Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00173
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: January 26, 2007
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00173
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text








Boost
Youth's
Speech Skills

Editorial, Page 4


Whole Child
Project
Discussed Here

Story, Page 6
I


ACA Key Club
Takes Shelter
Animals TO Run

Story Page 8

I


Locals Featured
On Black History
Calendar

Story, Page 14


Friday Morning


Monticello


139TH YEAR NO. 7. 50 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews


FRIDAY, JANUARY 26. 2007


Progress Made



On Upgrade Of



Water Meters


Officials Eye Possible

Surcharge For Water


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

City crews are making pro-
gress on the repair and replace-
ment of faulty water meters --
a key factor in the formulation
.-of new water and sewer rates.
The progress, however, is
not fast enough for city offi-
cials worried about a potential
budget shortfall, given that
they projected revenues based
on restructured rates that can't
be implemented until the water
meter issue is resolved.
That sums Tuesday's water
committee meeting, during
which time council members
Luther Pickels and Tom Vo-
gelgesang heard from industry
experts and city personnel on
the water meter problem.
City Superintendent Don
Anderson reported to the com-
mittee that industry experts
had checked selected meters
Across the city and found most


to be in good working order.
In addition, city personnel had
inspected every meter in two
of five city districts and found
only 45 were faulty.

In other instances, Anderson
said, the errors resulted from
inaccurate readings, leakages,
misidentification of meters,
and miscommunications be-
tween the meter reader and the
billing department, among
other things.
Bottom line, Anderson said,
the problems were being
worked out and the actual
number of faulty meters was
probably going to turn out to
be much lower than originally
expected.
A true tally, however,
.wouldn't be available.until the
meters in all five districts were
inspected, a task that could
take several more weeks given
the limited personnel, he said.
That wasn't satisfactory to
Pickels or Vogelgesang, who
pointed out that the council


had budgeted expenditures
based on anticipated revenues
that wouldn't be realized until
the new rate structure was in
place. And that rate structure
couldn't be formulated until
the meters were all functioning
properly and recording accu-
rate water usage, they said.
the two council members
wanted to know: Did the.city
need to hire an outside con-
tractor or additional city per-
sonnel to expedite the project?
Anderson plead for a little
more time. His crews were
dedicating as much time as
possible to the task, given that
they had a great many other
tasks'to perform, he said.
He wasn't necessarily against
the idea of hiring additional
personnel, Anderson said. As
for hiring a. contractor, how-
ever, the latter would have a
difficult time finding all the
meters in the city, even if a list
could be provided.
"Some meters are in the
weirdest places," Anderson
said.
City Clerk Emily Anderson
further pointed out that even if
(See Water Meters, Page 2)


Car Wash Coming Soon


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

A new car wash -- to be
called the Splash-N-Dash Car
Wash --is coming to town.
* Located on a near one-acre
triangular parcel on US 19
South opposite the county's re-
cycling center, the facility will
consist of a 2,706 sq. foot
building and 10,459 sq. feet of
parking and driving area.
J. T. Surles, of Bona Fide
Investments, LLC., is the man
behind the new business, and
Leland Smith, of LA Smith
Engineering, Inc., is the engi-


neer.
As represented to the Local
Planning Agency (LPA) last
week, the facility will hold one
automatic bay and three self-
serve bays and will be
equipped with state-of-the-art
equipment. It will also be ca-
pable of accommodating boats
and recreational vehicles.
LPA members questioned
the site plan's lack of a vegeta-
tive buffer on US 19, as re-
quired by city code. But Smith
explained that the lack of a
buffer was purposeful, for rea-
sons of safety and security.
He explained that the indus-
try philosophy is to situate


such facilities as near the road
as possible and to face them so
that the bays are visible to the
public. That way, potential
customers have a clear view of
the bays as they drive up, and
they also are in full view of the
public as they wash their vehi-
cles.

"You don't want anything to
obstruct the view," Smith said,
adding that a vegetative buffer
would do just that.
Furthermore, because of the
need to provide 30 feet of im-
permeable surface for vehicu-
lar circulation, and the
(See Car Wash, Page 2)


DON ANDERSON, city superintendent, assured the water committee on Tuesday eve-
ning that progress is being made on the repair and replacement of water meters
across the city. Anderson expects to have a complete report of the status of all water
meters in the city within the coming weeks. (News Photo)


Commissioner TO Act


On Planners Absences


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Commission Chairman Jun-
ior Tuten prefers to address the
matter of planners' multiple
absences from Planning Com-
mission meetings discreetly --
one on one.
Presented last week with a
report of planners' attendance
at Planning Commission meet-
ings during the last six years,
Tuten instructed his colleagues
to review the data and act ac-
cordingly.
Each commissioner appoints
two planners, who serve at the
pleasure of the appointing
commissioner. The rules say
that commissioners can replace
appointees who miss three
consecutive meetings, but
rarely if ever is the rule en-
forced.
"I feel that our board mem-
bers can look 'at the informa-
tion and do what is* right,"
Tuten said last week, declining
to open the topic for
discussion. "This is an impor-
tant job, probably the most im-
portant job."
He said he would give the
board members until March to
take corrective action. Failing


that, he would bring the issue
up for public discussion at the
March 15 evening'meeting, he
said.
A review of the planners' at-
tendance records show that
two attended less than 50 per-
cent of meetings last year, and
that two others barely broke
above the 50 percent mark.
One of the worst, in atten-
dance was appointed late last
year and missed seven of 10
possible meetings. The second


worst in attendance missed
eight of 17 possible meetings
last year.
The record shows that one
meeting had to be called .off in
2000 because of the lack of a
quorum, one in 2002, one in
2004, and two in 2006.
Planner Bud Wheeler raised
the issue of his peers atten-
dance at the Dec. 21 meeting
of the County Commission.
Wheeler complained about the
(See Planners, Page 2)


BUD WHEELER, right, here talking with Planning Com-
mission Attorney Scott Shirley, complained to commis-
sioners about the unprofessional attire and behavior of
some of his colleagues. (News Photo)


Sand Mine Operation Is Concern To

Owners Of Neighboring Properties


SIGN on US 19 South near the intersection of Waukeenah Street says it all. The Local
Planning Agency last week recommended approval of the site plans for the new busi-
ness, which will boast state-of-the-art equipment. (News Photo)

A(


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Residents of Upper Cody
Church Road in the southern
part of the county are upset
about a possible sand mine op-
eration in their neighborhood.
The residents approached the
County Commission last week
with their concern.
The residents said they had
contacted a couple of state
regulatory agencies and had
been told that the latter had no
jurisdiction over the area,
which previously was St. Joe
Paper Company land.

4


The residents pointed out to
commissioners that the deeds
on their properties specifically
prohibited sand and other min-
ing operations. Even so, they
said, an individual in their
neighborhood was proceeding
to put in a sand mine.

"So we came to the county
to say that we don't want a
sand mine on that road," said
Peter Mason, one of the con-
cerned residents. "This guy is
wealthy and it looks like he's
on his way to putting in a sand
mine."
Wealth had nothing to do
with the matter, if the individ-


ual was violating the law,
Commission Chairman Junior
Tuten put in.
He asked Planning Official
Bill Tellefsen to report to the
board what he knew about the
situation.
Tellefsen informed commis-
sioners that he had only
learned about the alleged sand
mine operation the previous
evening.
But what little research he
had been able to do on the
matter indicated that county
rules prohibited such mining
operations, Tellefsen said. In
any case, such operations re-
(See Sand Mining, Page 2)


I












Blackwater Paintball Park


New Business In County


THE CITY COUNCIL is expected to make a decision on Feb. 6 whether to hire an out-
side contractor or additional personnel to expedite the water meter repair-and-
replacement project. (News Photo)


Water Meters Upgrade Program


(Continued From Page 1)
all the meters could be made to
work properly, it would still
take several months to get ac-
curate data on average uses for
the formulation of a new rate
structure.
"I don't think you're going to
have good figures to do a new
rate,structure for a while," An-
derson said.
In that case, Pickels offered,
the council might have to im-
pose an emergency temporary
surcharge on water and sewer
customers to make up for the
revenues being lost because of
the lack of a new rate
structure.
The committee gave (Don)
Anderson until Feb. 6, when
the City Council meets again,


to work up the data on the
three remaining districts.
With that information in
hand, Pickels said, the council
could better decide the time
and cost involved in the water
meter repair-and-replacement
project and whether it was ad-
visable to hire an outside con-
tractor or additional personnel.
The City Council late last
year implemented a new rate
structure based on an extensive
research. The new rate struc-
ture, however, resulted in sig-
nificantly higher water and
sewer bills that produced a
public outcry.
The new rate structure also
revealed a slew of problems,
including faulty water meters,
incorrect meter readings, unde-


tected leaks, and possibly
over-consumption by city resi-
dents unaware of their water
usage and accustomed to
cheap rates.
"I heard one lady say that it's
the Lord's water," Pickels ob-
served. "It's the Lord's water,
but we're not charging for the
water. We're charging for get-
ting it out of the ground and
getting it to their homes."
Even so, city officials ac-
knowledged problems with the
December implemented rate
structure and rescinded it last
month. They rescinded it, at
least, until they can correct the
water meter problems and de-
vise a more accurate and fair
rate structure.
So the matter stands.


Car Wash Coming To Town Soon
(Continued From Page 1) building to the back of the quired that the developer
topography of the land (which property, you lower its eleva- provide extra landscaping on
slopes toward the back), situat- tion and impede visibility," the property, which Surles
ing the building farther back Smith said. agreed to do.
on the property was not a vi- The planners accepted the The application goes to the'
able option, he said. absence of a buffer for reasons .' City Council next for review'
"Because the topography of safety. In lieu of the vegeta- and approval.
slopes down, if you push the tive buffer, however, they re-


Sand Mining Operation concerns


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Blackwater Paintball Park,
owned by Charles Kincaid
and Jeremy Roland is a new
buisness in the County, lo-
cated on Haypond Farm, off
of Dills Road.
Present business hours are
Saturday and Sunday, 9:30
a.m. until 6 p.m., however,
the Sunday hours may change
to avoid conflict with church
services.
Individuals and groups are
welcome, by appointment or
walk-in, and group pricing is
available with special dis-
counts.
"If people come in alone, we
can put them with a group,"
said Kincaid. "We also host
large group events. One large
company did their-Christmas
party with us, and it was a lot "
of fun.
"We have rental equipment,

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compressed air fills, C02 air
fills, and we sell paint," said
Kincaid. "We also have a
recreational course that is
more than 60 acres of tough
terrain and defensive playing
structures, and we will have a
speed-ball course up and run-
ning in about two weeks."
Kincaid said that he has
played paintball for about the
past five or six years and he
decided that he enjoys the
sport so much, he would open
his own paintball park.
"We decided to come to
Monticello because we love it
and its location," said
Kincaid. "It's beautiful, and
close to Tallahassee, Thomas-
ville and Madison, perfect for
what we're doing."
Kincaid is PTI certified and

Moa e Yo

A PLKce To


the park is insured through
the American Paintball
League. He is a graduate of
PTI training instruction lo-
cated in Johnson City, TN.
"Paintball is a lot of fun,
educational, and a great
source of physical activity,"
said Kincaid. He said that the
sport usually is greatly fa-
vored by athletes, hunters,
military, law enforcement
personnel, teens, and children.
"We plan to host some big
events in the near future and
hope to have a speedball tour-
nament in March," said Kin-
caid.
To make an appointment, or
for further information, call
491-0677 or 556-2315.
The web site is:
blackwaterpaintball.com.

uBr Ktchvn/

-183eProu dl9 Of
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friend; II a ltrhen -Mapler
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(Continued From Page 1)
quired that the individual ap-
ply to the county and go before
the Planning Commission,
which the subject individual
had failed to do.


Planners
(Continued From Page 1)
poor attendance, lack of prepa-
ration, and unprofessional at-
tire of some of his colleagues.
Planning Commission mem-
bers volunteer for the job,
which often requires long
hours and the handling of con-
troversial zoning and land use
issues. Hence, commissioners
say it's difficult to find capable
individuals willing to serve.
Which explains commission-
ers' reluctance to remove plan-
ners from the board, even
when cause exists. At the same
time, planners' decision have
far-reaching consequences, es-
pecially as the county contin-
ues to experience growth.


"There is a rule on mining in
Jefferson County," Tellefsen
said. "If he ignores it, we will
have to go into code enforce-
ment."
Scott Shirley, the county's
land-use attorney, recom-
mended that county official
mail the individual a formal
letter informing him of the


rules and that he must cease
!he mining.
"\ e want to put the brakes
on this thing right away,"
itten said.


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MONTICELLO, (FL). NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 26, 2007 PAGE 3

I Arbor Day Observed

Friday In Monticello


'. J. "" :




STUDENTS at Jefferson Elementary smile for the cam- members of the FAMU Marching 100 to help motivate
- .era at this "Pound FCAT" Pep Rally, which featured students to excel on the test.



'Pound FCAT' Pep


Rally Held At JES


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

In observance of Arbor Day
in the city Friday, members
of community groups and city
officials, came together be-
tween the Chase Street Park
and Bike Trail to plant 13
'Cleveland Pear trees, which
were donated by Simpson's
Nursery.
The Arbor Day Proclama-
tion, read by Mayor Julie
Conley, states:.
"Whereas Arbor Day is
symbolic of the Early Conser-
vation Movement and has
been observed in the United
States in various ways for
over a hundred years; and
"Whereas, the citizens of
Monticello have shown an in-
creased interest in planting
trees because of the tremen-
dous role that such trees play
in furthering and improving
the environment; and


"Whereas, trees are respon-
sible for producing oxygen,
for controlling floods, and for
providing wildlife habitat;
and
"Whereas, the City of Monti-
cello takes great pride in its
variety and number of trees,
and concern that Arbor Day
should be commemorated by
the planting of trees;
"Now, therefore, I, Julie S.
Conley, Mayor of the City of
Monticello, do hereby pro-
claim January 19, 2007 as Ar-
bor Day in the City of
Monticello, with the sincere
conviction that the enhance-
ment of the beauty of the
City's landscape by the plant-
ing of trees furnishes not only
an economic value, but also
human value that is priceless,
and benefits all."
If It Happens In
Jefferson County,
You'll Read It In The
Monticello News


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson Elementary School
held a "Pound the FCAT" pep
rally last week, in which band
members from the FAMU
Marching 100 were present..
"This pep rally serves as a
motivational tool for our stu-
dents as they prepare for this
year's FCAT exam," ex-
plained JES Math Coach
David Sherman.
"Our motto is, 'Pound the
FCAT', meaning that we
want our students to direct
their energy, strategies,
knowledge and skills toward
success on the FCAT.
"We have prepared our stu-
dents to enter into this year's
testing environment with con-
fidence and empowerment
through directed classroom
instruction, mentored after-
school programs, small group


instruction and dedication in-
spired by our outstanding
teachers," he said.
Sherman added that coordi-
nators wish to recongize
teachers, staff and administra-
tion for their dedication- in im-
plementing the changes which
have begun to improve the
academic standing at the
school, and the distinction
they desire as a first-class ele-
mentary school.
"We wish to thank the
FAMU Marching 100 for
contributing some of their
band members to bur pep
rally," said Sherman. ""We
see this as a sign of partner-
ship and support toward ex-
cellence and dedication and
practice toward excellence we
wish to instill in our
students."
He concluded that teachers,
staff and administrators wish
the students continued suc-
cess as they strive to "Pound
the FCAT".


":- .. ..l- -


"A New Year, A New You..." Louis 0. Potyondy, M.D.

WWW.PLASTICSURCERYSOUTHGEORGIA.COM
505 Gordon Avenue Thomasville, GA (229) 228-9900


vaI-


EETTHEAVE-YOU-ONE" TWN..-
--. .1 ..* .o' ,i -


- aI -i .x,5- t,. -
- .'bg
-. '*:e- i


:KELSI REAMS stands with her sisters Abby on left and
.Chloe on right. Kelsi hosts the hot chocolate fund-
raiser now in its fourth year, with her sister Chloe.



SHot Chocolate

SSale To Benefit


SCystic Fibrosis
their way of helping find a
FRAN HUNT cure for the disease.
SStaff Writer The money raised will be
used in research to help fight
The Fourth Annual Hot the battle against Cystic Fi-
SChocolate sale which benefits brosis. To date, Kelsi has
Sthe Cystic Fibrosis Founda- raised more than $5,000 for
Stion, will be hosted 8 a.m. un- the ongoing research.
til 3 p.m., Saturday at Witmer Kelsi won second place in
SRealty in Greenville, located the Tropicana Speech Contest
Son the corner of US-221 south in December, speaking about
Sand US-90 east. Abby and described how she
The annual event is hosted had raised money to help not
by Aucilla Christian Acad- only Abby, but others who
emy students, Kelsi Reams, have Cystic Fibrosis.
I 10, and her five year-old sis-
ter, Chloe. Anyone wishing to make a
The children's mother donation but who is unable to
Kathy Reams said that their attend the event, can make
: youngest daughter, Abby, was checks payable to CFF and
Diagnosed with Cystic Fibro- mail to Joe and Kathy Reams,
: sis when she was about five 418 NW Sand Dollar Way,
months old and this event is Greenville, FL, 32331.


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 26, 2007




Monticello News
(ISSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

%RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer



Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly Ex-
cept for the,weeks of July 4th, Thanksgiving, Christmas,
& New Years. Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post
Office. Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net


Boost Youth's


Speech Skills


Speech and language skills
develop at varying rates for
children. Still, there are certain
milestones most children reach
at specific ages.
Common, everyday interac-
tion between children and
those around them' is the best
way to boost and enhance
speech and language skills.
From birth, hearing is critical
for children to learn and react
to the work around them.
An unidentified hearing loss
can cause a delay in speech
and language development.
Consequently, it is better to
identify and treat hearing loss
as soon as possible.
Parents and other caregivers
can do many things to encour-
age speech and language de-
velopment and provide learn-
ing opportunities. Some exam-
ples:
Listen and respond to your
child. Acknowledge, encour-
age, and praise attempts to
communicate.
Talk to your child about
what you are doing, what you
see, what your child is doing,
and what your child sees. Use
language that is appropriate for


your child's speech and lan-
guage abilities.
Accept mistakes as your
child's speech develops. Sim-
ply repeat or expand what was
said, using the correct words
or sounds.
If you don't understand
what your child is saying, ask
your child to repeat or help
your child to rephrase.
Seek help if you suspect
your child is having a speech,
language, or hearing problem.
An evaluation can determine
whether or not a child's skills
are developing normally.

Certified speech-language
pathologists and audiologists
are educated and trained at the
master's or doctoral level to
evaluate communication skills
and treat disorders.
The steps you take can be
very important. During the
first five years of life, the
building blocks for lifelong
communication are formed.
Believing your child will
"grow out of a problem" can
hinder his or her ability to
read, write, learn, and engage
in social relationships.


Ford's Character


Opinion & Comment










S!Short Takes & Other Notions


By RON CICHON
Publisher

Councilmen Luther Pickles
and Brian Hayes are calling for
a review of the city charter.
The present charter is archaic
and needs to be updated for in-
creased efficiency of city gov-
ernment... The number of new
subdivisions planned for our
county is remarkable after
many years of slow growth...
Health Department sponsoring
an event Feb. 1 designed to get
folks active. Since taking over
the Health Department some
years ago, Director Kim Barn-
hill has promoted good health
through exercise and fitness.
Rare Door Restaurant has re-
opened and will be serving
dinners Thursday through Sat-
urday evenings... Pastors, from
the'Ministerial Association and
Ministerial Alliance will be
hosted for dinner at Sweetfield


MB Church Friday night. The
Rev. Ben Ransom is pastor of
Sweetfield... Bob Milne re-
turns to the Opera House for a
concert Feb. 2. He's called
America's top rag time boogie-
woogie pianist and puts on a
great show.

New research suggests that a
long term, moderate exercise
program may help stave off the
common cold... While on the
subject of exercise, it's best to
replace workout shoes after
running 300 to 500 miles or
300 hours of aerobic activity...
Three quarters of hospital bills
have overcharges and the aver-
age overcharge is about
$1,000, according to People's
Medical Society. a nonprofit
medical consumer rights or-
ganization.
I read somewhere that a few
lenders are touting 50 year
mortgages. Wow!... Florida re-
mains the leader in the vaca-


tion home market, which
includes timeshares, fractional
ownerships, destination clubs,
condos, and traditional vaca-
tion homes.
Florida Trend reports be-
tween U,S. Customs screening
at airports and seaports, and
the complications of getting
tourist visas, Florida will have
a tougher time bringing in and
pleasing international
tourists... Some day, an enter-
prising soul will provide a bus
or van tour of Our Town. What
with historic homes, churches,
plantations, and recreational
opportunities, Jefferson
County has a lot to offer.
Didja know; that of the 83
plus million visitors to Florida,
77 million are from the United
States and 4.4 million from
overseas. Canadian visitors
number 2 million and all of the
visitors account for $62 billion
in the state economy... I like


the Paygo plan promoted by
the Blue Dogs, in Congress. It
amazed me the Republicans
engaged in massive deficit
spending; when they held
sway in the Congress since the
GOP claims to be the party of
fiscal discipline. If the Demo-
crats don't do a better job with
fiscal matters, I suspect voters
will send them packing like
they did the Republicans.

The Rev. Clark Edwards, son
of Lois Lanier of Lamont, de-
livered the invocation at Gov.
Charlie Crist's inauguration.
He is currently pastor of First
United Methodist Church in
St. Pete... I'm told Simply Fit
for Women is off to a fast
start... Demetria Pope at Jake's
gets praise for her delicious
soups... Another payday loan
company recently opened in
Jefferson Square... CVS Drugs
to build soon on South 19 next
to Builder's Mart.


Should Be Emulated Sleep Eludes Some Folks


By REX M. ROGERS
Columnist

Politics and character make
uncomfortable suite mates
these days. It seems like the
days of gentlemen (or women)
politicians- people who could
debate like political warriors
during the day and then enjoy
a dinner together in the eve-
ning- are long gone.
Many politicians today have
failed to understand the differ-,
ence between disagreement
and dislike, or worse, loathing.
Now it's not enough to cri-
tique someone's point of view
on the merits. One must attack
the other person's character,
motives, and person. Political
adversaries are now enemies.
Partnership has given way to
partisanship; principle has
given way to power.
The passing of President
Gerald R. Ford this past week
gives us occasion to think
about politics and character,
for he represented the best of
both. Or rather, he was a man
who lived out his well
grounded character in his poli-
tics.
He didn't become something
or someone else to curry politi-
cal favor, and he didn't check
opinion polls or focus groups
to figure out what his point of
view should be. He was, in a
word, a man of integrity. Now
he's being fondly- and accu-
rately and fairly- remembered
not just for what he did but
even more for the way he did


President Ronald Reagan and
Speaker of the House Tip O'-
Neill were in some measure
men of the old school too.
They represented different
sides of "the aisle" and oppo-
site ends of the political spec-
trum, but at the end of the
day, they were American lead-
ers who liked one-upping each
other telling Irish-American
jokes.
Can you imagine President
George W. Bush and Speaker
Nancy Pelosi enjoying each
others' company at day's end?
Even more, can you imagine
Republicans and Democrats on
the Hill doing anything to-
gether other than perhaps pay-
ing respect to President Ford
lying in state in the Capitol?
I'm not suggesting no politi-
cal leaders in Washington,
D.C., demonstrate appropriate
character. Far from it. There
are men and women on both
sides of the aisle who are
American patriot doing their
best with the talent and under-
standing given to them. But
the overall tone, tenor, or cul-
ture of Washington, D.C., poli-
tics today is something else
again. Principled cooperation
isn't much in evidence.
I've said before, "God give
us more Jerry Fords." We need
men and women, both Repub-
lican and Democrat, who are
willing to move to the center,
give some in order to get
some, go along to get along.
build a team, and above all,
(See Ford's, Page 5)


By DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

A little diversity in marriage
or personal relationships is a
good thing. In my life, my
wife sees little value in spend-
ing any time watching'sporting
events, except she can some-
times be a TV golf junky and
can be found at some FSU
baseball games.
As for me, I can't get into the
new numbers fad called
Suduko or spend time playing
difficult games on the com-
puter, which come easy for
her.
There is one thing, however,
where I have the upper hand.
and she deplores my wonder-
ful gift. 1 can fall asleep the
moment my head hits the old


pillow! My wife, on the other
hand, has unfortunately fought
the insomnia battle her entire
life.
It turns out that it is quite
normal for everyone to experi-
ence the nuisance of not being
able to fall asleep from time to
time. A major problem arises,
however, when this situations
becomes chronic and seriously
interferes with daily life.
Interestingly, scientists say
we have a "sleep bank" that
keeps track of sleep data and
becomes depleted over time if
we lose a little sleep every
night. Conversely, the body
will correct' that depletion
when a person is allowed to
sleep as long as they like. Un-
fortunately, you can't "bank"
excess sleep in order to pre-
pare for an upcoming all night


binge.
In 'most cases, daily or per-
sonal tensions refuse to let the
mind relax, which is a situation
necessary in -order to fall
asleep. Working out some mi-
nor problems, however, can
help you relax and should aid
in your getting to sleep.
Unfortunately, working on a
very significant issue like how
to stretch the family income,
only builds more tension and
can compound the sleepless
experience.
Here are some truths and
myths that might be helpful for
anyone suffering from insom-
nia:
Temperature can be a major
factor in your sleep
experience. The body's tem-
perature actually drops slightly
when we fall asleep. Sleeping


in a cool room requiring a
blanket, may be helpful.
Avoid stimulants such as.
coffee and drinks containing
caffeine before retiring. They
are clearly "stay awake" sub-
stances. An alcoholic nightcap'
could be helpful, as most
things that tend to relax the
body are welcomed.
Snacks before bedtime are
not recommended unless it is
part of your standard routine in
preparing for bed. The excep-
tion, of course, is. that one
should not intentionally go the
bed feeling hungry, as those
sensations will interfere with
sleep as well.
The monotony of repeated
stimuli, such as the old count-
ing sheep can relax the mind
and aid in falling asleep.
(See Sleep, Page 5)


Illnesses Linked To Stress


Statistics don't lie. The facts
are in and research suggests
that stress is making Ameri-
cans sick.
According to the National
Institutes of Health, 80 to 90
percent of all illnesses are ei-
ther directly or indirectly caused
by stress.
In another study conducted
by the Center for the New
American Dream, researchers
found that more than 50 per-
cent of Americans would be
willing to take a day off work
without pay in an effort to feel


less stressed and have more
time with their families.
And ongoing public opin-
ion research finds that the ma-
jority of stress that people feel
is directly related to work is-
sues such as time
management, deadlines, and
dealing with difficult
coworkers.
Fortunately, there arc action
steps that people can incorpo-
rate into their daily routines to
help them regain control of
their lives.
Here are some tips for reliev-
ing workplace stress.


Eat Right. Avoid eating
unhealthy snacks. Eating
healthy food can increase your
energy.
Drink Less Caffeine.
Drinking lots of coffee and so-
das can increase your stress
levels. If you can't cut out
caffeine beverages com-
pletely, try to alternate your
caffeine intake with healthier
beverages or snacks.
Exercise. Exercise is a
great way to relieve stress,
so try to take a brisk 10-
minute walk during the day,
even if it means a walk


around the office or building.
Walking will help to get
your blood moving and give
you a mental break from your
tasks.
Stretch. Stretching can
help to relieve stiff muscles,
which can hold tension and
make you feel more stressed.
Simplify the Morning.
Getting up 15 minutes earlier,
and packing lunches or lay-
ing out clothes the night be-
fore, can help create a routine
and get you organized.
Think Positive. Take a
(See Illnesses, Page 5)


From Our Photo File



















a l ,; !
N. .




TAKING advantage of the many story books on tape, during Story Time at the
Library, in Sept. 1991, are from left: Fran Walker, Brooke Roddenberry, an Suzanne
Walker. (News File Photo)


--n-rn-.








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 26.
a- -'s:


* ..










CAROL




:.Allen Bo


Fiscal A(

Congressman Allen Boyd,
leader of the Blue Dog Coali-
tion, joined his fellow Blue
Dogs in demanding greater ac-
countability and responsibility
for the funds spent in Iraq.
The Blue Dog Coalition in-
troduced a resolution calling
for increased fiscal account-
ability and transparency in
funding the Iraq war.
"Since 2001, Congress has
provided more than $500 bil-
lion for military and recon-
struction operations in Iraq and
Afghanistan, and to date, there
has been little to no account-
ability for how these funds
were being spent, Boyd said.
"Our brave troops, our mili-


...,
r-^, .
r.


i., ~ ~ ..


:.-. .


KATZ, RN,


tary families, Congress, and
the American people deserve
to know where the money is
going, and that it is being spent
in the most effective and effi-
cient way."
The Blue Dog's Operation
Iraqi Freedom Cost Account-
ability Resolution focuses on
four crucial points for demand-
ing fiscal accountability in
Iraq. The Resolution would:
*Call for a transparency on
how Iraq war funds are spent.
Create a Truman Commis-
sion to investigate the award-
ing of contracts.
*Require that the Iraq war is
funded through the normal ap-


Illness Linked To Stress


'Continued From Page 4)
few minutes to 'reflect on the
good things in life. Taking
stock of what you have can
instantly improve your mood
and outlook.
Bieathe. When we are
stressed, we have a tendency
to take shallow breaths,
which can result in feeling
more tense. Start by inhaling
deeply through the nose for a
count of eight, then exhaling
slowly for a count of 16. Con-
centrate on your counting and
breath.
Rest. Be sure you are
getting enough sleep at night.
Nbt feeling rested can add
to your stress level and
make you feel more over-
whelmed. If you have been
experiencing recurring sleep-
less nights, consult your
physician for guidance.
*Do Things You Enjoy.
Try to do something you love


every day to give yourself
something to look forward to.
Most stress arises due to feel-
ings of life being out of control.
By taking time to get yourself
organized, and taking care of
yourself, you can begin to gain
control and ensure that your
workday is as relaxed as pos-
sible.
E-mail Stress-out. E-
mail has become one of the
most common forms of com-
munication but it can also be
one of the most stressful.
Opening a full e-mail box
can be overwhelming, not to
mention time consuming.
Learn how to use your e-
mail software, so you can organ-
ize your in-box and file away
all those important messages
in a way that makes them easier
to access. Also, don't forget to
trash any spam or useless e-
mails.
Change your habits so that
instead of leaving a message in
your in-box until it's. com-
pleted, try placing the task
from the e-mail on your task
list along with the contact in-
formation, then filing the e-
mail away until you are pre-
pared to reply.


Carol Katz, RN Appointed


Big Bend Hospice Manager


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Big Bend Hospice Director'-
of Home Care, Mo Gardner,
RN, announces the appoint- '
ment of Carol Katz, RN as
team manager for the patient
care team in Jefferson, Madi-
son, and Taylor counties.
Katz will be responsible for
the managing case managers,
nurses, and home health aids
in each county, and coordinat-
ing the interdisciplinary team
that includes family support,
music therapy, spiritual sup-
port, volunteer services, grief
and loss support and commu-
nity outreach.
"I am thrilled that Carol has
accepted this position," said
Gardner.


"Carol brings an excep-
tional nursing 'and manage-
ment background to this
position.
"In addition to having been
the case manager and nurse
on the Jefferson, Madison,
and Taylor team, Katz has
managed hospital critical care
and psychiatric units and

home health care.
"Her nursing background
and management expertise
will be valuable to leading
our Jefferson, Madison, and
Taylor team."
Katz, born and raised in
New York, earned her RN
and Associate of Science de-
gree from Queens College
NYU in 1963.
She and her family moved
to Florida in 1987 and later
settled in Monticello in 1999.


She joined Big Bend Hospice
in 2000.
She and her husband Joel
enjoy country living in Jeffer-
son County with their horses
and many dogs and cats.
Big Bend Hospice is a pri-
vate nonprofit organization
that provides compassionate


propriations process, and not
through "emergency" supple-
mentals.
*Use American resources to
improve Iraqi assumption of
internal policing operations.
"The Blue Dog resolution
will bring much needed ac-
countability to our costs in Iraq
and force Congress to assume
its constitutional duty of over-
sight," Boyd stated.
"It is well past time for the
Administration to be held ac-
countable for the money sent
to Iraq, and it is well past time
for Congress to exercise our
oversight role."
Boyd is a fifth generation
farrmer and Army veteran from
Monticello, in his sixth term
representing Florida's 2nd


Sleep
(Continued From Page 4)
Opening a window to get
fresh air seems to have little
effect for most people. Smok-
ing is no, no if you want a
good night's sleep. Smokers
tend to. believe that cigarettes
help them relax, but physio-
logically they create changes
that are precisely the opposite
of what is needed for getting to
sleep.
They add to the bodies ten-
sion by restricting blood ves-
sels, raising blood pressure and
increasing heart and respira-
.tion rates, clearly roadblocks
to falling asleep.
Sleeping pills are, of course,
helpful for some people.
Sometimes the side effects,
however, can seriously detract
from their overall benefits. To
quote my wife, "take the sleep-
ing pill and lose your mind or
don't take the pill and lose
your sleep."
As for me, if someone will
only help me understand what
the one leg out from under the
covers thing is, I will have
most of my sleep issues under
control!


Congressional District.
In addition to his wor-k on
the Blue Dog Coalitiori, 3oyd
serves on the House Appro-
priations Committee and the
House Budget Committee.


care to individuals with lim-
ited life expectancy, and their
families, offering care teams
consisting of an experienced
RN, a family counselor, a
home health aide, board certi-
fied music therapist, a chap-
lain, and trained volunteers to
every patient, and bereave-
ment counseling to anyone
who has lost a loved one.
It has been the hometown
hospice for the eight-county
region of Big Bend since
1983.


r, -iT A 0 ..
Sff^ *' ^. rl,".'h at .,-..,-

Tallahassee's First Avon
Fully Stocked Retail Store
3111 Mahan Drive, Suite #30
-. Lafayette Place (Publix Shopping Cet)
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Church of
Christ
US 19 South at
Coopers Pond Rd

Join us for a series of
discussions on the
ever important
subject of LOVE!
Based on the fun and
informative book,
Habits of a Loving
Heart by author and
speaker Willard
Tate.
Sessions will be held
Sunday evenings,
January through
April, at 6p.m.
For a full schedule
of dates and
subjects, call Jay at
997-1166


MONA


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---














PAGE 6. MONTICE.1O. (F)I,. NEWS. FRI...JANUIARY 26. 20107


Lifestyle


Ve6 Pdt.4e4




Vw# a aa meg& 199-3569


Dawn and Brian Ashworth,
owners of Sage Restaurant,
are the proud parents of r
baby girl, Hayden Lynn, born
Tuesday, Jan. 16.
Pink balloons and flowers
streamed from the restaurant
sign to mark the event.
Soup Supper fundraiser set
5:30-7:30 p.m. today in the
First Baptist Church Fellow-
ship Hall to help support Gar-
ret Getch as he prepares to
leave in May for the mission
field in Burkino Faso, Africa
Donation is $5 per person.
Plan to attend Bingo at the
Lions Club, 3 p.m. Saturday
at the clubhouse location,
7337-A Old Lloyd Road.
Member June Campbell
notes that signs will be
.posted. A large turnout is ex-
pected, so come early for a
good seat. Refreshments will
be available for purchase.
Proceeds for this monthly
fundraiser will be distributed
back into the community
through Club projects.
The Monticello Garden
Club members and friends
collected, more than 100 pair
of socks and slippers during
their S.O.S. collection, and
donated them to 35 residents
at the Jefferson Nursing Cen-
ter, and 30 residents at the
Brynwood Center.
Maggie and Fred Shofner
will celebrate 40 years of
marriage on Saturday, Feb. 3.
Fred said they may rent a
movie and enjoy a quiet eve-
ning together. Maggie
quipped: "But I'm not cook-
ing any fancy dinner!"
Daryll Stanley at the First
Baptist Church, is looking for
old pictures of the church
sanctuary.
They are in the process of
updating their directory and
would like to use the photo.
If you have an old such pic-
ture, Stanley would like to


borrow it for a short time. He
may be contacted at
997-2349.
Among those planting trees
Friday morning at the Chase
Street Park in celebration of
Arbor Day, were Jan Wad-
sworth, Mignonette Garden
Circle, and Toni Lane and
Gloria Brown, Founders Gar-
den Circle.
Healthy Start Care Coordi-
nator Joyce Steele, LPN re-
ports that free childbirth
classes began at the County
Health Department on Mon-
day afternoon.
She may be reached at 342-
0170 x107 for information or
to register.
Feed the Elderly Ministry
continues to serve a hot meal
on Thursday at the Greater
Fellowship MB Church. Glo-
ria Cox-Jones notes that dona-
tions of gallon-sized canned
goods, breads, to-go contain-
ers and flatware are always
needed, as are volunteers.
Gerrold Austin, director of
the Monticello/Jefferson Boys
and Girls Club, reminds, the
community that Karate
classes begin for Pre-K thru
5th grade students on Mon-
days and Wednesdays.
Membership in any of the
county Clubs is fast, easy, and
no cost to those students who
qualify for the after school
program. The first tournament
is in March.
SI understand that Ted Regis-
ter celebrated his 75th birth-
day with a cookout on
Saturday, Jan. 20. He was
born in Graceville, to Martha
Louise and Curtis Register.
He came to Monticello on
July 1, 1962 with his wife
Jackie and their children.
Ron, Slik reports that his
son Scott is back home from
Iraq.
He is now out of the service
and looking for work.


Whole Child Program


Requirements Discussed
presentation to local Advisory education, social interaction
DEBBIE SNAPP Council members on the de- and competence, and spiritual
Staff Writer tails of the program and foundation and strength.


The Healthy Start Coalition-
hosted an annual meeting of
the Whole Child Jefferson
Advisory Committee Friday,
Jan. 5.
The purpose of the meeting
was to learn more about the
requirements for implement-
ing a Whole Child Project in
Jefferson County.
Representative Loranne
Ausley, Chair of the Leon
Whole Child Project gave a


shared some lessons learned
in Leon County.
Currently Whole Child pro-
jects are operational in
Martin, Leon, and Manatee
Counties.
The Whole Child Project
includes six dimensions im-
pacting a child's life from
birth to age five.
These include: physical and
mental health, safe and nur-
turing environments, eco-
nomic stability, quality


Ausley stressed that the pro-
gram is not one that provides
direct services, but an ap-
proach to helping children
and their families, as well as
defining how agencies relate
to one another.
The overall outcome of ini-
tiating the Whole Child Pro-
gram will be a positive impact
on the lives of young children
and their families in Jefferson
County by increasing access
to services already in place.


Covenant Hospice


Offers Grief Support


Covenant Hospice offers
grief support and encourages
individuals who have experi-
enced the death of a loved one
to attend a six week grief sup-
port group that will meet 3
p.m. to 4 p.m. Thursdays,Feb.
1 through March 7, at the First
United Methodist Church in
Madison.
Bereavement Services are an
integral part of the special care
provided by Covenant


Hospice.
Grief is a normal, natural re-
sponse after a loved one's
death, but the feelings of loss
after the death can be over-
whelming.
Elizabeth Robinson, MSW,
bereavement specialist, pro-
vides grief support through
groups, workshops, and indi-
vidual counseling.
"A caring support system is
important and a support group


can bring individuals together
with others who know some of
what they are experiencing,
because they are going through
a similar situation ," said Rob-
inson.
Support groups allow indi-
viduals the opportunity to
share as much or as little as
they feel like sharing in a safe,
compassionate and caring en-
vironment, offering education
and information about the grief
process and helpful sugges-
tions for individual situations.
For more information about
grief, or to register for the grief
support groups, contact-Robin-
son at 1-800-541-3072, or
850-575-3998.


Technical assistance is
available from the Lawton
Chiles Center at the Univer-
sity of South Florida.
The development of the pro-
ject includes polling the com-
munity, through Listening
Projects about issues impact-
ing children and their
families.
Efforts will be made to
identify the root causes of
problems and gaps in
services.
Volunteer members of the
local Whole Child Advisory
Committee include: Gerrold
Austin, Kim Barnhill, Cissy
Boyd, Arsenio Bright, Jr.,
Mary Ann Clark, Lynn Elli-
ott, Bill Gunnels, Rev: Carl
Hanks, John Lilly, Gladys
Roann, Jerry Sutphin, Ed
Vollertsen, and Gary Wright.
Citizens are asked to help
support these community vol-
unteers when they contact you
for support in implementing
this program for families
here.
--m


CHEST
fT-


i$&4995
&up





SINC


NATHANIEL
BLACKSHEAR, Jr.
Nathaniel "Tookie" Black-
shear, Jr. age 84, died Saturday
January 20, 2007, in Madison.
Born in the Ashville Com-
munity of Jefferson County,
Mr. Blackshear was a longtime
resident of Greenville. He was
a retired logger and sharecrop-
S per and was a member of New
Zion Missionary Baptist
Church.
Funeral services will be Sat-
urday January 27, 2007 at
11:00 a.m. at New Zion Mis-
sionary Baptist Church, Green-
ville with the Rev. Alonzo
Fudge, Officiating with burial
at the Church Cemetery. View-
ing will be from 2:00 7:30
p.m. Friday, January 26, 2007
at Tillman Funeral Home,
Monticello.
Other than his wife, Lelia
Virginia Moore Blackshear of
64 1/2 years, Mr. Blackshear's
love and memory will live for-
ever in the hearts of his
Family, including his daugh-
ters, Carolyn Livingston
(Henry, Sr.), Frednell Black-
shear and Carrie B. Washing-
ton (Onazina, Jr.), all of
Greenville and a stepdaughter,
Joyce Alexander of Cocoa
Beach, FL; Sisters, Carrie Mae
Hamilton and Essie Mae Davis
(James), Greenville; brothers,
Cleveland Blackshear (Flossie)
of Madison, FL and Clarence
Blackshear (Lelia) of Jackson-
ville and an aunt, Rebecca Ar-
nold of Greenville, ten
grandchildren and sixteen


great-grandchildren, along
with numerous nieces, neph-
ews, other relatives and
friends.
He was preceded in death by
his son, Tommy Lee Black-
shear, Sr., in 1977.

EDWARD MANNING
Edward Manning age 70,
died Thursday January 18,
2007, in Tallahassee.
Born in Madison, FL, Ed-
ward grew up in Wacissa
where he attended Jefferson
County Schools. He had lived
in Tallahassee for many years,
working as a landscaper and at
Ferrell's Deli in Frenchtown.
Funeral services will be held
Saturday, January 27, 2007 at
2:00 a.m. at Beth Page Mis-
sionary Church, Wacissa, with
burial at Beth Page Cemetery,
Wacissa. Viewing will be Fri-
day, January 26, 2007 from
2:00 7:30 p.m. at Tillman Fu-
neral Home, Monticello.
Mr. Manning is survived by
two sisters, Doris Austin, Tal-
lahassee and Beatrice Williams .
of Ft..Pierce, FL; two aunts,
Gertrude Baskin of Perry, Fl
and Beatrice Scott of Lawtey,
FL; a devoted friend, Doll
Spencer of Tallahassee and his
two loving caregivers, his
nephews, Dwayne Manning of
Wacissa and Joseph Manning
of Tallahassee along with nu-
merous other relatives and
friends.
He was preceded in death
by brothers; Isaac, Henry,
Charlie, William and Roosev-
let: sister; Gladys.
(See Homes, Page 7)


JAN WADSWORTH


DON TAYLOR is served a spaghetti dinner
Club members, L-R: Edith Adams, Sarah
Dianne Braren. (News Photo)


by Woman's
Hofmeister,


Woman's Club Dinner

Adds $400 To Treasury


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Members of the Monticello
Woman's Club prepared their
famous spaghetti sauce for
their annual spaghetti dinner
fundraiser, last week.
Tickets sold fast and some
$400 was raised to be added
to the treasury towards their
annual scholarship, and for
clubhouse upkeep and repairs.


"We are pleased with the
amount raised considering it
was a rainy and cold day,"
says Amanda Ouzts, past
president.
Members thank all who par-
ticipated in the fundraiser,
and noted that all monies
raised through Club events
stay in the county.
Club meeting are held at
noon on the first Tuesday of
each month. The next meeting
is scheduled for Feb. 6.


SCome got itto go! )



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-,, 'Commodity.
Distribution

'Saturday

"DEBBIE SNAPP
( Staff Writer

The Second Harvest USDA-
4KCommodity program distribu-
tion, sponsored locally by
New Bethel AME Church,
Elizabeth MB Church, and
Hickory Hill MB Church, is
scheduled for 9 a.m. until
noon Saturday, Jan. 27 at
6496 Brock Road at Ashville
Highway.
Food is distributed every.
fourth Saturday of the month.
Volunteers are needed to
help bag the orders 6:30 p.m.
PRISON MINISTRY group presented a program for the LLL Club Tuesday. From left, Friday evening Jan. 26. They
will work until all the food
Jim Sledge, Butch Galloway. Standing: Gary Brock, Pam Brock, Lois Goode, Bert has beenbagged.
Banks, Fred Wilder. (News Photo)
Contact Essie Norton at 997-
5683 for additional informa-
tion.


SHOE SALE






8-50% FF!
HOE0v


Semi Annual Sale


ga B *I U Starts January 12th!
TRIPLE L CLUB President Phyllis Weldon enjoys a song ---- -.. .t tr.t f
w/Edna Eleazer during a recent meeting. The program 1410 Market Street, #C6
was about Prison Ministry. (News Photo) (between Mosaic & NarcissUs)
SMonday Saturday 10-6
Triple L Club Learns Closed Sundays 850-668-0466
i Spa Pedicures & Manicures
About Prison Ministry FAbREANA also avbcallto edule!


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Triple L Club met on
Tuesday to hear a program on
Prison Ministry from a local
group of volunteers.
The program included mu-
sic, song, prayer, testimonials,
and spiritual fulfillment. It
was designed to duplicate
what takes place during a
prison visit.
Presenting the program
were First Baptist Church
members Edna Eleazer, Lois
Goode, Butch Galloway, Jim

1- -omes 0
i | Homes O
a -


(Continued From Page 6)
FRANK
ROBINSON, Jr.
Frank Robinson, Jr. age 38,
Construction Painter died Fri-
day January 19, 2007 in Se-
bring, Florida.
Mr. Robinson attended Boca
Ciega High and played foot-
ball for St. Pete Lil Devils, he
attended St. John Missionary
Baptist Church.
Funeral Services will be
held Saturday, January 27,
2007 in St. Petersburg, Florida
Smith Funeral Home is han-
dling arrangements 727-894-
2266, www.smithfliinc.com.
Mr. Robinson is survived by
two sons, Kendrick Bullard,
and Bernard Allen of St. Pete;
one daughter, Shelby Wilson
of Tallahassee; father, Frank
Robinson, Sr., of St. Pete, FL;


.


Sledge, Fred Wilder and
Elizabeth Baptist Church
members Pam and Gary
Brock.
First Baptist Pastor Thermon
Moore, also a part of the
prison ministry, spoke about
prison visits and the uplifting
experiences he has witnessed
through being a part of the
ministry.
The LLL Club meets 10:30
a.m. on the fourth Tuesday of
each month.
Members enjoy a buffet
luncheon, and informative pro-
gram at the meetings.


)f Mourning


grandmother, Mary Hall of
Tallahassee; two brothers, Kel-
vin Coates of St. Pete, FL. and
Tramaine Robinson of Jack-
sonville, FL; two sisters Cheryl
Miller of St. Pete FL, Taleathia
Robinson of St. Pete, FL.,
companion, Aretha Bullard.

ARLIE NISTENDIRK
Arlie Moore Nistendirk
age 95, homemaker died Tues-
day, January 23, 2007 in Mon-
ticello.
Arlie Nistendirk was a native
of'Jackson, Missouri and a for-
mer resident Advance Mis-
souri. Mrs. Nistendirk moved
to Monticello, Florida in 1960.
She was of Baptist Faith and a
member of First Baptist
Church of Monticello.
Graveside service was held
at 2:00 p.m. Thursday January
25, 2007 at Spring Field
Cemetery Lloyd. No vistation-
was planned. In lieu of flow-
ers donations can be made to
First Baptist Church of Lloyd's
Building Fund, Lloyd. Florida
32337, and 850-997-5309.
She is survived by one
daughter Marilyn Edwards
('Butch' Walter) of Lloyd, one
sister Mrs. Veona Wooldridge
of Chaffee, Missouri. Two
grandchildren and one great
grandchild.
Preceded in death by her
husband Charles W.
'I.11 ,ii ,i i brother Fillmer
Moutlr, aind a sister Elsie
,1 iimes,


VL'I
of 1.1.1.1III1II1II Yl~j


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 26, 2007 PAGE 7


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CALL 997-7339 FOR MORE INFORMATION
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Monticello, FL
Simply Fit for Women is a limited liability company
HAVE FUN THIS YEAR
GETTING HEALTHY!!


Step Up, Florida!s. is a time for you to get active and get healthy by
taking advantage of great physical activity opportunities in Jefferson County,
Florida. All activities listed on the schedule below are free and open to the
public, so come out and participate for your health!



February 1, 2007 Event Schedule
8:00 am Walk around Monticello by advanced walking group who will meet on the sidewalk at
the corner of N Jefferson St and Dogwood Street (in front of Coffee Break). This
group walks five days a week. For details contact Gretchen Avera at 997-5007.
10:00 am Table tennis demonstration with FSU Table Tennis Team and presentation by Mark
Fenton, former member of the U.S. national racewalking team, at the Jefferson
Elementary School Media Center.
12:00 pm *. Kick- off event at the Jefferson County Recreation Park to include:
Ribbon cutting for the new walking path.
Presentation by Mark Fenton, former.member of the US national racewalking
team.'
-* Walking and biking around the new path at the Jefferson County Recreation
Park by all who attend and students from Jefferson Elementary School.
1:00 pm Simply Fit is offering a free tour and body analysis to the women of the community
from 1:00 pm 3:00 pm. For details contact Karen at 997-7339.
4:00 pm Warm up and stretch at the Boys and Girls Club of the Big Bend with Jamie Rogers.
Club members will then walk the Step Up, Florida!sM banner to the courthouse circle.
4:30 pm Physical Activity Showcase at the courthouse circle to demonstrate physical activity
opportunities currently available in Jefferson County. They include:
Connection, Boys and Girls Club of the Big Bend's dance team, led by
Tiffany Ransom. For details contact the Jefferson County Teen Center at
997-5262.
Tai Chi with Sean Dennison, Executive Director of the Taoist Tai Chi Society
of USA. For details contact 224-5438.
Ballroom Dancing led by Maurice Smith. For details contact the Jefferson
County Health Department at 342-0170 ext 222.
5:15 pm Warm-up and stretch with Jamie Rogers at the courthouse circle.
5:30 pm e Community walk around Monticello.
: Black History Month Events kickoff at the Monticello Opera House with a health fair
and will include a physical activity period with Tequila Hagan and Dr. Flossie Byrd
speaking on the theme of "Honoring the Past and Building Strength for the Future."
Additional o Jefferson County Schools will participate in various ways during school hours.

For More Information Contact 342-0170 ext 207


HEALTH


-~-


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~1*


I
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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 26, 2007

ACA Key Club Takes Shelter


Animals On 'Field Day'


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Key Club members of Au-
cilla Chrisitan Academy and
sponsors recently volunteered
at Humane Society Animal
Shelter.
Nine Key Club members,
sponsors Mary Hartsfield and
Nicole Conger, heard that the
shelter was seriously in need
of volunteers and foster
homes for pets, and decided
to help.
The club members origi-
nally went to the shelter to ap-
ply a new paint job to the
buildings but the weather
proved to be much too cold,
so it was decided by Key
Club sponsors and Shelter Di-
rector Xan Holton-Baker, that
the best thing to do would be
to take those canines which
could be leashed successfully
and calmly, to the Recreation
Park for some exercise for a
couple of hours.
"It was great," said Harts-
field. "We were there from
about 9:30 until noon, along


with Xan and other shelter
staff, walking, running, play-
ing, whatever we could do for
the dogs, and they all enjoyed
it immensely, both the kids
and the animals."
She added that she knew
personally, that one adoption
resulted from that visit and
united a student and a once
shy cat.
"I encourage every group or
individual who wants to vol-
unteer, to call the Humane
Society and set it up," said
Hartsfield. "It's both a lot of
fun and very beneficial for
both the volunteers and the
animals."
Holton-Baker added, "The
fact that so many animals
were loose at one time and
able to get along was
fantastic. Usually the dogs
are kept with a partner at the
shelter, because it helps them
to play and socialize, but this
was great."
She said that the non-
aggressive canines that were
good on leashes, were the
ones participating in the
"Doggie Field Day".


"Most of the dogs were
taken off of their leashes on
the ball fields and allowed to
run, and play.
The dogs enjoyed it and had
a good time. They were all
tired out when it was over,"
she said. This experience
helped us to determine the so-
cial skills our pets have to-
gether and how well the
animals socialize with other
people and unfamiliar
animals.
"We discovered each ani-
mals' unique characteristics,
which ones better enjoyed
running, fetching and the
like," said Holton-Baker.
She concluded that she and
the animals would greatly en-
joy more groups calling and
organizing such events for
them .


Childbirth Education Classes





Tuesday evenings
6:00 p.m. 8:00 p.m.
Archbold Memorial Hospital


Please pre-register by calling the Archbold Maternity Center
at 228-2943. Leave a message.

birth process, newborn care, labor & deliver, hospital admission, breast-feeding &
bottle-feieding, Ask the Pediatrician, and more ...


Looking ahead....
A breast-feeding class will meet on Thursday, February 22 from 5:00 7:00 p.m.
Call 228-2943 to pre-register or for more information.
* Upcoming four-week childbirth education series begin:
March 27, May 8, June 5, July 10, August 7, September 4, October 9 and November 20.


FCAT Writing Blitz

Planned At HMS/JCHS


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Howard Middle School and
Jefferson County High School
will conduct a two-day after
school Writing Blitz for
eighth and tenth grade stu-
dents, 3:15 until 5:15 p.m.,
Monday and Tuesday.

Bus transportation home for
students will be provided.
Assistant Principal Ranston


Chandler said, "The FCAT is
upon us andf we are request-
ing that all eighth and tenth
grade students attend the
Writing Blitz to better prepare
for the FCAT. We are certain
that we will make significant
gains here at the school."
He encourages student and-
parents to remember, "To-
gether, we can, and have
made a difference."-
For .additional information,
contact the .school office at
997-3555.


f -eritae The donation is tax deductible.
for the Pick-up is free.
Btor th l We take care of all the paperwork.




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SDorts


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 26, 2007 PAGE 9


Lady Warriors Second


Seed In District 3-1A


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lady Warriors basketball
team secured the second seed
in District 3-1A play after
winning three of the last four
games.
The Lady Warriors now
stand 14-7 on the season and
5-3 in district play.
Lady Warriors squared off
against Georgia Christian,
downing them, 39-22.
Bethany Saunders led the
score with 15 points, two re-
bounds, four steals.


Lindsey day, eight points,
eight rebounds, two assists,
two steals.
Lisa Bailey, eight points,
four rebounds, five assists,
four steals, one block.
Chelsea Dobson, a JV
player, stepped up to help the
Lady Warriors with four
points, four rebounds, two
blocks.
Caitlin Murphy, two points,
four rebounds.
Brittany Hobbs, two points,
two rebounds, two assists.
Nicole Mathis, two re-
bounds; Rikki Roccanti, three
rebounds; and Hannah


YOUTH SOCCER at the Recreation Park is geared for
students kindergarten through eighth grade. (News
Photo)



Youths Out In Force

For Soccer At Park


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Youth Soccer program
at the Recreation Park drew
some 100 youths, Saturday..
Coach Phil Barker said tt
was a wonderful day for soc-
cer. with the perfect weather
for the sport.
"We had all of our volun-
teers present, and two addi-
tional high school volunteers,
Katie Hopkins and a former
soccer player from Leon,
Valerie (last name
unknown)," he said.
Barker explained that stu-
dent volunteers earn commu-
nity service credit, which is
required before applying to
college.
Recapping the day, Barekr
said: "We had some warm-up
drills for the kids, including
dribbling, heading, passing,
and trapping,, and during play
I could see a lot of the kids
using those techniques," said
Barker. "It was really good to
see. They are good listeners
and really know how to fol-


low instructions."
He added that the children
have not yet been taught goal
Keeping skills, but students in
grades four through eight,
will be taught those skills this
weekend during drills. "I had
it on my agenda to cover, but
decided to reinforce skills
they had been already taught.
He reminded parents to be
sure their children are dressed
appropriately for whatever
Saturday may bring weather-
wise.
Teams seven and eight, are
set to play at 9 a.m.; teams
one and two, 10 a.m.; teams
three and four, 11 a.m.; and
teams five and six at noon.


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Sorensen, two steals.
ACA suffered a close 35-31
loss against Apalachicola.
"We should have beat
them," said Coach Daryl Ad-
ams. "No doubt, we had a bad
game."
Day led the score with eight
points, seven rebounds, three
assists.
Bailey, six points, seven re-
bounds, three assists.
Hobbs, six points, two re-
bounds,. three steals, one
block.
Saunders, six points, two
steals, two blocks.
Murphy, two points, six re-
bounds, two assists.
Mathis, two points, two re-
bounds; and Dobson, one
point, two rebounds.
Aucilla came back to down
Georgia Christian in a second
game, 43-38.
Saunders led the score with
17 points; Day and Bailey
each scored eight points;
Hobbs, four points; Roccanti,
three points and Courtney
Brasington, one point.
When the Lady Warriors
went up against Munroe, the
46-31 win gave the Lady
Warriors second seed spot in
the district.
Day led the charge with 18
points, and 14 rebounds for a
double-double, three assists,
five steals, three blocks.
Saunders, eight points, three
assists, six steals.
Bailey, six points, eight re-
bounds, two assists, six steals,
one block.
Mathis, six points, four re-
bounds, two assists.
Brasington, four points, two
rebounds.
Roccanti, two rebounds.


MCA Boys

Defeat
Old Plank
The Monticello Christian
Academy boys basketball
team celebrated their first win
of the season last week,
downing Old Plank Christian,
48-30.
Philip Payne led the Charg-
ers with 24 points, one bucket
of which was a three-pointer;
Ian Morrow, nine points;
Luke Lingo, eight points;
Chip Gallon, four points; and
Cody Vowell sank one three-
point bucket.


AUCILLA CHRISTIAN ACADEMY Lady Warrior Bethany Saunders blocks her
opponent. In the Georgia Christian game, Saunders earned 15 points as leading
scorer. (Photo by Lynne Saunders)


Mood Swings To Face

Golden Eagle Wings


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Mood
Swings, ladies A-league ten-
nis team, won four and a half
of six mathces, against Glen
Arvin Classics., last week.
Captain Patty Hardy said the
reason for such an odd num-
ber was that midway through
play, some of the matches
were stopped because of rain.
"It was a misting, heavy fog,
and soon the courts got too
slippery to continue pla',,"
said Hardy.
Team #1, Katie Brock- and
Lisa Jackson, won the first
set, 6-3, and was tied 4-4 in
the second set when they
were rained out, resulting in
splitting the points.

Team #2 Patty Hardy and
substitute player Liz Kushner,
lost the first set, 2-6, lost the
second, 6-2, and were ahead
2-1 in the tiebreaker, when


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the set was called due to rain
and points were split.
' Team #3, Angie Delvecchio
and Laura Kirchhoff, lost the
first set, 3-6, won the second,
6-3, and the tiebreaker was
called due to rain, resulting in
a split of points.
Team #4, Susan Goodwin
and Trisha Wirick, won the
sets, 6-1 and 6-2.
Team #5, Lindsey Taylor
and Susan Scarboro, lost the
first set, 3-6, won the second,
6-2, and won the tiebreaker,
6-3.
Team #6, Jennifer Ellis and
substitute player Cathy Neal,
won the sets, 6-0 and 6-0.
The Mood Swings, square
off against the Golden Eagle
Wings, 9:30 a.m., Thursday,
at Golden Eagle Country
Club.


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 26, 2007

Locals Play Tennis In

Florida Championship I


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Local tennis players com-
peted recently in the Combo
Doubles Florida Champion-
ship in Daytona Beach.
Amy Harrison played in
two divisions, 7.5 and 8.8,
winning three of her four
matches.
In the 6.5 division, Trisha
Wirick and Cindy Wainright
.were joined by Monticello A-
league teammates, Laura
Kirchhoff, Angie Delvecchio,
Susan Goodwin and Cathy
Neal, to finish their third
flight.
The men's teams played
tough matches to finish fourth
statewide at 6.5. Duke Harri-


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lady Warriors are included
on the latest list of Big Bend
Leaders.
In scoring, Lindsey Day is
#9 nine with 192 points, an
average of 11.3; and Mallory
Plaines, though she hasn't
played in almost three weeks,


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

JV Warriors lost a close
game to Munroe, 42-40, in re-
cent action.
Coach Daniel Roccanti said
the game was a disappoint-
ment, because Munroe made
the game winning shot just as


son teamed up with Brad
Mueller to go 1-1.
Mark Wirick won with Tal-
lahassee player Rodney Lewis
and lost a close one with
Mueller.
Tennis teams made up of
players from Monticello and
Tallahassee competed against
teams from all over the state
during the event.
This league allows players
with different ability levels to
team together and compete.
The Championship com-
pleted a season that began in
Sept. Qualifying teams had to
finish first in their local dis-
trict and field three courts of
doubles for each match.
"The prized trip is full of
tough competition and lots of
fun rooting for local teams,"
said Kirchhoff.


AMONG competitors in the Florida Tennis Champion- cello and Tallahassee in competition with teams from
ship in Daytona Beach, are locals Mark and Trisha all over the state.
Wirick. Area teams consisted of athletes from Monti-


Munroe Downs Warriors


47-41 In Recent Action


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Warriors lost to Munroe
47-41 in recent hoop action..
"It was close and we were
ahead during most of the first
half," said Coach Dan Nenn-
stiel. "But Munroe took the
lead in the second half and


stayed there."
He said that the Warriors
should have made some of
their three-point attempts,
"We were zero of 17 for
three-pointers and we were
only 11 of 24 from the free-
throw line, so we lost some
points there," said Nennstiel.
Kyle Barnwell led the score
for Aucilla with 15 points and


Chargers Beat Creekside


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Christian
Academy boys basketball
team celebrated their second
win of the season, after down-
ing Creekside Christian Mon-
day, 51-31.


Leading the Chargers was
Philip Payne with 14 points;
Luke Lingle, ten points; Chip
Gallon, ten points, two buck-
ets being three-pointers; Ian
Morrow, eight points; Josh'
Baker, four points; and Jared
Bailey, two points.
The Chargers face LATMA
Christian, 5 p.m., Friday here.


12 rebounds (11 of which
were offensive rebounds) for
a double-double, two assists,
one steal.
.Stephen Griffin, 13 points
and 12 rebounds for a double-
double, two assists, three
blocks.
Prateen Patel, four points,
four rebounds, two steals.
Wade Scarberry, three
points, six assists, seven re-
bounds, two steals.
Reggie Walker, two points,
seven rebounds.


Michael Kinsey, two points,
four rebounds; and Jim. Ste-
phens, two points.
Clark Christie, one of the
middle school players, as-
sisted the Warriors in the
game. "He played a little at
the end; and I appreciate him
coming out to help us," said
Nennstiel.
The warriors face off
against Bell, 8 p.m., Friday,
there.
"Bell is a senior-laden team
with big, strong players," said
Nennstiel. "They beat us
handily twice last year and
once already, this year, which
resulted in a 67-35 loss.
We're going to have to get
our shooting percentage up
for them," he concluded.


is #12, with 144 points, an av-
erage of 9.6 per game.
In rebounding, Day is #7,
with 146, an average of 8.6.
Plaines is #11 with 116, an
average of 7.7; and Lisa Bai-
ley is #13 with 112, an aver-
age of 6.6.
In steals, Bailey and Hobbs
are tied at #8 with 52 each, an
average of 3.0.


the game ended.
Stephen Dollar and Luke
Witmer, led the score with ten
points each; Alex Dunkle, six
points; and A. J. Connell and
Wilson Lewis, each scored
five points.
The Warriors face Bell, 5
p.m., Friday, there. In the pre-
vious game against Bell, Au-
cilla suffered the first loss of
the season.


ACA Middle Girls Fall To

Georgia Christian 28-26


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Middle School girls at ACA
narrowly lost to Georgia
Christian 28-26, Friday.
"We played well, keeping
the game pretty much tied
throughout, but Georgia
Christian scored the winning
basket with just two seconds
remaining in the game," said
Coach Mac Finlayson.
Sarah Sorensen, 14 points,


ACA Middle
Boys Fall To
GA. Christian

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Geogia Chrisitan slipped
by ACA Middle School boys,
31-27, Friday.
Coach Ray Hughes said the
boys could have won, but two
stronger players, Clark Chris-
tie and Matt Dobson, fouled
out in the fourth period.
Dobson, 14 points; Trent
Roberts and Corey Burrus,
each scored six points; and
Alex Gulledge, one point.
The Warriors now stand 8-3
on the season.

MCA Girls
Lose To
Creekside

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lady Chargers lost to
Creekside Christian 32-12,
Monday.
The only two girls scoring
were Rayne Baker, 12 points;
and Keneshia Jordan, two
points.
The Lady Chargers face off
against LATMA Christian, 5
p.m., Friday here.


eight rebounds; Taryn Cope-
land, five points, eight re-
bounds; Anna Finlayson,
Kaitlin Jackson, and Eliza-
beth Riley, each scored two
points.
The girls now stand 8-3 on
the season.


I-
FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Christian-
Academy girls basketball
team celebrated the first win


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of the season after slamming
Old Plank Christian, last
week, 42-29.
The Lady Chargers now 1-3
on the season.
Keneshia Jordan and Chris-
tian Morrow led the charge
Sfor the Lady Chargers, each
with six points; Sarah Parrott,
four points; and Latisha Har-
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points.


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ACA Girls On Big Bend


Leaders List


Munroe Downs JV Warriors
42-40 in Recent Hoop Play


MCA Girls Down Old Plank
8


0 M.









MONTICELLO, (FL). NEWS. FRI.. JANUARY 26, 2007 PAGE 11


Keep Old Man Winter Out


According to the U.S. De-
partment of Energy, heating
accounts for almost half of the
average family's winter energy
bill, making it by far the larg-
est energy expense for most
homes.
So, to keep Old Man Win-
ter's grip from your wallet, the
following are a few tips to as-
sist in combating the cost of
heating your home:
Inspect areas around win-
dows and doors, gaps along


baseboards, mail chutes, and
entry points for power lines,
ducts and vents for air infiltra-
tion.
If a draft is present, use a
caulk and/or weather stripping
to seal the areas. This simple
effort will alleviate the poten-
tial for heat loss and can help
reduce heating bills by as
much as 10 percent.
Purchase a do-it-yourself
window insulation kit to add
an additional barrier to your


home-winterization program.
Most insulation kits consist
of a clear film and double-
sided installation tapes. With
the heat of a hair dryer, you
can create a tight, transparent
barrier between the window
and the inside of your house,
keeping the heat in and the
cold out.
Install fire-retardant socket
sealers behind electrical sock-
ets located on walls making up
the perimeter of your home.


Don't forget to checl for
worn doorstops at the bottom
of doors, too. You want to be
sure that you seal as many ar-
eas of your home as possible.
Hire a heating professional
to inspect your home's system
before winter arrives.
The professional will advise
you of what needs to be done
to maximize your heating sys-
tem's efficiency, including tac-
tics such as vacuuming vents
and other heating components


and replacing filters.
Check to make sure your
attic, crawl spaces, exterior
and basement walls, ceilings
and floors are insulated to the
proper level.
Visit a home center to learn
about recommended adequate
insulation levels and then go
home and measure.
According to the U.S. De-
partment of Energy, if your
home is properly insulated,
you can save nearly 30 percent
on home energy bills.
Have your chimney
cleaned and inspected. You


can lose much heat and money
through your chimney, espe-
cially if your damper does not
operate properly.
By conducting a home-
winterization program, you'll
be warmer and, most impor-
tantly, you'll be able to say
you've kept Old Man Winter
out of your home and your
wallet.


SSISB CALL TO ADVERTISE
YOUR BUSINESS



DIRECTORY 997-3568



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Tallahassee, Fl. 32303
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o 'Keessler t A'I OldJh "I Do Windows, Etc."
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JACKS BOATS AND TRAILERS, INC. Construction LLC
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VEHICLES 449"19 orth, PATVs J-CRC 329001 Wall Paper Hanging

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S-"* DTC $1.83 $5.00 $16.28 Portable Toilet Rentals
Brd... Marlboro $3.18 $8.99 $28.94
Brad McLeo 1 1 1 5565-A Crawfordville Rd IIbi _.-
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family reunions, parties Licensed and Insured
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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 26. 2007


LEGAL
INVITATION FOR BID (Construc-
tion Contract) City of Monticello
City Hall 245 S. Mulberry Street
Monticello, FL SEALED BIDS, sub-
ject to the conditions contained
herein, will be RECEIVED until
2:00 p.m. Thursday, February 15th,
2007, at the offices of the Architect
(at the address below) and then
opened, for furnishing all materials
and performing all work for: The
re-painting and partial restoration
of the two-story building at 245 S.
Mulberry Street, Monticello, Flor-
ida otherwise known as the Monti-
cello City Hall. The work will
include (but is not limited to): Refin-
ish and re-paint all existing exterior
painted surfaces unless noted other-
wise. Remove paint from existing
brick foundation piers. Replace-
ment and/or repair of miscellaneous
wood elements as indicated and/or
noted on the drawings. Plans and
specifications, not exceeding two
sets, may be obtained from: John-
son / Peterson Architects, Inc., 2110
Centerville Road, Suite C, Tallahas-
see, Florida, 32308 (850) 224-9700.
Cost of plan is $25.00 per set (non-
refundable), payable upon pick up
or order of plans. Payments will be
made as follows: Monthly, in accor-
dance with AIA Document A101-
1997, "Standard Form of
Agreement Between Owner and
Contractor" Contract duration shall
be 60 calendar days from Notice of
Proceed to Substantial Completion.
Liquidated damages for delay will
be $100.00 per calendar day. Bids
must be submitted on the Bid Form
provided, and the successful bidder
will be required to execute AIA
Document A101-1997, "Standard
Form of Agreement Between Owner
and Contractor".
1/24,26/07,c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION PACIFIC ISLAND
INVESTMENT PARTNERS, LLC,
Plaintiff, vs. PHYLLYS R.
BALDWIN F/K/A PHYLLYS R.
COLSON, et, Defendant(s). CASE
NO. 2006-326-CA DIVISION


* Got A Cute Photo?

Send It To Us And
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Our Readers!

Kids Dogs *
Strange stuff, etc.

Monticello News
P.O. Box 430
Monticello, FL
32345

"You Can't Be Without It'"


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NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure
dated January 17, 2007 and entered
in Case No. 2006-326-CA of the
Circuit Court of the SECOND
Judicial Circuit in and for
JEFFERSON County, Florida
wherein PACIFIC ISLAND
INVESTMENT PARTNERS, LLC,
is the Plaintiff and PHYLLYS R.
BALDWIN F/K/A PHYLLYS R.
COLSON; PAUL R. BALDWIN;
BENEFICIAL FLORIDA, INC.;
ASHVILLE AREA PROPERTY
OWNERS' ASSOCIATION, INC.;
are the Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at
NORTH DOOR OF THE
COURTHOUSE LOBBY IN
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA at
11:00 AM, on the 16th day of
February, 2007, the following
described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment: LOT 33,
BLOCK D, AUCILLA SHORES
SUBDIVISION, AS PER PLAT
BOOK B, PAGE 38, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA. A/K/A 929 E Buckhorn
Trail, Greenville, FL 32331 any
person claiming an interest in the
surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the
seal of this Court on January 17,
2007. Kirk Reams Clerk of the
Circuit Court By: Norma L.
Wilkins Deputy Clerk FILED AND
ENTERED DATE 1/17/07 KIRK B.
REAMS CLERK OF CIRCUIT
COURT
1/26,2/2/07,c

NOTICE
BINGO- sponsored by Lloyd
Lions Club. 3 p.m. until,
Saturday, Jan. 27 at 7337-A Old
Lloyd Road, $50 Bonanza!
Proceeds for club projects.
997-1754
HELP WANTED
Cox Auto Trader is currently
seeking drivers to deliver our
magazines in the Tallahassee
FL, Madison, FL and
surrounding areas. Computer
knowledge helpful, requires
reliable vehicle, good driving


m m .)111rlai~l~l
Fondl6 o


HELP WANTED HELP WANTED.


record, valid drivers license ,
insurance. One day a week-
Thursdays. Pick up magazines
in Madison. Call 386-590-1255
1/24,26,31,2/2,7,9,14,16,21,23,28
,3/2,c
Caregiver for elderly lady. Must
be pble to cook, drive, light
housekeeping, work flexible hrs.
Call 997-6803
R/D 1/24,26,pd
Aucilla Christian Academy is
currently accepting applications
for a bus driver position. Must
have (or be willing to obtain) a
CDL class B with P and S
endorsements. Also, must be a
positive, Christian role model.
For more information or to
apply, please contact the school
at 997-3597.
R/D 1/24,26,c
Driver ASAP 36-43cpm
/$1.20pm + Sign On Bonus $0
Lease NEW Trucks CDL-A + 3
mos OTR (800) 635-8669.
1/24,26,fc
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Working through the
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Call Today!! (800) 488-2921 Ask


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Paid Training! min. 1 yr
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WAGGONERS TRUCKING
(912) 571-9668 OR (866)
413-3074.
1/24,26,fc

SERVICES ..
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn

Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quick responses.
6/22. tfn
Notary Public Documents/
Marriages performed will


SERVICES
Travel. Call Joan 948-2788
R/D 1/26,31,2/2,pd
Childcare Services- infant to 3
years old. In my home. Call
997-5498 reasonably low prices.
11/1,TFN,c
Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
new menopausal products.
Jackson's drug store.


SERVICES: T
Housekeeping- Call Savanah at
294-5634
R/D 1/24,26,31,2/2,pd
If you have a child attending
FSU/FAMU high schools, and
carpooling is not working, for
an affordable fee, you have an
option. Call Freeman Davis
510-5162, 421-8060.
R/D 1/17,19,24,26,31,2/2,pd


Big Bend Hospice, the leader in compassionate care
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following position available on our care team

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2006 Nissan Altima 2.55

White 18" Chrome rims 4- Speed
Automatic, Keyless remote ,Cruise /p
Window/ p Door, CD, Cloth Seats,
6- Speaker Audio System


150 8TH AVE. N. E,* CAIRO, GA 39828
PHONE (229) 377-4162 (800) 217-8955 FAX (229) 377-9789


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At Roy Campbell Chevrolet


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'Sa ii justt past 19 on Hwy 319N)


RCI$20T OVER $2 MILLION

| RANPPROV IN INVENTORY

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Some restriclicns apply. See dealer for details. Not responsible for typographical errors or omissions. Pictures shown may not be actual vehicle advertised.
All offers with approved credit. Offers expire dale of publication. Last years taxes and year-to-date check stub required.


. I'mil


lI~alillow" r .1 IM


PKI 94:1 A'A'd 1"'I j I FUR


I ICI PH H 4


F, --i'


id n !o o Ia;t;


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 26, 2007 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED

Your Community Shopping Center

I!


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday;..$9.00
Each Additional Line....$1.25
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


FOR SALE
SHEDS- custom built storage
sheds. See display on Hwy. 221
North, Greenville. Call Bob
242-9342
R/D
1/10,12,17,19,24,26,31,2/2,7,9,14
,16,21,23,28,3/2,7,9,14,16,

Black/Bay TB Gelding Great
on Trails, Foxhunting. $2200.00
OBO Paint Gelding Overo
w/Blue Eyes. Barrels/Trails
$3500.00 OBO 997-5770 Riding
Lessons.
R/D 1/24,26,31,2/2,pd

$150 Queen Pillow-top Mattress
Set. New in Plastic with
warranty.. 850-222-9879
12/l,tfh,c
Cherry sleigh bed SOLID
WOOD- BRAND NEW in box,
$250. (850) 545-7112
12/1,tfn,c
LEATHER SOFA &
LOVESEAT. NEW, warranty,
sacrifice $795. (can deliver).
(850) 425-8374.
12/1,tfn,c
NEW king POSTER bedroom
set bed, dresser, mirror, chest,
2 nightstands. $4400 value, must
sell $1650. (850) 545-7112
12/1,tfn,c
KING PILLOWTOP Mattress
Set. Brand new in plastic. Must
move, $225. (850) 222-9879
12/1,tfn,c

OR RENT
1 Rm. efficiency Apt $300 per
month 997-6492 Leave mess.
1/17, tfn,c
Mobile home- 2BDR near 1-10
$475.mth Modular- 3BDR near
JCKC $675.mth 421-3911
R/D 1/12,17,19,24,26,31,pd
Spacious 2/1 and 1/1 apts, also
office space, near Monticello
center. Section 8 OK Call
850-491-8447
1/24,tfn,c
Jefferson Place Apts., 1 & 2 BR,
HUD Vouchers Accepted 1468
,S. Waukeenah St. Office 300,
Monticello. 997-6964. "This
institution is an Equal
Opportunity Provider and
Employer".
9/6.tfn, c

REAL ESTATE
Nobles Subdivision- Newly
renovated 3/1 total under roof
1710 sqft new doors- vinyl
windows- CHA carport, fenced
150x100 lot. Well landscaped
owner/ Realtor $118,700 O.B.O.
997-2973 or 997-6806.
11/15,TFN,c
Peaceful Country Living on
almost 5 acres! Nice 3 BR/ 2 BA
home, 1672 sq. ft., screened
porch, garage plus carport,
outside screened room for
entertaining. A great buy at
only $189,900. Call today to
view. Renee' Smawley, Coldwell
Banker Hartung & Noblin, Inc.
508-4525
1/24,26,c
North Carolina Cool Mountain
Air, Views & Streams, Homes,
Cabins & Acreage. FREE
BROCHURE (800) 642-5333.
Realty of Murphy 317 Peachtree
St. Murphy, N.C. 28906.
www.realtyofmurphy.com
1/24,26,fc
NEW PRICE! 10+ AC-
$299,000! UPSCALE
Equestrian Gated Community!
200 Year Old Oaks. Established
lush pastures.. Paved private
rds, u/g utilities. 2 miles from
HITS! Exc financing! Call (868)
352-2249 x 1156.
1/24,26,fc


. , .. ..
A UTOMO1, -
$500 POLICE IMPOUNDS
Cars from $500! Tax Repos, US
Marshall and IRS sales! Cars,
Trucks, SUV's, Toyota's,
Honda's, Chevy's & more! For
Listings Call (800) 425-1730 x
2384.
1/24,26,fc
1996 Ford F350 Diesel Crewcab
$5000, O.B.O. No calls after
9:00 p.m. please 251-2237
1/10,tfn,nc
1989 International Dump
Truck. 18 CY. Tandem Axles.
$18,000. 251-2437, 997-0901.
R/D 12/6,tfn,nc
1996 Ford Ranger XLT
Supercab 2 wd 4.0 V6 127K AC
AT Toolbox Needs some minor
work, but,driveable now. $3,000
251-0763 8am 8pm
R/D 9/27,tfn ,nc
BUSINESS .
OPPORTUNITIES
-TRAVEL AGENCY- Full
Service INTERNET *
Turnkey Under $1,000
www.TravelsWithClara.com
www.HowifiredMyBoss.com
R/D 1/12,17,19,24,26,pd



"Familiar Faces
And Quiet Places"


A Pictorial And Nar-
rative
History Of
Jefferson County


By Derelyne Delp
Counts


Available At The
Chamber Office And
Leading
Merchants


FOUND
Keys on green ring found
Sunday 11/26/06 on Lake Road
near Tecumseh Rd. Call Debbie
@ 997-3568
11/29,tfn,nc

GARAGE SALE
GRAND YARD SALE, many
vendors Feb. 3rd & 4th from
8:00 until at 12 Oak B & B on
Boston Hwy.
R/D 1/26,31,2/2,pd


CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots,
Land We Make
Mortgage Loans,
Reverse Mortgages!
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc
878-3957


e '- ' ,

.. .:. ,,~, -- ': : .
; .# .- .,.1 ..


ve--.c- ~c

Exclusive, Private Living In Downtown Monticello!

Riley Palmer Built in 06, 3 BR/2 BA, 1440 sq ft, on N. Cherry
Court, brick & Hardie board exterior, oversized one car
garage, large tiled,kitchen, raised panel cabinets, solid surface
counters, wood floors, vaulted living room ceiling w/crown
molding, screened back porch, prewired for security and data.

$229,500 Ken Foster Palmer Properties 544-5040


FOR SALE

* OLDIE BUT GOODIE, 2 BDRM, 1 BTH, pine flooring, arched
opening between Living and Dining, fireplace insert, detached
workshop storage, half acre lot, $100,000

* US 19 NORTH, 5 acres, zoned for Recreational vehicle/travel
trailer park, edge of city limits $90,000, additional acreage available

* AIRSTRIP, home and hangar bordering 6000 ft. long grass strip,
5 acres or more, no pilots license required., NE Jefferson County
,$269,000

* FIXXER UPPER, on US 90 downtown lyonticello, 2Bd, IBth,
built in 1925, $95,000

* LIQUIDATION, Seller in trouble, house needs work, corner lot,
$69,000 "As Is"

M/1-933-6363
All Realty Services
Big eBnd Florid
LWMETESIRMON
REALTOR
M" FM.
macaw=Ra~~2


n, -Priced for quick sale
Sellers Motivatedl
343 Attatulga Road,
Lamont Area
Custom 2004 Home on
5.66 acres. All brick,
built in 2004, 3 BR/2
BA split plan, 2 car
garage. Hardwood,
tile & carpet flooring.
All appliances
Dianne Spooner, Broker, Hill Spooner & included. Like new.
Company Inc. 850-508-1846 Move-in-ready.
$279,000


VMS, Inc.

is accepting applications for a Maintenance
Technician to work on State Roads out of the
Monticello, Florida office. This is a full time
entry level position that includes, but not
limited to, hurricane disaster response,
landscaping, litter removal, and sign repair
replacement. Applicant must have a valid
Florida's driver's license with a safe driving
record, This position requires a background
check & drug testing. Starting salary $9.50 an
hour. Benefits available upon completion of
probation. Apply at 1455 N. Jefferson Street,
Monticello, FL. (850) 997-5000.


"I '

Southern Forestry Reaty
www.soforest.com
-'
83+ac, W Jefferson Co.;-
15-20 yr old loblolly, natural
pines & hardwoods. 5 ponds,
great fishing & hunting tract.
Power available
58+ac, Madison Co. 30 ac
12-yr old planted pines,
frontage on Aucilla River &
Hwy 90, beautiful oaks, road
system. $5172/ac.
199+ac, Jefferson Co. 35
min. E of Tallahassee. Natural
upland pines & hardwoods. Full
of turkey & deer, ponds w/fish
& ducks. Power available.
111+ac, Jefferson Co. 18-
20 yr old planted pines, 50 ac
hardwood bottom. Nice rolling
topography, 35 min to Tallahas-
see. Full of game near Aucilla
River. $5000/ac.

Rob Langford
850-556-7575
Many more investment opportu-
nities available in North Fl,
South GA, and Southeast AL.


Joann Bridges Academy in Greenville, FL
is currently seeking:
Special Education Teacher (ESE)
The candidate must be certified by.the State Board of Education, hold a
certificate as a Special Education Teacher and be certified in a designated subject
area. Applicant will have to successfully pass a background screening.
Please fax your resume to the attention of Renee Johnson, Lead Teacher (850)
948-4227 or call (850) 948-4220 for more information.

Mental Health Therapist
The Therapist will provide individual, family, and group psychotherapy and
develop specific treatment goals for the youth. This person must be able to
document appropriate clinical information in the medical record in a timely
manner.
Applicants must have graduated from any accredited college or university with a
master's degree in social work, counseling and guidance, psychology or human
services as well as a successful background check. Experience working with
clients in a facility setting is preferable
Please fax your resume to the attention of Ms. Mobley, Facility Administrator
at (850) 948-4227 or call (850) 948-4220 for more information.
SJOANN BRIDGES ACADEMY
Youth Services International Southeastern
Programs, Inc.
950 S.W. Greenville Hills Road, Greenville, Florida 32331
(850) 948-4220 Fax` (850) 948-4227


..-.. . . .

;, Housing Vouchers

ii We accept aII vouchers
ii 2/2 $615 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 $50 dep. 3

S Pool & Youth Activities

p 575-6571
.: . .......... .. I


(850) 997-4340


Property Management Servicesl!l
Great Rentals
2/1 1/2 bath mobile home east of
town on 5 acres $650/month
2 bedroom cabin in the woods $750 mo


Wooded Tract 2.09 hillside acres east of town
on graded County Road $30,400

Just Listed!! 3 bedroom 2 bath delightful log
cabin with front and back screened porches,
board fence pasture, double carport and out
building on 4.07 acres $385,000

Lloyd Acres on a wooded hillside a 3 bedroom 2
bath modular home with oak floors, fireplace and
lots of very nice extras including shop for $87,500

Historic Budd House built ca 1882 by commu-
nity leader of the day for his family. Lovely wood
work, high ceilings, spacious rooms, grand fire-
places, marvelous porches, currently 4 bedrooms
and 2 baths $355,000

Waterfront Home!! Like New, roomy, 3 bedroom
2 bath home with big carport, nice shed with 5
acres on very nice lake near 1-10 and US 19
$385,000 See it at www.TimPeary.com

Amazing Buy!!! Mixed Use Property 12 plus
partially cleared acres on US 19 south land use
designation permits 4 houses per acre near Den-
nis' Trading post only $36,500 per acre

New Listinq 13.29 acres some wooded some
open $5,000 per acre

Terrific Location 3 bedroom 2 bath doublewide
with fireplace, big porch, garage, shed, above
ground pool, with big trees, fence paddocks, on.
county maintained paved Cherry Tree Lane now
$127,500

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly wooded
acres Only $36,500

Pasture and Pecans 5-10 lovely acres on paved
road $15,500 per acre Very nice property, good
deed restrictions

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in. remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only. $329,000

Country Livinq at it's Best! REDUCED Com-
fortable 4 bedroom 3 bath home on five fenced
acres with guest cottage w/bath, 2 car garage, big
shop, pasture 100 pecan trees and a nice pool
Only $365,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South near
Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Wooded Acreaqe 5.35 acres on private road
off Paul Thompson Road $128,500

Waukeenah Hiqhway 27.99 acres good home
site fenced pasture $545,000


Aucilla Shores 5 level wooded acres
$75,000

.. Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath -
doublewide
with nice deck, fenced yard on 1 acre
$73,500

Helo! Serious Buyers Lookina for::


- Small Farm 125-350 acres for grand kids
-20-130 acres investment for 2 brothers


Realtor Tim Peary


850-997-4340
See all our listings at
www.TimPeary.com


Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate! g
Simply the Best!


4
4
4
4


I


oil


!,









PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 26, 2007

Locals Featured On Black

History Month Calendar


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Jefferson County's Carmen
Cumings Martin, and Dexter
Errick Farmer, are among
citizens featured in the 2007
African American History
Month Calendar, unveiled by
Tallahassee Community Col-
lege.
Each year the calendar
highlights African Americans
who have made a difference.
Cummings-Martin, repre-
senting July, is a former
County Watermelon Festival
Queen, and a FAMU
graduate.
She serves as Community
Relations Director and Dis-
trict Representative for U.S.
Congressman Allen Boyd.
After 18 years as a news an-
chor and reporter for WCTV,
Channel Six, she is well
known throughout the region.
Prior to becoming a re-
porter, Cummings-Martin
worked in the press office of
former Gov. Bob Graham.
She has taught as an adjunct
at FAMU and FSU, and now
hosts a weekly in-depth look
at the urban community called
"Florida Vibrations."


Despite numerous job offers
in larger markets, she has re-
mained committed to her fam-
ily and community.
Farmer, representing No-
vember, has a great desire to
make a positive impact on the
lives of those he encounters
on a daily basis.
He serves as the coordina-
tor of research programs and
services at Florida A&M Uni-
versity's School of Allied
Health Sciences.

Farmer is a native of Mon-
ticello. He entered Tallahas-
see Community College, and
later continued his education
at FSU and, completed his
Bachelors degree in Business
Communication.
Realizing that the best way
for him to create positive so-
cial change was in public
service, he earned a Master's
degree at FAMU in Applied
Science with a concentration
in Public Administration.
He is now pursuing a Doc-
torate in Public Administra-
tion from Walden University.
He is involved in many serv-
ice organizations.
He is currently vice presi-
dent of the Beta Lambda


Sigma Chapter of Phi Beta
Sigma Fraternity, Inc. which
works with the Boys and
Girls Club, March of Dimes,
and New Beginnings Day
Care.
He is director of Tallahas-
see Sigma's Educational
Foundation, which focuses on
the proactive development of
young men, and vice presi-
dent of the Tallahassee Na-
tional Pan-Hellenic Council.
He is also a member of the
American Society for Public
Administration and the
FAMU Boosters, and serves
on the TCC Alumni Associa-
tion Board of Directors.
Questions,
Anyone?
Get the answers you can
trust about government
programs, benefits, and
services from the Federal
Consumer Information
Center.
Just call toll-free:
1-800-FED-IEWO
(That's' 1-800-333-4636)
Mon-Fri 8am-8pm ET
Or visit
www.pueblo.gsa.gov/call
U.S. General Services Administration


FreeaHeal*thSureeuning


:11


Archbold Memorial Hospital, Archbold's Heart &Vascular Center, and the
Lewis Hall Singletary Oncology Center perform free screenings on the first
Tuesday and first Wednesday of the month. Get checked for early signs of
cardiovascular disease and cancer. Early detection is the best protection!

Y r yourelIf .


S~ Tr ri4i rfxptmilt

* ForFpece, vfmnind

"First Tuesday"
Cancer screenings
Feb. 6, by appointment.

"First Wednesday"
Cardiovascular screenings
Feb. 7, by appointment.


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850-223-1900
Mon Fri: 8:30 AMN 5:30 PM. 1920 S. Jefferson Street. Perr'. FL.


**Rates exclude taxes & Sprint Fees (including USF charge of up to 2.41% that varies quarterly, cost recovery fees up to $1.55 per
line, & state/local fees that vary by area). Sprint Fees are not taxes or gov't req'd charges.
Coverage not avaji. cvcrywhcre. Avail. features & services will vary by phonc/nclwork. Nextcl National Network reaches 263 million peo-
ple. Offers not available in all markets or locations. Subject io credit approval. $200 carly termination fee &S 19.99 (max SS0/account) set-
up fee per line. Monthly infrastructure fee ofS 1.99 per account applies. Deposit may be required. Additional terms & restrictions apply. See
store or Sprint.corn for details. Offer ends 2/17/07. Service Plan Overage (S(.45/min). Partial minutes charged as full minutes. Nights: 9pm-
7am. Wknds: Fri. 9pm-Mon. 7am. Bonus min. cannot be shared and are good for 24 months. Anytime minutes may only be shared with
units on same plan on same account. Walkic Talkie: Nationwide walkie-talkie (.l O/iin). Mail in Rebate: Requires purchase by 02/17/07 and
activation by 03/03/07. While supplies last. Rebate amount can't exceed purchase price, Allow 8-12 weeks to receive rebate check. Terms
and conditions on rebate form or ncxtelconnections.com. Nextcl reserves the right to cancel/extend offers without notice.
02006 Nextcl Partners. Inc. NEXTEL. the NEXTEL. logo & other marks are service marks & trademarks of Nextel FOCUS
Communications, Inc. All third party product or service names are the property of their respective owners. MOTOROLA &
the Stylized M logo are the registered in the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office. All rights reserved. ndri


small business


tip #37
Offering an affordable health plan to your
employees can boost your employee retention.


If you do not currently offer your employees health
benefits, you may be eligible for a 40% premium savings
for Capital Health Plan coverage through the Capital
Health Partnership.

Learn more. Find out if your small business qualifies by
calling 523-7333 or go to:
www.capitalhealthpartnership.com.



Capital

Health

Partnership


NOTICE OF AMENDMENT TO THE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE LAND USE
MAP OF THE CITY OF MONTICELLO


AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MONTICELLO, FLORIDA,
AMENDING ITS COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR
AUTHORITY; PROVIDING FOR FINDINGS OF FACT;
PROVIDING FOR JURISDICTION; ADOPTING AMENDMENT
TO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE LAND USE MAP TO
II$CLUDE A FUTURE LAND USE DESIGNATION FOR A
CERTAIN RECENTLY ANNEXED PARCEL CONSISTING OF
APPROXIMATELY 329.85 ACRES AND AMENDING THE
FUTURE LAND USE MAP DESIGNATION FOR A CONTIGUOUS
89.53 ACRE PARCEL; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND
PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.



The City of Monticello proposes to adopt the following amendment to its future land use
map by Ordinance 2006-08. The future land use map proposed designation is RLD -
Residential Low Density for a parcel identified on the map below., A public hearing on
the ordinance will be conducted by the Monticello City Council on February 6, 2007 at
7:00 p.m. at Monticello City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Street, Monticello, FL 32344.
Interested persons may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed
ordinance. The entire text of the ordinance may be inspected at City Hall, 245 S.
Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday.



MONTICELLO
'US 900.







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