Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00174
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: January 31, 2007
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00174
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text








Relay For Life
Seeking

Cancer Survivors


Story, Page 6


Step Up Florida
Takes Place
Tomorrow

Story Page 9
I


Photo Page
Of 4-H

Activities

Photos, Page 10


Wednesday Morning )


Monticello


1-2i E' A T NTCA Q fR CTNTP


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007


County Officials Begin Process




Of Revising Comprehensive Plan


Process Expected To

Take Until November


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

County commissioners and
planners last week began what
could turn out to be a major re-
vision of the Comprehensive
Plan, in effect redefining the
county's future look and qual-
ity of life.


Planners

Absences

Are Noted

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Planners' attendance -- or
lack thereof-- at meetings con-
tinues to draw attention, par-,
ticularly in light of the critical
function that they perform and
the Comprehensive Plan
evaluation that they are about
to undertake.
Last week, at the County
and Planning commissions'
joint meeting, a. citizen noted
the absence of three Planning
SCommission members.
Santa Hokanson said the fail-
ure of the planners to attend
the workshop underscored the
seriousness of the problem, es-
pecially now, given the impor- _
(See Planners, Page 3)


Formally called an Evalua-
tion and Appraisal Report
(ERA), these periodic reviews
are intended to afford local
governments an opportunity to
reevaluate and improve their
comprehensive plans.
Specifically, the reviews al-
low local governments to ex-
amine the various elements of
their comprehensive plans and


make changes were necessary.
The elements, by way of ex-
planation, are housing, traffic,
conservation and recreation,
among other categories.
The difference between this
and past ERAs is that this time
it will be left up to local gov-
ernments to decide what areas
of their comprehensive plans
need adjustment, as opposed to
the state dictating the changes.
"This is about local issues,"
Planning Official Bill Tellef-
sen, who led Thursday eve-
ning's discussion, explained to


TESS KNIGHT was honored as District Employee of the
Year Friday. A delegation surprised her at JES with a
bouquet of red roses, a number of orange and blue bal-
loons, and a Plaque of Recognition. From left, Kelvin


the participants. "What, in
other words, are the local is-
sues that we need to address?
How is the Comprehensive
Plan working for us as an indi-
vidual county?"
Among the several local is-
sues that Tellefsen identified
as needing to be addressed (It
will be up to planners and
commissioners ultimately to
make the determination) were:
The Future Land Use Ele-
ment -- Tellefsen pointed out
that the goals, objectives and
policies of this element will re-


quire in-depth review, if only
to ascertain if changes are nec-
essary.
Among the reasons that he
cited for possible changes: to
ensure clarification of intent;
to reflect changes resulting
from overall development pat-
terns; and to address code en-
forcement -- an issue that
lately has become critical, as
state funding rides on it.
The Infrastructure Ele-
ment (a new name for the pre-
viously titled "Sanitary Sewer,
Solid Waste, Drainage, Potable


Norton, District Human Resource Officer, Franklin
Hightower, School Board Member, Knight, Phil Barker,
superintendent. See Story Page 14. (News Photo)


Water and Natural Groundwa-
ter Aquifer/Recharge Element)
-
Tellefsen proposed that this
section be amended to make it
mandatory that new develop-
ments connect to sanitary
sewer and potable water sys-
tems whenever and wherever
these become available.
He also proposed that rules
be promulgated to establish
when existing residences must
connect to such systems, under
conditions that will be spelled
out in the Development Code.
The intent also is to establish
policies for septic tanks, in-
cluding whether higher-than-
current standards should be es-
tablished for such systems and
determining when existing
septic tanks must be upgraded
to the higher standards.
The Future Land Use Map
-- Tellefsen proposed that the
map be changed to reflect the
goals, objectives and policies
of all the elements, particularly
the Future Land Use Element
itself.
He suggested that the county
get away from zoning three-
and-five-acre homestead par-
cels and move instead toward
smaller residential parcels,
"particularly in areas that
should be developed as in-fill
and that have a true potential
to be served by public
utilities."
Smaller lots, Tellefsen said,
would translate into lower
costs for land buyers, allowing
for the possible construction of
affordable housing, another of
the local issues that need to be
(See Comp Plan, Page 2)


Discussions Will Decide


Future Look Of County


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Citizens interested in learn-
ing what the county will look
like in the future -- or better
yet, wanting to have input into
what the future will bring --
would do well to attend Plan-
ning Commission workshops
in the coming months.
Indeed, for the next six to
eight months -- maybe longer
-- planners and then commis-
sioners, along with interested
citizens, will be .determining
the future look and feel of Jef-
ferson County.
Although seemingly an aca-
demic exercise at present, the
policies, procedures and rules
that planners and commission-
ers put in place and the desig-
nations that they assign on the
land-use map will ultimately
affect every citizen in the
county, one way or another.
Should there be higher den-
sities in certain areas, meaning
higher concentrations, of


houses on smaller parcels; if
so, where?
Should there be high-rise
residential apartments and con-
dominiums in the Lloyd area?
What about concentrations of
commercial and industrial
zones radiating out from the
interchanges?

Where should sewer and wa-
ter lines be installed, under-
standing that these utilities re-
quire high concentrations of
customers to be viable and at
the same time will encourage
high concentrations of residen-
tial and commercial develop-
ment along their paths?
Should high-density corri-
dors.follow established major
arterial roadways, such as US
90 and US 27? Or should they
break ground and establish
high density corridors in pres-

ently less developed areas of
the county?
What about development?
Should the county discourage
three-and-five-acre parcel
homesteads and instead en-
courage smaller, more intense


developments?
What about conservation
subdivisions? Should the
county encourage more of
these green-space preserving
developments?
And what about affordable
housing? Will the county en-
courage housing'for working
families or become more and
more a bedroom community
for Tallahassee and a haven for
the well-to-do?
These are the kinds of ques- -
tions that planners and county
commissioners will be answer-
ing over the succeeding
months.
Granted, rules don't always
get enforced and things don't
always turn out as planned, but
what goes into these revisions
could have far reaching conse-
quences, serving as a guide for
the future growth and develop-
ment of the county.

The Planning Commission
meets regularly the second
Thursday of each month. The
next meeting is scheduled for 7
p.m. Feb. 8.


CVS PHARMACY is moving to a new and large building, which is to be built farther
south on US'19, just north of Jefferson Builders Mart. The new store will be more
than 13,000 sq. feet. (News Photo)

CVS Pharmacy Planning Move


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The Local Planning Agency
(LPA) last week recommended
to the City Council for ap-
proval, with slight modifica-
tion, the site plan for a new
CVS Pharmacy building.
The new CVS building,
which will go on the site of the
defunct Better Built Homes on
US 19 (just north of Jefferson


Builders Mart), will be much
larger than the present facility.
Indeed, the plans call for a
13,225 sq. foot building with
68 parking spaces.
CVS currently shares the
building complex with Movie
Gallery and Subway, across
the street from the Winn Dixie
shopping center, on US 19
South.
One of the planners' ex-
pressed concerns last Tuesday
was the driveway that CVS is


proposing to construct to con-
nect the parking lot to Wau-
keenah Street.
The planners expressed con-
cern that the driveway will be-
come a cut-through for resi-
dents of the large development
that is going up just east of
Waukeenah Street. They wor-
ried that these residents will
use the driveway as a quick ac-
cess to US 19.
The planners stipulated that
the developer install traffic-
(See CVS, Page 2)


*4









'ICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 31, 2007

IL General Snowden TO Speak


At Prayer Breakfast


SNOWDEN


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The monthly Business-
Community Prayer Breakfast
will be 7 a.m. Thursday, in
the Christ Episcopal Church
Parish Hall, and feature guest
speaker Lawrence F. Snow-
den, Lt. General, United '
States Marine Corps., ret.
Snowden attended Stetson
University in Deland, FL in
1938 and received his BS De-
gree in Economics from the
University of Virginia in
1942.
In 1950, he received a Mas-
ter degree in Personnel Ad-
ministration from Northwest-
ern University and in 1968,


attended the Advanced Man-
agement Program, Graduate
school of Business, Harvard
University.
Enlisting in the Marine
Corps reserve after Pearl Har-
bor, he was commissioned a
2nd Lt. in 1942.
He served as Platoon
Leader and Company Com-
mander in combat in the Mar-
shal Islands, Saipan and Tin-
ian. He was a Rifle Com-
mander during the assault
landing on Iwo Jima, where
he was twice wounded.
He was a Battalion second
Officer in Korea and a regi-
mental Commander in Viet
Nam.
As a Major General, serving
as Chief of Staff, US Forces,


Agency Awards Billingsley


Certificate Of Service
Billingsley received his Hi' started working with the
DEBBIE SNAPP award in recognition of 42 Leon County Committee in
Staff Writer years of integrity, dedication, 1965 when the agency was
and knowledge while serving then Iamed Agriculture Stabi-
The Jefferson/Leon/Wa-- the producers in Jefferson, lization and Conservation
kulla Farm Service Agency Leon, and Wakulla counties. Service.
met Dec. 7,. 2006 and After all the food and fan- He is a 1943 graduate of
awarded Julian Billingsley, fare Billingsley sat down and Leon County High, and after
County Committeeman, with told of the events and experi- a couple of years in the Air
a Certificate of Service ences of his past which was Force, he went on to the Uni-
plaque. intermingled with agriculture, versity of Florida, graduating
in 1951 with a Major in Ani-
Smal Husbandry.
::; Billingsley was a feed
dealer for Morman Feeds. His
route covered many counties
across the Big Bend which in-
cluded Jefferson, Leon, Tho-
;mas, Taylor, Gadsden,
Wakulla, and Madison.
In the late 60's he began a
mobile feed business selling
l ...ground feed in the surround-
ing counties along with liquid
fertilizer.
. In 1982 he decided to fi-
nally retire, so he says with a
smile, but only on paper.
He then began a lawn serv-
ice business that he still main-
tains at ..age- 82, along with
other odd jobs.
He continues to keep busy
never sitting still for long.
He raises approximately 80
cows and calves on the family
1. farm.


SJapan, for three years, he re-
ceived the second order of the
sacred treasure from Emperor
Hirohito.
Appointed to the rank of Lt.
General in 1975, he was the
Marine Corps principal repre-
sentative in the Joint Chiefs
of Staff for two years and
then served as Chief of Staff,
Headquarters Marine Corps
until he retired in May 1979,
with more than 37 years serv-
ice.
.From July 1979 until July
19, 1986, General Snowden
represented a major American
corporation, managing inter-
national programs in Japan,
Korea and Taiwan.
Returning to CA, he man-
aged programs in the Middle
east for the next two years.
In 1983, he was recalled
from Japan to serve on the
Commission to investigate the
terrorist bombing of the Ma-


CVS Drugs
(Continued From Page 1)
calming devices, such as speed
humps, to discourage drivers
from using the driveway as a
cut-through.
The planners also stipulated
that the 26-foot -width of the
driveway be reduced by the in-
clusion of a striped bicycle
lane.
Councilman Tom Vogelge-
sang, who sits on the LPA in
an advisory capacity, pushed
for the developer to install a
sidewalk on the south side of
the driveway. Attorney Paula
Sparkman, however, advised
that a reading of the codes did
not appear to give the city the
authority to require the instal-
lation of sidewalks on drive-
ways, which aren't properly-
(See CVS, Page 5)


rine Corps unit in Beirut,
Lebanon, a terrorist act which
claimed the lives of 241 US
military personnel.
Snowden was a volunteer in
the department of Elder Af-
fairs for more than eight years
where he taught leadership
and public speaking to De-
partment staff and assisted in
training AmeriCorps Units
throughout the state.
He was the Volunteer of the
Year in 1998 in the Civic Af-
fairs category.


He achieved the rank of dis-
tinguished Eagle Scout in
1973 and also received the
Silver beaver Award. Snow-
den served for eight years on
the Suwannee River Area Boy
Scout Council.
From 1993-1998, he was
the Chairman of Florida's
World War II Commemora-
tive Program.
The Prayer Breakfast is avi-
alable for a donation, and all
are encouraged to attend and
to bring a friend.


Money Market

I Competitive rates
I Check-writing choices
I Personal service
*Current historical 7-day taxable money market yield available on
01-26-07. Effective yield assumes reinvested income. The rate on the
money market fund will fluctuate.
An investment in the Fund is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal
Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although
the Fund seeks to preserve the value of your investment at $1.00 per
share, it is possible to lose money by investing in the fund.
You should consider the investment objective, risks, and charges and
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other information. Your Edward Jones investment representative can
provide a prospectus, or visit our website at: www.edwardjones.com,
which should be read carefully before investing.


Robert J. Davison
205 E. Washington St.
Monticello, FL 32344
850-997-2572
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC.

EdwardJones
Serving Individual Investors Since 18p


Spam business


HUGH McCallister, left, chairman of Jefferson, Leon,
Wakulla, County Committee presents Julian Billinglsey
with a certificate of service.



Comp Plan Revision
Cnntiidrn. 1l nT 1 d P


(otUleltlllCU rL Um1 ra JL)
addressed.
"Not everyone can afford a
$250,000 home," Tellefsen
said.
Too, he pointed out, the
more houses that are con-
nected to public utilities, the
more income that will be gen-
erated via sewer and water
bills for the maintenance and
expansion of the utility sys-
tems.
The deadline for submission.-


of the ERA to the state is No-
vember. Planners will work on
the proposed changes first and
submit their results as recom-
mendations to the County
Commission for final review
and approval.
In essence, what the exercise
will do, as one planner aptly
put it, is to change the makeup
and character of the county,
determining what the commu-
nity will look like in 10 to 20
years from now.


He is the son of the late
Fellows and Pearl
(Thompson) Billingsley.
He lives where he was born
and raised on the family farm
located in the Baum Commu-
nity.

He's proud to have the abil-
ity to still get up and go.
He's the youngest 82 year
old the agency staff have had
the pleasure to be around.
As he finishes his visit, he
gets up to leave. There are
aches and pains as he rises out
of the chair but no one will
ever hear him utter a word
about them.
He dons his cowboy hat and
thanks all for taking time with
him.
He wishes everyone in the
office well, and with a smile
says he'll be back. They have
no doubt he will.
'* C


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calling 523-7333 or go to:
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 31, 2007 PAGE 3

Club Members May Qualify


For College Scholarships


JEREMIAH CAMEL and the three Wiseman, taken at the annual "Bethlehem in Monti-
cello." (News Photo)




Jeremiah Camel Diagnosed


With Terminal Cancer


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Resident Billie McClellan,
asks for the prayers of the
community for Jeremiah, eve-
ryone's favorite resident
camel.
Jeremiah has been diagnosed
with cancer, which may prove
to be fatal for the animal.
McClellan said that Jere-
miah was showing signs of
digestive problems, so he was
taken to the Gainesville Ani-
mal Hospital, where he was
given a sedative, x-rays and a
biopsy was taken.
"He was diagnosed with
cancer of the lower jaw
bone," said McClellan. "So
far, Jeremiah is running,


prancing and acting like he
feels well, but that will
change."
She said that the cancer may
prove to be in other areas of
his body as well. "The vet
doesn't think he's going to
live," said McClellan.
"They've never dealt with a
camel with cancer before,"
she said. "But as much as I
hate to, I have to put Jere-
miah's health on the back
burner for now."
She said that on the same
day that Jeremiah was diag-
nosed, her husband, Paul, un-
derwent his third serious back
surgery.
."It's just heartbreaking," she
said. "All I can do at this
point is pray and hope for the


best. As long as Jeremiah can
eat and is acting like he feels
well, he'll be here, enjoying
life. But if.he starts to take a
turn for the worse or can't eat,
we'll have to put him down."
She added that General Lee,
Jeremiah's longtime burro
buddy, is sticking close by his
side showing support.
"Lee is staying with him all
the time," said McClellan.
She added that the cancer is
not the same illness that took
her previous camel, Akbar.
"He had a fatal fungus that
basically infected every part
of his body," she explained.
McClellan said that more
would definitely be learned of
Jeremiah's fate at a later date.
"We have to just keep giv-
ing him the best life possible
and make sure he's comfort-
able and does not suffer any,"
she concluded.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lamont resident, Ida Crim,
is the 34th graduate at the
County Adult School.




















CRIM

Crim, 62, credits the en-
couragement and support of
her eldest daughter, Vickie
Mays, and especially her
grandson, Laclarence Mays,
for her accomplishment.
"Vickie has been trying to get
me to go back to school and
get my diploma for about the
13 years," said Crini. "But


when my grandson started on
me, I decided to try.
She explained that Vickie is
a school teacher and Laclar-
Sence is a volunteer who as-
sists teachers for the adult
school classes every Thursday
-night at 7 p.m. at Mt. Morilla.
"He worked with me and af-
ter about the third try, I made
it," said Crim. "I earned my
diploma.
"Back in the day when I was
going to school, if you got
pregnant or were over age,
you weren't given the oppor-
tunity to get a GED, said
Crim. "But when they started
giving the classes again here
at Mt. Morilla, I decided why
not.
Serving as the manager or
of the Super 8 Motel, the
night classes worked out per-
fectly for her.
"They are closer to home
and much more convenient
for those of us who live a
long way away from town,"
she said.
"I am so grateful to God,
my grandson, granddaughter,
and Dr. White and Dr. John-
son for being so
encouraging," said Crim. "I
am thankful to God for letting
my mind be still enough to
take the test and pass it."


Planners Absence Noted


(Continued From Page 1)
tance of the task that they were
about to undertake.
SNor was the problem a new
one, she said.

. It (planners' nonattendance
at meetings) is not 'a surprise
and hasn't been a surprise,"
Hokanson said. "It's been a
longtime problem."
In view of that, she ex-
pressed dismay and mild out-
rage that commissioners had
given themselves two months
to deal with the issue.
Commission Chairman Jun-
ior Tuten declined to respond
to Hokanson's comment, let-
ting stand his original
deadline.
Tuten last month gave his


colleagues until mid March to
resolve discreetly the issue of
non-attending planners or face
possible board action.
"This is the nucleus of our
group," noted planner Bud
Wheeler, who initiated the is-
sue of planners nonattendance
with commissioners.
Planners present at last
week's joint workshop were
Pat Murphy, Angela Gray,
Corwin Padget, Nick Prine, C.
P. Miller, and Wheeler.
(Wheeler himself was late.)
Absent were John Greene,
John Walker, Sandra Saunders
and Roy Faglie (Faglie, how-
ever, regularly attends meet-
ings).
Planners volunteer their
time.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Members of the Boys and-
Girls Clubs who qualify are
eligible for a scholarship,
thanks to the owners of Intui-
tion Systems and the Boys
and Girls Clubs of the Big
Bend.
Recently, Jim Van Horn,
president of Intuition Systems
(formerly Intuition Solutions)
presented Buddy Streit, presi-
dent of the Boys and Girls
Club of the.Big Bend, with a
check for $68,151 .
The largest scholarship gift
in the history of the organiza-
tion, it will be used to pur-
chase tuition and fees for six
Boys and Girls Club students
over three years, starting in
2008.
At the check signing ere-
mony, held at Boys and irls
Club headquarters on Laura
Lee Avenue, Van Horn said-
rf1(



"It is Institution's hope that
our gift to the Boys and Girls
Club will inspire and enable
their members to pursue their
educational dreams."
Institution's Human Re-
source Director Sherry Lewis
says that the company has a
history of supporting educa-
tional goals, so the gift to the
Boys and Girls Club was a
perfect fit.
"We actually have been
working on this idea for a'
while," Lewis explained.
"We interviewed several or-
ganizations and chose Boys
and Girls Club because they
already had a vetted process
in place for choosing scholar-
ship winners.
"We also did not want to be
personally involved in actu-
ally choosing the winner, we
wanted that person to be cho-
sen by people who know him
or her and who understand
their personal situation."
When presented with the


check, Streit said "This is a
very important- investment in
the future of our kids and our
communities.
"Boys and Girls Clubs all
across the country provide the
hope and opportunity, the tu-
torial programs and the posi-
tive adult role models for
young people.
"But this gift provides real,
tangible financial support so
kids can know they will be
able to go on in their educa-
tion if they work hard and ap-
ply themselves."
The $68,000 gift will be
used to purchase two Prepaid
College Plans in 2008, two in
2009, and two in 2010; schol-
arship applications from
qualified Boys and Girls Club
members will be accepted be-
ginning in 2007.


AIRFR
PCSEV


80-5-22*wwIfeev~om


_1" /HI.ORAAL DEISI;NS 190 E Dogwood Street Monticello 9972015


Step Up, Florida!sM is a time for you to get active and get healthy by
taking advantage of great physical activity opportunities in Jefferson County,
Florida. All activities listed on the schedule below are free and open to the
public, so come out and participate for your health!



February 1, 2007 Event Schedule

8:00 am Walk around Monticello by advanced walking group who will meet on the sidewalk at
the corner of N Jefferson St and Dogwood Street (in front of Coffee Break). This
group walks five days a week. For details contact Gretchen Avera at 997-5007.
10:00 am Table tennis demonstration with FSU Table Tennis Team and"presentation by Mark
Fenton, former member of the U.S. national racewalking team, at the Jefferson
Elementary School Media Center.
12:00 pm *: Kick- off event at the Jefferson County Recreation Park to include:
Ribbon cutting for the new walking path.
Presentation by Mark Fenton, former.member of the US national racewalking
team.
Walking and biking around the new path at the Jefferson County Recreation
Park by all who attend and students from Jefferson Elementary School.
1:00 pm *4 Simply Fit is offering a free tour and body analysis to the women of the community
from 1:00 pm 3:00 pm. ipr details contact Karen at 997-7339.
4:00 pm Warm up and stretch at thBoys and Girls Club of the Big Bend with Jamie Rogers.
Club members will then wa the Step Up, Florida!sM banner to the courthouse circle.
4:30 pm O* Physical Activity Showcas ,t-the courthouse circle to demonstrate physical activity
opportunities currently avaable in Jefferson County. They include:
Connection, Boys hd Girls Club of the Big Bend's dance team, led by
Tiffany Ransom. For details contact the Jefferson County Teen Center at
997-5262.
Tai Chi with Sean Dennison, Executive Director of the Taoist Tai Chi Society
of USA. For details contact 224-5438.
Ballroom Dancing led by Maurice Smith. For details contact the Jefferson
County Health Department at 342-0170 ext 222.
5:15 pm Warm-up and stretch with Jamie Rogers at the courthouse circle.
5:30 pm Community walk around Monticello.
*: Black History Month Events kickoff at the Monticello Opera House with a health fair
and will include a physical activity period with Tequila Hagan and Dr. Flossie Byrd
speaking on the theme of "Honoring the Past and Building Strength for the Future."
Additional Jefferson County Schools will participate in various ways during school hours.

For More Information Contact 342-0170 ext 207


HLIDIDAM O
HEALTH


ffer on


Ida Crim Earns Her


GED At Age 62


:-fI

Step Up, Florida!"-










PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 31, 201




Monticello News
(ISSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly Ex-
cept for the weeks of July 4th, Thanksgiving, Christmas,
& New Years. Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post
Office. Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
N Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net


Foundation Helps === Opinion & Comment


Foster Youths


For more than half a million
children in the U.S. foster care
system, the concept for a "for-
ever family" may no longer be
just a dream- thanks to a pro-
gram supported by a popular
restaurant chain that, with its
customers, is helping them
find permanent, loving homes.
Most children enter the fos-
ter care system through no
fault of their own, often fol-
lowing abuse or neglect. Rob-
ert was one of these children-
placed in foster care at the age
of 5 after he was deserted by
his parents. Robert spent two
months on his own, looking af-
ter his little brother and sister,
and over the next five years
moved between foster homes,
waiting for a loving family.
Wendy's Wonderful Kids, a
direct-service, signature pro-
gram of the Dave Thomas
Foundation for Adoption, is
working in all 50 states, the
District of Columbia and Can-
ada to move foster care chil-
dren like Robert into perma-
nent families.
Established by Dave
Thomas, founder of Wendy's
and an adopted child, the
Foundation concentrates on
finding adoptive families for
children in the foster care sys-
tem.
."We asked adoption agen-
cies across America what was
preventing them from moving
children from foster care to
permanent homes. They told
us they do not have adequate
time or resources to focus ex-
clusively on these children,"


said Rita Soronen, executive
director of the Dave Thomas
Foundation for Adoption.
"Ours is a proven program that
demands results, accountabil-
ity and quality service on be-
half of the children who need
us most."
WeQdy's restaurants and
their customers around the
country raise money that
comes back to the community
in the form of an experienced
adoption recruiter whose pri-
mary job function is to execute
aggressive, child-focused pro-
grams targeted exclusively at
placing foster care children
with adoptive families.
With the help of Wendy's
Wonderful Kids, Robert found
a loving, adoptive family with
Elaine, a devoted foster mother
now caring for seven adopted
and foster sons. Robert strug-
gled when he first entered
Elaine's home at the age of 10-
he had been through a lot and
didn't know whether this home
would be any different.
After earning Robert's trust,
Elaine helped him make
remarkable progress. Now 13,
Robert's grades are up.. He is
thriving in his new, stable en-
vironment.
Over the past two years, the
program has helped more than
1,100 children like Robert be
matched or adopted..
With the generosity of com-
munity members across the
country, the organization will
continue to help many thou-
sands of children find forever
families.


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
January 29, 1997
Following the recommenda-
tion of the Citizens Advisory
Task Force, the City Council
approved Tuesday evening the
application of a $550,000 fed-
eral grant to be used for neigh-
borhood revitalization.
Fourteen local businesses
have signed on to the Junior
Chamber of Commerce's anti-
smoking campaign aimed at
teenagers.
A man who wants to buy a
county easement with the idea
of converting it into a private
road to give him access to a
property he hopes to buy will
get his wish, but not exactly
the way he envisioned it.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
January 28, 1987
Economic growth in Madi-
son county was brought on by
a leadership which took the
heat form citizens while laying
down the base work to lure in-
dustry into the area, said Doyle
Conner, Jr. Economic Devel-
opment Director of Madison
County.
Conner was addressing
members of the Monticello
Chamber of Commerce as he.


explained the process which
led to his area attracting indus-
try.
When Representative Gene
Hodges and State Senator
Wayne Hollingsworth held
their Legislative Delegation
meeting in the county court-
house Friday morning, they
heard one continual refrain
from local public officials and
private citizens alike.
That refrain was, "We need
help," help in attracting eco-
nomic growth into the county,
help in meeting the state man-
dated programs at the land fill,
and at the county jail, and help
from raising revenues from
sources other than the ad valo-
rem tax.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
January 27, 1977
A life was saved Sunday
noon because of the quick ac-
tion of a JCHS freshman who
pulled a man from a burning
house. James Lee Parker is
credited with saving the life of
Robert Murray when fire
broke our in Murray's home
on South Railroad St.
Some 400 people jammed
the JCHS cafeteria Friday
(See From Our, Page 5)


Camera May Not Flat!


"That picture you put in the
paper made me look like a
monkey," the irate caller com-
plained.
I don't know about
monkeys, but I do know the
picture was a fairly good re-
semblance.
It's a little rude to say, "this
is what you lookalike," but
what is there to say?
Most of us think we're
better-looking than we are. So
the image in the picture may
not quite square with the im-
age we have in our minds of
what we look like.
Heck, I often tease Laz
Aleman about making my hair
look gray in pictures. Why
does he do that to me?
And, from an angle my
glasses took real thick as
though I have a sight problem.
Darn that photographer!
I' m not at all pleased at
how big he makes my nose
look. What is the matter with
that guy, anyway?
You see, the caller and I
have something in common.
Pictures of us in the Monti-
cello News simply don't do us
justice.
Now, there is a great deal


Publisher's


Notebook


Ron Cichon
*


of difference in having a studio
portrait made and having your
picture snapped at a reception
or party.
Sometimes the camera
catches us with our mouths
open, chewing food, yawning,
or with eyes half closed.
To say the camera man did-
n't catch us looking intelligent
would be an understatement.
I've seen pictures of some
of our most prominent citizens
that made 'em look dumb and
dumber.
I tear the pictures up and
throw them away. They don't
get published.
I've been doing that for the
more than 31 years I've pub-


lished this newspaper.
It's not only pictures of
prominent citizens that get torn
up and discarded either. It's
any picture that would cause
embarrassment to someone.
The camera not only catches
us with our mouths open and
eyes half closed, it also catches
other parts of the anatomy in
awkward or unfortunate posi-
tions.
Those pictures are torn.up
and thrown away, too.
On occasion, someone will
call and ask how come their
picture never appeared in
print even though they were
photographed by a newspaper
photographer.
I tell them it is our policy


We're Impatient With


By DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

It is fascinating the remark-
able changes in personal char-
acter that can take place in just
a couple.of generations.
Every American is the re-
cipient of a strong and mag-
nificent nation due solely to
the courage, character and
unity of the WWII great gen-
eration. We younger Ameri-
cans have freely partaken in all
the opportunities and rewards
given to us through their sacri-
fices.
Rather than learning from
their example and picking up
the torch of unity and solidar-
ity to insure the success of our
future generations, we have


become a self-centered, impa-
tient and collective bunch of
spoiled brats.
As a people, our strength of
character compass is woefully
dysfunctional and we have
compounded this dilemma by
a continual erosion and dese-
cration of our moral con-
science under the heading of
social progressiveness.
Although there are many ex-
amples of our pathetic charac-
ter, one need to look no further
than the current situation in
which we find ourselves re-
garding the war in Iraq. 1
couldn't help by compare to-
day's national "fiber" (or lack
thereof), regarding the Iraq
War with that demonstrated by
the great generation involved
in the Second World War. I


wondered what it would be
like to apply the same individ-
ual and political Iraq War
mentality demonstrated today
to our national WWII experi-
ence.
First there would be that
large group of naysayer's who
would argue that it was Japan
that attacked the United States
at Pearl Harbor and not the
Nazis, and we have no busi-
ness what-so-ever attacking or
engaging the Germans in an
armed conflict.
There would also be that
sorry and pathetic conspiracy
theory group out there that
would lament that President
Roosevelt and his administra-
tion were preoccupied with
Germany and the Nazis long
before WWII started and our


GOP Deserved To LosE


By TOM DeWEESE
Columnist

Fhe recriminations are fly-
ing. Why did the Republicans
lose so badly? Who's at fault?
What will it mean in the battle
for freedom?
They betrayed their base of
supporters and thought they
could get away with it. It's that
simple.
The loss wasn't about scan-
dals. Not about Jack
Abramoff. Not abut Congress-


man Mark Foley.
The Republican base left the
party because it became the
biggest spending government
in the U.S. history. It became
the government most invasive
of our private lives in U.S. his-
tory.
And the Republicans became
the poorest defenders of our
national sovereignty and inde-
pendence in U.S. history.
That's why they lost.
It's the reason why they
were able to toss out the
Democrats twelve years ago,


but then they headed down the
same road. Americans simply
don't want that kind of gov-
ernment.
For fifty years the Republi-
can believers fought in the
trenches, taking defeat after
defeat, as they battled against
the ever-growing behemoth of
Big Government. Year after
year the majority Democrats
heaped more spending, more
regulations, more government
intrusion on our heads, threat-
ening to bury the Republic for-
ever.


ter
not to run pictures that embar-
rass people and the camera
caught them in an unflattering
pose so the picture was dis-
carded.
Normally the person is very
appreciative of this policy.
Once in a great while,
though, the person will de-
mand to see the picture. Or, as
recently happened, a mother
wanted to know why we didn't
show her the picture of her
.daughter before we destroyed
it. She would have decided if
it could be printed, she said.
There's a very good and
simple,reason why we don't do
that.
First, upon seeing, a picture
that ,is unflattering. or. poten-
tially embarrassing,. I immedi-
ately destroy it.
I don't want it laying around
or getting into the photo file.
Secondly, what is published
in this newspaper is my re-
sponsibility. So, I'm not going
to knowingly publish a picture
that might embarrass some-
body' even if a mother wanted
me to.
We can't make all the ladies
look like Vanna White or the
men like George Clooney, but
we can and do try to avoid em-
barrassment.


war

starting a war with them is
nothing more than a personal
vendetta solely generated by
Roosevelt and his henchmen in
the oval office.
Indeed, there are those who
would conjecture that Roose-
velt knew in advance about the
attack on Pearl Harbor and
kept quiet in order to steer-the
nation into a war with the Na-
zis.
There would have to be a
segment of military "experts"
that would argue fighting both
the Japanese, (who actually at-
tacked us), and the Nazis at the
same time, stretches our mili-
tary forces way too thin and
thus our capabilities to accom-
plish a winning strategy.
(See Impatient, Page 5)






The Republican faithful be-
came ever more desperate to
stop it. They dug in. They
fought harder. The battle cry
became "Elect a Republican
majority, take control of the
government, and roll it all
back and reestablish the ideas
of Jefferson and Madison."
We believed in the fight and
eventually, we won. We had
every reason to believe the Re-
publicans would at least begin
the process of rolling back the'
(See GOP, Page 5)












kGOP Deserves To Lose
(Continued From Page 4) ing to allow it to pass out c
ll-intrusive government mon- his committee.
ter. The bill, passed by a large
We even had it in writing un- majority in the House, woul
t er the "Contract with Amer- block federal money to an
Sica." community that used th
That document, signed by power of Eminent Domain fc
Republican candidates during private development. Not on
the campaign of 1994, was our member of Specter's commi'
guaranttee. It would restore ac- tee protested his action.
icountability and fiscal respon- The Republicans passed th
asibility to Congress. outrageous Patriot Act, allow
SIt would end the cycle of ing the federal government t
Scandal and disgrace. The come into private homes with
*document outlined a plan to out a warrant. The Republican
.put a stop to the frivolous law- have passed the Real ID Ac
suits; it called for term limits which by 2008 will establish
Ito create a "citizen National ID card.
legislature." The Republicans created th
There were promises to get Department of Ifomeland Se
rid of the Department of Edu- curity, through which one Cza
cation and many more unnec- (the Secretary) oversees 2
essary federal agencies. None combined departments of th
,of that happened. federal government, givin
The Republicans gave us
School to Work, Goals 2000 this ol0. l.dn oaprecedentec
and the Workforce Develop- power to snoop into, spy on
ment Act. and control every action of the
These three Acts completely American people.
transformed America's public Under the Republicans, oui
schools, away from local con- nation's foreign policy has be-
trol to become federal outlets. come a bullying tactic, forcing
.Federal curriculums were man- other nations to comply with
k'dated. Federal "textbooks were our form of government and
create. Parents lost control of our brand of economics.
their children's education. We invade and occupy. Nc
The Republicans put the wonder such tactics have made
United States back in the UN's us the most hated nation on
UNESCO. This snake pit of earth, and that is what fuels the
globalism is responsible for terrorists.
anti-American curriculum that Is such nation building really
promotes global citizenship in keeping with the visions ol
over American. President our Founding Fathers who
Bush's Secretary of Education warned us against entangling
Rod Page told a UNESCO ourselves in the problems ol
gathering that the No Child other nations? Where in Re-
Left Behind Act is in complete publicans archives is such a
compliance with UNESCO policy advocated?
Under the Republicans, the
global education policy, fed
federal government spent
The Republicans, through eral government spen
the Bsh White H e, con $2.47 trillion in 2005 up 49
the Bush White House, con-
tinue to enforce the policy of percent since 1995. The deficit
tinue to enforce the policy of
of $400 billion is the largest
Sustainable Development from
the UN's A a 21 in history. In 1995 the public
the UN's Agenda 21 policy.
debt limit was $4.9 trillion,
Under the Republicans it con
tinues to be official federal Today it's $8.2 trillion (up 67
government policypercent). These increases are
Si not a result of war or a bad
'. : That policy represents a mas-
economy. It's simply goverh
sive government control ofpri- econ It's simply gover-
ment out of control.
*ate property and local com-
muy Now, this year, we learn
munity decision. tha
m decision, mthat the Republican Admin-
Republican Senator Richard t the Republican Adin-
S h istration is working secretly to
Lugar has made every possible a
implement a North American
attempt to ratify the UN's Law leent rth eric
Union, which will destroy our
of the Sea Treaty. And, while which will destroy ou
very national identity and sov-
still not ratified, many of its eregnty byional idntiy and so
ereignty by "harmonizing" our
provisions are quietly being borders ith anaa an Me
borders with Canada and Mex-
implemented by the govern- co
ment. The Law of the Sea
les tn a Is this the nation the Repub-
Treaty is nothing less than a
ty i ntin lican faithful envisioned as
scheme to create UN global
scheme to create UN global they celebrated the Republican
taxes.p n S to Ar victory in 1994? Of course not.
Republican Senator Arlen
Specter has singleanely It is a betrayal of unbelievable
Specter has single-handedly. w
proportions. And that's why
managed to kill the Property roortons. n ths
Act by ref the Republicans lost. They de-
Rights Protection Act by refus-


a-i ve iit.


From Our Files


(Continued From Page 4)
night to honor Monticello na-
tive Jack Youngblood at a tes-
timonial dinner.
Gary Wright has been named
president of the Farmers and
Merchants Bank by bank di-
rectors succeeding Bill.Carra-
way who will remain as Chair-
man of the Board.
FORTY YEARS AGO
January 27, 1967
Mrs. Cleo Richer and Mrs.
J.E. Elam attended an area
-school finance meeting the
middle of last week in Panama
City.
Mrs. W.B. Dunn Jr.; and
daughter, Kay, spent several
days this week in Atlanta at-
tending a furniture market.
Winners of the mixed dog-


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 31, 2007 PAGE 5

SEmergency Energy Aid

SAvailable For Elderly
SIn the light of the current is- not received by the utility
SrezeBI wfarnino fnr Nnrth Flor- company. including nronane


of

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7


fight tournament held Sunday
afternoon at the Jefferson
County Club were as follows:
Mrs. Sarah Mitchell and For-
rest Brown had the low gross
score of 43; and Mrs. Ed Bai-
ley Jr. and Kenneth Cooksey
had the low net of 33.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
January 27, 1957
Frances Flewellen has been
named the Betty Crocker
Homemaker to Tomorrow in
Monticello.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
January 27, 1947
Francis M. Wells was cele-
brated chairman of the Jeffer-
son County Chapter of the
American Red Cross for the
coming year at a meeting held
Monday at the city hall.


CVS Pharmacy Move


(Continued From Page 2)
roadways.
In light of Sparkman's ad-
vice, the planners refrained
from requiring the installation
of the sidewalk.
The city's consultant engi-
neer also voiced some minor
concerns about the project,
mostly relating to the infra-
structure and the storm-water


retention facility. These con-
cerns the CVS hired engineers
addressed or promised to ad-
dress to the city engineer's sat-
isfaction.

The CVS site plan now goes
to the City Council for review
and approval, likely at the Feb.
6 meeting.


Mont-.36manetaou JewoNiapaw

Monticello News


)





"LUCKY" is a female, white with calico markings, and
all shots and is spayed. She is very playful and reaches
out through the bars of her cage for attention frotI
passersby. To adopt her or any other pet, call the She'l-
ter at 342-0244. (News Photo)




Impatient With Waf
Wnf ..1 -r. A \


We would need some Cindy
Sheehans and Senator Barbara
Boxers to use soldiers' coffins
as a political soapbox by con-
tinually reminding all the pub-
lic that young soldiers are
being killed fighting the Nazis
in a conflict that we should not
have started or be involved in
fighting.
There would be a cry to pull
all of our forces out of the
European Theater and use
them to fight only the Jap'anese
who, after all, are our actual
emenies.
We would expect polling
numbers regarding President
Roosevelt's handling of the
war to drop significantly fol-
lowing such setbacks as the
loss of Wake Island and the
Japanese capture of the Philip-
pines. Likewise, we would
surely see a significant lessen-
ing of American's support for
the war, (and the president), as
Americans read about our de-
feats and loss of lives in the
African campaign, fighting the
wrong war/people.
When word of the potential
disasters and casualties of a D-
Day invasion plan reached
Congress, we would expect to
see the Democrats and some
Republicans, (or the reverse
because Roosevelt was a
Democrat), publicly denounc-
ing such a bold plan in a war
we shouldn't be fighting in
Europe and one we are not
sure of winning. American
support for the war in Europe
would drop to an all time low
when the blood bath of Omaha
Beach was finally revealed.
Certainly after the carnage
of D-Day, there would be a
steady drum beat that Roose-
velt, together with Winston
Churchill, purposely lied to
everyone, or at least deceived
us, into starting a needless and
costly war with the Germans.
Once France and the Bene-
lux countries were liberated,
there would be a cry for the
French, Belgians' and Holland-
ers' to take over the bulk of the
fighting so that American sol-
diers could be redeployed to
fight our real enemy in the Pa-
cific Theater.
Finally, when the Nazis
launched the successful sur-
prise attack in the Battle of the
Bulge, pushing back the allies
and threatening the outcome of
the war, up would pop all the
"I told you so" group predict-
ing nothing but doom and
gloom.
But none of this took place.
Instead our great generation
was clear headed and never
wavered in realizing the abso-
lute necessity of being united
as a people behind our national
leadership in a time of war.
Fortunately, they also keenly
realized the threat posed by a
Nazi regime (controlled by a
dictatorial madman) and the
future consequences of simply
relying on "political


diplomacy" in dealing witl-the
likes of the Third Rich.
I am not saying that legiti-
mate national dissent in a free
democracy is wrortg. Quite to
the contrary, it is necessary for
reasonable people to voice
logical differences to maintain
checks and balances in a free
society. Contradictions
couched solely in selfish mo-
tives to gain a pure political
advantage, however, are not
only detrimental to the integ-
rity of a democracy, but sow
the seeds of disunity, apathy
and discontent that ultimately
have brought down history's
most powerful nations.
We indeed are not the next
great generation.

AMERICAN HEART
ASSOCIATION
MEMORIALS &TRIBUTES


S1800--AHA-USA1


ida, the Area Agency on Aging
for North Florida reports the
availability of the Emergency
Home Energy Assistance for
the Elderly Program (EHEAP)
funds for eligible households
in Jefferson and surrounding
counties.
To be eligible, an individual
who is at least 60 years of age,
must reside in the applicant's
household, a current utility bill
that indicates a past due pay-
ment or shows an immediate
disconnection date if payment


C .'---- 0 r r-"^
and electricity.
The household income must
be at or below 150 percent of
the Federal Poverty Income
Guidelines.
Elder residents who rely on
propane as their main source
of heat, who are at risk of run-
ning out during this:freeze
warning, may also be poten-
tially eligible.
Schedule an appointment at
the Senior Center to apply for
the Emergency Energy Assis-
tance.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC

MEETING

THE DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY ANNOUNCES
A WORKSHOP TO WHICH THE PUBLIC
IS INVITED

DATE: February 8, 2007
TIME: 6:00 P.M.
PLACE: 1490 W. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32344

SUBJECT: Howard Middle School Facilil Usage


The Rare Door

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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 31, 2007 L ife sty le


t Peecke ~Juuuuuuuuu~ s
Rea#eouw



' Sesd ad eowi &L Pw4ze edfte4 o dilEt= ?
lip


12 LAYER CHOCOLATE
CAKE

1 cup butter softened
2 cups sugar
6 large eggs
3 cups self rising flour
1 cup whole milk
1 tbs. vanilla extract
waxed paper

Frosting:
2 cups granulated sugar
6 tbs. cocoa, heaping
1 Ig. can evaporated milk
3/4 cup margarine, not butter.

Cut 12 round circles of
waed paper to fit an 8 inch
pan.
Grease cake pans and set
aside.
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Cream butter and sugar. Add
eggs one at a time, mixing well
after each addition.
Mix vanilla with milk and
add alternately with flour to
the sugar mixture.
Start with a small amount of
flour mixture and mix; add
some milk and mix.
Continue alternating and end
with flour. Line each cake pan
with one waxed paper circle,
and pour 2/3 cup cake batter
into pans and bake for six min-
utes.
Cool a few minutes and re-
move cakes from pans and
peel off'paper.
Use 3/4 cup for 9 inch pans,
one cup in 8 inch pans for 6 to
8 layers.
Frosting:
Place sugar and cocoa in a
medium saucepan, over me-
dium heat and whisk until well
blended, with no cocoa lumps.
Immediately add milk and
margarine, mixing with the
whisk.
Boil 3 to 5 minutes until de-
sired spreading consistency.
Frost layers while cake and ic-
ing are still warm.


For a milder chocolate
flavor, use 5 tbs. of cocoa.

Submitted by:
Margie Drew

CHICKEN POT PIE

1 lb. skinless, boneless chicken
breasts, halved and cubed
1 cup sliced carrots
1 cup frozen green peas
1/2 cup celery sliced
1/3 cup butter
1/3 cup chopped onion
1/3 cup all purpose flour
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. celery seed
1 3/4 chicken broth
2/3 cup milk
2 9 inch unbaked pie crusts

Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
Combine chicken, carrots,
peas, and celery in a
saucepan.
Add water to cover and boil
for 15 minutes. Remove from
heat, drain and set aside.
In saucepan, over medium
heat, cook onions in butter un-
til soft and translucent.
Stir in flour, salt, pepper,
and celery seed. Slowly stir in
chicken broth and milk. Sim-
mer over medium low heat un-
til thick.
Remove from heat and set
aside.
Place the chicken mixture in
pie crust. Pour hot liquid mix-
ture over.
Cover with top crust. Seal
edges and cut away excess
dough.
Make several small slits in
the top to allow steam to es-
cape. Bake in preheated oven
for 30-35 minutes, or until pas-
try is golden brown and filling
is bubbly.
Cool for 10 minutes before
serving.


Submitted by:
Shirley Washington


JIM BARD, aka the Noodle Cooker, prepares the pasta
for the recent Woman's Club Spaghetti Dinner. The la-
dies report that Bard was also helpful in lifting the
heavy pots. (News Photo)


Doers Group
TO Meet
February 8
The DOers Diabetes support
group will meet 12 p.m.,
Thursday, Feb. 8, at the
Health Department.
Residents are invited to
come out and play Food Pyra-
mid Bingo, a low-fat high-fun
nutrition game and win a
prize.
Participants will learn about
proper food serving sizes.
For further information con-
tact Bonnie G. Mathis at 342-
0170, ext. 1301.


Questions,
Anyone?
Get the answers you can
trust about government
programs, benefits, and
services from the Federal
Consumer Information
Center.
Just call toll-free:,
1-800-FED-INFWO
(That's 1-800-333-4636)
Mon-Fri 8am-8pm ET
Or visit
www.pueblo.gsa.gov/call
U.S. General Services Administration


ANABELLE BOWLING received a blue ribbon and trophy for her expertise in sewing
t.he receinant 4-.H Awards Banquet.


1st Baptist
Relay For Life
Fundraiser

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The First Baptist Church
Relay for Life team will hold
a Garage Sale and Cake Sale
8 a.m. 2 p.m. Saturday.
The fundraising event will
take place in the Fellowship
Hall at 325 West Washington
Street. 45
Contact Arlene Young at
342-1188 for information
about donation drop off and
volunteer scheduling.
Hot dogs, drinks, and other
food items will be available.
for sale.


UnitedStat
'IT dLVB


S.. I .. 1 It Happens In
Jefferson County, 1-800-USA-NAVY
Se E MYou'll Read It In The www.navyjobs.com
Relay For Life Event Monticelo News
Montice~o News


Recruits Survivors


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Relay for Life Survivor
Chair Persons Wanda and
Jim Becker, request cancer
survivors and caregivers to
register for the April Relay
for Life 18-Hour event, as
soon as possible.


Movie Matinee
Set Monday

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Monday Movie Matinee is_
scheduled for 1:30 p.m. Feb.
5, at the First United Method-
ist Church.

Dr. Doolittle III, is the se-
lected comedy that will be
shown.
This monthly event is
planned specifically for sen-
iors, and there is no charge.
Popcorn and soft drinks are
also served at no charge.


The Beckers are striving to
recruit the biggest turnout of
survivors to date.
Survivors will receive a T-
shirt to wear during the first
lap of the Relay for Life.
T-shirts will need to be or-
dered so registration is re-
quested by Feb. 13.
All survivors in the commu-
nity will be honored with a
complimentary dinner, pro-
vided by the Woman's Club,
at the Opera House on Tues-
day, April 10.
Guest Speaker will be Dr.
Paul Sawyer of the S.E.
Urological Institute in Talla-
hassee.
The Becker's may be con-
tacted at 342-1742 for a regis-
tration forms, or any Team
Captain may be contacted for
information about how to be a
part of this Survivor Celebra-
tion.





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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 31, 2007 PAGE 7


ATTENDING the Relay for Life Kickoff Dinner, recently, are Monty, Hilda and Curtis
Lee Morgan with the CarQuest Team. (News Photos)


TO SHOW their support for the event, JW and Shirley Cooksey attended the Relay for
Life Kickoff Dinner, at the Opera House.


-'---0 0-


F .


L'.
*i.


-A- --
MARY MADISON serves up spaghetti with homemade
Feed the Elderly Ministry.


sauce as a volunteer in the


'Feed Elderly' Needs

Supplies, Volunteers


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Feed the Elderly Outreach
Ministry (FTE,) a mission of
Greater Fellowship MB
Church, is in need of Jlun-
teers to deliver and prepare
the food.
Spokesperson Gloria Cox-
Jones reports that FTE is pro-
viding a service to the elderly
and disabled in the commu-
nity. She notes that funds are
low, and additional volunteers
are needed.
Having been in existence
for three years, FTE, pre-
peares a homemade meal each


National Wear Red Day Set Friday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Family and Consumer Sci-
ences Extension Agent, Heidi
Copeland-'- ,reminds area
women that Friday, February
2, is National Wear Red Day.
Wearing red is intended to
raise the awareness that heart
disease is the number one kil-


ELSIE TUDOR
Elsie Tucker Tudor, age 77,
died Saturday January 27,
2007, in Tallahassee, Florida.
Mrs. Tudor was born in
Augusta, Georgia and was of
Baptist faith.
A Service of Remembrance
will be held at 11:00 A.M. Sat-
urday, February 3, 2007 at
Beggs Funeral Home Monti-
cello Chapel, 485 E. Dogwood
Street, with no visitation. In
lieu of flowers please make
donations to the Shrines Hos-
pital for Children, Mahi Shrine
Center, 1480 NW North River
Dr., Miami, Florida 32125-
2602.
Elsie is survived by her hus-
band Pierce C. Tudor of Mon-
ticello, one son Charles H.
Beale III (Gale) of Evans, GA,
three step-sons Ronald R. Tu-
dor of Monticello, Gene Tudor
of Charlotte, N.C., and Donald
J. Tudor of Fort Lauderdale,
FL, two sisters, Betty Cox
(Mike) of Augusta, GA, and
Dorothy Quinn of Martinez,
GA, one sister-in-law Lois
Tucker of Martinez, GA, three
nephews Herbert Quinn and


ler of women, of special sig-
nificance because Jefferson
County is number one in
stroke and number three in
heart attack related deaths in
Florida's 67 counties.
One in three women dies of
heart disease. But heart dis-
ease can also lead to disability
and a significantly decreased
quality of life.


Joel Cox of Augusta, GA, C.
W. Tucker of Statesboro, GA,
three nieces Von Catchpole
and Diane Hart of Augusta,
GA, Vicky Fredricks of
Charleston, S.C., two grand-
daughters Michelle Brown
(Graig), Heather Parkerson
(Tommy), one grandson Chip
Beale (Beth), step grandchil-
dren Chris Brown, Sydney
Brown, Landen Beale, Brandi
Pulliam (Roff), Tom Lewis
(Rhonda), step great grandchil-
dren Hope Goode, Hudson
Pulliam, Tucker Pulliam,
Justyn and Parker Lewis.
She is preceded in death by
her mother and father Dorothy
and Joseph Tucker, one sister
Evelyn Eubanks and brother
Clarence Tucker.









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Many women don't knov,.
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Women don't take their risk
of heart disease seriously, or
personally, and often fail to
make the connection between
risk factors, such as high
blood pressure and high cho-
lesterol, and their own chance
of developing heart disease.
This campaign is especially
geared toward women, ages
40-60, the time when a
women's risk of heart disease


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Even those who have heart
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Women are urged to talk to
their doctors, find out their
risk factors and take action to
lower them.


God's Likeness...
Why not look like it?
Men aZ Ladies suits,
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Thursday.
Meals are prepared at the
Greater Fellowship dining
hall, and delivered or picked
up.
Meals consist of a salad,
vegetable, rice or mashed po-
tatoes, bread, and meat.
Items needed for the prepa-
ration of these meals include
meats, gallon sized canned
vegetables, fresh fruits and
vegetables, breads, three com-
partment carryout plates, and
the like.
Delivery volunteers and
food preparers are needed all
the time.
Supplies may be brought to


the church location at 690
Cypress Street on Thursdays
between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m.
Call 997-4375 for more in-
formation.
Donations may be made to
Feed the Elderly Outreach
Ministry, c/o Gloria Cox-
Jones, P.O. Box 864, Monti-
cello, FL. 32344 or call
997-4572.
Jennifer Allen may also be
contacted at 997-5980, or
Georgianna Williams at 997-
6311.

Saddle Raffle
Hereford brand by Tex-Tan
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$1,450.00 or
15" Tourquise Seat and Trim
roughout all leather, silver
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Raffle Tickets $5.00 at
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Don't be left out of the winners
circle. Buy yours today.
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WL'4J -'s Warehouse Sale

First Saturday of the Month
*Comforter Sets *Window Coverings
*Bedspreads *Pillows
Saturday, Feb. 3, 2007
Doors Open 8AM -12 Noon
707 Gil Harbin Industrial Blvd., Valdosta, GA
Call for Directions: 800-633-2215 |
-- ---------- --- ---E
First Baptist Church of Perry
Annual Women's Conference



i "Intentional Living"
Guest Speaker Diane Tuttle
of First Baptist Church, Woodstock, Ga.
S1 /J"," i ,, ra'duzi r CI.C'< !Ch nt.an I.ll. t'r,
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TWO MAGICAL WEEKENDS AT THE
ALACJA COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS IN GAINESVILLE,FL
Visit the Marketplace where artisans sell their wares.
Performances by Magicians, Musicians and Jesters.
Cheer Battling Knights, Birds of Prey,
and Human Chess Games.

January 27-28 & February 3-4
10 am 6 pm At $12 adults / $5 Ages 5-17
Friday, February 2
9 am 4 pm Al. Admission half price
Presented by the City of Gainesville Parks, Recreation & Cultural Affairs
www.gvlculturalaffairs.org 352-334-ARTS


7


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'I-UIUI


II OLV7















PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 31, 2007


Sports


Lady Warrior JVs

Beat Munroe 22-14


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy JV girls basketball team
downed R. F. Munroe, 22-14.
Chelsea Dobson led the
charge for the Lady warriors
with 13 points. She shot at 26
percent from the field drop-
ping in six of 23.
She also dropped in one free-
throw of five attempts, had 13
offensive and nine defensive
rebounds for a total of 22, one
foul, four block/steals, two
turnovers.
Michaela Roccanti, one as-
sist, two, block/steals, one


turnover.
Becky Turner, two points,
two offensive rebounds, two
fouls, three turnovers.
Jodie Bradford, one point
four offensive and three de-
fensive rebounds for a total of
seven, four fouls, five
block/steals, two turnovers.
Miranda Wider, one assist,
four defensive rebounds, two
fouls, three turnovers.
Dana Watt, two points, one
offensive, five defensive re-
bounds for a total of six, one
foul.
Angela McCune, two
points, one offensive rebound,
one turnover.


JCHS Ladies Drop 3;

Stand 1-11 On Season
38-23.
FRAN HUNT Coates led the score with 11
Staff Writer points, three rebounds, two
steals.
The Jefferson County High- Brooks, five points, four re-
School varsity girls basket- bounds, one assist, one steal;
ball team dropped its last Griffin, three points, seven re-
three games to stand 1-11 on bounds, two steals; Footman,
the season, two points, four rebounds,
The Lady Tigers were clob- two steals; and Hall, two
bered by North Florida Chris- points, four rebounds.
tian 68-21. In the third game, Jefferson
Keneshia Coates led the lost to Chiles, 50-41.
scored with eight points, six Griffin lead the Lady Tigers
rebounds. with 13 points and 22 re-
Donna Ransom, five points, bounds for a double-double,
six rebounds, four assists; one steal.
Shanice brooks, three points, Coates, nine points, five re-
two rebounds, two steals, one bounds, one steal; Footman,
assist. eight points, six rebounds,
Latoya Footman, two points, two steals; Ransom, seven
three rebounds, one steal; Jaz- points, nine rebounds, three
maun hall, two points; and steals, five assists; Hall, two
Chandra Tucker, one point, points, three rebounds; and
three rebounds, two steals. Brook, two points, three re-
Wakulla defeated the laidies, bounds.


Tigers Drop 2; Stand

2-14 On The Season


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Recreation Department
will take pre-registrations for
T-Ball, Coach Pitch, Little
League Baseball, and Girls


'''
f-;.
4
C~l
r; kn~


ROSHAWN PARKER prepares to kick the ball during an
after school game of flag football.
J)i


JENERICK NOEL prepares for a tackle during an after
school flag football game at the St. Phillip Boys and
Girls Club.


Youth Softball, throughout
February, with the deadline
to register 9-11 a.m.,
Saturday, March 3.
Registration fee is $30 for
T-Ball, Coach Pitch and girls
Youth Softball.
Registration fee for Little


League Baseball is $35.
Parents must present a copy
of the child's birth certificate
at the time of registration.

Registrations will not be
taken over the phone.
Director Kevin Aman


ACA Athletes Named Leaders


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Athletes from Aucilla
Christian Academy were
named to the list of Big bend
Leaders last week in basket-
ball.

In boys scoring, Stephen
Griffin stands at #12 with 196
points, an average of 10.9.


Griffin also stands at #4 in
rebounds with 161, an aver-
age of 8.9.
Griffin is in at #6 in assists
-with 53, an average of 2.9.
and Wade Scarberry stands at
#9 with 46, an average of 2.6.
Scarberry stands at #2 in
Steals with 66, an average of
3.7; Kyle Barnwell stands at
#6 with 54, an average of 3.0;
and Griffin stands at #8 with
50, an average of 2.8.


Griffin stands at number
two in blocks with 57, an av-
erage of 3.2.
In girls basketball, scoring,
Lindsey Day stands at #12

with 235, an average of 10.7.
In rebounds, Day stands at #6
with 196, an average of 8.9.
In steals, Lisa Bailey stands
at #6 with 68, an average of
3.1q; and Brittany Hobbs
stands at #8 with 63, an aver-
age of 2.9.


stressed that March 3 is the
absolute deadline for registra-
tion.
He added that anyone who
misses registration will be put
on a waiting list, with excep-
tions.
Players will be given the
choice of playing on the same
teams as last year, if they are
returning to the same league,
or they will be placed in a
draw.
The one exception is that all
girls youth softball players
will be placed in a draw.
T-Ball is for children ages
6-7; .Coach Pitch, ages 8-9;
Little League Baseball, ages
10-12; and Girls Youth soft-
ball ages 10-13.
Players must reach the age
required in their specific
league by April 30, 2007.
For further information, con-
tact Aman at 342-0240.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County High Ti-
gers dropped their last two
games, to stand 2-14 on the
season.
The boys lost to Chiles, 82-
40.
Leading the score for Jeffer-
son was Tim Crumitie with
19 points; Jon Dady, three
points, one rebound, three as-
sists, two steals; and Anthony
Johnson, two points, three re-
bounds, three assists.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Mac Finlayson has been
coaching the 12 and under
YMCA boys basketball
league local players, who play
in Thomasville twice per
week.
Monticello Magic is one of
five teams in the league, and
local players include: Austin
Bentley, Justin Brown, An-
thony De La Torre, Jay Fin-
layson, Lenorris Footman,
Zak Steele and Jicarre Wat-
kins.
The boys began playing in
early January and will play
through mid February.
A Playoff Tournament will
determine the seeding of the
teams.
Each team must play the
other four teams twice during
the tournament.
During the recent Free-
throw Tournament, which is
similar to the Knights of Co-
lumbus Free-throw Champi-
onship, Jay Finlayson, who is
11, shot from the 12 foot line,


Lucius wade, ten points,
three assists, two steals; Har-
old Ingram, two points, one
block; and Jordan Blair, two
points.
The Tigers were downed by
Maclay, 50-38.
Leading the score was Cru-
mitie with 15 points, two re-
bounds, two assists.
Dady, eight points, two re-
bounds, three assists, three
steals; Johnson, five points,
six rebounds, two assists, one
steal; Wade, eight points, one
assist, two steals; and An-
thony McDaniel, two points.


dropping in 15 of 15 to win in
his division.
Steele, who is 12, shot from
the 215 yard line and hit nine
of 15 to win in his division..
Finlayson said the boys will
play in Regional Finals in
Valdosta in February, and
possibly on to the State
Finals.
The Monticello Magic aver-
age two practice sessions per
week.


* Got A Cute Photo?

Send It To Us And
We'll Share It With
Our Readers!

Kids Dogs *
Strange stuff, etc.

Monticello News
P.O. Box 430
Monticello, FL
32345
"YOU Can't Be Without It"


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Warriors Fall To Bell

77-30 In Recent Play


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy varsity boys basketball
team lost to Bell, 77-39 last
week.
"We had a good first half,
with the score about 30-40,
but we caved in after a while
and Bell blew us away in the
third," said Coach Dan Nenn-
stiel.
Wade Scarberry led the
Warriors with 15 points, one


assist, four rebounds.
Stephen Griffin, eight
points, including a nice dunk
basket at the end of the game,
six assists, four rebounds, one
steal, two blocks.
Reggie Walker, six points,
nine rebounds, two steals, one
block.
Kyle Barnwell, four points,
two assists, five rebounds,
two steals.
Prateen Patel, two points,
four rebounds, one steal; and
Michael Kinsey, four points,
three rebounds, four steals.


YOUTHS turn out in large numbers for soccer at the Recreation Park on Saturday
mornings. (News Photo)



Step Up Florida Events


Begin 8 A.M. Tom orrow


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Step Up Florida activities
begin at 8 a.m Thursday. with
a walk around Monticello, by
an advanced walking group
which will assemble in front
of the Coffee Break on North
Jefferson Street.
For further details contact
Gretchen Avera at 97-5007.
A table tennis demonstration
with the FSU table tennis
team and presentation by
Mark Fenton, former member
of the US national race walk-
ing team, at the JES media
center, at 10 a.m.at the Jeffer-
son Elementary School Media
Center.
The Kickoff Event begins
at noon, at the Recreation
Park. On the agenda is the


ribbon cutting for the nIew
walking path; a presentation
by Fenton.and walking and
biking around the new bJke
path by all who attend along
with students from JES.
Simply Fit is offering a free
tour and body analysis to the
women of the community, 1-3
p.m. For further information
contact Karen at 997-7339.
At 4 p.m., there will be a
warm-up and stretch at the
Boys and Girls Club with Ja-,
mie Rogers.
Club members will then
walk the Step Up Florida ban-
ner to the Courthouse Circle.
At 4:30 p.m., there will be a
physical activity showcase at
the Courthouse Circle to dem-
onstrate the opportunities cur-
rently available in the county.
These include: Connection,
the Boys and Girls Club
dance team, led by Tiffany
Ransom. For details contact
U


the Teen Center at.997-5262.
Also slated is Tai Chi with
Sean Dennison, executive di-
rector of the Taoist Tai Chi
Society of USA, for informa-
tion call 224-5438.
Ballroom dancing will be
led by Maurice Smith, For
further information contact
the Health department at 342-
0170. ex. 222.
Jamie Rogers will conduct a
warm-up and stretch at the
Courthouse Circle at 5:15
p.m.
And at 5:30 p.m., will begin
community walk around
Monticello.
Black History Month events
will kick off at the Opera
House with a health fair and
will include a physical activ-
ity period with Tequila Hagan
and Dr. Flossie Byrd, speak-
ing on "Honoring the Past and
Building Strength For the Fu-
ture."


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Youth Soccer program
drew its consistently high
turnout of some 100 youths,
Saturday.
"The weather was perfect
for soccer," Coach Phil
Barker remarked.
"We had all of our volunteers
there working with the
youth," he said.
Commenting about the ac-
tivities of the day, Barker
said: "We had some warm-up
drills for the kids, including
dribbling, heading, passing,
and trapping, and during play
I could see a lot of the kids
using those techniques during


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School varsity boys basket-
ball team now. stand 2-16 on
the season after dropping the
past two games.
The Tigers were downed by
Taylor County, 66-49.
Leading the score was Tim
Crumitie with 16 points; La-
Marcus Bennett, 1 points, six
assists; Jon Dady, three
points, three rebounds, three
assists, three steals; Anthony

.-


match play.
"It was really good to see.
the youth put into practice
what they learning at our mini
clinics."
Working with Volunteer
Dan Nennstiel, with fourth
through eighth grade teams,
Barker said: "The kids were
doing great in the goal keep-
ers box. We had one little girl
playing goalie, and a ball was
kicked at the goal and she
kept it from scoring. I thought
for sure it would knock her.
down, but she stopped it."
Soccer action continues Sat-
urday with teams one and
two, 9 a.m., teams three and
four, 10 a.m., teams five and
six, 11 a.m., and teams seven
and eight at noon.


Johnson, three points, three
rebounds, one steal; Lucius
wade, seven points; Harold
Ingram, three points, four re-
bounds; and Jordan Blair,
four points.
SMadison County beat the
Tigers 48-33.
Crumitie, 16 points, two re-
bounds; Bennett, nine points,
five assists, three steals;
Dady, three points, three re-
bounds, two assists; Johnson,
one point, six rebounds, one
steal; and Wade, six points,
one steal.


,JANUARY 31, 2007 PAGE 9


Got A Cute

Photo?



Send It To Us

And We'll

Share It With

Our Readers!



Kids Dogs

Strange

stuff, etc.



Monticello

News
P.O. Box 430
Monticello,
FL 32345




"You Can't

Be Without

It"


OUR LIFELINE

IS TOLL-FREE

Grab the line and
let us help you.

THE VOICE OF HOPE
1-800-572-1717
upmsayn


Car Care Experts


No6Calories.

No Fat.

No Cholesterol.



...NO KIDDING. Our free Consumer
Information Catalog serves up over 200
free and low-cost government booklets
you can really sink your teeth into. Perk
up your appetite with subjects like saving
money, buying a house, educating your
children, getting federal benefits, eating
right, staying healthy, and many more.

So come 'n get it! Whatever your taste,
you can feast on the free Catalog. It's filled
with plenty of satisfying booklets. Just call
toll-free 1-888-8 PUEBLO.

Or get a bite on the Consumer Information
Center website: www.pueblo.gsa.gov

A public service of this publication and the
Consumer Information Center of the U.S. General Services Administration


Sorensen Tire Center, Inc

From Wheel Barrow to 18-Wheeler
We've got your tires!




O/foS *vcTrk


1300 North Jefferson St., Monticello
(850) 997-4689



Jake's Brakes & Alignment
OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE
JAKE McGRATH
OWNER-OPERATOR
Akebono Original Equipment
Ceramic Brake Pads


222-2330
MV01366
Ask Someone Who's Stopped There
234 E. PERSHING
MON FRI 7:30 A.M. to 5:30


0 MXXON
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r JAWS BRAKES
' 1 .


McCall's Automotive
2007 S. Monroe St.
Tallahassee
850-942-1043

Mike Decker, Owner
Vince Gerheim, Shop Manager
Brakes and Engine Work, C V Axles

10% Discount for State Workers
and Military





AUTOMGV E SERVICES
DIAGNOS7TCS. REPAIRS



Domestic & Imports
1510 N. Jefferson St. Monticello
SPECIAL $10.00 OFF
Transmission Power Flush
Cooling System Power Flush
Power Steering Flush
*Fuel Injection Service
Expires Feb. 28, 2007


Youth Soccer At Park

Draws Good Turnout


JCHS Loses To Taylor,

Madison Counties


DIVf IN!


LET THE JOURNEY BEGIN


1-800-USA-NAVY
www. navyjobs.com


SDive into MDA, and learn more
about summer kids' camps, family
support groups, and life-saving research.
SMuscular Dystrophy Association
I 1-800-572-1717 www.mdausa.org
a.


--










PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 31, 2007



County 4-H Activities


ii' "1)


. '


A


7-L


;




:. .. : ., "


^COMPETING in the 4-H County Events Team Health category are Cydney Hastings
-and Tyshonda Jordan.


i.- '


DEMONSTRATING Food Preparation at the County Events are Tierra
Chevarra Ulee.
'k.P. "EM. 1 0 M.:


Thompson and


. i-.' .


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Nq.


.IN THE GENERAL Category of the County Events are Stephanie and Alyssa Stephens.



a i iM
= I .e 4ailB s~aw, u Fun C SI 1

Im-%X AW&

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lu~~i- *jr~ i


ARSENIO BRIGHT demonstrates Food Preparation.


t .
-.: ", .


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;;
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4~;. I:


STEPHANIE STEPHENS sings and plays the keyboard at the 4-H Share the Fun Event.


^1



.^
" "

; i .-'. .
i .4
I,

,. .


4-H COUNTY COUNCIL visits nursing homes and entertains residents. From left,
:Shanka Farmer, Shayne Broxsie, Jazmaun Hall, Shauntavia Clinton, and Lashonda
Miller.


-ONE.




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4-H STATE CONGRESS attendees include: L-R: Jazmaun Hall, Michelle Ward, Alana -- .. r'' -* -
Chambers, Shayne Broxsie, Carmen Skipworth, Angela Scurry, Tierra Thompson,
Chevarra Ulee, Shanka Farmer, Arsenio Bright, Alex Farmer. ALEX FARMER was recognized at the 4-H State Congress for community service.


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--

b I ... .j.




MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 31, 2007 PAGE 11


CA


997


-3568


For Classified Ads
That Work!


1I


For
Fast Results!


0


cel


ws


'You Can't B9 Without It'


Proud Of Jefferson County


O


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0


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~~ng








NTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 31, 2007


No
Calories.

No Eat.

No
Cholesterol.

...NO KIDDING. Our free
Consumer Information
Catalog serves up over
200 free and low-cost
government booklets you
can really sink your teeth
into. Perk up your appetite
with subjects like saving
money, buying a house,
educating your children,
getting federal benefits,
eating right, staying
healthy, and many more.

So come 'n get it! What-
'ever your taste, you can
feast on the free Catalog.
It's filled with plenty of
satisfying booklets.
Just call toll-free
1-888-8 PUEBLO.


Or get a bite on the
Consumer Information
Center website:
www.pueblo.gsa.gov


,II


What's New


With Jim!
At Roy Campbell Chevrolet

2003 Chevy Monte Carlo
V-6, Auto, AC, PR Windows, PR Door Locks,
Tilt, Cruise, AM/FM CD, Local Trade In


STK# 10847A


S APALACHEE
CENTER
Recovery Specialist I (#TBA)
A bachelor's degree from an accredited university or college with a major in counseling, social work, psychology, criminal
justice, nursing, rehabilitation, special education, health education, or a related human services field (a related human serves
field is one in which major course work includes the study of human behavior and development) and have a minimum of one
year of full-time or equivalent experience working with adults experiencing serious mental illness or a bachelor's degree
from an accredited university or college and three years full-time or equivalent experience working with adults experiencing
serious mental illness.

Recovery Specialist II (#TBA)
A Masters degree from an accredited university or college with a major in counseling, social work, psychology, criminal
justice, nursing, rehabilitation, special education, health education, or a related human services field; or other Master's de-
gree from an accredited university or college with two year full-time or equivalent experience working with adults experienc-
ing serious mental illness. Prior work experience with adults with psychiatric disabilities required. Assertive community
treatment experience working in off-site community settings consistent with the PACT model of service delivery preferred.
Experience working in a Recovery model with customers preferred. Professional experience working with persons with se-
vere and persistent mental'illness (SPMI) preferred. Must possess a valid driver's license.

Recovery Team Leader (#TBA)
Masters degree from an accredited university or college with a major in the filed of counseling, social work, psychology,
nursing, rehabilitation, special education, health education, or a related human services field with three (3) years of full time
or equivalent related professional experience one of which was in a supervisory/administrative capacity; or a Bachelor's de-
gree from an accredited university or college with major in the field of counseling, social work, psychology, nursing, reha-
bilitation, special education, health education, or a related human services field and five (5) years of full time or equivalent
related professional experience, one of which was in a supervisor/administrative capacity. Must possess current, valid
driver's license.

For more information and a complete listing of available positions:
www.apalacheecenter.org
Human Resources
2634-J Capital Circle NE
Tallahassee, FL 32308
Pre-Hire Drug Screen & FDLE background check
An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer
Drug-Free Workplace


-I -t

W$232.60 or*- .990

60 Moth


U Downl PI vou d I i mi T e and T ill
I lust Do tr" I 206 Moultrie Road
229-226-3901 Thomasville, GA
Wit' (just past 19 on Hwy 319N)


In Case Of Emergency Dial 911


I -


SBusiness




Directory


CALL TO ADVERTISE \
YOUR BUSINESS

997-35681


of Madison, Inc.
Certified Electrical Contractor
We have a Bucket Truck available to set poles and
other applications




850-509-7914 *.850-933-8167


Herndon Trucking
Truck Rental Custom Hauling
Sand Gravel Refuse
.Backhoe Service
Light Clearing & Diiveways
Office (850) 948-4019
RAYMOND HERNDON Mobile (850) 570-0458


Kessler
Construction LLC
Repair; Remodeling & New Construction
Licensed and Insured
sti tes Mark Kessler
S Phone: 850-997-4540
CRC1329001


U


Licensed & Insured EC-13001894


Comfort Specialist
S TRAN


Commercial &
Residential Service
Sales
Installation


rIM HUNT

FIRST IN SERVICE
FREE ESTIMATES
TIM. HUNT State License # CACO 52439
Phone: 850-877-4136 2840-B Industrial Plaza
Fax: 850-656-1275 Tallahassee, Florida 32301
Mobile: 850-251-4308 E-mail, thunl@cenlralh alingconsullanls.com


Castaneda

Masonary, LLC
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL
(850) 508-6396
Lic. & Ins.
Brick & Block


FLINT RIVER
TIMBER COMPANY
BUYERS OF PINE AND
HARDWOOD TIMBER
SPECIALIZING IN PINE
PULPWOOD THINNING


4L


John T. Sanders
(850)643-7575


Dav
(229


e Dumas
)224-4331


CHERRY ST.
CONSIGNMENT SHOP
DESIGNER CLOTHES, SHOES,
BOOTS,HUNTING APPAREL,
CHILDREN'S CLOTHES,
JEANS 50% OFF
322-6854
200 CHERRY ST. MONTICELLO,
NEXT TO DRY CLEANERS


ViAav Croet c "l"
Melanie Mays
Private lessons, lessons from beginning to advanced in
crochet and knitting board. Call for class times. Crochet
club forming, call for information.


850-997-6026 home office


850-321-0036 cell


www.oldfashionedknittingboard.com
www.divacrochet.com
Certified crochet teacher, F.I.T. in New York


Bell Mobile Home
Transport & Setup
Relevel ~ Tie-downs Permits
Call For FREE Estimates
Kevin Bell 850-948-3372
WE INSTALL METAL ROOFS


1 1 0 II


'"~, A nchor

'Trust
TProperties
220 Tenth St. S Steinhatchee, FJ 32359
352-498-777.,-" cTofCfree 877-498-7770
Pam Wessels ;Mark Rebin Larry Nichols
Realtor/Broker Realtor Associate Realtor Associate


Northside Mower and
Small Engine Repair
For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub
Cadet, Snapper, Murray & More,
Warranty, Repairs for all makes & models.
Pickup & Delivery Service Available
562-2962


Register's

Mini- Storage
315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile Off US 19 South

997-2535


S Sister Fay GULF COAST M & M Transmission
Palm Reader & Advisor PROFESSIONAL ROOFING METAL 1IDo Foreign & Domestic
Are you Unhappy? Worried? Sad? Roof'Inspections, new roofs, ROOFING All T r e
Have you been Disappointed? re-roofs, & repair specialist. All Types Front Wheel Rear Wheel
Give me a call and let me help you. CCC#1325926 1" Of Metal Full Drive Train
Serving Leon County for 50 years Folsom Constructing, .LLC.850- 566-6504 Ful lin of Roofing Differential
We Do Parties! Tarot Cards*Palm Readings*Astrology accessories in stock 178 NE Duval Ave.
Callinfor2freequesoessoriinstok Madison, FL32340
Call In for 2 free questions S S pia FshingsY Mde.All Type Warraned.Meal Aailable Madison, FL 32340
Licensed by County & City Cu to your desired lengths everyy Service Available 850-973-45
Mon.-Fri l0am-Spqi, Sun 1-5pm, 1729 Mahan Drive 0-73-
(850)878-9327 Call Toll-Free 888-393-0335 352-498-0778 Horseshoe Beach, FL

BURNETTE PLUMBING & G LOEAF ERTH ORKi
North Florida Cabinets Appliance Repairs: B WELL SERVICEPM G&
oreLLC W ashers, Dryers, Stoves, Family Owned Since 1902 864 NW US 221
Kitchen Cabinets, Counter Tops, W washers, Dryers, Stoves, Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled Fixtures- Greenville, Fl. 32331
Kitceand Vanities. Refrigerators. Faucets Pumps Replaced Sewer & Water Pond Land Clearing* Demoli-
Connections Tanks Replaced Water heater Phone: 850-948-7891 HRoad Work*Site Prep
Built to last, quality guaranteed. Owned & Operated by Andy Rudd Repairs- All Repairs Cell: 850-973-7135 Free Estimates and Consultation
648 _Fax: 850-948-2482
80Licensed/Insured 997-5648 E-mail: Joe Reams, Jr.
850-264-3391 Leave Message ,Crtote:o I" s e joeballreams@msn.com Owner
is oil


i


I


-- -


T.- -1 Till,


I









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.. JANUARY 31, 2007 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED

Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$9.00
Each Additional Line....$1.25
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGAL
NOTICE The Jefferson County
Board of County Commissioners
ivill hold Regular Session on
Thursday, February 1, 2007 at 9
A.M. at the Jefferson County Public
Library. J.N. Tuten, Jr. Chairman
1/31/07,c

HELP WANTED
Cox Auto Trader is currently
seeking drivers to deliver bur
magazines in the Tallahassee
'FL, Madison, FL and
surrounding areas. Computer
knowledge helpful, requires
reliable vehicle, good driving
record, valid drivers license &
insurance. One day a week -
Thursdays. Pick up magazines
in Madison. Call 386-590-1255
;1/24,26,31,2/2,7,9,14,16,21,23,28
3/2,c
iAVON! Start the year with a
iew career, earn 50%, only $10
to start! 570-1499
R/D
1/31,2/2,7,9,14,16,21,23,28,pd
Driver needed 850-528-5218
'1/31,2/2,7,9,c

SERVICES
We are a church that values
tradition, but we are not
fundamentalists. Christ
Episcopal Church, three blocks
N of the courthouse. Sunday

HELP WANTED

S Martha's Bouncing
Babies

is looking for
Experienced Day
Care Workers Call

850-997-5730


MONTICELLO


NEWS




Covering

The Growth

Of The

Community!


SERVICES
services at 8:30 and 11:00 AM.
997-4116.
1/17,c
Housekeeping- Call Savanah at
294-5634.
R/D 1/24,26,31,2/2,pd
If you have a child attending
FSU/FAMU high schools, and
carpooling is not working, for
an affordable fee, you have an
option. Call Freeman Davis
510-5162, 421-8060.
R/D 1/17,19,24,26,31,2/2,pd
Notary Public Documents/
Marriage Performed will
Travel. Call Joan 948-2788
R/D1/10,12,17,19,24,26,31,2/2,
Child Care Services- infant to 3
years old. Reasonably low
prices. In my home. 997-5498
11/1,TFN,c

Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
new menopausal products.
Jackson's Drug Store.
5/12 tfn, c
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd, 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
TFN

FOUND
Keys on green key ring found
Sunday 11/26/06 on Lake Road
near Tecumseh Rd. Call Debbie
at 997-3568
11/29,12/1,6,tfn,nc

LOST
Female Black English Cocker
Spaniel. Last seen on Old Lloyd Rd
near 1-10 & Old Field Plantation;
Please call 997-3511 or 210-7562
REWARD
1/31,2/2,pd

GARAGE SALE
Sat. & Sun. Feb. 3 & 4-9:00 AM
- Until,Royal Mini Storage S.
Hwy. 19 Antiques, GOOD
USED FURNITURE, MANY
SMALL HOUSEHOLD ITEMS.
DEALERS WELCOME.
1/31,2/2,PD
GRAND YARD SALE, 12 Oak
B&B on Boston Hwy. many
vendors Feb. 3rd & 4th from
8:00- until
R/D 1/26,31,2/2,pd


'95 Mustang must sell quick
$2,000. 509-0946
1/31,2/2,pd


Lake Park of Madison

is currently taking applications for RNs, LPNs,
CNAs, Activities Director and
Maintenance Personnel.
Please call or apply in person at

259 SW Captain Brown Road, Madison, Florida

850-973-8277


Big Bend Hospice, the leader in compassionate care
to individuals with life-limiting illnesses, has the
following position available on our care team


RN Case Manager
Full-time RN Case Manager for Jefferson County.
Current Florida license as RN required. Plus 2 -3 years
med-surgery experience preferred.

Great benefit package!
Interested candidates can apply in person
1723 Mahan Center Blvd.
Tallahassee, Florida
or by faxing a resume to (850) 575-6814
or

Apply on-line!
at
www.bigbendhospice.org


wB Bend
Hospice
yourahomnol hlp,,w,,k Sic aI9S


EOE/DFWP/ADA
Smoke Free Workplace


AUTOMOTIVE
RV 26' sleeps 6, $5,500 asking.
997-0901 evenings 251-1641 cell.
1/31,tfn,nc
1996 Ford F-350 Diesel
Crewcab. No calls after 9:00 pm
please 251-2237.
1/10,TFN,nc
1989 International Dump
Truck. 18CY. Tandem Axles.
$18,000. 251-2437, 997-0901.
R/D 12/6,tfn,nc
1996 Ford Ranger XLT
Supercab 2wd 4.0 V6 127K AC
AT Toolbox Needs some minor
work, but driveable now. $3,000
251-0763 8am 8pm
9/27,TFN,nc

FOR SALE
Sheds- custom built storage
sheds. See display on Hwy 221
North Greenville. Call Bob
242-9342
R/D1/10,12,17,19,24,26,31,2/2,7,
9,14,16,21,23,28,3/2,7,9,14,16,
Black/Bay TB Gelding Great
on Trails, Foxhunting. $2200.00
OBO Paint Gelding Overo
w/Blue Eyes. Barrels/Trails
$3500.00 OBO 997-5770 Riding
Lessons.
R/D 1/24,26,31,2/2,pd
Futon light oak color-
w/pullout- Blue cover. 997-3917
$50.00 Excellent condition.
!/31,2/2,pd
For sale 1 male, and 1 female
Donkey about 2 'V yrs old. Call
after 6:00. 997-4930.
1/31,pd
Sofa 7'6", Love Seat 5'6" both
recliners. Good condition.
$600.00 for both 850-997-8727
1/31,2/2,pd


FOR SALE
* 2 Craftmatic single beds,
$1500.00 Firm. Washer -
heavy duty, 2 yrs old, $150.
997-1638 call 9am 8pm or
leave msg.
1/31,2/2,pd
Queen pillow-Top Mattress set.
Brand new in plastic with
warranty. $150. 850-222-9879
12/6,TFN,c
SOLID WOOD Cherry sleigh
bed BRAND NEW in box,
$275. (850) 545-7112
12/6,TFN,c
SOFA & LOVESEAT. Brand
NEW LEATHER, still wrapped,
lifetime warranty, sacrifice
$795. (delivery available). (850)
425-8374
12/6,TFN,c
NEW QUEEN POSTER
bedroom set bed, dresser,
mirror, chest, 2 night stands.
$4000 value, must sell $1500.
850-545-7112.
12/6,tfn,c
DINING ROOM Beauti \y
cherry table, 2 arm & 4 side
chairs, lighted china cabi t.
Brand new in boxes, can deli vr.
Must move, $799. 850-545-'1 I\.
12/6,tfn,c
FOR RENT
Spacious 2/1 and 1/1 apts, also
office space, near Monticello
center. Section 8, OK. Call
850-491-8447
1/24,tfn,c
Mobile home- 2 BR near 1-10
$475. mth Modular- 3 BR near
JCKC $675. mth 421-3911
R/D 1/12,17,19,247,26,31,pd
House 4-BR 2-Bth 997-3967,
544-6688.
1/31,pd


Prestige Home Center 850-576-5458
Division of Nobility Homes, Inc.
2521 W. Tennessee St. Tallahassee Florida 32304









STractors: 7410 John Deere, 2750 John Deere, 1010
John Deere, 1100 Massey Fergas'on, 255 Massey
Fergason, 886 International, 350 International, 600
Ford, 5000 Ford, 2000 Ford, 1210 David Brown, 990
David Brown
SBulldozers & Forklifts: Case Forklift, King Forklift,
Hyster Forklift, D-8 Cat
S Trucks: 4 BWEC Ford 4x4('01-'03), 1994 Ford Ranger,
1987 Ford Ranger, 1994 ford F150, 1991 Ford F150,
1989 Ford F150, 1979 2 Ton Ford, 1969 2 Ton Chevy
EEquipment: 4 Bottom Switch Plow, 3 Point Hitch Rake,
maschio Tiller, Box Blade, 3 Point Hitch Blade 6ft, 3
PoirI Hiti Hole Punch, .lohn Deere Mower 14ft

And Much,
Much, More!!!!
some items may be
added or deleted


Terms: Cash, Cashier's Check, good company or Personal Check with Current Bank Letter of Credit
Guaranteeing Payment Day of Sale.10% Buyers Premium on all purchases. Appropriate sales tax will be
charged. Buyers Note:.All items sold in as is condillon, Directions: From Madison, Fl. travel North on
Hwy 53 to sale site. Inspection: Friday, Feb. 9th from 2-5 pm & sale day from 8:30 until sale time


For More Information or Free Color Brochure
1,800-448-2074 or (229) 263-9202
e-mail: info@burtonreallyandauctlon.com
---'J. on line brochure: www.burtonreallyandauclion.com ( i.uL
Stephen F. Burton ,
REALTYANO AUCTION, NC. Lic RE Broker/Auctioneer utl "
-.-GA 1548 AB 587 AU649 AL #1337 SC3580R


For Sale by First United Methodist Church 2400 sq.
ft. home at 895 West Washington Street. This former
Methodist Parsonage with split floor plan has 4 bed-
rooms and 3 1/2 baths, refinished hardwood floors.
New tile floors in kitchen, laundry and baths, carpet
in the family room and master bedroom. Bathrooms
newly renovated. Wood stove insert in fireplace.
Large lot landscaped with magnolias, camellias, crepe
myrtles and azaleas. Large deck and screened porch.
$259,500. For more information
call 997-5545


i Housing Vouchers

*m,1 We accept all vouchers
S2/2 $615 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 $50 dep. i

, Pool & Youth Activities ;

= 575-6571
,, mmm m m m m mmlU m m


(850) 997-4340


1v.
6, VI


Property Management Services!!!
Great Rentals
2/1 1/2 bath mobile home east of
town on 5 acres $650/month
2 bedroom cabin in the woods $750 mo


Wooded Tract 2.09 hillside acres east of town
on graded County Road $30,400

Just Listed!! 3 bedroom 2 bath delightful log
cabin with front and back screened porches,
board fence pasture, double carport and out
building on 4.07 acres $385,000

Lloyd Acres on a wooded hillside a 3 bedroom 2
bath modular home with oak floors, fireplace and
lots of very nice extras including shop for $87,500

Historic Budd House built ca 1882 by commu-
nity leader of the day for his family. Lovely wood
work, high ceilings, spacious rooms, grand fire-
places, marvelous porches, currently 4 bedrooms
and 2 baths $355,000

Waterfront Home!! Like New, roomy,'3 bedroom
2 bath home with big carport, nice-shed with 5
acres on very nice lake near 1-10 and US 19
$385,000 See it at www.TimPeary.com


Amazinq Buy!!! Mixed Use Property 12 plus
partially cleared acres on US 19 south land use
designation permits 4 houses per acre near Den-
nis' Trading post only $36,500 peracre

New Listing 13.29 acres some wooded some
open $5,000 per acre

Terrific Location 3 bedroom 2 bath doublewide
with fireplace, big porch, garage, shed, above
ground pool, with big trees, fence paddocks, on
county maintained paved Cherry Tree Lane now
$127,500

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly wooded
acres Only $36,500

Pasture and Pecans 5-10 lovely acres on paved
road $15,500 per acre Very nice property, good
deed restrictions

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Country Livinq at it's Best! REbUCED Com-
fortable 4 bedroom 3 bath home on five fenced
acres with guest cottage w/bath, 2 car garage, big
shop, pasture 100 pecan trees and a nice pool
Only $365,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South near
Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Wooded Acreaqe 5.35 acres on private road
off Paul Thompson Road $128,500

Waukeenah Highway 27.99 acres good home
site fenced pasture $545,000

Aucilla Shores 5 level wooded acres
$75,000

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath
doublewide
S with nice deck, fenced yard on 1 acre
$73,500


Help! Serious Buyers Looking for::


- Small Farm 125-350 acres for grand kids
-20-130 acres investment for 2 brothers


Realtor Tim Peary

850-997-4340
See all our listings at
www.TimPeary.com

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


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~~~~~~I ~ ~ -C ~ t ~ ~ 1 1 ~ ~ ~ ~ -- ----r


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PAGE 14. MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 31, 2007
Al m.-~
.' ~LAlga-i


Person Elemientary School, was
recognized as District Em-
ployee of the Year, Friday.


and a plaque of appreciation.
Barker remarked that Knight


Friends Of Library

Seeking Members


HMS STUDENTS Lawrence Thomas, Lazadria Edwards, Ja'cari Johnson, Kelvi
listen to an explanation in Instructor Wilfong's Geography Class.


"a


JCHS Geometry Instructor Chris Weider explains a concept to
(News Photos)


Shriners Urge Citizens To


Keep Children From Burns


Shriners, which operates 22
hospitals for children, encour-
age citizens to take necessary
precautions against bums re-
lated to hot objects and hot
foods, and stress the impor-
tance of bur awareness.
This year children are en-
couraged to stay away from
hot objects and hot foods.,
which can cause bums which
are preventable.
The electric iron and the
curling iron are two common
hot objects contacted by
young children.
Other hot objects that can
cause bum injuries include
ranges, ovens and micro-
waves.
Shriners Hospitals offers the
following tips to keep chil-
dren safe from bums on hot
objects and hot foods:


*Do not allow children near
stoves, hot oven doors, hot
barbecue grills, heaters or
other hot appliances, such as
curling irons and electric
irons.
*When cooking, use the
back burners and turn handles
inwards.
*Never place space heaters
on top of cabinets, tables, fur-
niture or the like. Never use
heaters to dry clothing or
shoes.
*Create a "no-zone" or
"safe-zone" around the stove


in Mutch


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Friends of the Jefferson
-- a County Public Library Sys-
tem continues to seek new
members.
Those who like books
and/or patronize the library
more than once a year; those
who think the people of the
county should have access to
the best and most current in-
formation resources and read-
ing material are the kind of
members sought by, the
Friends of the Library..
Friends support the Library.
Program; they provide pro-
S gramming of interest to the


Library community; partici-
pate in local programming
such as inviting authors, sup-
porting local history projects
and exhibits; and providing
feedback to improving serv-
ices.
The membership year runs
from January through Decem-
ber.
Individual membership is
$10, a family membership is
$15, sponsorship is $25, pa-
tron and business membership
is $50, and patriot member-
ship is $100.
For more information on
playing an active role in the
Friends, call the Library at
342-0205.


Rotary To Sponsor

B Dad/Daughter Dance


and oven for the children,
about a five foot perimeter,
and keep children outside of
this zone.
*When barbecuing keep an
eye out for children who want
to pull themselves up for a
better view of the grill, as it
can topple over on the child.
*Use grill lighter fluid spar-
ingly.
Unplug or turn off electric
or hot items after use.
Keep hot food and bever-
ages away from children.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Area Rotarians will sponsor
a "Daddy Daughter Valen-
tine's Dance" 7 p.m. 9 p.m.
Sat. Feb. 3 at the National
Guard Armory 1225 Easter-
wood Drive, Tallahassee.
The cost is $25 per couple,
and $10 for additional daugh-
ter ticket.
Fathers, uncles, and grand-
fathers will escort favorite
daughters, nieces, grand-
daughters to the second an-
nual Valentine's Ball.
Join for a fun-filled multi-
generational daddy daughter
dance dedicated to a, night of
nurturing that bond no matter
the age.
Bring your special girls for
a wonderful evening includ-
ing a dance exhibition by pro-
fessional ballroom dancers,
group dance instructions, and
sweet treats in a prom-style
extravaganza!
Show her how special she is
with a date night she will re-
member forever.
Buy tickets from any Talla-
hassee Hancock Bank, or Fa-
mous Dave's BBQ on Capital


Circle NE.
Receive a $5 Famous
Dave's gift certificate with
purchase, and present the
ticket for 10 percent off din-
ner before the dance (don't
forget to eat early.)
For more information,
www.rotaryddd.org or 224-
1111.
All proceeds to benefit The
North Florida Rotary Youth
Camp, the Relay for Life, and
other Rotary charities.

Aerica eart
Assdciaton.,. .

It keeps
more than
nmemones, .:
alive.-"


Tess Knight Named


I District Employee (
Knight was surprised at the
RAY CICHON school, when Superintendent
Managing Editor Phil Barker and a delegation
t* from the District Office
1l Tess Knight, paraprofes- showed up and presented her
sional in kindergarten, at Jef- with a bouquet of red roses
arnd nrnoaP and bhle balloons.


Got A Cute Photo?
Send It To Us And
We'll Share It.With
Our Readers!

Kids Dogs *
Strange stuff, etc.

Monticello News
P.O. Box 430
Monticello, FL
32345

"You Can't Be Without It"


SWALK-IND

BATH TUB


Freedom of

the Press Is

Everybodlys

Freedi,%1


x.,ff.. a e
4FE'

tr t '


It's her future.Do the mathK


BACK AT THE OPERA HOUSE

BY POPULAR DEMAND




BOB MILNE




A RAGTIME BARREL HOUSE

EXTRAVAGANZA



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2007
8:00 P.M.


$15 ADULTS, $12 MEMBERS, $5 STUDENTS
CALL 997-4242 FOR RESERVATIONS AND INFORMATION


THE POWER TO GET MORE

THINGS DONE WITH NEXTEL.


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line, & state/local fees that vary by area). Sprint Fees are not taxes or gov't req'd charges.
Coverage not avail, everywhere. Avail. features & services will vary by phon/network. Nextcl National Network reaches 263 million peo-
ple. Ofters not available in all markets or locations. Subject to credit approval. S2(00 early tennination fee & S19.99 (max S80/accoun) set-
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store or Sprint.corn for details. Offer ends 2/1707. Service Plan Overage (SO 45/min). Partial minutes charged as lull inunaes. Nights: 9pm-
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I2007


Df Year
was one of his first students
when he first came to teach
here from Jacksonville.
Her Principal Sandra Collins
said of Knight: "Her personal
characteristics, such as pa-
tience, consideration, and good
judgment are great assets to
have when working with
young children..
"She is very-sensitive to stu-
dent needs, and they respond
to her in a positive manner.
"She helps each child per-
form well academically and
socially, and is always coop-
erative when assigned special
or extra work."
Instructor Judy Carney said
of Knight: "She is dependable,
conscientious, creative, enthu-
siastic, and self motivated.
"She.has a sincere desire to
help students in her charge to
progress, and has attained
Child Development Associate
certification, which enables
her to provide early childhood
care on. a professional, private
level, should she so choose.
"Knight is well liked by the
entire staff of our school."
Instructor Margaret Frazer
said of Knight: "She is
flexible, and has a genuine
concern for students, cowork-
ers, staff members.
"She strives to bring out the
best and most positive attrib-
utes of her students and to en-
hance their learning. She is fair
and positive with her students.
"Her pleasant personality
and attitude is infectious with
her students and coworkers."


student Randall Clark.


l-'5


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