of age must reside in the applicant household, a bill that indicates an
immediate disconnection date if payment is not received by the utility company (this
includes propane and electric), and the household income must be at or below 150%
of the Federal Poverty Income Guidelines.

Please contact Terrie Mihan (850-342-0271) to schedule an appointment or to
request more specific information about the Emergency Home Energy Assistance
Program.

The Emergency Home Energy Assistance for the Elderly Program is funded by the
State of Florida Department of Elder Affairs and is administered by the Area
Agency on Aging for North Florida, Inc.


-
Michael J. Ford, M.D. & Staff
are pleased to welcome to our practice
Michael A. Stickler, M.D.

Dr. Stickler joins us after serv-
ing as chief resident in the
division of dermatology and
cutaneous surgery at the
University of Florida Shands
Hospital in Gainesville.

He is currently accepting new
patients for general, surgical,
cosmetic dermatology.
Dr. Stickler is a provider for
most medical plans, including.
CHP.


(850)422-3376 P
2040 Fleischmann Rd. Dev Tma to o
Tallahassee, FL


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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 7, 2007


LEGAL
Notice of Job Opening:
Jefferson County Clerk of
Court is accepting applications
for a Budgeting and Payroll
Administrator. Job description
and application may be
obtained in the Office of the
Clerk of Circuit Court, Room,
10, County Courthouse,
Monticello, Florida Salary
range is $25,000 to $40,000.
Minimum education and
experience requirements are: *
A bachelor's degree from an
accredited college or university
with a major in accounting,
finance, or business
administration.* Four (4) years
experience in according,
budgeting, and payroll
processing in either the
governmental sector or private
sector. Applications will be
accepted until 5:00 p.m.
February 26, 2007 at the Office
of Clerk of Circuit Court. Equal
Opportunity/ Affirmative
Action Employer. Drug Free
Workplace. Drug testing is a
required part of the
pre-employment physical.
Applicants with a disability
should contact the above office
for accommodation.
2/7, 9, 14, 16, c
Notice of Public Meeting: The
Jefferson Communities Water
System Inc. will conduct a
Public Meeting on Feb. 19, 2007
at 7:00 p.m. at 395 Water Mill
-Rd. Monticello, Florida, to give
the citizenry an opportunity to
become acquainted with the
proposed water system
improvements and to comment
on such items as economic and
environmental impacts, service
area alternatives to the project
and other .matters of concern.
The meeting will include
discussion of the application
process and J.C.W.S., Inc.
action relative to approving,
executing and submitting a
formal application to USDA
Rural Development for grant
and local approval. Any
questions may be directed to


LEGAL
Bob Cooper Manager
850-997-0314. Regular Meeting
Has Been Cancelled.
2/7/07, c
Jefferson County Board of
Commissioners: Request bids
for plaster coating of the
exterior of the Planning and
Building Department. 445 W.
Palmer Mill Rd., Monticello,
FL. Contractor is responsible
for measurements and submittal
of all specifications. Contact:
Wallace 0. Bullock /
Mike Gramling 850-342-0223
Deadline: 02/15/07 12:00 noon
2/7, 2/9/07, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY CIVIL
DIVISION: 21 MORTGAGE
CORP.ORATION, Plaintiff, vs
TIMOTHY D. LONG, SR.;
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
TIMOTHY D. LONG, SR.; IF
LIVING, INCLUDING ANY
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID
DEFENDANT (S), IF
REMARRIED, AND IF
DECEASED, THE
RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN
HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND
TRUSTEES, AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH
UNDER OR AGAINST THE
NAMED DEFENDANTSS;
UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendat(s) case No 06-369-CA
NOTICE OF SALE Notice is
hereby given that, pursuant, to
a Final Summary Judgement of
Foreclosure entered in the
above-styled cause, in the
Circuit Court of Jefferson
County, Florida, I will sell the
property situate in Jefferson
County, FLorida, described as:
COMMENCE AT A LIGHTER
WOOD POST MARKING THE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF
SECTION 16, TOWNSHIP 1


LE


GAL


NORTH, RANGE 5 EAST,
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH
00 DEGREES 14'43" EAST,
ALONG THE WEST
BOUNDARY OF SAID
SECTION 16, 1177.76 FEET
TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING; THENCE FROM
SAID POINT OF BEGINNING,
CONTINUED SOUTH 00
DEGREES 14'43" EAST
ALONG THE WEST
BOUNDARY OF SAID
SECTION 16, 933,50 FEET TO
A POINT ON THE
NORTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF
COUNTY ROAD 158;THENCE
RUN SOUTH 54 DEGREES
00'09" EAST ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE 410.00
FEET TO A POINT THENCE
LEAVING SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE RUN
NORTH 00 DEGREES 14'43"
WEST 1174.19 FEET TO A
POINT; THENCE WEST
330.68 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING. To inculde a:
2004 REGENCY MOBILE
HOME VIN N19386A
90520114, 2004 REGENCY
MOBILE HOME VIN N19386B
90520219, 2004 REGENCY
MOBILE HOME VIN N19386C
90520297' A/K/A 2665 Aucilla
Rd. Monticello, Fl 32344 at
public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, At the
North Door of the Jefferson
County Courthouse, Monticello,
Florida at 11:00 a.m. on March
2nd 2007. DATED THIS 31
DAY OF JANUARY, 2007. Any
person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner
as of the date of the lis pendens,
must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale. Witness, my hand
and seal of this court on the 31st
day of January 2007. CLERK
OF CIRCUIT COURT. Law
offices of Daniel Consuegra,
9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa,
FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for
Plaintiff. In accordance with the


LEGAL
-American with Disabilities Act
of 1990, persons needing a
special accommodation to
participate in this proceeding
should contact the ASA
Coordinator no later than seven
(7) days prior to the
proceedings. If hearing
impaired, please call (800)
955-9771 (TDD) or (800)
955-8770 (vioce) via Florida
Relay Service.
2/7, 2/14/07, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA CAPITAL CITY
BANK, Plaintiff, vs. WILSON
F. BRITT AND ALISON K.
BRITT, individually and d/b/a
ALISON BRITT
SEWPURLATIVES, SCORE
FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
AND UNKNOWN TENANTS)
,Defendants. CASE NO.
05-290-CA.NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE is given pursuant to a
Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated January 30, 2007, in Case
No. 05-290-CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Second Judicial
Circuit, in and for Jefferson

County, Florida in which
CAPITAL CITY BANK is the
Plaintiff and WILSON F.
BRITT and ALISON K. BRITT,
individually and d/b/a ALISON
BRITT SEWPURLATIVES,
SCORE FEDERAL CREDIT
UNION and UNKNOWN
TENANT(S), are the
Defendants,. I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash
at the west front door of the
Jefferson County Courthouse in
Monticello, Jefferson County,
Florida at 11:00 a.m. on March
2nd, 2007, the property set forth
in the Partial Final Judgment of
Foreclosure as to Third
Mortgage and more particularly
described as Follows: A
PARCEL OF LAND SECTION
18, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH,
RANGE 5 EAST JEFFERSON


LEGAL
COUNTY, FLORIDA BEING A
PORTION OF A PARCEL
DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 36 PAGE
142 AND OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 122, PAGE
217 OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA, MORE
PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
BEGIN AT THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF LOT 21 OF
SPRINGDALE PECAN
PLANTATION SUBDIVISION,
AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF, RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK "A" OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND SAID POINT
BEING ON THE NORTH
BOUNDARY OF NOW
CLOSED FIRST (1ST)
STREET, AND THENCE RUN
SOUTH 37 DEGRRES 59
MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST
83.41 FEET TO A POINT ON
THE WESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF
COUNTY ROAD 149 THENCE
SOUTH 35 DEGREES 55
MINUTES WEST (BEARING
BASE) 346.96 FEET, ALONG
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE
TO A POINT ON THE NORTH
BOUNDARY OF AN
EXISTING DIRT ROAD
THENCE ALONG THE
NORTH BOUNDARY OF AN
SAID DIRT ROAD AS
FOLLOWS; NORTH 52
DEGREES 46 MINUTES 32
SECONDS WEST 34.85 FEET
TO A POINT ON A CURVE
CONCAVE TO THE SOUTH,
THENCE ALONG SAID
CURVE HAVING A RADIUS
OF 57.61 FEET THROUGH A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF 68
DEGREES 11 MINUTES 40
SECONDS, FOR AN ARC
LENGTH OF 68.57 FEET
(THE CHORD OF SAID ARC
BEING NORTH 86 DEGREES
52 MINUTES 22 SECONDS
WEST 64.59 FEET TO A
POINT, THENCE SOUTH 59


DEGREES 01 MINUTES 48
SECONDS WEST 57.00 FEET
TO A POINT, THENCE
LEAVING SAID ROAD RUN
NORTH 01 DEGREES 16
MINUTES 19 SECONDS
WEST 344.67 FEET TO A
POINT ON THE SOUTH
BOUNDARY SAID LOT 21
AND THE NORTH
BOUNDARY OF SAID
CLOSED FIRST (1ST)
STREET, THENCE NORTH 88
DEGREES 41 MINUTES 30
SECONDS EAST 301.3 FEET,
ALONG SAID NORTH
BOUNDARY TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING. DATE
January 31st, 2007 Kirk Reams
Clerk of the Circuit Court.
Garvin B. Bowden: Gardner,
Wadsworth, Duggar, Bist &
Wiener, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood
Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32308.
2/7, 2/14/07.c

NOTIC .. .
The JefFerson County Board of
County Commissioners will hold a
workshop involving the County
Coordinator job description and
duties on Friday, February 9, 2007
at 9 a.m. at the Jefferson County
Public Library. J.N. Tuten, Jr.
Chariman
2/7/07,c


Got A Cute Photo?

Send It To Us And
We'll Share It With
Our Readers!

Kids Dogs *
Strange stuff, etc.

Monticello News
P.O. Box 430
Monticello, FL
32345

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Call in for free questions special Flashings M l T s Wrranted Metal Available Madison, FL 323411
Liceaed by County & City special Flashings Made.All Tpe Warranted.Metal AvailThie
Mon.-Frl 10am-8, Sunl-Spm, 1729 Mahan Drive Cut to your desired lengths .Delivery Service Available 850-973-451
(850)878-9327 Call Toll-Free 888-393-0335 352-498-0778 Horsehoe Beach, FL


North Florida Cabinets Appliance Repairs: BURNETTE PLUL RVBING & ali


Kitchen Cabinets, Conter Tops, St Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled Fixtures- Greenville, Fl. 32331
and Vanities. Refrigerators. Faucets Pumps Replaced Sewer & Water Pond' Land Clearing* Demoli-
Built to last, quality guaranteed. Owned & Oerated b And Rudd Connections Tanks Replaced Water heater Phone: 850-948-7891 ie Haulingad WoSite Prep
Built to last, quality guaranteedwne & operated by Any ud Repairs All Repairs Cell: 850-973-7135 Free Estimates and Consultation
Licensed/Insured 997-5648 Fax: 850-948-2482
8eE-mail: Joe Reams, Jr.
850-264-3391 Leave Message Cse iIjoeballreams@msn.com Owner


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MONTICELLO(FL)NEWSWED., FEBRUARY 7, 2007 PAGE 13


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Monticello News
PO Box 428
Monticello, Fla. 32345


REAL ESTATE


MONTICELLO


NEWS



Covering

The Growth

Of The

Community!


Jefferson Co. Land Auction 700
acres, starting @1200/ac
owner/agent/March 10th www.
700AcreAuction.com
HELP WANTED
Cox Auto Trader is currently
seeking drivers to deliver our
magazines in the Tallahassee
FL, Madison, FL and
surrounding areas. Computer
knowledge helpful, requires
reliable vehicle, good driving
record, valid drivers license &
insurance. One day a week -
Thursdays. Pick up magazines
in Madison. Call 386-590-1255
1/24,26,31,2/2,7,9,14,16,21,23,28
,3/2,c
Operations Assistant: For
paratransit Company in
Monticello/Jefferson County.
Scheduling, routing and
dispatching of daily
transportaiton services. Prefer
experience in passenger
transportation service,


ABSOLTEAUCIN
Wednesday, February 14th
Auction Starts @Noon Registration @ 11:00AM


Several Propertles %iI be Sold Homes, Condos, Land, & \\arerfronl
Call anytime, or for more information please visit
www~vaneree-co


For Sale by First United Methodist Church 2400 sq.
ft. home at 895 West Washington Street. This former
Methodist Parsonage with split floor plan has 4 bed-
rooms and 3 1/2 baths, refinished hardwood floors.
New tile floors in kitchen, laundry and baths, carpet
in the family room and master bedroom. Bathrooms
newly renovated. Wood stove insert in fireplace.
Large lot landscaped with magnolias, camellias, crepe
myrtles and azaleas. Large deck and screened porch.
$259,500. For more information
call 997-5545


HELP WANTED

knowledge of Windows-based
computer operations, and
familiarity with
Monticello/Jefferson County
area a must. A Class D Florida
Driver's License will be
required. This is a
Safety-sensitive position which
requires substance abuse testing
per FTA/DOT. Position is
located in the BBT Jefferson
County (Monticello) office
days/hours of work are typically
Monday through Friday, 8:00
am to 5:00 pm. Send
Letter/resume to Big Bend
Transit, Inc. 290 West Dogwood
St., Monticello, FL 32344
2/7, 9, 13, 15, 21, 23, c


Cleaning service needs people in
Monticello area after 5 p.m. 3
days a week part time work
must be able to pass a back
ground check. Only serious
minded inquires only. Call
Karen at 850-942-6200 or
850-926-7029.
2/7,9, c
AVON! Start the year with a
new career, earn 50%, only $10
to start! 570-1499
R/D
1/31,2/2,7,9,14,16,21,23,28,pd
Driver needed 850-528-5218
1/31,2/2,7,9,c

AUTOMOTIVE
RV 26' sleeps 6, $5,500 asking.
997-0901 evenings 251-1641 cell.
1/31,tfn,nc
1996 Ford F-350 Diesel
Crewcab. No calls after 9:00 pm
please 251-2237.
1/10,TFN,nc
1989 International Dump
Truck. 18CY. Tandem Axles.
$18,000. 251-2437, 997-0901.
R/D 12/6,tfn,nc
1996 Ford Ranger XLT
Supercab 2wd 4.0 V6 127K AC
AT Toolbox Needs some minor
work, but driveable now. $3,000
251-0763 8am 8pm
9/27,TFN,nc
FOR SALE
SOLID WOOD Cherry sleigh
bed BRAND NEW in box,
$275. (850) 545-7112
12/6,TFN,c
SOFA & LOVESEAT. Brand
NEW LEATHER, still wrapped,
lifetime warranty, sacrifice
$795. (delivery available). (850)
425-8374
12/6,TFN,c
NEW QUEEN POSTER
bedroom set bed, dresser,
mirror, chest, 2 night stands.
$4000 value, must sell $1500.
850-545-7112.
12/6,tfn,c
DINING ROOM Beautiful
cherry table, 2 arm & 4 side
chairs, lighted china cabinet.
Brand new in boxes, can deliver.
Must move, $799. 850-545-7112.
12/6,tfn,c


FOR SALE

Queen pillow-Top Mattress set.
Brand new in plastic with
warranty. $150. 850-222-9879

FOR ENT :
._J NT _- I--.
Spacious 2/1 and 1/1 apts, also
office space, near Monticello
center. Section 8 OK. Call
850-491-8447
1/24,tfn,c

FOUND
Keys on green key ring found
Sunday 11/26/06 on Lake Road
near Tecumseh Rd. Call Debbie
at 997-3568


GARAGE SALE


Giant Moving Sale Fri. & Sat.
8-12, 1285 Magnolia Ave.
Behind Sage Rest. 251-5018
2/7, 9, pd

SERVICES
Ours is a church where diversity
is celebrated and thinking is
encouraged. Christ Episcopal
Church, three blocks N of the
courthouse. Sunday services at
8:30 and 11:00 a.m. 997-4116
2/7, c

I build sheds, decks, handicap
ramps, exterior carpentry
work, window/door
replacement. Call Bob 242-9342
R/Dl/10,12,17,19,24,26,31,2/2,7,
9,14,16,21,23,28,3/2,7,9,14,16,
Child Care Services- infant to 3
years old. Reasonably low
prices. In my home. 997-5498
11/1,TFN,c

Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
new menopausal products.
Jackson's Drug Store.
5/12 tfn, c
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd, 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
TFN

HELP WANTED

Martha's Bouncing
Babies
is looking for
Experienced Day
Care Workers Call

850-997-5730


BUILDING MAINTENANCE TECH

Archbold Memorial Hospital is currently seeking
qualified applicants for the above full time position.
Previous experience required. Experience in
electrical and AC preferred.
Fax resume to Employment Manager, 551-8733
or email lkennedy@archbold.org.
EOE


Big Bend Hospice, the leader in compassionate care
to individuals with life-limiting illnesses, has the
following position available on our care team

RN Case Manager
Full-time RN Case Manager for Jefferson County.
Current Florida license as RN required. Plus 2 -3 years
med-surgery experience preferred.

Great benefit package!
Interested candidates can apply in person
1723 Mahan Center Blvd.
Tallahassee, Florida
or by faxing a resume to (850) 575-6814
or
Apply on-line!
at

www.bigbendhospice.org


n ~ EOE/DFWP/ADA
Big Bend Smoke Free Workplace


spicee
5 U OCtlmO Vfl hop C ,-C1d.,lnS I OW


^-- _- l ..il _-. u..-..

Housing Vouchers

We accept ll vouchers
S 2/2 $615 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 $50 dep.

S Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571


-....W-WW wWWWr^ Wu


(850) 997-4340


Property Management Services!!!


Great Rentals
2/1 1/2 bath mobile home east of
town on 5 acres $650/month
2 bedroom cabin in the woods $750 nio


Wooded Tract 2.09 hillside acres east of town
on graded County Road $30,400

Just Listed!! 3 bedroom 2 bath delightful log
cabin with front and back screened porches,
board fence pasture, double carport and out
building on 4.07 acres $385,000

Lloyd Acres on a wooded hillside a 3 bedroom
2 bath modular home with oak floors, fireplace
and lots of very nice extras including shdp for
$87,500

Historic Budd House built ca 1882 by commu-
nity leader of the day for his family. Lovely wood
work, high ceilings, spacious rooms, grand fire-
places, marvelous porches, currently 4 bedrooms
and 2 baths $355,000

Waterfront Home!! Like New, roomy, 3 bed-
room 2 bath home with big carport, nice shed with
5 acres on very nice lake near 1-10 and US 19
$385,000 See it at www.TimPeary.com

Amazinq Buy!!! Mixed Use Property 12
plus partially cleared acres on US 19 south land
use designation permits 4 houses per acre near
Dennis' Trading post only $36,500 per acre

New Listing Contract Pending 13.29 acres
some wooded some open $5,000 per acre

Terrific Location 3 bedroom 2 bath doublewide
with fireplace, big porch, garage, shed, above
ground pool, with big trees, fence paddocks, on
county maintained paved Cherry Tree Lane now.
$127,500

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly
wooded acres Only $36,500

Pasture and Pecans 5-10 lovely acres on
paved road $15,500 per acre Very nice property,
good deed restrictions

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Great Opportunity!!! Comfortable 4 bedroom
3 bath home on five fenced acres with guest cot-
tage w/bath, 2 car garage, big shop, pasture 100
pecan trees and a nice pool Only $365,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Wooded Acreage 5.35 acres on private road
off Paul Thompson Road $128,500

Waukeenah Highway 27.99 acres good
home site fenced pasture $545,000

Aucilla Shores 5 level wooded acres $75,000

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath double-
wide with nice deck, fenced yard on 1 acre
$73,500

Investment Property Choice lot on the
Ecofina River 20 minutes to the Gulf, State
property on 3 sides, septic tank on property,
paved road only $195,000


Realtor Tim Peary

850-997-4340
See all our listings at
www.TimPeary.com

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


I


1- 1









PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., FEBRUARY 7, 2007

Foundation Sponsors

Public Leaders Series


A Distinguished Leaders Se-
ries got underway Monday via
phone and the Internet.
The kickoff event was an in-
terview with Senator Bob Gra-
ham about national security
and terrorism.
Commissioner of Agriculture
Charles Bronson will address a
a range of issues affecting our
food supply.
Secretary Tom Pelham will
speak to growth and its im-
pacts, and the role of leaders in
charting quality living for
communities.
Information and access is
available at:
www.LeadershipSpotlight.com
for these and other programs
and speakers ifi the series.
A Growth Leaders Roundta-
ble focused on growth and en-
vironmental topics also got
underway Monday.


Direct access is available at:
www.GrowthinFlorida.com
The Florida Public Interest
Foundation sponsors these
programs. They can be ac-
cessed free of charge.
Marcia Elder is the chairper-
son of the Foundation.
The Foundation is based in
Monticello. Additional infor-
mation is available at:
www.ForThePublic.net

Saddle Raffle
Hereford brand by Tex-Tan
16" Roping Saddle, value
$1,450.00 or
15" Tourquise Seat and Trim
roughout all leather, silver
and raw hide trim, value
$999.00
Raffle Tickets $5.00 at
Michelle's Bull Pen, Perry, FL
Don't be left out of the winners
circle. Buy yours today.
850-584-3098


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