Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00172
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: January 24, 2007
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00172
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text








Sensible
Strategies For
Healthy Aging

Editorial, Page 4
I


Step Up Florida
Kickoff
Set February 1

Story, Page 8
I


ACA, JES
Academic Honor
Roils

Stories Pages 10, 12
a


United Way
Meets County
Goal Of $25,000

Story, Photo Page 14
II


Wednesday Morning


Monticello

139TH YEAR NO. 6, 50 CENTS Published Wednesdays & Fridays


News
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 24, 2007


Developer, Neighbors Hope


To Solve Problem


Amiably


High Powered Attorney

Now Involved in Matter


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Everyone is saying that they
want the issue resolved amia-
bly, but a high-powered attor-
ney is now involved, and at
least one of the participants is
saying he is ready to sue.
That's the latest development
on the Sanctuary subdivision
in the Lloyd area and the ero-
sion problems that the project
is allegedly causing to neigh-
boring property owners.
SLast Thursday evening, after
hearing from the two adjoining
property owners and from the
county's planning attorney and
engineer, commissioners de-
cided to do nothing for the
time being, other than to let the
staff continue monitoring the
situation.
Meanwhile, Attorney Cynthia
Henderson, who is represent-
ing the two adjoining property
owners, Dr. George Haedicke
and Jose Rodriguez, expressed
optimism that she could work
out the problems amicably
with developers Lisa and Jeff


Ard, whom she knows person-;
ally.
The discussion began with
Haedicke passing out pine sap-
lings from his tree farm to
county officials and members
of the audience.
The saplings, Haedicke said,
represented part of his eco-
nomic future, a future that was
now being threatened by
storm-water runoff from the
Ards' development.
Haedicke said he wanted it
understood that he bore no
grudges against anyone and
that he still wanted to resolve
the matter amicably. But he
also wanted it understood that
runoff from the development
continued to erode his land.
"I have sought relief and un-
fortunately, the Department of
Environmental Regulations
(DEP), the Department of
Transportation (DOT), the
county and the county engi-
neer have had difficulty find-
ing the ability to help me solve
the problem because it's no-
body's. problem but mine,"
Haedicke said.
He expressed appreciation


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Review of the city charter
appears to be an idea whose
time may have come.
The City Council, at least,
indicated two weeks ago that it
will appoint a commission to
review the charter.
The issue surfaced at the Jan.
9 meeting, when Councilman


Luther Pickels suggested that
the council should dedicate
one of its planned monthly
workshops to a review of the
charter.

"We're way behind," Pickels
said. "I feel we need to review
our charter to see where we're
at."
Councilman Brian Hayes
endorsed the idea
enthusiastically. In fact, he


;.4;


..:~t~~~


COUNCILMAN LUTHER PICKLES, left, proposed the
city review its charter, with an eye to updating it. On
right is City Attorney Bruce Leinback. (News Photo)


that Ard, in good faith, had of-
fered to provide 20 truckloads
of dirt to help solve the prob-'
lem. But it was his estimation,
Haedicke said, that the solu-
tion would require closer to
500 truckloads in order to cre-


himself had planned to raise
the issue, Hayes said.
But rather than the council
taking up the matter in a
workshop, Hayes suggested
that the council appoint a
standing committee to review
the charter on an annual basis.
"I'm talking about the
.creation of a charter review
commission," Hayes said.
That commission, in turn,
would make recommendations
to the council for what would
likely represent some fairly
substantial changes to the
charter, he said.
The city charter dates from
the 1920s, according to City
Clerk Emily Anderson. She
points out that it requires a
voter referendum to amend the
charter.
In 1991, for example, voters
approved a reduction of the
City Council from seven to
five members, she says. And in
1995, voters rejected a pro-
posal to make the chief of po-
lice and city clerks offices
non-elected.
Monticello is one of a few
remaining cities in the state
that still has an elected clerk
and chief of police.
The issue likely will be dis-
cussed again at the Feb. 6
council meeting.


ate a berm to deflect the water
from his property.
"If I had a magic wand I
would make the problem go
away," Haedicke said.
But failing that, and being
that it was "crunch time", he


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


The city's Internet service
continues picking up custom-
ers, if slowly.
As of last week, according to
Councilman I Tom
Vogelgesang, head of the tech-
nology committee, the service
had 39 customers.
"It's rolling," Vogelgesang
said. "It's doing what it's sup-
posed to be doing."
He said the goal originally
was to get 50 or 60 customers,


had resorted to hiring an attor-
ney to see if she could solve
the problem.
Henderson introduced her-
self as a longtime environ-
mental attorney, "always on
the developers' side".


DR. GEORGE HAEDICKE, an adjacent property owner to the Sanctuary subdivision,
distributes pine saplings to county officials and members of the audience prior to his
addressing the commission last week. Haedicke said storm water runoff from the de-
velopment is ruining his tree farm, which represents a financial investment to him.
(News Photo)


and that goal was now within
reach.
What's more, he had a great
many ideas to promote the
service, which ideas he
planned to share with his peers
in one of the coming monthly
workshops, he said.
"Talking it up is the number
one way to get customers to
join," Vogelgesang said.
City Superintendent Don
Anderson, meanwhile, re-
ported that the industrial park
tower was now operational and
that the city had also installed
(See Internet, Page 2)


The fact was that the situa-
tion represented a Comprehen-
sive Plan violation, in that the
subdivision's post construction
runoff exceeded the property's
pre-construction conditions,
Henderson said.
She said the way the storm-
water facility was designed, it
was causing the storm water to
be shot gunned to the adjacent
properties, creating a drastic
change in the preexisting soil
and vegetative conditions.
"If we had been involved
early, it could have been a dif-
ferent design, so that water
went to the back of the prop-
erty," Henderson said.
Even so, she believed that
with everyone working toward
the common goal of finding an
ainiable solution to the prob-
lem, every thing would work
out fine, she said.
Rodriquez was more direct
in his presentation.
For the record, he too had
hired the services of Hender-
son, he said. He also wanted it
put in the record that possible
ethics violations had been
committed, including a Florida
Sunshine violation by two
commissioners.
"I know that Ms. Henderson
\vill try to work this out
(See Developers, Page 2)


Work Starts

On Upscale

Subdivision


More than two years after
county officials approved the
Heritage Hills subdivision in
the Lloyd area, the developer
has finally broken ground on
the upscale development.
Dan Brown, vice president
of the Tallahassee-based
Turner Heritage Homes, said
Thursday that the ground-
breaking took place Jan. 11.
He said the contract calls for
completion of the development
by September.
Brown said the prices of the
73 houses to be build will be
determined in future by the
market. The houses are being
build on three-acre lots.
The development is taking
place on a 300-acre parcel just
northwest of the I-10 and SR-
59 interchange.
The development is slated to
have paved roads, lighting and
house-to-house garbage
pickup, among other
amenities.
When county officials ap-
proved the development in the
fall of 2004, the developer rep-.
resented that the typical house
would be valued at about
$225,000.
Turner Heritage Homes bills
itself as a home production
(See Upscale, Page 2)


Review Of City Charter


Could Now Be in Offing


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


:, : T "
.'---, .

.. . ... ' ""* : *". .::-..- ..sa.. : -,a , '""




Turner Heritage Homes broke ground recently at its 73-
unit Heritage Hills subdivision just north of Lloyd.
(News Photo)

City Internet Growing

One Customer At Time


I








PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 24, 2007


Allen Boyd Named To


House Budget Committee


JEFF ARD, developer of the Sanctuary subdivision in the Lloyd area, talks to the.
Planning Commission during the preliminary steps of the application process. (News
File Photo)


Developers, Neighbors Hope


(Continued From Page 1)
quickly if she can," Rodriquez
said. "But if not, I'm ready to
sue Mr. Ard, the commission
and anybody else who buys
land or owns a lot in that land.
So let's leave it at that."
Scott Shirley, the county's
land-use attorney, advised
county officials that there was
nothing they needed to do at
present.
Shirley acknowledged that
the project was running behind
schedule as a result of the al-
leged failure of the original
contractor to build the storm-
water system as designed. But
a new contractor was on the
job and working to correct the
problems, he said.
"I have not heard from any
technical source that there is a
flaw in the design, other than
what the attorney said here to-
night," Shirley said.
What's more, he reminded
commissioners that the devel-
oper had posted a $200,000
bond, which gave him until
September to correct any prob-
lems.
"So that's where we're at,"
Shirley said.
Frank Darabi, the county's
consultant engineer, wanted it
clearly understood that the
county did not design or per-
mit storm-water facilities. That
was the purview of state regu-


latory agencies such as the
DEP, he said.
What the county did, or bet-
ter yet, what he did on behalf
of the county, Darabi said, was
to review the construction to
make sure it was done cor-
rectly and would not cause the
future homeowners problems.
"So I don't review permit-
ting," Darabi said. "I don't re-
view water quality data. I don't
review a 100-year storm and
how many inches they have to
store. What we do is make sure
that the system, as designed,
will take care of the storm wa-
ter within the subdivision and
that it's built according to the
plans so that we're not leaving
a liability for the
homeowners."
To that extent, he had in-
spected the system, found it
lacking, and had not approved
it, Darabi said. And he would
continued not to approve it un-
til the system was designed ac-
cording to the plan, he said.
He did.not think county offi-
cials should involve them-
selves in the dispute between
the developer and the contrac-
tor or any such matter, he said.
Nor was it his responsibility
to baby-sit the project, he said.
The developer and the contrac-
tor knew their job and if they
didn't do it right, he simply


wouldn't approve the project.
"If they don't fix it, you
don't issue any building per-
mits," Darabi said. "And in ad-
dition to that, you still have the
bond."

The question of the county
not issuing building permits in
the event the system failed to
be approved raised some eye-
brows, given that the devel-.
oper is already selling lots.

"So the developer can con-
tinue to sell lots and build
model homes on the property
until, the issue is resolved,"
asked Tom LaMotte, a Lloyd
area resident.

"The final plat has been ap-
proved," Shirley said. "That
means that lots can be sold.
But there is no basis for this
board to do anything."

"At thistime, there is no ac-
tion recommended to the
board," Shirley advised the
board, continuing. "The staff is
monitoring the situation and,
will continue to that."

Added Darabi: "We have not
approved the project. Once
they notified us it's been com-
pleted, we'll make another in-
spection at their cost. It's not
our job to baby-sit them."


Internet Making Slow Progress


(Continued From Page 1)
an antenna on the water towqr
on Water Mill Road.
He said it was only a matter
of a short time away before
people in the Lloyd area would
be able to access the service.
"When we're positive that we
can get to Lloyd, I will notify


you," Anderson assured the
council.

The city charges a one-time
fee of $50 for setting up the
service. The installation
charge varies, but it's about
$75. The antenna is free. And
the monthly charge ranges


from $29 to $39, depending on
the level of service.
The city launched its Internet
service in early September,
following a couple of years of
research and setbacks.
To date, the city has spent
more than $120,000 to get the
system up and going.


Upscale Subdivision In Lloyd Breaks Ground
(Continued From Page 1) Wakulla counties, with house "Since the 1950s, Turner
builder with its own design prices generally ranging from Heritage has been building
studio. The company is consid- $150,000 to $500,000 andmes," Brown said.
ered a leader in the home con- more.
struction industry.
Turner Heritage Homes is The company prefers to be "We look forward to becoming
credited with developing mul- known as a full-service, semi- a part of the Jefferson County
tiple subdivisions in Leon and custom style home builder. community."




BACK AT THE OPERA HOUSE

BY POPULAR DEMAND




BOB MILNE




A RAGTIME BARREL HOUSE

EXTRAVAGANZA



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2,2007
8:00 P.M.


$15 ADULTS, $12 MEMBERS, $5 STUDENTS
CALL 997-4242 FOR RESERVATIONS AND INFORMATION


Congressman Allen Boyd
has been named to the House
Budget Committee, and will be
actively involved in every as-
pect of the nation's fiscal pol-
icy.
S"I am eager to get to work on
a fiscally responsible budget
for next year," Boyd said.
"With record federal deficits
in recent years, I understand
the challenges that lie
ahead in order to get our books
in balance.
"I expect to play an integral
role in restoring soundness to
the federal budget and plotting
a path for a brighter fiscal out-
look in the future."
As the leader of the Blue
Dog Coalition, Boyd has been
a longtime advocate for fiscal
responsibility and meaningful
budget reforms.
He was active in the biparti-
san budget plan in 1997 that
produced a balanced budget
four years in a row, and re-
sulted in budget surpluses in
1999 and 2000.
On the House Budget Com-
Smittee, Boyd will work to re-
store the budget enforcement
tools that were in place in the
1990s, such as pay as you go
.rules and spending caps.
"I'm delighted Allen Boyd
will be joining the Budget
Committee, and I look forward
to working with him in tack-
ling the tough budget chal-
:lenges before us, first and
foremost the huge deficit this
administration has run up."
said House Budget Committee

Ainerican-Heart
Association..
nohlsTa .o j


It keeps
more than
memones,
,alive.:


BOYD


Chairman, John Spratt.
"Allen will be a key player
in our effort to wipe out the
deficit in five years with fiscal
responsibility and restraint.
"We will fight to ensure that
Social Security is safe and
sound for generations to come.
And we will carry forward our
fight for the good programs
that millions of Americans de-
nend on.
Boyd is in his sixth term rep-
resenting Florida's 2nd Con-
gressional District.
In addition to the House
Budget Committee, Boyd will
continue to serve on the House
Appropriations Committee and
lead the Blue Dog Coalition.


Coalition To Hear

Legal Service Update


The Jefferson County Com-
munity Coalition (JCCC) will
be meet 9:30 a.m. Tuesday,
Jan. 30 to share agency infor-
mation, and to hear Speaker
Rocky Cabagnot present an
update about Legal Services
of North Florida.
He will present some news
on how non-profits in this
area can collaborate for some


grassroots efforts to serve the
needs of the poor in this
county, and receive free legal
counsel to do so.
The community is invited to
attend this first meeting of the
new year.
The JCCC is a grouping of
concerned community agen-
cies working together for the
good of the county.


Tallahassee Memorial

Family Medicine of

Monticello Florida



1549 S. Jefferson St.
Monticello, Fl 32344
L 850-997-0707
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It is time for everyone to get active and get
healthy by taking advantage of the great physical
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February 1, 2007.


WANTED... ANYONE WHO

can walk, bike, run, rollerblade, or do any

other type of physical activity as we

"Just Move" throughout Jefferson County.


To sign up, individuals or groups, contact the

Jefferson County Health Department at

(850) 342-0170 Ext. 207 or 206.


I/Jiave/


:~











MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 24, 2007 PAGE 3


Boland New Physician


At Health Department


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


THESE logs slipped off a truck which was parked on the Courthouse Circle, when the
brakes failed and set the vehicle in motion last week. (News Photo)


Faulty Brakes cause


Log Truck Accident


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

A log truck obstructed traf--
fic in town last week for ap-
proximately four hours, as
MPD, Sheriffs deputies FHP
and VMS workers, as well as
some local residents, detoured
traffic through the back
streets of the city in order to
avoid the scene.
On Jan. 16, at approxi-
mately 3:59 p.m., Aubrey.
Parker, 37, of Boston High-
way, left the tractor trailer he
was driving unattended and
parked'on the east side of the
Courhouse Circle.
While the vehicle was unat-
tended the brakes failed, caus-
ing the vehicle to roll
backwards in a westerly di-
rection onto South Jefferson
St.
Once the vehicle was in the
street, the tractor trailer


turned, causing the load of
logs on the trailer to shift, and
the trailer rolled over.
City Police report that one
traffic sign was destroyed in
the incident.
An inspection of the brake
system of the tractor trailer
was conduced by DOT law
enforcement officer James
Sailor, -who determined that
the brake system was faulty.
A citation was issued to
Parker for the faulty brakes.
The inadequate brake sys-
tem was determined to be the





Freednom of

the Pess Is


EveWybody/s


Ne0f dti l1.


cause of the incident.
No one was hurt in the acci-
dent.


Dr. Jerry Boland is the new
Medical Director for the
County Health Department.
He is a board certified fam-
yij physician, and a graduate
oYt George Washington Uni-
v.ersity School of Medicine, in
S ashington DCin 1986.
-. He also graduated from
BIayfront Medical Center
family y Practice residency
program in 1986.
SBoland served as the Direc-
tor of the Taylor County
Health Department in Perry,
e from 1992-2002.
He joined the FSU College
.of Medicine in 2002, where
he established the College of
--Medicine's Rural Track in
Marianna.
Boland returned to the Flor-


ida Department of Health in
June of 2006 to pursue his
lifelong interest of caring for
uninsured patients.
He also serves as the Medi-


and Calhoun County Health
Departments.
Boland is very enthusiastic
about working in the County
Health Department and looks
forward to serving the com-
munity.

His office hours are at the
Health Department on Thurs-
days, from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m.


BOLAND


II


WWW.PLASTICSURGERYSOUTHGEORCIA.COM
505 Gordon Avenue Thomasville, GA (229) 228-9900


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Heartfelt thanks to anyone who contributed to the Big Bend Hospice Tree of Remembrance.
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GIFT GIVEN BY
Patricia
Patricia
Edith
Glenda
Mary Helen
Dick & Friedel
Steve & Nan
Lottie
Lottie
Fran
Dale & Margaret
Dale & Margaret
Dale & Margaret
Dale & Margaret-
Dale & Margaret
Nancy & Joe
John
Vanessa
Etta
Dale
Polly
Brenda
Patricia W.
Patricia W.
Patricia W.
A.C. "Buddy"
John & Barbara
John & Barbara
John & Barbara
John & Barbara
John & Barbara
John & Barbara
John & Barbara
John & Linda
Herbert & Linda
Herbert & Linda
Herbert & Linda
Herbert & Linda
Loalee
The Wyche, Tillman & Lane
Helen & Bud
Judy
Judy
Linda
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Jackson
Wayne & Nola
Russell & Betty
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J.D. & April
Jane H.
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Dorothy P.
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Gleasman
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Gorga Allen
Hamedani
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Heath
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Hill
James
Kempton
Lewis
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Maconillan


IN MEMORY OR HONOR OF
Helen Reinard
Charles Aaron
Paul R. Adams
Elsie & Oliver Lipsey
Oliver Andrews
Emma & Fritz
Mary Jane Lovett
W.T. "Bill" Berry
Randy Stephens
Chet Black
Ellis Boatwright
Maggie Boatwright
Wesley Boatwright
Estelle Boatwright
Walter Boatwright'
Mary Ruth "Poppy" Revell
Joyce Bradberry
Joyce Bradberry
Mary L Johnson
Forrest Brown
Forrest Brown
Wally Bentley
Richard & Hetty Gilbert
Dickie Gilbert
Gerald Cathey


Thelma
J.C.
Daphne
Hugh
H.L.
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Burgess
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Hilda
Dr. Dave
Dr. Jackie
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Sevilla B.
Eva
Betty J.
Jim
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-Eck
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Lewis
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Wager


GIFT GIVEN BY
Jack & Eleanor
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Ely
Ely

Donna & Stan
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Edward
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Costella
Susan
Brandi
John & Belinda


McCurcheon
McCurcheon
Merritt & Family
Merritt & Family
Morris
MOrris
Morris
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Park
Progress Energy
Rathbun
Redfean
Rutherford
Shannon
Shelfer
Shofner
Steen,
Strickland
Walker
Ward
Waters
West
Wheeler


IN MEMORY OR HONOR OF
James & Evelyn Canning
Peg & Bill Murphy
Dodie Kirkland
Myrtice Warn
Grace Morris
Mike Morris
Mack Morris
Beth Poston
Louella Natale
Lawrence Stephens
John & Bernice Rathbun
Faye Redfean
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Cheryl .s Faye

Lether Johnson
CE Strickland
Jessie M. Hightower
Myrtice Ward
Richard L. Waters
Virginia Jones
Annie Ruth Maynard


-Thank You To Our Sponsors:


ital City


SDig De llU. 205 N. Mulberry St.

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(850) 566-7491
www.bigbendhospice.org

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- A A~ A A ~ A~ A A- A a A- A~ A A- A, A A- A A A A A A A G G 4, 4 e 0 e 4 eI e- 4 0Pe 4- 00 0 t' 4 e- 4 O0,45









PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 24, 2007


Monticello News
(ISSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
SPublisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly Ex-
cept for the weeks of July 4th, Thanksgiving, Christmas,
& New Years. Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post
Office. Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net

% ...............


Sensible Strategies Opinion & Comment

For Healthy Aging -
ForJw&W& Irea. =.LAI :____, =._..,."IA


What is longevity without
health? Adults today are
looking not only to extend
their lives, but to enjoy their
extra years.
Researchers at the University
of Pittsburgh's Center for
Healthy Aging simplified the
barrage of health messages
aimed at older adults to create
the 10 Keys to Healthy Aging.
The Center is promoting
these sensible strategies for a
long, healthy life among
residents of Pittsburgh, and
they hope to share them across
the country.
Allegheny County in
western Pennsylvania has one
of the highest concentrations
of adults aged 65 years and
older, second only to Dade
County, Florida.
Years of research yielded
these keys:
Prevent bone loss and
muscles weakness
Control blood pressure
Increase physical activity
Regulate blood sugar
Stop smoking
Maintain social contact
Participate in screening for
cancer
Get regular immunizations
Lower cholesterol
Combat depression.
Dr. Constance Bayles,
director of the center, says
these strategies can help
people take charge of their
health and delay or prevent
disease and injury as well as
speed recovery time.


"Empowering older adults is
one of our many missions,"
Dr. Bayles said.
While some keys seem basic,
such as maintaining social con-
tact, activity can become diffi-
cult as adults age and become
less mobile, she said.
Part of the center's work is
to help seniors access re-
sources for social contact,
physical activity, transporta-
tion and other needs.
The Center for Healthy Ag-
ing is a Prevention Research
Center (PRC) in a network of
33 academic centers of the fed-
eral Centers for Disease Con-
trol and Prevention funds.
Each PRC works closely with
a local community to design
effective interventions.
Nine PRC's belong to a
Healthy Aging Network that
collaborates on the best ways
to promote health for older
adults and transform research
results into sustainable com-
munity programs.
The University of Washing-
ton's Health Promotion Re-
search Center (HPRC), for
example, developed Enhance
Fitness, a physical activity cur-
riculum for older adults that
improves flexibility and
strength and is shown to re-
duce hospital visits by partici-
pants.
The program is now offered
at 92 sites in nine states. The
HPRC also developed a coun-
seling program that reduces
minor depression in seniors.


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
January 22, 1997
The Citizens Advisory
Task Force, the group charged
with deciding how a $550,000
grant that the city is seeking
should be used, were sched-
uled to make their recommen-
dation to the City Council on
Tuesday at 6 p.m.
The Teenage Pregnancy
Program (TAP) now in its sev-
enth year of operation at Jef-
ferson County High School
continues to help reduce the
number of pregnancies in the
county.
In keeping with the annual
celebration of Arbor Day, the
City planted an Oak tree on the
Jefferson Elementary Campus,
Friday.
Just when commissioners
were ready to review and pos-
sible approve design changes
for the last phase of the court-
house restoration project, a
monkey wrench got tossed into
the works.
TWENTY YEARS AGO

January 21, 1987
After six years as the Chief
of the Lloyd Volunteer Fire
Department Tim Barfield is re-
signing his post.
Monticello Fire Chief
Wesley Howell reports his de-


apartment responded to 43
structure fires and 36 vehicle
fires last year as the county
sustained more than $350,000
in fire losses.
Mike Reichman, President of
the Economic Development
Corporation, is scheduled to
meet next week with a realtor
representing Pizza Hut Corpo-
ration to discuss plans for lo-
cating a pizza restaurant here.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
January 20, 1977
Jefferson residents were
treated to an hour-long snow-
fall Tuesday afternoon be-
tween 1 and 2 p.m. and a
second snowfall Tuesday
night.
A thin blanket covered the
county Wednesday morning to
the delight of youngsters. Not
enough snow fell to be re-
corded at the Agricultural Cen-
ter.
Navy Airman Earl Getch Jr.,
son of Mr. and Mrs. E.L.
Getch has completed recruit
training at the Naval Training
Center, Orlando, FL.
Cattle and hog receipts at the
Monticello Livestock Market
on Monday were somewhat
light, partially due to the sub-
freezing temperatures. The
(See From Our Files, Page 5)


. uimumr urvey missed -MarK


A survey suggests newspa-
per editing ranks right up there
with policing the streets and
fighting fires as one of 20 most
stressful occupations.
Gee, I've been an editor off
and on for a lot of years and I
always thought it was a fun
job. Have I missed something?
Of course, dealing with emo-
tional callers can be a bit
stressful.
I confess to never knowing
quite what to say when I'm hit
with, "Why did you deliber-
ately leave my child out of the
awards pictures? What have
you got against my kid
anyway? His 95-year-old
grandfather is going to be sick
about this. This could kill him,
you know!"
Arrgh! Ma'am, do you really
think we sent a photographer
to the awards banquet with in-
structions to shoot 46 kids and
not 47? Oh yes, I'm not in the
business of killing anyone's
grandfather.
Does this settle Henrietta
Huffy down? No siri She
screeches on, "I know what


Fiscal

By ALLEN BOYD
Congressman

For the past ten years, I h
been outspoken in Congi
about one of the issues th
believe is most detrimenta
our country's long term hea
our out-of-control natic
debt now rapidly approach
$9 trillion.
On the second day of
110th Congress,'fiscal cons
vatives, including mys
made a huge stride to rein
our national debt with the p
sage of pay-as-you-go bud
rules, commonly known
PAYGO. This marks the f
and most important step
ending record budget defi
and curbing our national del
PAYGO prohibits Congr
from spending on credit,
practice we all know to be


Publisher's


Notebook


.Ron Cichon


you do. You just take pictures
of the kids from prominent
families and ignore the others.
That's what you always do !"
S Ma'am, please understand
I the-schools decide who get the
awards, all we do is take pic-
tures of the recipients.
"Blam!" Henrietta slams the
phone down.
I sit staring at the dead re-
ceiver feeling a bit stressed.
Don't get the idea this is a
sexist column. I've had calls
from Bubba Bombastics who
are just as emotional.
"If I lose my job because you


I


published the story about my
arrest, I'm gonna come look-
ing for you."
I don't do too good with
threats so I get a little excited
and tell Bubba I'm not hard to
find at all. Would he like to
stop over now?
"Blam!" Bubba slams the
phone down.
Thank goodness most callers
are sane and rational. The
great majority are very pleas-
ant.
Apart from emotional call-
ers I think of editing a newspa-
per as being exciting and not-


stressful.
The people on the staff who
must read my awful handwrit-
ing may feel differently.
Or my renditions of "My
Way" and "When the Moon
Hits Your Eye Like a Big
Pizza Pie, That's Amore" are
probably stressful to those in
earshot on production nights.
And keeping up with where
I'm going and when I'm com-
ing back to the office may get
a little hairy.
In these areas I may unwit-
tingly be the cause of some
stress.
I'm not sure how newspaper
editing made the list of the 20
most stressful jobs. Frankly, I
don't understand where survey
people get a lot of the stuff
they get.
Remember the survey that
found seven percent of Ameri-
cans would kill somebody for
$10 million? Or that 25 per-
cent would abandon their
families? And 23 percent
would become prostitutes for a
week?
I think the survey team had
one too many at Paul's Tavern.


Responsibility Pledged
wise and fiscally unhealthy, With PAYGO rules on the demonstrates Congress' strong
and requires that Congress books from 1990 to 2002, we commitment to fiscal responsi-
.have the funds to pay for any saw deficits disappear, huge ability and subsequently, a
new spending. projected budget surpluses, strong commitment to the fu-
ave-: This common-sense practice and rapid economic growth, ture of our children, our grand-
ress is followed by families, farm- Following the expiration of children, and our great nation.
at I ers, and small business owners PAYGO in 2002, a budget PAYGO is not a partisan issue,
1 to in North Florida every single with a surplus of $236 billion but a common-sense remedy to
lth- day and should be practiced by in 2000 was in deficit by $413 our country's bad habit of defi-
'nal the federal government as billion in 2004. cit spending.
ring well. History has shown that
S The pay-as-you-go concept PAYGO is an essential compo- By reinstating the pay-as-
the was originated in. the late nent of fiscal responsibility you-go principle and prohibit-
ser- 1980's by Democrats looking and necessary in order to put ing legislation that will in-
self, for ways to reduce the deficit, our budget on a glide path to crease the deficit, Congress
i in It was first embraced by Presi- balance. PAYGO has worked has begun to put the budget
'as- dent George H.W. Bush in the in the past, and it will work back on track.
Iget Budget Enforcement Act of again. Ultimately, PAYGO will
as 1991. With our persistent call for help create a fiscally stable
first PAYGO then was adopted meaningful budget reforms, government- a government
to by President Bill Clinton in his the Blue Dog Coalition de- that is able to focus on making
cits deficit reduction budget of serves much of the credit for progress for the common good
bt. 1993 and extended by Presi- the swift passage of PAYGO of the American people. How-
ess dent Clinton and Congress in rules in the first week of the ever, we have a long way to
Sa the bipartisan Balanced Budget new Congress. go, and our work is far from
un- Act of 1997. The passage of PAYGO over.


Secrets Of Minimum


By DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

I am absolutely amazed at
the vast number of Americans
who are totally ignorant re-
garding the true dynamics of
the minimum wage issue.
By and large, Americans re-
ceiving the minimum wage
generally fall into the unskilled
and less educated segment of
our society. Their jobs usually
entail mundane and less than
glamorous work that most
Americans would prefer not to


perform.
On the surface, it would
seem that citizens earning
much higher salaries would be
willing to promote equity in
the workplace by supporting a
"livable" minimum wage for
poorer Americans. Why then is
it only the Democratic party
that champions this cause
while the Republican party op-
poses it?
To understand this debate,
one must go below the obvious
surface issues to unwrap the
political coverings that mask
the true significance of raising


the minimum wage. This is
precisely why the vast majority
of Americans don't get it, be-
cause it takes some research
and not just a couple of sound
bites on TV.
So who actually benefits
from the increase in the mini-
mum wage? The workers who.
are paid the minimum will ob-
viously see an increase in their
weekly checks and associated
income tax.
Most people have the im-
pression that such an increase
will give less skilled workers a
better standard of living and


Wage
increased buying power.
Wrong.
The cost of products and
services will slightly increase
across the board and literally
nickel and dime their way
through any minimum wage
increase.
Most won't notice this "price
nudge", which once again ac-
counts for the ignorance of
Americans to grasp the real
economic effects of raising the
minimum wage.
The owners of fast food res-
taurants, grocery stores and the
(See Minimum, Page 11)


From Our Photo File


" -I


IN THIS Sept., 1991 photo, a handmade quilt to be awarded at the forthcoming St.
Margaret Church bazaar is displayed by, from left: Minnie Stokley, Shug Leskanic,
Nellie Rome, Pastor Rev. Joe Schwab, Ellie Kotyuk, Florence Amato. (News File
Photo)


L


_ I sr












Letters...


Writer Says Martial Arts Not


Dear Editor:
It came tc
cently that lo
here in Mont
lahassee ha
doors to the
Chinese mart
In brothel
great passion
brothers and
very careful
thing, or Yog
arts, for the fc
To undi
whether Tai
martial arts a:
with Christiar
derstand thai
cises, though
physical, are
shoots of par
teams.
Any person
practicing suc
stand where
what they spri


In Harmony With Christie
always from a religion. There is no conception of-
o our attention re- Therefore it is truly said that Heaven or Eternity that is not
)cal churches, both a practitioner of Tai Chi or involved in religion or relig-
ticello and in Tal- Yoga or the like, is quite liter- ious belief or thought. The
ve opened. their ally, practicing a religion. Is it practice of Tai Chi is intended
teaching of the possible to practice the physi- to bring the Ying and Yang,
ial art Tai Chi. cal forms of something that is positive and negative, darkness -
rly love, but with intended to open one's body and light, into balance, in order
n, we ask our and mind to some spirit, or the to channel the chi or
sisters to consider spirit world, or the gods, or "ultimate" force, but this is not
y doing any such whatever the goal of that relig- the way of Jesus.
;a, or other martial ion is, without this happening? Just a minimal amount of
allowing reasons: Doubtful, and therefore not 'study of the subject shows that
erstand how and advisable to people who fol- the practice of Tai Chi is in-i
Chi and other low Jesus, Who is the way. tended to bring longevity, even,
re not in harmony Tai Chi is a creature of the immortality.
nity, one must un- religion called Taoism. Tao This immortality though, is.
t all these exer- can be translated "The Way," not the eternal, transformed
h they appear and is often translated The life the Bible speaks of, but 'a
the direct off- Way to Heaven or Eternity. never-ending version of this
ticular belief sys- While there is a philosophi- life.
cal aspect to Taoism, it is a re- But Jesus said He is the Life,
:n who considers ligion, and a way of divination and there is no other name
:h needs to under- also in the I Ching and divina- given among men by which
they come from, tion is not allowed by the Bi- we must be saved. Such prac-
ing from, and it is ble. tices promise healing and.,


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 24, 2007 PAGE 5
IlllI


,.In the world, we have tribu-
lation and pain, and we can be-
&ome confused and without the
o61ly Spirit in us, we can be
fooled into thinking that Jesus
is'not the Way.
In our painful and difficult
lives, we long for peace, love,
gentleness, goodness, meek-
ness, patience, and self control,
but these-are the fruits of the
Holy Spirit.
We lack these, not because
Jesus is false, but because we
lack His spirit inside us.
Pray for baptism of the Holy
Spirit, and receive the true
consolation : the Way, the
Truth, and the Life.
SMartha and JM Cravenzola


Giving away
FREE gas for 1
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purchase of
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For Details


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refund check and I'll turn

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Dreams, hurry I don't
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CALL 929-377-41162oar 2-87-8955
VAMAA NI,


From Our Files


(Continued From Page 4)
bulk of cattle receipts were
slaughter cows and large
slaughter heifers. Slaughter
cows sold for up to $27 No. 1
hogs sold for up to $40.30.
FORTY YEARS AGO
January 20, 1967
The twice postponed foot-
ball awards banquet, spon-
sored by the Quarterback Club,
will be held next Thursday
night, Jan 26, and all members
are urged to be present.
Directors of the Chamber of
Commerce are reminded that
the regular meeting Tuesday
will be a night dinner meeting
at the Brahman Restaurant at 7
p.m.
Five students from Monti-
cef>- i'i ri N-1FJC i "lid-
soj, '. re mn. some 110
students who make the Dean's
List for the Fall term just
ended. The five from Monti-


cello are:
Leskanic, J
Smith
Thompson.


Judith Harris, John
ohn Loot Jr., Jane
and Margaret


FIFTY YEARS AGO
January 20, 1957
A.N. Watson was elected
mayor of Monticello Monday,
receiving 118 votes by
write-in, Watson, along with
six other city officers, was
sworn in Tuesday night, and
Judge Kenneth Cooksey ad-
ministered the oaths.
Mr. and Mrs. G.W. McDon-
ald announce the birth of a
daughter Marilyn Sue.

SIXTY YEARS AGO
January 20, 1947
!J..B., ,ie,en, as. elected .ice.,
presip 9ft ofthe US,,Highw,aiy.
19 Association when it met at
a hotel in Thomasville, GA, on
Wednesday.


health, claiming to be better, .
than other exercises, such as '
running, or calisthenics, but
the goal is immortality, not
eternal life.
Jesus says by His stripes we,:
are healed. It is to Jesus we
must go for peace and balance,
healing and miracles.
Just from these few simple
findings, readily available in
any book on Taoism or any ar-
ticle about it on the Internet, it
is abundantly clear that this
practice, among others, is in
conflict with Christianity.
How can a Christian exercise
the forms of something that
calls itself "the way," when
that is a claim one he calls his
Lord reserves solely for Him-
self?
My brothers and sisters, he
cannot without falling pray to
a counterfeit consolation.
In order to compete the de-
-:,-l.1..,1 ..,i A practice' often
appear to pi.' c nE I2 c -rl:': but
our consolation ir toi bc t il.
Holy Spirit, not some spirit of
the earth or of the power of the
air.


The Jefferson County Recycling Proqram accepts
the following items for recycling:

All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers. Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars'etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?





Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Centers'- Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.


YOUR PICTURE ON YOUR

VISA CREDIT CARD

FREE To Envision Members!


Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


Whatever you're interest, show it off to the
world with a personalized Envision VISA Credit
Card. Getting an Envision Credit Card is fast,
easy and it's FREE. Current Envision VISA
Card members can' simply click on the photo
credit card link on our Web site and with just a
few easy steps your personalized credit card
order will be on its way. To become a member
and to apply for an Envision VISA Credit Card,
visit any of our financial centers or go to envi-
sioncu.com for details!


envision
c r e d it union
942.9000 enuisioncu.com


The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.















pA1. 6. MONTICELLO. (FL). NEWS. WED., JANUARY 24, 2007


-tl U)


Lifestyle


j eete ecvuw't



3 ^
S Sead u4 yowr favorite recifes to e e sare
e ,_ 6" t o o '. au th'e'.g" ed ge


CROCK POT CHICKEN
CHILI

2 lbs. boneless chicken thighs
3 16 oz cans tomatoes with
chilies and garlic
1 pkg. hot chili seasoning or
hot taco seasoning
2 15 oz cans white beans
drained and rinsed

Combine all ingredients a 5
qt. crock pot.
Cover and cook on low for
7-9 hours.
Before serving, stir well so
that chicken breaks into small
pieces.

HONEY MUSTARD
ROASTED POTATOES

4 Ig. baking potatoes
1/2 cup Dijon mustard
1/4 cup honey
1/2 tsp. crushed dried thyme
salt and pepper to taste

Peel potatoes and cut each
into 6-8 pieces. Cover with
water in a large saucepan and
bring to boil over medium
high heat.
Cook 12-15 minutes till just
tender and drain.
Combine mustard, honey
and thyme in small bowl; toss
potatoes with honey, thyme,
mustard in a large bowl till
evenly coated.
Arrange potatoes on foil
lined baking sheet coated with
nonstick cooking spray.
Bake at 375 degrees for 20
minutes or until potatoes begin

CARD OF THANKS
A special thank you to eve-
ryone that has helped me and
my family in its time of
mourning.
I have been blessed to be
living in Monticello.
The support and love be-
stowed on my family has been
great and heartfelt.
Thank you and God bless.
Annie Mae Mills
Wife of Willie Mills
(Good Buddy)


to brown around the edges.
Season with salt and pepper.

BLUEBERRY CRUMBLE

4 cups fresh or frozen thawed
blueberries
2 tbs. sugar
3 tbs. butter softened
3 (1.5 oz) pkgs. Instant oat-
meal with maple and brown
sugar

In a 9" pie pan, toss blueber-
ries with sugar.
In a small bowl combine but-
ter and instant oatmeal till
mixture forms coarse crumbs.
Sprinkle over blueberries.
Bake at 375 degrees until
mixture bubbles around edge
and topping is light brown,
about 30-35 minutes.

ORANGE ROUGHY WITH
RED PEPPERS
1 Tbs olive oil
8 orange roughy fillets
2 red bell peppers seeded and
sliced
1 tsp. dried thyme
1/2 tsp. salt
1/8 tsp. pepper

Heat olive oil in heavy -skil-
let. Add bell peppers and cook
and stir over medium high heat
for 2-3 minutes.
Place fillets over peppers and
sprinkle with thyme and salt.
Lower heat to niedium low
and cover skillet Cook 15-20
minutes, shaking pan occa-
sionally until fish flakes easily
with a fork.

Become an American Red Cross
Disaster Services Volunteer
The Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross is seeking to
train Disaster Services Volunteers
in your community. Contact us at
878-6080 or visit our web site at
www.tallytown.com/redcross.


+
American
Red Cross


iC Qi AVON

Tallahassee's First Avon
Fully Stocked Retail Store
S" 3111 Mahan Drive, Suite #30
Lafayette Place (Publix Shopping CenoB)
850.386.AVON (2866) -
www.youravon/adasilva l








January 8 27


HUGIE AFTER

INVENTORY

- IALE <


S20% OFF ALL
In-Stock Fabrics, Trims,
) Furniture, and Ready-Mades
(Excludes Linings & Prior Purchase)

(

F.i (
1355 Market Street e 224-292


SHANKA FARMER is one of the 4-H County Council
members.


4-Hers Work On Adopt

A Road Project Saturday


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
;o.
Several county youth par-
ticipated in the annual 4-H
Adopt-A-Road Project Satur-
day, Jan. 13.
They picked up well over
100 pounds of trash on a two
mile stretch of Lake Road.
After the community service
project was completed, the


youth were treated to pizza at
Pizza Hut.
Those participating in the
clean up included Janelle
Bassa, Arsenio Bright, Shaun-
tavia Clinton, Alex Farmer,
Shanka Farmer, Jazmaun
Hall, Shaumese Massey, Lena
Odom, Angela Scurry, Jim
Selph, Carmen Skipworth,
Keion Scott, Charles Taylor,
Tierra Thompson, and Che-
varra Ulee.


Bethel AME Church

Hosts Conference


The Second Quarter Confer-
ence for Bethel AME Church,
New Bethel AME Church, Mt.
Pleasant AME Church, and
Philadelphia AME Church
convened at Bethel AME
Church, Jan. 14, with Presid-
ing Elder Charles Williams in
charge.
The meeting was opened by
Betli ei" AME Church Choir
with the song: "When There Is
Praise in the Temple."
Rev. David Williams offered
the prayer and Rev. Helen
Johnson-Robinson extended
greetings and presented Elder
Williams.
Conference secretaries were
Althera Johnson, Patricia Gal-


Ion, and Eddie Gallon, Jr.
Conference Marshal was
Eric Evans.
Conference Reporters were:
Brandi Gallon, Eddie Gallon,
Jr.. and Mary Hagan.
Business Reports were pre-
sented by officers of all
churches and a Memorial
Service was held for deceased
members, Sister Sara Farmer,
with Sister Patricia Gallon
speaking about her life; Sister
Louisiana Jones, with Brother
John Peck speaking on her life;
and Brother Willie Mills, with
Brother Ned Hills speaking on
his life.
Elder Williams offered the
final prayer and benediction.


Heart iHand




Classes held Monday & Friday
at 9:00 AM, 10:00 AM & 5:45 PM
$12.00 per class at the door or
$100.00 for 10 classes within one month
Jefferson Arts
575 W Washington St.
Monticello, FL 32344
All ages and fitness levels welcome;
children must be accompanied by adult
(Daycare not provided)
Linda Ricke
Yoga/ Pilates Instructor
Yoga Alliance Certified/AFAA Trained
(850) 997-3518 (850) 590-7717
lindaricke@nettally. corn




CAUTIONe_


SHO


E


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Monday Saturday 10 6
Closed Sundays 850-668-0466
Spa Pedicures & Manicures
FAbREANA Aalso available, call to schedule!
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 24, 2007 PAGE 7


DOROTHY
SHEPHERD
Dorothy Waneta Shepherd
age 56, died Tuesday, January
16, 2007 of ovarian cancer.
Dorothy was born, raised
and lived all her life in Monti-
cello.
A Memorial Service will be
held in the Chapel of Beggs
Funeral Home in Monticello at
2:00 p.m., Saturday, January
27, 2007. In lieu of flowers,
Dorothy requested that memo-
rial contributions be made ei-
ther to St. Jude's Children's
Research Hospital, 501 St.
Jude Place, Memphis TN
38105 (e-mail at donors
@stjude.org 1-800-822-6344)
or to Big Bend Hospice, 1723
Mahan Ctr. Blvd., Tallahassee,
FL 32308-5428 (e-mail at
hospice@bigbendhospice.org
(850)878-5310).
Dorothy is survived by her
loving husband, John B.
Timms; one son, John F. Bar-
rett (Lisa) of Tallahassee; a
brother, Bill Shepherd of Hay-
esville, NC and his fiance Bar-
bara; and her mother, Dot
Shepherd, of Hayesville, NC
Dorothy was preceded in
death by her father, Wilson
Shepherd.

GLADYS HICKS
Gladys Lucile Hicks, age
86, January 21, 2007, in
Tallahassee. *
Mrs. Hicks was born in
Wilcox County, Georgia. She
grew up around Pinetta and the
Hickory Grove Area. She lived
in Lee most of her life. She
was a faithful member of
Midway Baptist Church.


Funeral services will be
Thursday January 25, 2007 at
11:00 a.m. at Midway Baptist
Church, with burial to follow
in Midway Cemetery. The
family will receive friends
Wednesday, January 24, 2007
from 6:00 8:00 p.m. at Beggs
Funeral Home Madison
Chapel, and one hour prior to
the service at the church.
Gladys is survived by her
husband Rev. Chatman Hicks
of 68 years, of Lee; two sons,
Delbert (Carolyn) of Tallahas-
see, and Sherrill (Luci) of Do-
than, AL; one daughter, Vivian
Simmons Smith (Jim) of Talla-
hassee and Panama City; one
brother, Elmer Sevor (Juanita)
of Geneva, FL; two sister, Eula
Welch of Lee, and Virginia
Wynn (Sheldon) of Tallahas-
see; five grandchildren, Rob-
byn Whitcock, Greer Blanton,
Ivy Hicks, Dayton Hicks, and
David Allen Simmons III., and
six great grandchildren.
ELIZABETH MIMS
Elizabeth Hannah Mims,
age 86, a Retired Secretarial
Bookkeeper died January 20,
2007, in Tallahassee.
Elizabeth was a native of Vi-
roqua, Wisconsin and a former
resident of Live Oak, and
Clearwater, Florida and Indi-
ana. Her life was spent work-
ing in the Church and she also
taught Sunday School. She
was a member of Monticello
Church of the Nazarene. She
was also a Community Service
Volunteer at the Central.
Church of Christ for five
years.
Funeral service was held
Tuesday, January 23, 2007 at
10:00 a.m. at Beggs Monti-
cello Chapel, Monticello. Visi-
tation was Monday, January
22, 2007 from 5:00 7:00 p.m.
at the Funeral Home. Inter-
ment followed in the City of
Live Oak Cemetery, Live Oak,
Florida at 1:30 p.m.
She is survived by one son
Charles Mims (Marti) of Mon-
ticello, one daughter Betty
Oglesby (Cecil) of Everglade
City, Florida, six grandchil-
dren and fifteen great-
grandchildren.


Supper To Benefit

Missionary Worker


GETCH


Soup Supper fundraiser is
planned 5:30-7:30 p.m. Fri-
day for Garret Getch, the old-
est grandson of Sue and
Lewis Getch, owners of Mon-
ticello Printers.
Sponsored by the Women
on Mission, First Baptist
Church, Monticello, the event
is an effort to help support.
Getch as he prepares to leave
in May for the mission field
in Burkino Faso, West Africa,
where he will spend a year.
15-Bean Soup, salad, bread,
dessert, and a beverage will
be served in the church Fel-
lowship Hall for a $5 dona-
tion per person.
This will be an eat in or take
out meal. Contact Lynn Miller
at 559-3525 to pre-order.
Leave a message if no
answer.
The community is encour-
aged to participate in this
worthy cause.
Getch, a recent high school
graduate, will be an assistant
to his former pastor, and will
lead the music ministry,
teaching children and teenag-
ers about the Bible, winning
souls, teaching whenever
needed, and helping to start a
church.
On this mission he will con-
tinue -his education and train-
ing, for future ministry.. ...
He is required to pay half of
his own expenses for the year,
and is working to accomplish


this goal.
He is the son of Annette and
Earl Getch of Bowdoin, ME.
Getch says he is well quali-
fled for this mission, and ex-
,plains it this way:
S After his family moved
from Iceland to Maine, he be-
came a Home School student
for the first time in his life,
and worked hard for his
grades.
Once in Maine, the family
joined the Mid-Coast Baptist
Church, and he immediately
began training underneath his
Pastor Robert Mitchell, Jr.
Under his guidance, Getch
assisted in Children's Church,
and later became the Chil-
dren's Church Leader.
He also started an orchestra
in the church to play during
the services.
As his time at Mid-Coast
continued, he was able to go
travel and visit oTer
churches.
During this time, he contin-
ued talking with his old mn-
tor from Iceland, Pastor John
Hallman, who was called to
Iceland to start a church, and
once it was established, he
left Iceland to prepare for the
ministry in Africa.
Hallman was mentor to
Getch and taught him one on
one, and planted the thought
of going to Africa.
Ultimately, it was decided
that Getch would be sent out
of Mid-Coast as a church
planter, helping a missionary
start a church.
* The mission of Getch and
Hallman is to establish
churches in Burkina Faso,
West Africa.
Getch is now working two
jobs to accumulate the money
to go.
The entire trip will cost
about $8,000 and he needs to
raise at least half of that for
the trip. In addition, he will
need monthly living expenses.
He. is learning about the
country, as well as French,
the primary language of the
country.


Circle Plans To Meet


p
On Valentine 5 Day
Williams Named Club


WM Iemllll I p I C i1 hair v Wl

Membership Chair


Sabrina L. Williams, is
Membership Recruiter/Reten-
tion Coordinator of the Boys
and Girls Clubs of Jefferson
County.
Her mission is to create
awareness of the quality pro-
grams the Clubs in the county
offer.
She believes in serving the
community with providing re-
sources that will help families
in the area.
Williams is a wife of 11
years and mother of two, and
.a native of North Carolina.
She moved to Florida in the
early 80's, upon graduating
from high school, and later at-
tended Florida Community
College at Jacksonville,
where she studied History
Education.
After earning Her AA de-
gree, she attended Florida
A&M University where she
Majored in Secondary


WILLIAMS
Education/History.
She worked at a local mu-
seum as an Educator/History
Interpreter for 7 years.
Before this time, she was
involved in the educational
programs for local schools
and groups, including the
Boys and Girls Clubs.
While being a part of these
programs, she quickly real-
(See Williams, Page 10)


The Mignonette Garden
Circle members and friends
spent a good part of their
January meeting visiting,
and reminiscing, facilitated by
the large group attending.
The meeting was held at the
home of Eleanor Hawkins,
with Mary Ellen Given co-
hosting with Hawkins.
Given took advantage of
this opportunity to pass out
copies of her new book,
"Sparks Given Out," an auto-
biography about her life.
Kim Kennedy spoke to the
group about Green Industries
Institute, (GII) and what they
have to offer.
GII is an educational insti-
tute, well known for it's ex-
cellent online and on-site
courses for horticulture pro-
fessionals and home garden-
ers.
Volunteers have the oppor-
tunity to take advantage of a
wide variety of educational
experiences, from informal
.. teaching by GII staff to work-
shops, seminars, and online


Check Out our

"Guy's Guide" to

giving flowers on our

Website -


wwwgell.li ngsfl.owei-s.corn


courses.
She mentioned that Friends
of Green Industries Institute
(FOGII) is open for member-
ship, $20per year.
Because of poor health,
Jane Glover informed her
friends that she will be mov-
ing closer to her children, and
will be unable to attend future
meetings on a regular basis.
The Feb. 14, Valentine's
Day meeting will be held
noon, at the home of Shirley
Widd. Members planning to
attend are asked to contact
Widd so she can plan on how
much food to prepare.


1-800-USA-NAVY
www.navyjobs.com


When was


the last


time you


made an


investment


that saved


lives?


Questions,
Anyone?
Get the answers you can
trust about government
programs, benefits, and
services from the Federal
Consumer Information
Center.
Just call toll-free:
1-800-FED-INFO
(That's 1-800-333-4636)
Mon-Fri 8am-8pm ET
Or visit
www.pueblo.gsa.gov/call
U.S. General Services Administration



Braren Guest

Speaker

At Circle

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Monticello Garden Club
President Dianne Braren was
the guest speaker at the most
recent Founders Garden Cir-
cle meeting.
She updated the members
on the goings on in the Club
and on the state and national
level.
Circle Chair Edna Fendley
relates that the meeting'was
held at Jae's Sub ard Grill,
with a plant exchange pro-
gram.
Circle meetings are held
noon on the second Thursday
of each month. Fendley may
be contacted at 997-5660 for
information about upcoming
meetings.


Got A Cute

Photo?



Send It To Us

And We'll

Share -It With

Our Readers!



Kids Dogs

Strange

stuff, etc.



Monticello

News

P.O. BOX 430

Monticello,
FL 32345




"You Can't

Be Without

It"


TWO MAGICAL WEEKENDS AT THE
ALACJA COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS IN GAINESVILLE,FL
Visit the Marketplace where artisans sell their wares.
Performances by Magicians, Musicians and Jesters.
Cheer Battling Knights, Birds of Prey,
and Human Chess Games.

January 27-28 & February 3-4
10 am 6 pm $12 adults / $5 Ages 5-17
.Friday, February 2
a .. ~ 9 am 4 pm 4 Admission half price
Presented by the City of Gainesville Parks, Recreation & Cultural Affairs
www.gvlculturalaffairs.org 352-334-ARTS


SAVER


When you invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
enormous-healthier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. It's a dividend that builds a
strong community.


190 E Dogwood Street


850.997.2015


307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL. 32303 (904) 414-0844


climate control

It's simple. Heat and cool
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ENERGY STAR", to reduce
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and make a big difference
in the fight against
air pollution.

To learn more, go to
energystar.gov.


I


I

















* PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 24, 2007


Sports


-r i;7sl~t1.It


P~ .,I





.y, ,.y ~ ir r5~a,.


1PL 1
I 5 j,"' ..r. ,, ...
:' ;, :'.. ."* "
s i .'' ** *


Lady Warrior JVs


Beat Carrabelle


k


S e

S..


,YOUTH SOCCER Program at the Recreation Park Saturday mornings has attracted
close to 100 children since it began early this month. (News Photo)




Step Up Florida Kick


Off Event Set Feb. 1


Jefferson County has been
chosen to host the Step Up
Florida kickoff event for the
entire state, noon, Thursday,
Feb. 1, at the Recreation Park.
The kickoff event will fea-
ture a presentation by Mark
Fenton, a dynamic motiva-
tional speaker and former
Olympic race walker.
A ribbon cutting is slated to
promote the new walkingibik-
ing path at the park; and there
will be a reading of the Step
Up Florida proclamation.
A walk and bike ride
around the new path will fol-
low.
Health Educator Michele
Brantley encourages all who
attend the event to participate,
including elementary children
who will join the event by
riding bicycles around the
new path, that was created
through a partnership between
the Florida Department of
Health's Chronic Disease
Health Promotion and Educa-
tion Program, County Com-
missioners, County Road De-
partment, and the County
Health Department.
Brantley said there would
be something at the event for
everyone, no mater what age
or how fit.-
She invites residents to join
in as they walk, bike, and run
the Step Up Florida fitness
flag around the county, begin-
ning with an advanced walk-
ing club at 8 a.m. around
Monticello and continuing
with various activities
throughout the day.
"Physical activity is an im-
portant part of good health,"
said Brantley. Regular exer-
cise reduces the risk of car-
diovascular disease, which is
the leading cause of death in
the US.
"Physical activity helps
control weight, decreases high


ACA Middle

BOys Lose

To Maclay
The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy boys middle school bas-
ketball team lost to Maclay,
39-20, to stand 8-2 on the sea-
son.
"Maclay is the only team
that has beat us this year,"
.said Coach Ray Hughes.
"They are a pretty good team.
We were playing well, but
soon after the game started,
Maclay got as hot as a fire-
cracker."
Scoring for the Warriors
were Matt Dobson, six points;
Corey Burrus, five points; and
Clark Christie, Tyler Jackson
and Alex Gulledge, each
scored three points.
Additional statistics were
not available.
The previous game slated
against Steinhatchee was
postponed and rescheduled
for 4:30 p.m., Jan. 25, there.


blood pressure and reduces
the risks of diabetes and colon
cancer, as well as the symp-
toms of arthritis," said Brant-
ley. "It can even reduce
anxiety and depression.
"But despite the evidence of
the benefits of regular physi-
cal activity, 50 percent of
adults in America do not get
enough exercise, and 25 per-
cent of adults are not active at
all," she said. "More than one
third of high school students
do not get enough exercise ei-
ther, and childhood obesity is
an increasing problem in our
society."
Throughout the month of
February, the Step Up Florida
initiative promotes physical
activity and health Jifestyles
for all Floridians, and high-
lights opportunities for physi-
cal activity.
Step Up Florida promotes 60
A Day, the Florida Way, en-
couraging 60 minutes of
physical activity a day for
better health.
"But if that sounds daunting,
remember that every little bit
helps," she said. "For exam-
ple, just 30 minutes of brisk
walking, five days a week,
will help lower your blood
pressure and control your
weight. The little changes
you make today add up to big
improvements in your
health."
Brantley made some sug-
gestions for increasing physi-
cal activity in your daily life:
Walk, cycle, jog, skate,
etc., to work, school, or the
store, or place of worship.
Park the car further away
from your destination.
Get on or off the bus sev-
eral blocks away.
Take the stairs rather than
the elevator or escalator.
Play with children or pets.
Perform gardening or
home repair activities.




THE GENERAL IS

FIGHTING MAD!








Lt. Gen. Robert Johnston,
USMC Ret.,'Chief of Staff
of Operation Desert
Storm, is fighting mad.
He's joined MDA's battle
to save lives. The general
knows the enemy life-
threatening diseases.
Join the general. Vol-
unteer to help MDA. Call
your local office or
(800) FIGHTMD.


Muscular Dystrophy Assoc.
www.mdausa.org


Use leg power, take small
trips on foot to get your body
moving.
Exercise while watching
TV, for example, use hand
weights, bicycle, treadmill or
stair climber, or stretch.
* Dance to music.
Keep a pair of comfort-
able walking or running shoes
in your car and office.
Make Saturday morning
walk a group habit.
* Walk while doing errands.
To find out more about how
to make physical activity a
part of your every day life, or
to receive information about
Step Up Florida, contact the
Health Department at 342-
0170, ext. 206 or 207.


ACA JV Girls defeated
Carrabelle 31-14, recently..
Michaela Roccanti shot at 60
percent from the field, drop-
ping in three of five buckets
for a total of six points, one
assist, one offensive and two
defensive rebounds for a total
of three, two block/steals,
three turnovers.
Tiffany Brasington shot at
67 percent from the field
dropping in two of three, for a
total of four points, one assist,
one offensive and two defen-
sive rebounds for a total of
three, two fouls, five
block/steals, and one
turnover.
Savannah Williams shot at
33 percent from the field, hit-
ting one of three for two
points, one assist, one offen-
sive and two defensive re-
bounds for a total of three,
four block/steals, and three
turnovers.
Chelsea Dobson led the
score for the Lady Warriors
shooting at 40 percent from
the field dropping in four of
ten for eight points, one
assist, nine offensive and two
defensive rebounds for a total
of 11, one foul, one
block/steal.
Becky Turner, two assists,
three defensive rebounds, two
fouls, four block/steals, three
turnovers.
Jodie Bradford dropped in
one of six for the field and
shot at 43 percent from the
free-throw line, dropping in
three of seven for a total of
five points, two offensive and
four defensive rebounds for a
total of six, two turnovers.


Warriors Fall 50-40

TO GA. Christian


The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy varsity boys basketball
team fell to Georgia Christian
last week, 50-40., to stand 4-
11 on the season.
"Georgia Christian is a nice
school with a real nice gym,"
said Coach Dan Nennstiel.
They have a professionally
rnm, decent team."
He added that the warriors
played well, though they
scored only three points in the
first quarter.
"Georgia Christian averages
about 70 points per game, our
goal going in was to hold
them in the 50's, where we
usually score," he said. "We
kept fighting and kept it to a
ten-point game, which is
really good."
Stephen Griffin led the score
for the Warriors with 15
points, one basket of which
was a, really nice dunk at the
end of the game, which re-
sulted from a steal, five as-
sists, nine rebounds. five


steals, one block.
Reggie Walker played his
best round of the season with
13 points, one assist, nine re-
bounds, one steal, and com-
mitting no turnovers.
Wade Scarberry, five
points, three assists, five re-
bounds, three steals.
Kyle Barnwell, five points,
two assists, five rebounds,
two steals.
Michael Kinsey, two points,
one assist, two rebounds, one
steal.
Prateen Patel, one point,
two rebounds, two steals.
Rob Searcy, one steal.
Nennstiel said that though
Jim Stephens played only in
the final minutes of the game,
he played very well.


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Miranda Wider shot at 33
percent from the field, sinking
one of three for two points,
one assist, one defensive re-
bound, three fouls, two
block/steals, three turnovers.
Dana Watt dropped in one
offensive from the field for
two points, two offensive and
one defensive rebounds for a
total of three, one block/steal,
three turnovers.
Angela McCune shot at 100
percent from the free-throw
line, sinking two of two for
two points, five offensive and
one defensive rebound for a
total of six, one foul, one
turnover.
The Lady Warriors now
stand 8-5 on the season.


.. .. .... ....... .











,,J
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i _

Growing.








Gone.



Remember. Only you can prevent forest fires.
SA public service of h.e US D A
u l Forest Service., and your Stave Foresters.


TAJTGAIJG!
















850-575-8628
7596 W. Tennessee St.
Tallahassee, Florida
^^*a^O~

















,Tallahassee, Florida


The
Earned Income
Tax Credit.
You've
earned it.
Why not claim
it?
If you're working hard just to-make
ends meet and have one or more
children living with you, you may
qualify for the EITC. Think of it as a
reward for doing one of life's most
.beautiful, most important afid most
loving jobs. Visit our Web site or
ask your tax preparer if you qualify.
A message from the Internal
Revenue Service.
www.irs.gov


~1


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 24, 2007 PAGE 9


School Students


To Receive IDs


TEAM representing agencies pooling resources to establish student identification
program here includes, from left: Sheriff David Hobbs, FMB VP Mike Sims, Progress
Energy Representative Gaye Hannah, Superintendent Phil Barker.


Denson Earns

GED At

Adult School

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Sherita Denson is the 33rd
graduate of the Adult School
this year.
She plans to attend Talla-
hassee Community College to
earn begin her studies to be-
come a pediatrician.
"As a child, I was always
taught to never give up, no
matter what my situation
was," said Denson.
"My reason for taking the
GED was to enable me to pur-
sue my education, not in a
quicker, but more challenging
way."
She concluded that she
hopes to go on and accom-
plish her hopes and dreams in
life and become a better per-
son.

Monroe 32nd


Adult School 1

Graduate


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Keneshia Monroe earned
her GED at the Adult School,
as the 32nd graduate this
school year.
"Growing up I always
wanted to finish school, and
afterward, go to any college-
to get my cosmetology
license. so I could one day
open my own shop," said
Monroe.
"But I really wanted to join
the Air Force.to defend my
country," she said. "But I be-
came pregnant and had to put
my Air Force dreams to the
side. My child comes first."


JCHS Loses To

Taylor County

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County var-
sity boys basketball team fe-
all to Taylor Country 65-54,
last week, to stand 2-12 on
the season.
Tim Crumitie led the score
for the Tigers with 25 points,
one rebounds, four steals.
Jon Dady, five points, three
rebounds, three assists.
Anthony Johnson, eight
points, five rebounds, three
assists.
Lucius Wade, nine points,
three assists, two steals.
Harold Ingram, nine points,
seven rebounds, two blocks.


PRINCIPAL ARTIS JOHNSON with Keneshia Monroe,
the 32nd student to earn her GED this school year.
(News Photos)


ADULT SCHOOL Principal
Denson, 33rd graduate this


NO ,


Artis Johnson and Sherita
year.


The American Football
Coach's association, in con-
junction with the County
Sheriffs Office, teamed up to
to provide child ID kits for
children, grades K-5 through
12, attending all county
schools, public and private.
To make that goal a reality,
Farmers and Merchants Bank
and Progress Energy teamed
up and donated $1,200, so the
kits could be purchased.
"The kits will provide all
children in the county with
finger prints, photo ID, and
DNA sample," said Sheriff
David Hobbs.
"The Sheriffs Office will
not keep the ID's of the chil-
dren. They will be maintained


by the child's family, who
would use them if the child
were to disappear," said
Hobbs.
"Approximately 800,000
children in the US are re-
ported missing each year, and
this is one way of protecting
our children in the county."
He added that the kits
should be available within the
next month or two.
Once those kits are received,
the Sheriffs Office and Su-
perintendent of Schools Phil
Barker, will determine how
they will be issued.
"We could not do this if not
for the sponsorship of FMB
and Progress Energy," Hobbs
concluded.


The County Farm Bureau is
celebrating Feb. 4-10 as iFood
Check Out Week.
The cost of food in America
remains affordable, with
families spending just under
10 percent of their disposable
personal incomes on food,
according to statistics
compiled by the Agriculture
Department's Economic
Research Service.
The average household will
have earned enough disposable
income to pay for its annual
food supply in about 36 days,
the County Farm Bureau
reports.
Bureau President Stephen
Monroe remarked: "The safe,
abundant, and affordable
domestic food supply
produced by America's
farmers and ranchers is
responsible, at least in part, for
our nation's increasing
standard of living."
To mark the occasion 10 lo-
cal Farm Bureaus and Jeffer-
son County donated $1,000
worth of food to the Ronald
McDonald House in Tallahas-
see.
This House provides a home
away from home for the fami-
lies of seriously ill children re-
ceiving medical treatment in.

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The food will be used to help 7
feed families staying at the
House.
"Compared to food, Ameri-
-cans work longer each year to Monti
pay for their housing, federal Nev
taxes and medical care," Mon-
roe said. YOU C
I Monroe said the affordable Withoi
high quality food we enjoy as
consumers is a product of our
successful food production and
distribution system, as well as
America's farmers and re-
anchers continued access to ef- "Fai
fective and affordable crop
protection tools. Faces
"This week should hold
meaning for most Americans," Quiet P
he said. "Although we are con-
cerned that some Americans
cannot afford to buy the food A Pic
they need, we are proud of the A
role Florida farmers play in And Na
producing the most affordable
food in the world. Histol
"Food Check Out Day
tracks the amount of income Jeffe
needed by Americans to pur-
chase food on an annual Cou
basis," Monroe said.
"Despite a few fluctuations
over the past few years, food
prices have remained relatively By D
stable over time." Delp C
On Feb. 7, Farm Bureaus
will prepare an old fashion
noon lunch for about 50 peo-
ple at the Ronald McDonald Availal
House in Tallahassee.
The Ch.

Off,

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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 24, 2007


Eats flies. Dates a pig. Hollywood star.


Pass It On.


THE FOUNDATION LoR A BETTER LIFE
www.forhbrrerlifc.org


THE CITY planted a total of 13 Cleveland Pears, do-
nated by Simpson Nursery, Friday, in recognition of Ar-
bor Day. From left: Evelyn Thomas, Emily Anderson,


Toni Lane, Jan Wadsworti, Gerrold Austin, David Frisby
Julie Conley, Gloria Brown i


Aucilla Christian Academy


Reports Honor Roll


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy
Principal Richard Finlayson
has announced the honor roll
for the third six weeks period.
Students and their grade
levels include:
In K-3, receiving all S+'s:
Aidan Cribbs, Lindsey Davis,
Keira Evans, Caroline Flynt,
Dean Forehand, Riley Ham-
rick, McKenzie Hurley, Kris-
han Patel, Jordan Swickley,
Megan Vann, Olivia Walton,
Travis Wheeler, and Ashlyn
Williams.
In K-4, receiving all S+'s:
Jacob Barker, Joshua Clark,
Jocelyn. Davis, Carter
Derome, Joshua Eades, Ans-
ley English, Nicholas Flynt,
Anna Halbert, Jason
Hamilton, Alex Haselden,
Christa Hayes, Austin High-
tower, Hannah Holton, Gant
Lee, Grant Merschman, Abby
Reams, Wyatt Reese, Mylie
Rogers, Elizabeth Scheese,
Grayson Sircy, Austin
Wheeler, and Benjamin Wur-
gler.
In K-5, receiving all S+'s:
Alexis Alexandrou, Grace
Beshears, Andrew Burrus,
Emily Forehand, Matthew
Greene, Haylee Lewis, Mag-
gie Mall, Gabbie Smith,
Nicholas Swickley, and Cody
Whiddon.
All S, S+s: Marissa Cooley,
Evan Courtney, Kash
Connell, D. J. Cox, Taylor
Davis, Emily Engle, Lydia
Hall, Bethany Hayes, Ryan
Jackson, Ameer Khdor, Am-
ber Knowles, Lynelle Love-
less, Ayush Patel, Kaleb
Poppell, Chloe Reams, Me-
gan Schofill, Levi Stafford,
Dilyn Stowers, Cole Tuten,
and Mackensie Wirick.
In first grade, receiving all
A's: Emily Adams, Walker
Davis, Timothy Finlayson,
Jessica Giddens, Cameryn
Grant, Kenlie Harvey, Eliza-
beth Hightower, Noah Hul-
bert, Katie James, Carly
Joiner, Haylee Jones, Nour
Khodr, Ryals Lee, Jenna
Merchman, Abigail Morgan,
Jake Pridgeon,' Cannon Ran-
dle, Brandon Slaughter, Quin-
ton Thomas, Ria Wheeler,
Tedo Wilcox, and Daniel
Wurgler.
Receiving all A's and B's:
David Bailey, T. J.
Hightower, Evan Hocking, D.
J. Key, Jake Pridgeon, Abi-
gail Ratliff, and Joe Walton.
In second grade, receiving
all A's: Traynor Barker, Cali
Burkett, Alex Derome,
Stephanie English, Sarah
Hall, Kirsten Reagan, Ramsey
Sullivan, and Kate Whiddon.
Receiving all A's and B's:
Meagan Beaty, Dena Bishop,
Hanna Black, Cali Burkett,
Rebecca Carson, Katie Ful-
ford, Chaz Hamilton, Joe


Hannon, Brittany Hughes,
Jenny Jackson, Erica Keeler,
Donnie Kinsey, Lindsey Law-
son, Lauren Lee, Hannah
Lewis, Summerlyn Marsh,
Gatlin Nennstiel, Sarah Riley,
Will Sircy, Natalie Sorensen,
Larrett Terrell, Kirsten Whi-
don, and Hank Wirick.
In third grade, earning all
A's: Taylor Copeland, Erin
Lee, Thomas Swickley, T. J.
Swords, Justin Welch, and
Emma Whitmer.
All A's and B's: Jake Ed-
wards, Megan Giddons, lan
Haselden, Sam Hogg, Ally
Mall, Taylor McKnight, Rean
Montesclaros, Sgrah Tharpe,
Courtney Watts, Ip. J. Wilkin-
son, and Mattison Gaige Win-
chester.
In the fourth grade, earning
all A's: Morgan Cline, Ricky
Finlayson, Haleigh Gilbert,
Doug Gulledge, Lindsey Min-
cey, and Bryce Sanderson.
Earning all A's and B's:
Austin Allen, Austin Bishop,
Timmy Burrus, Ty Chancey,
Jaden Clark, Abigail Floyd,
Cheyenne Floyd, Hunter Han-
dley, Julie High, Sarah James,
Brooklyn McGlamory, Car-
son Nennstiel, and Bradley.
Vollertsen.
In fifth grade, earning all
A's: Matthew Hutcheson, Ra-
chel Lark, Aimee Love, and
Annie Yang.
Earning all A's and B's:
Tanner Aman, Victoria
Brock, Justin Brown, Devin
Courtney, Casey Demott,
Lauren Demott, Jacob
Dunbar, Kayla Fulford, Ash-
ley Hebert, Capas Kinsey,
Christina Reams, and Jessica
Welch.
In sixth grade, earning all
A's: Nick Buzbee, Ashli
Cline, Jay Finlayson, Russell
Fraleigh, Jared Jackson, Ka-
ley Love, Hadley Revell,
Ashley Schofill, Pamela Watt,
and Wendy Yang.
Earning all A's and B's:
Alexis Burkett, Tres Cope-
land, Hannah Haselden, Da-
kota McGlammory, Whitney
McKnight, Sammy Ritter,
Hans Sorensen, and Audrey
Wynn.
In the seventh grade, earn-
ing all A's: Tyler Jackson and
Shelby Whitmer.
Earning all A's and B's: Levi
Cobb, Matt Dobson, and
Vickie Perry.
In the eighth grade, earning
all A's: Kaitlin Jackson.
Earning all A's and B's:
Taylor Pridgeon, Clark
Christy, Taryn Copeland,
Anna Finlayson, and Sarah
Sorensen.
In the ninth grade, earning
all A's: John Stephens, and
Dana Watt.
Earning all A's and B's:
Ryan Barclay, Tiffany
Brasington, Clay Fulford, Jes-
sica Hunt, Wilson Lewis,
John Stephens and Kaylyn
Watt.


and Tristan Sorensen..
'Earning all A's and B's: Ben
Buzbee, Jayce Davis, Lindsey
'Day, Will Hartsfield, Katy
Plummer, Nicole Mathis, and
'Hannah Sorensen.
In the twelfth grade, earning
all A's: Lisa Bailey, Joanna
C.obb, Serena Harvin,
Amanda Hunt, Courtney Kin-
sey, Will Knight, Melissa
Martin, Caitlin Murphy, Rikki
Roccanti, and Taylor Rykard.
SEarning all A's and B's were;
~Josh Carswell, Shaye Eason,
Kristen Fongeallaz, Brittany
Hobbs, Holly Jones, Dustin
Roberts, Angela Steinberg,
and J. T. Ward.


In the tenth grade, earning
all A's: Chel-eaj Dbbson, and',
Michaela Roccanti.
Earning all' A's and B's:
Ashley Echols, Katelyn
Levine, Byron Love and Sa-
vannah Williams.
Inithe eleventh grade, earn-
ing all A's: Rebekah Aman,
Courtney Brasington, A. J.
Connell, Courtney Connell,
Stephanie Dobson, Alfa'Hunt, '
Prateen Patel, Ramsey Revell



Williams
(Continued From Page 7)
ized; the importance of quality
after school" academic activi-
ties.
In addition to her work with
the museum, she has worked
as a Parent Liaison With kids "
that have special needs for the
past five years through the
FSU Department of Commu-
nication Disorders.
She has also worked with
the local Health Education
Center to promote the impor-
tant health issues facing our
community.
To'contact Williams about
any of the three Clubs in the
county area, her office line is-
997-4226.


11I1 I.nf

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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 24, 2007 PAGE 11


Minimum Wage


(Continued From Page 4)
like will simply add a penny or
two to some products to cover
their new minimum wage la-
bor costs, thus passing on the
increase to us.
If there is no actual benefit to
the poor workers, then why are
the Democrats so vehement in
their desire to ram through
minimum wage legislation as
one of their first acts in the
new congress?
Quite simply, the Democrats
need to accomplish two objec-
tives. First they need to rein-
force the class warfare that the
Democratic party relies on to
garner votes from the poorest
workers in our society.
More importantly, however,
it is a major under the table
pay off to the big (and small)
union bosses, who throw tons
of money into the Democratic
National Committee coffers.
It is actually quite clever, al-


beit underhanded and decep-
tive to use the poor among us
to gain and maintain political
office, but what's new?
You see in the manufactur-
ing and other unionized sectors
of the workplace, the wages of
the lowest paid American
worker can not be raised with-
out increasing the hourly
wages of all the more skilled
laborers above them.
Unions argue that the dis-
lance between wages of the
unskilled minimum wage work
force and skilled "union" em-
ployees must maintain a
"credible" distance. This ripple
effect forces the likes of Gen-
eral Motors to virtually in-
crease the wages of all hourly
workers.
More money for the workers,
more money for the union via
higher dues, more contribu-
tions available and reason to
support Democratic politicians


and, of course, an increase in
the price of a new car or truck
for you and me to cover GM's
costs.
Where does it stop? Con-
gress could legislate raising the
minimum wage to $25.00 an
hour and I will guarantee you
that the next day a hamburger
and fries will cost you fifteen
bucks!
I am not sure how this mini-


mum wage "dance" will play
out among the twelve million
illegal aliens squatting on U.S.
soil. I suspect that part of the
agenda in the newly controlled--
Democratic congress will be to
brow beat the public and fel-
low politicians into giving
massive amnesty for all ille-
gals, ergo future Democrat--
voters.


Now they aren't stupid
enough to come right out and
use the word "amnesty", but
what ever program is offered
under the progressive heading
of a "Comprehensive Immigra-
tion Reform" will indeed
amount to amnesty.
Remember, if it looks like a
duck, walks like a duck and
-quacks like a duck--- it's a
duck!


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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 24, 2007


Jefferson Elementary Tells


Academic Honor Roll


Jefferson Elementary School
Principal Kay Collins reports
the academic honor roll for
the second nine weeks period
Students and their grade
levels follow:.
In grade one, earning all
A's:: Jayshawn Francis, Des-
tiny Geathers, Samyia How-
ard, Dylan Rudlaff, Kenijah
Smith, Nicholas Toelle, Lyne-
cia Dawson, Anakaren Del-
gado, Liset Jiminez-Perez, Ja-
son Joiner, Janashia Jones;
Christian Steen, Denzel
Shaw, Allison Parker, Ya'L-
hana Howard, Marquis Rob-
inson, Rodreka Beverly, Jaq-
uan Williams, Kyshawndre
Wade, AliyahThompson.
Also, Jadica Arnold, Jas-
mine Boyd, Isaiah Coleman,
Summer Eades, Lorenzo
Geathers, Aniyiah Thompson,
Kristal Nogal, Charlesia Car-
ter, Brooke Josey, Tamia Kel-
logg, and Shoshanna Mast.
All A's and B's: Blaze
Goode, Monica King, Jamari
Hallman, Davion Brockman,
Lazaveya Morris, and Caleb
Young.
Also, Evander Bend, Diego
Garcia, Shania Mosley, Kevin
Shuler, Brianna Neely, Jarret
Jones, Deldrick Geathers,
Makayla Brown, Arissa Ben-
nett, Justin Crumity, Tatani
Roach, Camilla Graham,
Janee' Jones, Robert Lewis,
Ja'lecia Williams, Jacari
Dean, Kevon Blue, Tykeria
Howard, Janazhia Beverly,
Miguel Jimenez, Eduardo Ji--
menez, Timesha Morris, Dar-
ius Oldham, Kaleyah Parrish,
Otis Scott, and Lazarus
Tucker.
Also, Tikeya Johnson,
Rashone Miller, Ricky Mur-
ray, Julius Norman, Anthony
Thompkins, Maliki Thomp-
son, Andrew Tilk, and Mark
Vinson.
In grade 2, all A's: Chyna
Frazier, Omari Sloan, and
Jalen Jones.
All A's and B's: Darren El-
lis, Mia Smith, Tremelody
Robinson, Austin McClellan,
Kelvisha Norton, Terrel
Jackson, Kameela Grayson,
and Janunika Ball.
Also, Cecelia Castilo,


Duane Holmes, Estela Mo-
rales, Mercedes Sanders, and
Akeiran Williams.
Also, Clevan Greene, Kei-
lan Greene, Espititcare Jean,
Sara Joiner, Ja'mya Madry,
Misty Price, Shaderica Virgil,
Briana Webb, Emmerald Gra-
ham, Sedricka Robertson,
Cassandra Sneed, Alonto Da-
riety, Jr., Sante McDowell,
Austin Harrell, Keyanna'
Scott, and Alex Trico.
In grade 3, earning all A's
were: Elicia Brewster, Hattie
Weatherspoon, Carlie Barber,
Alexa Falzone, and David
Sysskind.
Earning all A's and B's
were: Savannah Welch,
Azende Thompson, Thaddeus
Francis, Mykala Dean, Mar-
kashia Ball, Zack Bell,
Alaysja Burnley, Tyshun
Thurman, Kaieychia Davis,
Tremerris Parrish, Felix
Serna, Lauren Williams, Sho-
nycia Graham, Aliyah Brad-
.ley, Brittany Tarver, Moura
Jones, Sarah Sanders, Delan-
dra Nealy, and Anthony Foot-
man.


In grade four, receiving all
A's and B's were: Qua'Bryss
Crumitie, Sierra Fain, Kasi
Rowland, Estela Valdouinos,
Katherine Vinson, Dewayne
Sanders, Michael Johnson,
T'yira Howard, TianaJarrell,
Cortez Jones, Nikoloas Gra-
ham, Tarlan Jackson, Jose
Nogal, Janeshia Aikens,
Shawnterious Blue, Roberto
Campas, Nakata Hawkins,
Agueda Martinez, Danella
Potter, Tyaaunie Richardson
and Raheem Trumpet.
In grade five, receiving all
A's was Phidell Lewis.
Receiving all A's and B's
were: Yasmine Whigham,
Ja'lexia Sloan, and Karoline
Gillyard.


American Heart
Association.
Fighting Har Disease
.andStroke

It keeps
more than
memories
alive,


For Sale by First United Methodist Church 2400 sq.
ft. home at 895 West Washington Street. This former
Methodist Parsonage with split floor plan has 4 bed-
rooms and 3 1/2 baths, refinished hardwood floors.
New tile floors in kitchen, laundry and baths, carpet
in the family room and master bedroom. Bathrooms
newly renovated. Wood stove insert in fireplace.
Large lot landscaped with magnolias, camellias, crepe
myrtles and azaleas. Large deck and screened porch.
$259,500. For more information
call 997-5545


TEGAL.
STHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY CIVIL
DIVISION CITIFINANCIAL
SERVICES, INC., SUCCESSOR
BY REASON OF MERGER WITH
CITIFINANCIAL SERVICES, INC.
344, LLC, SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO, ASSOCIATES
FINANCIAL SERVICES OF
AMERICA, INC., Plaintiff, vs.
CASE NO. 07-04-CA WILLIAM
SCOTT RANDERSON,
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
OF THE ESTATE OF KIM H.
RANDERSON A/K/A KIM H.
MARTIN, A/K/A KIM
HENDERSON MARTIN,
DECEASED; UNKNOWN HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, TRUSTEES OF KIM H.
RANDERSON A/K/A KIM H.
MARTIN, A/K/A KIM
HENDERSON MARTIN.
DECEASED; WILLIAM SCOTT
RANDERSON; THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF WILLIAM SCOTT
RANDERSON; WILLIAM SCOTT
RANDERSON, HEIR; AVERY
TERRELL MARTIN, HEIR;
TRAVIS RANDERSON, HEIR; IF
LIVING, INCLUDING ANY
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID
DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED, AND IF
DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE
UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND
TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS;
CITIFINANCIAL EQUITY


MONTICELLO


NEWS




Covering

The Growth

Of The

Community!


LEGAL
SERVICES, INC.; WHETHER
DISSOLVED OR PRESENTLY
EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH
ANY GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR
TRUSTEES OF SAID
DEFENDANTS) AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR
AGAINST DEFENDANTSS;
UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendantss. /
NOTICE OF ACTION TO:
WILLIAM SCOTT RANDERSON
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
OF THE ESTATE OF KIM H.
RANDERSON A/K/A KIM H.
MARTIN, A/K/A KIM
HENDERSON MARTIN,
DECEASED; UNKNOWN HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, TRUSTEES OF KIM H.
RANDERSON A/K/A KIM H.
MARTIN, A/K/A KIM
HENDERSON MARTIN,
DECEASED; WILLIAM SCOTT
RANDERSON; THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF WILLIAM SCOTT
RANDERSON; WILLIAM SCOTT
RANDERSON, HEIR; AVERY
TERRELL MARTIN, HEIR;
TRAVIS RANDERSON, HEIR; IF
LIVING, INCLUDING ANY
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID
DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED, AND IF
DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE


LEGAL
UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND
TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANT(S) Whose residence
are/is unknown. YOU ARE
HEREBY required to file your
answer or written defenses, if any,
in the above proceeding with the
Clerk of this Court, and to serve a
copy thereof upon the plaintiff's
attorney, whose name and address
appears hereon, within thirty days
of the first publication of this
Notice, the nature of this proceeding
begin a suit for foreclosure of
mortgage against the following
described property, to wit: THE
NORTHERLY 165 FEET, MORE
OR LESS, OF A TRACT OF
LAND, MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS; COMMENCE
AT A POINT OF THE EAST
BOUNDARY OF THE RIGHT OF
WAY OF STATE ROAD NO 96
(PINHOOK ROAD), WHERE SAID
ROAD INTERSECTS THE
SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE
OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER
OF THE NORTHWEST
QUARTER OF SECTION, 8,
TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 4
EAST, AND RUNNING EAST
ALONG SAID SOUTHERN
BOUNDARY LINE, 20 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES


41


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dream home a reality.

Serving North Florida
& South Georgia
since 1977,


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With Jim!
At Roy Campbell Chevrolet


2006 Chevy Trailblazer 4DR LS
Auto, AC, PW Windows, PW DR Locks, Tilt,
Cruise, CD Player, "Loaded", Factory Warranty,
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All You ad isax Ian I itnIc e W ?I
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wwwr cam bell.com
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I I dd i T T d Tid


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id rla,$Oj









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 24, 2007 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$9.00
Each Additional Line....$1.25
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classifed Department at:
997-3568


L .. : "
EAST 210 FEET; THENCE EAST
56 FEET; THENCE NORTH 351
FEET; THENCE WEST 261 FEET,
MORE OR LESS, TO THE EAST
BOUNDARY OF THE RIGHT OF
WAY OF SAID STATE ROAD NO.
96; THENCE SOUTHERLY 562
FEET, MORE OR LESS. ALONG
THE EASTERN BOUNDARY OF
THE RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE
ROAD NO. 96, TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING; BEING IN
SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE
NORTHWEST QUARTER OF
SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 1
SOUTH, RANGE 4 EAST,
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA. To include a: Unknown
Unknown, VIN Unknown and
Unknown A/K/A 9215
WAUKEENAH HWY
MONTICELLO, FL 32344 If you
fail to file your answer or written
defenses in the above proceeding, on
plaintiffs attorney, a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint or
Petition. DATED at JEFFERSON
County this 10 day of January,
2007. Clerk of Circuit Court By
Deputy Clerk Norm L. Wilkins In
accordance with the American with
Disabilities Act of 1990, person
needing a special accommodation to
participate in this proceeding
should contact the ASA Coordinator
no later than seven (7) days prior to
the proceedings. If hearing
impaired, please call (800) 955-9771
(TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (voice), via
Florida Relay Service. Law Offices
of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King
Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Tel (813) 915-8660 Fax (813)
915-0559 Attorney for Plaintiff
R/D 1/17,1/24.07,c
Public Meeting Notice One or more
members of the following boards
may be present at forum on Livable
/Walkable Communities on
February 1, 2007 at 6:00 p.m. at 345
East Washington Street, Monticello,
FL 32344: Monticello Panning
Agency, Monticello City Council,
Jefferson County Board of County
Commissioners, Jefferson County
Planning Commission, Utilities
Development Committee, and the
Executive Legislative Committee.
R/D 1/24/07

INVITATION FOR BID
(Construction Contract) City of
Monticello City Hall 245 S.
Mulberry Street Monticello, FL
SEALED BIDS, subject to the
conditions contained herein, will be
RECEIVED until 2:00 p.m.
Thursday, February 15th, 2007, at
the offices of the Architect (at the
address below) and then opened, for
furnishing all materials and
performing all work for: The
re-painting and partial restoration
of the two-story building at 245 S.
Mulberry Street, Monticello,
Florida otherwise known as the
Monticello City Hall. The work will
include (but is not limited to):
Refinish and re-paint all existing
exterior painted surfaces unless
noted otherwise. Remove paint from
existing brick foundation piers.
Replacement and/or repair of
miscellaneous wood elements as
indicated and/or noted on the
drawings. Plans and specifications,
not exceeding two sets, may be
obtained from: Johnson / Peterson
Architects, Inc., 2110 Centerville
Road, Suite C, Tallahassee, Florida,
32308 (850) 224-9700. Cost of plans
is $25.00 per set (non-refundable),
payable upon pick up or order of
plans. Payments will be made as
follows: Monthly, in accordance
with AIA Document A101-1997,
"Standard Form of Agreement
Between Owner and Contractor"
Contract duration shall be 60
calendar days from Notice of
Proceed to Substantial Completion.
Liquidated damages for delay will
be $100.00 per calendar day. Bids
must be submitted on the Bid Form
provided, and, the successful bidder
will be required to execute AIA
Document A101-1997, "Standard
Form of Agreement Between Owner
and Contractor".
R/D l/24,26/07,e


NOTICE ,"
BINGO sponsored by the Lloyd
Lions Club. 3 p.m. until, Saturday,
Jan. 27 at 7337-A Old Lloyd Road,
$50 Bonanza! Proceeds for club
projects. 997-1754.
R/D 1-19,24,26,pd

HELP WAN.T%#',_
-i_^->--- --
Seeking substitute teachers for
Kids Incorporated Early Head
Start, Jefferson. Call Norma for
interview 997-4736.
R/D 1/19,24,c
Cox Auto Trader is currently
seeking drivers to deliver our
magazines in the Tallahassee
FL, Madison, FL and
surrounding areas. Computer
knowledge helpful, requires
reliable vehicle, good driving
record, valid drivers license &
insurance. One day a week -
Thursdays. Pick up magazines
in Madison. Call 386-590-1255
1/24,26,31,2/2,7,9,14,16,21,23,28
,3/2,c
Caregiver for elderly lady. Must
be able to cook, drive, light
housekeeping, work' flexible hrs.
Call 997-6803
R/D 1/24,26,pd
Aucilla Christian Academy is
currently accepting applications
for a bus driver position. Must
have (or be willing to obtain) a
CDL class B with P and S
endorsements. Also, must be a
positive, Christian role model.
For more information or to
apply, please contact the school
at 997-3597.
R/D 1/24,26,c
Driver ASAP 36-43cpm
/$1.20pm + Sign On Bonus' $0
Lease NEW Trucks CDL-A + 3
mos OTR (800) 635-8669.
1/24,26,fc
Earn Up to $550 Weekly
Working through the
government PT NO Experience.
Call Today!! (800) 488-2921 Ask
for Department W21.
1/24,26,fc
Drivers- Car hauling career.
GREAT HOME TIME!
Exceptional Pay & Benefits!
Paid Training! mon. 1 yr
Class-A CDL exp. req. THE
WAGGONERS TRUCKING
(912) 571-9668 OR (866)
413-3074.
1/24,26,fc

BUlaTi~i^C'^'''^'"'"
U .J 7. ..



- TRAVEL AGENCY Full
Service INTERNET
Turnkey Under $1,000
www.TRAVELSWithClara.com
www.HowiFiredMyBoss.com
R/D 1/12,17,19,24,26,c
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE
Do you earn $800/day? 30
Machines. Free Candy All for
$9,995. (888) 629-9968
BO2000033. CALL US: We will
not be undersold!
1/24,26,fc
AMERICA'S DRIVING
ACADEMY start your driving
career today! Offering courses
in CDL A. low tuition fee! Many
payment options! No
registration fee! (866) 889-0210

info@americasdrivingacademy.
comr
1/24,26,fc

SERVICES ..

We read the Scriptures in their
cultural and historical context.
Christ Episcopal Church, three
blocks N of the courthouse.
Sunday services at 8:30 and
11:00 AM. 997-4116.
1/17,c


r VMS, Inc.

is accepting applications for a Maintenance
Technician to work on State Roads out of the
Monticello, Florida office. This is a full time
entry level position that includes, but not
limited to, hurricane disaster response,
landscaping, litter removal, and sign repair
replacement. Applicant must have a valid
Florida's driver's license with a safe driving
record, This position requires a background
check & drug testing. Starting salary $9.50 an
hour. Benefits available upon completion of
probation. Apply at 1455 N. Jefferson Street,
Monticello, FL. (850) 997-5000.


SERVICES l
Housekeeping- Call Savanah at
294-5634.
R/D 1/24,26,31,2/2,pd
If you have a child attending
FSU/FAMU high schools, and
carpooling is not working, for
an affordable fee, you have an'
option. Call Freeman Davis
510-5162,421-8060.
R/D 1/17,19,24,26,31,2/2,pd
LPN, retired- will care for
elderly patient. Call Joan
948-2788
R/DI/10,12,17,19,24,26,31,2/2,
Child Care Services- infant to 3
years old. Reasonably low
prices. In my home. 997-5498
1 /1,TFN,c

Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
new menopausal products.
Jackson's Drug Store.
5/12 tfn, c
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd, 997-5648. .Leave
Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ '997-3116,
933-3458.
TFN

FOUND.
Keys on green key ring found
Sunday 11/26/06 on Lake Road
near Tecumseh Rd. Call Debbie
at 997-3568
11/29,12/1,6,tfn,nc


$500 POLICE IMPOUNDS
Cars from $500! Tax Repos, US
Marshall and IRS sales! Cars,
Trucks, SUV's, Toyota's.
Honda's. Chevy's & more! For
Listings Call (800) 425-1730 x
2384.
1/24,26,fc
1996 Ford F-350 Diesel
Crewcab $5,000 O.B.O. No calls
after 9:00 pm please 251-2237.
1/10,TFN,nc
1989 International Dump
Truck. 18CY. Tandem Axles.
$18,000. 251-2437, 997-0901.
R/D 12/6,tfn,nc
1996 Ford Ranger XLT
Supercab 2wd 4.0 V6 127K AC
AT Toolbox Needs some minor
work, but driveable now. $3,000_
251-0763 8am 8pm
9/27,TFN,nc

FOR SALE
Sheds- custom built' storage
sheds. See display on Hwy 221
North Greenville. Call Bob
242-9342
R/D1/10,12,17,19,24,26,31,2/2,7,
9,14,16,21,23,28,3/2,7,9,14,16,
Black/Bay TB Gelding Great
on Trails, Foxhunting. $2200.00
OBO Paint Gelding Overo
w/Blue Eyes. Barrels/Trails
$3500.00 OBO 997-5770 Riding
Lessons.


R/D 1/24,26,31,2/2,pd
Washer Dryer- in good working
order $100 each 997-6803
R/D 1/24,pd

Queen pillow-Top Mattress set.
Brand new in plastic with
warranty. $150. 850-222-9879
12/6,TFN,c
SOLID WOOD Cherry sleigh
bed BRAND NEW in box,
$275. (850) 545-7112
12/6,TFN,c
SOFA & LOVESEAT. Brand
NEW LEATHER, still wrapped,
lifetime warranty, sacrifice
$795. (delivery available). (850)
425-8374
12/6,TFN,c
Sofa/loveseat. New micro fiber
set, $475, must move, delivery
available. 850-222-7783
12/6,TFN,c
BEDROOM: New 6 pieces set
still boxed, $599, can deliver
(850) 422-8374
12/,TFN,c


I~W~NT


3 Miles West of Courthouse 4
BD. 2 BA. M.H. Carport and
'Lg. Deck $900 mth. + Dep.
Shown by appt. 850-893-6500
R/D 1/19,24,pd
Spacious 2/1 and 1/1 apts, also
office space, near Monticello
center. Section 8 OK. Call
850-491-8447
1/24,tfn,c
Mobile home- 2 BR near 1-10
$475. mth Modular- 3 BR near
JCKC $675. mth 421-3911
R/D 1/12,17,19,247,26,31,pd
1 RM efficiency Apt $300 per
month 997-6492. Leave mess.
R/D 1/17,c


Peaceful Country Living on
almost 5 acres! Nice 3 BR/ 2 BA
home, 1672 sq.ft., screened
porch, garage plus carport,
outside screened room for
entertaining. A great buy at
only $189,900. Call today to
view. Renee' Smawley, Coldwell
Banker Hartung & Noblin, Inc.
508-4525
1/24,26,c
Nobles Subdivision- Newly
renovated 3/1 total under roof
1710 sqft. New doors- vinyl
windows -CHA- carpet Fenced
150x100 lot. Well landscaped
owner/Realtor $118,700 O.B.O.
997-2973, 997-6806
R/D 11/15,TFN,c
North Carolina Cool Mountain
Air, Views & Streams, Homes,
Cabins & Acreage. FREE
BROCHURE (800) 642-5333.
Realty of Murphy 317 Peachtree
St. Murphy, N.C. 28906.
www.realtyofmurphy.com
1/24,26,fc
NEW PRICE! 10+ AC-
$299,000! UPSCALE
Equestrian Gated Community!
200 Year Old Oaks. Established
lush pastures. Paved private
rds, u/g utilities. 2 miles from
HITS! Exc financing! Call (868)
352-2249 x 1156.
1/24,26,fc


Prestige Home Center 850-576-5458
Division of Nobility Homes. Inc.
2521 W. Tennessee St. Tallahassee Florida 32304


Joann Bridges Academy in Greenville, FL

is currently seeking:

Special Education Teacher (ESE)
The candidate must be certified by the State Board of Education, hold a
certificate as a Special Education Teacher and be certified in a designated subject
area. Applicant will have to successfully pass a background screening.
Please fax your resume to the attention of Renee Johnson, Lead Teacher (850)
948-4227 or call (850) 948-4220 for more information.

Mental Health Therapist
The Therapist will provide individual, family, and group psychotherapy and
develop specific treatment goals for the youth. This person must be able to
document appropriate clinical information in the medical record in a timely
manner.
Applicants must have graduated from any accredited college or university with a
master's degree in social work, counseling and guidance, psychology or human
services as well as a successful background check. Experience working with
clients in a facility setting is preferable
Please fax your resume to the attention of Ms. Mobley, Facility Administrator
at (850) 948-4227 or call (850) 948-4220 for more information.
JOANN BRIDGES ACADEMY
Youth Services International Southeastern
Programs, Inc.
950 S.. Greenville Hills Road, Greenville. Florida 32331
(850) 948-4220 Fax: (850) 948-4227


4 m 0 m m m 0 m m m n- 0 0

S Housing Vouchers :


=! We accept al1 vouchers
S2/2 $615 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 $50 dep. m

S Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571 *
- - - -s - B -ia. iL-T


(850) 997-4340


; C
9'

f
fc >f


Property Management Services!!!
Great Rentals
2/1 1/2 bath mobile home east of
town on 5 acres $650/month
2 bedroom cabin in the woods $750 mo


Wooded Tract 2.09 hillside acres east of town
on graded County Road $30,400

Just Listed!! 3 bedroom 2 bath delightful log
cabin with front and back screened porches,
board fence pasture, double carport and out
building on 4.07 acres $385,000

Lloyd Acres on a wooded hillside a 3 bedroom 2
bath modular home with oak floors, fireplace and
lots of very nice extras including shop for $87,500

Historic Budd House built ca 1882 by commu-
nity leader of the day for his family. Lovely wood
work, high ceilings, spacious rooms, grand fire-
places, marvelous porches, currently 4 bedrooms
and 2 baths $355,000

Waterfront Home!! Like New, roomy, 3 bedroom
2 bath home with big carport, nice shed with 5
acres on very nice lake near 1-10 and US 19
$385,000 See it at www.TimPeary.com

Amazing Buy!!! Mixed Use Property 12 plus
partially cleared acres on US 19 south land use
designation permits 4 houses per acre near Den-
nis' Trading post only $36,500 per acre

New Listing 13.29 acres some wooded some
open $5,000 per acre

Terrific Location 3 bedroom 2 bath doublewide
with fireplace, big porch, garage, shed, above
ground pool, with big trees, fence paddocks, on
county maintained paved Cherry Tree Lane now
$127,500

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly wooded
acres Only $36,500

Pasture and Pecans 5-10 lovely acres on paved
road $15,500 per acre Very nice property, good
deed restrictions

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Country Living at it's Best! REDUCED Com-
fortable 4 bedroom 3 bath home on five fenced
acres with guest cottage w/bath, 2 car garage, big
shop, pasture 100 pecan trees and a nice pool
Only $365,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South near
Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Wooded Acreaqe 5.35 acres on private road
off Paul Thompson Road $128,500

Waukeenah Highway 27.99 acres good home
site fenced pasture $545,000

Aucilla Shores 5 level wooded acres
S$75,000

.. Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath
doublewide
with nice deck, fenced yard on 1 acre
$73,500


Help! Serious Buyers Looking for::


- Small Farm 125-350 acres for grand kids
-20-130 acres investment for 2 brothers


Realtor Tim Peary

850-997-4340
See all our listings at
www.TimPeary.com

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


I








PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 24, 2007


$25,
BE A LIFE


United Way Meets


o00

SAVER


100%/a



7001o
60CI/
500/0
40,3/
30%
2010
10%


COUNTY UNITED WAY met its goal of $25,000 with
more donations expected to come in. Capital City Bank
displayed the "Be a Lifesaver" on its front lawn and
employees participated 100 percent in raising funds.


From left, Employee Tonia Baxter, Catherine Arnold,
Big Bend Hospice, a United Way Agency, Employee
Wanda Baker, Mary Carol Kaney, United Way of Big
Bend.


Students Earning Good


Citizen Awards At JES


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Students named good citi-
zens at Jefferson Elementary
have been announced at the
school.


Students and their grade
levels include:
In Pre-K: Ayinna Bradley,
Tristan Craig, Jamiya Steen,
Siera Montgomery, jaquez"
Frazier, Jarkie "RJ" High-
tower, Selenia Rosas, and
Matthew Steen.


Buy SCV Banquet

Tickets By Jan. 26


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Local members of the Ma-
jor Pickens Bird Camp 1327
plan to attend the Colonel
David Lang Camp 1314 an-
nual Lee/Jackson Banquet of
the Sons of the Confederate
Veterans (SCV) 6:30 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 3 at the Loyal
Order of Moose Lodge in Tal-
lahassee, located at 1478
Capital Circle, NW.
The public is invited to at-
tend with them to celebrate
Southern Heritage and South-
ern ancestors,
The ticket cost is $30 and
must be paid in advance.
Deadline for the sale of tick-
ets is Jan. 26.
Tickets may be purchased
by contacting Fred Beshears
at 997-2516 or Karen Colson
at 877-2425.
To help celebrate the birth-


days of General Robert E. Lee
and Lt. General Thomas J.
"Stonewall" Jackson will be
keynote speaker Chris Sulli-
-van of Greenville, SC.
This year marks the 200th
anniversary of'the birth of
Lee and the affair will be held
in his honor as the SCV has
declared 2007 as the "Year of
Lee.".


Local NFCC
Graduates
Eight Monticello residents
received career and technical
certificates for the fall term at
North Florida Community Col-
lege.
Graduates include: Julian
Boyce, Lanetra Cooks, Korez
Mack and Mary Tillman.
Shannon Broxsie, Toni
Hightower, Alice Johnson, and
Theresa Olson.


In K-5: YuNijha Cooper,
Treyu Rebb, JuJuan Dean, Ja-
cob Grubb, Alantex Ford,
Cole Ridd, William Branch,
Mickayla Courson, Melanie
Webb, Tumiria Denmark,
Maggie Kellogg, Justin Gran-
tham, and Nai Azia Foster.
In grade 1: ShaMyria Sim-
mons, Nicholus Toelle, Tamai
Kellogg, Shoshanna Mast,
Desitny Kishore, Christina
Steen, Robert Lewis, Arissa
Bennett, Briana Neely, Ky-
shawndre Wade, Jadica Ar-
nold, Isaiah Coleman, Nicole
Dollar, and Sara McElveen.
In grade 2: Jalen Jones, Ke-
neshia Robinson, Sara Joiner,
Anthony Circone, Alonzo Da-
riety, Tanisha Scott,
Mon'Treze Simmons, Kay-
anna Scott, Estella Morales,
and Eduardo Romero.
In grade 3: Calvin Parrish,
Jabriya Oliver, Norman
Mack, Zahkia Wilson, De-
Landra Nealy, Brittany
Tarvel, Carlie Barber, Hattie
Weatherspoon, Felix Serna,
and Alexa Falzor.
In grade four: Raheem
Trumpet, Charlene Austin,
Tarlon Jackson, Bailey
Zelker, Estela Valdovinas,
and Katherin Viason.
In grade five:: Shakayla
Rooks, Phidell Lewis, Watler
Mosley, Alexis Allen,
Amanda McClenden, and
Alonso Romero.
In Grade 3-5 ESE: Kharcy
Allen and Marquis Harris.


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If you know
a child with
muscular dystrophy
who can benefit
from a special
getaway, tell him
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summer camps.
They're fun and free!


Its Goal Of

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County United
Way "Be a Life Saver" goal
of $25,000 has been met, and
more donations are expected
to trickle in.
Capital City Bank proudly
displayed the "Lifesaver"
banner on its front lawn, as its
employees had 100 percent
participation in the
fundraiser.
"This has been one of the
county's best ever


$25,000
campaigns," says Mary Carol
Kaney, board development
campaign associate for the
United Way of the Big Bend.
"All monies raised in this
county stay in this county,"
she reiterates.
United Way is a local
agency, not a chapter of a na-
tional organization, and dona-
tions help people right here.
Many companies choose the
United Way in which they par-
ticipate, because one short
campaign allows employees to
contribute to 40 local certified
agencies.


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