Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00171
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: January 19, 2007
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00171
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

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ews


FRIDAY, JANUARY 19,2007


Stage Set



For Higher



Densities
tives that governments offer
SLAZARO ALEMAN developers to get the latter to
Senior Staff Writer dedicate a percentage of their
property to open space. The
B T i Plannn, Commission higher the percentage of the


THIS unoccupied semi-truck was parked on the court- be detoured through the &"ty's back streets. Depart-
house circle when it rolled back, jackknifed, and ment of Transportation personnel inspected the truck
spilled its load of logs in the southbound lane of South and found it to have faulty brakes. A citation was is-
Jefferson Street. It took crews approximately four sued. Fortunately, no injuries occurred. (News Photo)
hours to upright the truck. Traffic, meanwhile, had to



City Will Seek $600,000 In


State Grants, Maybe More


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The'City Council last week
held the first of two required
public hearings for an applica-
tion to a $600,000 Community
Development Block Grant
(CDBG).
Scott Modesitt, of Summit
Professional Services, Inc., the
consultant firm assisting the
city with the application, ex-
plained the process to officials
and the public.

Money Is For
Expansion Of
Sewer System,
Development

Modesitt said the first step in
the process was to select one
of four available categories.
Those four categories are
housing rehabilitation, neigh-
borhood revitalization, com-
mercial revitalization, and
planning and design specifica-
tions.
Modesitt told the officials
that now was a propitious time
for the city to apply for the
money, given the city's im-
proved scoring potential.

He listed among the require-
ments of the grant that the pro-
ject must benefit
low-and-moderate income
families and prevent urban
blight.
He said another requirement
was that the receiving entity
contribute a percentage of the
cost of the project, be it in
money, labor, or materials.
Modesitt recommended that


the city apply for a neighbor-
hood revitalization grant,
which he said it stood the best
chance of getting.
He said the specific project
to be pursued was the citywide
expansion and upgrade of the
sanitary sewer system. This
project, he said, would piggy-
back nicely on the other sani-
tary sewer system
improvements that the city was
undertaking.
In fact, the ongoing sanitary
sewer improvements is what
was giving the city its com-
petitive edge in the scoring
process, he said.
"You're highly competitive
in this category now because
of readability," Modesitt said,
referring to the recent video-
taping of the sanitary sewer
system in order to identify and
pinpoint areas of weakness.
In conjunction with the
neighborhood revitalization
grant, Modesitt encouraged
city officials to apply also for
an economic development
grant.
Such a grant, he said, could
be uped to build new infra-
structure to attract new busi-
nesses or retrain expanding
businesses.
The catch, he said, was that
to qualify for the funding, the
businesses had to create a cer-
tain number of jobs for low-to-
moderate income persons.
Modesitt encouraged city of-
ficials to apply for the eco-
nomic development funding
even though officials presently
know of no businesses that
want to expand or locate here.
He said it was a good strat-
egy to proceed with the hear-


ings as if an applicant existed.
That way, if a business did
step forward, the documenta-
tion would already be in place,
he said.
Following Modesitt's advice,
the council moved to apply for
both a neighborhood revitali-


zation grant and an economic
development grant.
Immediately following the
public hearing, Modesitt con-
ducted a fair housing work-
shop that earned the city extra
points in the scoring process.
(See Grants, Page 5)


I 11 n A rilllinlllg % IA gVAI
last week recommended for
approval two interrelated ordi-
nances that will make possible
the existence of conservation
subdivisions here.
A conservation subdivision,
by definition, is a residential
development that concentrates
buildings or lots on part of a
property and allows the re-
maining land to be used for
common open space, recrea-
tion, agriculture or the preser-
vation of environmentally sen-
-. sitive features.
Conservation subdivisions
Share one way that local officials
aim to preserve the county's
historic and rural character.
The first ordinance, actually
a Comprehensive Plan amend-
ment, establishes the mecha-
nism for the issuance of den-
sity bonuses in agricultural
zones and so sets the ground-
work for adoption of the sec-
ond ordinance.
,Specifically, the first ordi-
nance allows for the issuance
of density bonuses in the fol-
lowing zoning categories:
agriculture-3 (one dwelling per
three acres); agriculture-5 (one
dwelling per five acres); and
agriculture-20 (one dwelling
per 20 acres).
Density bonuses are incen-


land the developer dedicates to
open space, the higher the den-
sity bonus that the developer
receives.
Literally, a density bonus
translates into the ability of a
developer to place more
houses on a particular piece of
land than the zoning designa-
tion allows. Provided, of
course, that the developer
dedicates the appropriate per-
centage of property to open
space.
The second ordinance sets
the standards for the design
and permitting of conservation
subdivisions.
Among the many listed
purposes of conservation sub-
divisions, are, to:
Encourage development
that permanently conserves
natural resources such as wet-
lands, flood plains, streams,
groundwater, old-growth for-
ests; steep slopes, scenic
views, and archaeological
sites;
Encourage compact and
efficient development practices
that consume less land and
provide for the best use of in-
frastructure;
Promote interconnected
greenways and corridors
S(See Densities, Page 2)


Courthouse Oak


Is In Poor Health


A TREE EXPERT from Tallahassee inspected the his-
toric oak tree on the courthouse circle and found it to
be in bad shape. The expert suggested that some of the
pavement surrounding the tree be removed so that the
tree roots could get more water and oxygen. Barring
such action, he predicted the further decline of the tree
in the coming years. (News Photo)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The patriarch oak tree. just
south of the courthouse is in
poor health, and absent reme-
dial intervention, will likely be
dead within another five to 10
years.
That's the prognosis of tree
expert--Bill Armstrong, who
last week presented his find-
ings to the City Council.
"The historic meeting tree is
in decline," Armstrong said.
"The leaves are a bad color
and it has a lot of bad wood."
The problem, he said, is that
the tree has been relegated to a
small rectangular patch of soil,
with everything else around it
paved.
"The tree is struggling to
stay alive," Armstrong said.
"It's going downhill and left
alone, it will probably die in
another five or 10 years."
Armstrong conducted his as-
sessment of the tree as part of
a petroleum cleanup project
that is scheduled for the nearby
BP gasoline station.
He related that the petroleum
cleanup project will entail dig-


going 45 feet deep and five feet
wide holes in the vicinity of
the tree. He said the company
doing the cleanup hired him to
-recommend steps that it could
take to mitigate the damage to
the tree.

Tree Analysis M
Results From
The Scheduled .
Cleanup Of BP
Site Next Door .
Among Armstrong's propos-
als are the pruning of the tree's
roots and branches.
Armstrong plans to donate
$300 worth of nutrients that he
will inject directly into the tree
to give it vitality. He said the
effects of the treatment should
become evident soon after its
application in the form of
greener, more vibrant leaves.
"It should help a little," he
said.
But unless the city takes ag-
gressive steps to protect the
tree, it's future looks dim, he
said.
Armstrong explained that
trees, like any living thin&, re-
(See Courthouse, Page 3)


KMo


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1.3y1 iI r UK nu. 3, zJVu 13I









PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 19, 2007

Saturday Community Clean


Up Day At Recreation Park


CECIL GARDNER, a pastor in Lloyd, caught this 2 1/2
Ib. speckled perch near Reeves Fish Camp in Lake Mic-
cosukee recently. Eli Reeves said the perch is the big-
gest of its size to be caught in the lake in a long time.
He said the fishing is getting better on the lake and is
expected to get even better with the spawning of the
fish next month. (Photo courtesy of Reeves)



Densities Being Raised


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

A Community Clean up at-
the County Recreation Park is
slated for 10 a.m. until 3 p.m.,
or until the project is com-
pleted, Saturday.
"Everyone's help is needed
to give our park a face lift,"
Michelle Brantley, of the
Health Department staff, re-
ports.
"Our park is a place to
make memories for our chil-
"dren and grandchildren. These
memories and friendships last
a lifetime."
Brantley said that any time
donated will be helpful, even
if volunteers cannot stay for
the entire day. She added that
everyone of all ages.is wel-
come, including individuals,
families, youth groups, clubs,
and organizations. "We have
a job for everyone," she said.


Brantley said the commu-
nity cleanup project will focus
on painting, cleaning, plant-
ing, and raking. Paint and
painting supplies will be pro-
vided.
She asked that if volunteers
have brooms rakes, wire
brushes or ladders, to please
bring them, and to also make
sure they bring enough food
and drinks for themselves,
families or organizations.
"This cleanup is an excellent
way for our children to feel
that they are an important part
of a community project by
contributing their time and
energy,' said Brantley.
"It is also a way for them to
earn community hours to-
wards badges and school
scholarships."
She said that members of the
County Commission, staff of
the Road Department, Recrea-
tion Park Director Kevin
Aman and Heath Department


staff, have already been work-
ing hard on park improve-
ments.
Those improvements include
resurfacing both of the tennis
courts and the existing walk-
ing path.
"Donations from organiza-
tions and individuals have
been raised to hire a tree trim-
ming service," she said. "The
purpose of this service is to
make the park a safer place.
"Already, the tree service,
county staff and community
volunteers have been working
to remove limbs and dead
trees, grind stumps, and clean
up by painting bathrooms
next to the office.
"What a difference this has
made and so very much more
can be accomplished with the
help of those in the commu-
nity."
She said this cleanup is the
beginning of many changes
that are based on the commu-


nity's request. Established
policies, ordinances and pro-
cedures are being reinforced
and examined by the County
Commissioners, and Kevin
Aman and Board members.
"The Recreation Park is a
place for all to enjoy," said
Brantley. "We want everyone
in the community to utilize
the facilities that are available
here."
She concluded that if resi-
dents have enjoyed the use of
'the Recreation Park facilities,
or have never seen the park,
coordinators extend invita-
tions to all community mem-
bers to come out and support
this beautification project.
"Together, we can make a
difference," she said.
For those who can not physi-
cally come, but wish to help,
donations for improvements
are being accepted.
For further information con-
tact Brantley at 342-0170, ext.
207.

V61Hm 1(hl ion I
800.377.5399Hll
wwwSBfaI^ MHUbF M^daio^Br


(Continued From Page 1)
throughout the community;
and,
Protect prime agricultural
land and preserve farming as
an economic activity.
To qualify as a conservation
subdivision, a development
must consist of 80 or more
acres and be located in one of
the three zoning categories
(ag-3, ag-5 or ag-20).
All lots in conservation sub-
divisions must be a minimum
size of half acre.
Some other rules that apply:
At least 75 percent of the
open space must be
contiguous, when practicable.
At least 50 percent of the
open space must consist of
land that is suitable for devel-
opment or home-site building.
The open space must be
directly accessible to the larg-
est practicable number of lots
within the subdivisions.
An average width of 75
feet, with a minimum of 50
feet of undeveloped open
space, must be left along the
interface of public roadways
and the development, in order
to preserve the county's rural
character.
As for the density bonuses,
these will be determined after
establishing the maximum
number of lots that would be


permitted on the property
based on a conventional subdi-
vision.
Once this maximum number
of lots is established, the de-
veloper will be permitted addi-
tional units based on the
percentage of land that he or
she sets aside for open land.
A minimum set-aside of 40
percent open land will result in
a 20 percent density bonus. A
minimum set-aside of,55 per-
cent open land will result in a
30 percent density bonus. And
a minimum set-aside of 70 per-
cent open land will result in a
40 percent density bonus.
The typical example cited is
a 100-acre parcel in an ag-5
zone, which would normally
allow 20 houses, or one house
every five acres. If the devel-
oper concentrates the 20
houses on 30 acres and leaves
70 acres in, open space, he or
she would qualify for a 40 per-
cent density bonus, or eight
extra houses, for a total of 28
houses on the property.
This way, officials figure,
both sides win: the developer
gets to maximize profits and
the county gets more open
land.
Both ordinances now go to
the County Commission for re-
view and adoption.


WWW.PLASTICSURGERYSOUTHGEORGIA.COM
505 Gordon Avenue Thomasville, GA (229) 228-9900


Gene Hall To Hold

Community Meeting


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

County Commissioner
Gene Hall for District 2 will
host a community-wide inter-
est meeting 4 p.m. this Sun-
day at the Fellowship


Missionary Baptist Church on
Cypress Street.
The topic of the meeting
will be Indoor Recreation.
For further information,
contacted him at 997-0281 or
321-6673?
Refreshment will be served.


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Trucker

Cited In

Accident

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

An Aramark semi truck
driver was charged with care-
less driving on S. Jefferson
St., resulting in an accident,
last week.
MPD reports that Ernest
Bannister was driving the
semi south on Jefferson St. in'
the outside lane, when the
front passenger side corer of
the vehicle, as it struck and
knocked down a light pole.
The vehicle also caused
damage to property located at
1185 S. Jefferson St. when it
knocked down the mail box,
and lost approximately 50
gallons of diesel fuel in the
resident's front lawn.
The vehicle was removed
shortly thereafter from the
scene and power company.
employees quickly cleaned
the spill with assistance from
Fire Rescue, and replaced the
pole.


Courthouse
(Continued From Page 1)
quire nutrients and oxygen.
And presently, the tree is being
starved and, in a sense, as-
phyxiated, he said. That's be-
cause the pavement prevents
air and nutrients from reaching
the roots.
Armstrong suggested that the_
city consider removing some
of the pavement around the
tree. He said now would be a
good timn to do it, since the
petroleum cleanup project will
be breaking up much of the
concrete anyway.
Winston Lee, a landscape ar-
chitect who is assisting the city
with the beautification of the
courthouse circle, agreed to
work with Armstrong to come
up with a plan for the salvation
of the tree.


Lro e"-
Bri* s-


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 19, 2007 PAGE 3

Monticello Named


Tree City USA


Monticello has been named a
Tree City USA Community by
the National Arbor Day Foun-
dation to honor its commit-
ment to community forestry.
This is the 19th year that
Monticello has received this
national recognition.
Monticello has met the four
standards to become a Tree
City USA community: a tree
board or department, a tree
care ordinance, comprehensive
community forestry program,
and an Arbor Day observance.
"Trees in our cities and
townshelp clean the air, con-
serve soil and water, moderate
temperature, and bring nature


AFTER the accident, this truck was towed into the Jefferson Square parking lot to
clear the roadway for traffic.
,r s.--aBi.bs.. . ,A ^ W*M. - -


into our daily lives," said John
Rosenow, president of the Na-
tional Arbor Day Foundation.
"Tree City USA designation
recognizes the work of elected
officials, staff and citizens who
plant and care for the commu-
nity forest.
"Trees are a vital component
of the infrastructure in our cit-
ies and towns, and provide en-
vironmental and economical
benefits.
"A community and its citi-
zens, that recognize these
benefits and provide needed
care for its trees deserves rec-
ognition and thanks, Ro-
senow said.


SHARE Distribution

Planned Jan. 27


Pick Up and Distribution
for Aucilla SHARE will be
held 8:30-10:00 a.m.
Saturday, Jan. 27 at the Cen-
tral Baptist Church in Aucilla,
655 Tindell Road.
Registration Copy and Vol-
unteer Service Reports will
need to be turned in at the
time of food package pick up.
Volunteer Service is any-
thing done for someone other


WORKERS quickly removed debris and replaced the power pole that was snapped off
in the accident. (News Photos)


1-800-USA-Ny VY--
www.navyj obs.,com


0








]ts her future.Do the math.:


NOTICE OF COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
AMENDMENT
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
ORDINANCE NO.


AN ORDINANCE OF'JEFFERSON COUNTY FLORIDA, RELATING TO
ALLOWABLE LAND USES; PROVIDING FOR FINDINGS OF FACT;
PROVIDING FOR PURPOSE; AMENDING THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN,
BY AMENDING POLICY 1-2 AGRICULTURAL AREAS OF THE FUTURE
LAND USE ELEMENT; AUTHORIZING A DENSITY BONUS TO
RESIDENTIAL DENSITY FOR CONSERVATION SUBDIVISIONS;
CLARIFYING USES IN THE 100 YEAR FLOODPLAIN; PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT; PROVIDING FOR
INCORPORATION INTO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR
AUTHORITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
The Jefferson County Commission will hold a public hearing on the proposed text changes that will amend the county
wide Jefferson County Comprehensive Plan.




p,..-. 3/ ,4
fco. L












JEFFERSON COUNTY


The public hearing on the adoption of the proposed comprehensive plan amendment ordinance will be held on
February 15, 2007 at 6:00 pm., or as soon thereafter as such matter may be heard, in the courtroom of the county
courthouse located at the intersection of U.S. Highways 90 and 19. The hearing may be continued from time to time
as may be necessary. Information concerning the amendment is available at the Jefferson County Planning
Department, 445 W. Palmer Mill Road, Monticello, FL 32344, telephone 850-342-0223. From the Florida
'Government in the Sunshine Manual' Each board, commission, or agency of this state or of any political subdivision
thereof shall include in the notice of any meeting or hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing is required, of such board,
commission, or agency, conspicuously on such notice, the advice that, if a person decides to appeal any decision
made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or
she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings, is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based.


than family that is unpaid.
As there is no food storage
facility, food packages will
need to be picked up or they'
will be forfeited, and resold to
someone else..
Basic packages are a guar-
anteed retail value of $36 or
more, for the SHARE cost of
just $18.
Cash donations to help pay
for gas expenses will be
gladly accepted.


Tallahassee Memorial

Family Medicine of

Monticello Florida



1549 S. Jefferson St.
Monticello, Fl 32344
850-997-0707


,. (



"Step Up, Florida...

On our Way to Healthy Living!".




It is time'for everyone to get active and get
healthy by taking advantage of the great physical
activity opportunities in our community on

February 1, 2007.


O OurWoy To Healty Livn
Si"'g ", ' Yj'i-'g'-' '' .....' "i".,"


WANTED... ANYONE WHO

can walk, bike, run, rollerblade, or do any

other type of physical activity as we

"Just Move" throughout Jefferson County.


To sign up, individuals or groups, contact the

Jefferson County Health Department at

(850) 342-0170 Ext. 207 or 206.


HEALTH


K --- U /I-vlDe
~ifffe,!,un


I









PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 19, 2007




Monticello News
(ISSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

I LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly Ex-
cept for the weeks of July 4th, Thanksgiving, Christmas,
& New Years. Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post
Office. Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net


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for a pat on the back from the
cyber-underground. Today's
cyber-criminals are in it for the
money.
Worse yet, anyone with
confidential information is at
risk- and a single bad cyber-
move by just one rogue or un-
witting user is sometimes all it
takes to put sensitive data into
the wrong hands.
For example, a government
employee in Oregon recently
put more than 1,300 taxpayers
at risk of identity theft when
he used an office computer to
surf porn sites and, in the proc-
ess, unknowingly downloaded
a Trojan horse.
The Trojan horse captured
and relayed keystrokes- in-
cluding names, addresses, and
Social Security Numbers- for
four months before being de-
tected.
What's more, all this hap-
pened at an agency that was
otherwise fortified with fire-
wall, anti-virus, and intrusion
detection software that was up-
dated many times a day. And
it's not just porn sites that are
home to malicious code.
Cybercriminals often set
up phony sites that look like
legitimate ones in order to lure
consumers into divulging data.
That's why a new genera-
tion of protection tools is


By REX M. ROGERS
Columnist

"Better living through chem-
istry" has been one mantra of
American culture for at least a
century. We've found ways to
ease headaches and toothaches,
destroy harmful germs carry-
ing disease throughout our
bodies, and reduce pain and in-
fection resulting from life-
threatening wounds. Penicillin
is one reason I am alive today.
Who would want to reverse
our knowledge of life-saving
and life-enhancing medicines?
Now we have drugs to help
us lose weight, Botox'for re-


needed. Consumers must know
when they're on a legitimate
site versus a bogus or spoofed
site.
Many of today's tools deter-
mine the authenticity of S a
site simply by checking to see
if it is on the "good" or the
"bad" list of known sites.
The problem is, the average
phishing site stays up for only
six hours, after which oppor-
tunistic cybercriminals dis-
mantle and move on-in order
to evade detection by authori-
ties.
Consequently, a variety of
mechanisms must be used be-
fore a site is declared safe or
unsafe, from verifying its secu-
rity certificates to analyzing its
behavior.
Consumers also need to be
protected against keystroke
loggers and the like at the mo-
ment they are most vulnerable
to attack- that is, at the scene
of the potential crime as a
transaction takes place.
Doing so requires more than
the intrusion detection tools of
yesterday that could identify
known threats by their finger-
print. With new threats being
unleashed at a record pace,
consumers need tools that can
detect crimeware that is so
new that its fingerprint is not
yet known- but its conduct
gives away its malicious
nature.
Moreover, all this protection
must not get in the way of the
consumer's online experience.
After all, users who no longer
trust or enjoy their Internet in-
teractions will likely return to
doing business the brick-and-
mortar way.
Fortunately, a growing
number of security providers,
are taking notice and now offer
increasingly sophisticated
technologies designed to pro-
tect online transactions and in-
teractions.
And as more consumers em-
brace these new tools, the
Internet will become a safer
environment for everyone.


during wrinkles, Collagen to
make qur lips sexier, Prozac if
we are weary and Valium if we
are hyper, and certain drugs to
extend our sex lives into our
90s.
Since the 1960s, we've also
struggled with chemicals that
introduced teems to our vo-
cabularies like "psychedelic,"
"junkie," "Crack," "Narcs,"
and now "steroids," "Better
living through chemistry," we
have learned, is not always
better.
Like all other life questions
that confront us, whether and
how to use chemicals is pre-

(See Chemistry, Page 5)


By RON CICHON
Publisher


There don't appear to be
any good options for the situa-
tion in Iraq. While the Presi-
dent has announced a plan to
increase troops to clear and
hold neighborhoods, many ex-
military leaders don't think the
effort will work. I suspect
we'll know in 90 days.
Longtime mail carrier James
McDaniel retires at the end of,-
this month.... Relay for Life
activities will be getting under-
way shortly. A host of fund-
raising events will be held by
many clubs, churches and or-
ganizations...

Realtor Lynette Sirmon's of-
fice is now located in Riley
Palmer's building on West
SWashington St.... Julie Conley
may be on her way to holding
the record in longevity as
Mayor. The Council reelected
her for another 1-year term,
her fourth... Carolyn Carswell


has done good work heading
the Humane Society. The
group's big fundraiser, "Bless
the Beast," is set for Feb. 17 at
the Opera House.
Several people have re-
sponded to our request for cute
Photos. Keep 'em coming and
we'll share them with our
readers... The Legislature is in
special session trying to come
up with a solution to high in-
surance rates. Solons say it is a
knotty problem... Gov. Char-
lie Crist doesn't stand on cere-
mony. When he meets some-
one, he puts out his hand and
says, "I'm Charlie."
Some office inspirational
poster: Artificial intelligence is
no match for natural
stupidity... Plagerism saves
time... Teamwork means never
having to take all the blame
yourself... Eagles may soar,
but weasels don't get sucked
into engines... If you can stay
calm, while all around you is
chaos, then you probably
haven't understood the serious-
ness of the situation.


Morning chuckle: You know
it's a "No Frills Airline" when
they don't sell tickets, they sell
chances; before the flight, the
passengers get together and
elect a pilot... before you take
off, the Captain asks all pas-
sengers to chip in.for gas.

Back when the girls were at
home and we had four cats, I
used to write some tongue-in-
Scheek columns about cats.
People remember those col-'
umns and frequently ask why I
don't write. about .cats
anymore. Reason is our home
is pet free these days. Makes it
a lot easier when we want to
go out of town.

I did come across some "Cat
Truths" the other day and offer
them up for the cat lovers
among us... Thousands of
years ago, cats were wor-
shipped as gods and they have
never forgotten this... Any-
thing not nailed down is a cat
toy... Dogs come when called,
cats take a message and get


back to you later.
Quotable quote: "We've got
this gift of love, but love is
like a precious plant. You can
just accept it and leave it in the
cupboard or just think it's go-
ing to get on by itself. You've
got to keep watering it. You've
got to really look after it and
nurture it." John Lennon

Didja know' the King Ranch
in Texas, the largest in the
state, covers as much land as
does the,entire state of Rhode
Island?... Mutual Funds have
crossed the $10 trillion mark.
Fund assets rose by $286.6 bil-
lion or 2.9 percent last year to
_just over $10 trillion... People
ages 65 and older are volun-
teering at high rates than the
previous generation did at
those ages, according to a
study conducted by the Corpo-
ration for National and Com-
munity Services. The
volunteer rate for older Ameri-
cans has risen to 23.5 percent
today, compare with 14.3 per-
cent in 1974.


'Paygo' Plan Encouraging
couraging words. I am con- marks tacked on to major simistic regarding any relief
By DENNIS FOGGY fused, however, with the state- pieces of legislation. from congress in fluiicring
Columnist ment, "Congress must return I failed to see any discus- away our hard earned tax dol-
accountability to our govern- sion about earmarks and the lars.


I just received Congressman
Allen Boyd's annual "Wash-
ington Update" today. I was
eager to read it and delighted
to hear of the pay as you go
"PAYGO" strategy of the
"Blue Dog Democrats" for
managing congressional
spending!
There are few if any issues-
that need full bipartisan con-
gressional support more than
this piece of legislation.
Equally important to me is the
fact that my very own con-
gressman is one of the people
"driving the bus".
The "Holding Government
Accountable" section on page
two also has some very en-


ment and renew our duty to
serve as a check-and-balance
for overspending, waste, fraud
and financial abuse within the
executive branch. WHAT?
The last time I checked it
was the Democratic Congress-
man from Louisiana under
investigation by the FBI for
taking a payoff and hiding
$90,000 in his freezer, not the
White House! Besides, Con-
gress holds the legislative
purse strings for spending, not
the President.
I also suspect there is some-
thing amiss between talk of
fiscal responsibility, govern-
ment financial accountability
and those sneaky 'little ear-


Blue Dog 12 Point Plan indi-
cating to me that the "Blue
Dogs" are avoiding them like
the plague!
I did hear from another
source, however, that new pro-
posed rules changes would re-
quire earmarks to be added up
front so that everyone can see
and evaluate them before
agreeing to the legislation.
I am for giving this "Blue
Dog" thing a chance. Let's see
if this is just more capitol hill
double speak, as the Demo-
crats strut their stuff to
straighten out control of waste-
ful spending in D.C. Without
strong and realistic earmark
legislation, however, I am pes-


Congressman Boyd wrote
of bipartisan cooperation be-
tween Democrats and Republi-
cans in dealing with legislation
in Congress. Unfortunately,
despite all the political prom-
ises regarding the importance
of bipartisan actions, the new
Democratic leadership has
elected to do just the opposite.
During the first 100 hours of
the new Congress, Democrats
plan to introduce legislation
without any discussion, input
or proposed amendments from
Republican members. The ra-
tional is that these issues have
been previously debated to

(See Paygo, Page 5)


we Could Outlive Our Money


Many people know at least
one person who has reached
the milestone age of 100.
According to the U.S. Cen-
sus Bureau, in 1990 only
37,000 Americans reached age
100. That number had doubled
to 74,000 by 2002.
What's to be expected in the
future? By 2050, the number of
centenarians is expected to
skyrocket to more than 1 mil-
lion. At that time, the number


of people who live to age 85
could be as many as 20
million.
It's no secret- Americans are
living longer than ever. Ad-
vances in medicine and a focus
on personal health have in-
creased our longevity.
This is, first and foremost,
good news. But with increased
longevity also comes a serious
risk- outliving the money you
have saved for retirement.


Studies show that most
Americans are worried about
what will happen when the
company paychecks stop com-
ing in.
The 2005 "Financial Retire-
ment Fears Study" sponsored
by the National Association for
Variable .Annuities reported
that 95 percent of Americans
have financial fears about re-
tirement, and 42 percent are
specifically worried that they


will run out of money prema-
turely or they will have to
downgrade their lifestyle.
Chances are, savings alone
wop't be enough to fully fund
the average American's retire-
ment. The fact is that most
Americans won't be able to
rely on dividends from stocks,
bonds or mutual funds to live
off.
They simply won't have

(See We Could, Page 5)


From Our Photo File


- 'p,-." '.


ENGINEER JAMES D. WARD points out the route for Big Joe Road paving project to
County Commissioner Gene Cooksey, left, and DOC Project Administrator Brian
Blair. The road serves Jefferson Correctional Institute. (News File Photo)


Short Takes & Other Notions


Are We Living Better

Through Chemistry?








.% '* ,,


Grants
( pntinued From Page 1)
The workshop was to educate
officials and the public about
th laws regarding fair
"hb using.

S','The brief presentation essen-
ially boiled down to the fact
trat the law forbids housing
w o discrimination based on factors
.- " d., such as race, color, national
origin, religion, sex, familial
. status or handicap.


SOUR LIFELINE

IS TOLL-FREE

e Grab the line and
I let us help you.

COUNTY RELAY. FOR LIFE kickoff event welcomes second time cancer survivor Ray THE VOICE OF HOPE
Hughes. Joining him for dinner are: Margaret Calhoun, Teresa and Mark Kessler. 1-800572-1717
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We Could Outlive Money IDR


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 19, 2007 PAGE 5


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(Continued From Page 4)
enough accumulated assets.
That means that they will
probably have to draw down
their principal throughout their
retirement years. In this situa-
tion, knowing how much to
withdraw each year becomes a
challenge.
What about inflation? It can
take another bite out of a re-
tiree's income pool. An infla-
tion rate of just 3 percent can
erode $100 to $54 in 20 years.
Most experts recommend



'Paygo'

(Continued From Page 4)
death and require no further
discussion.
Thus far, the first couple of
legislative initiatives have
passed with a reasonable
amount of Republican support.
Time will tell if bipartisan co-
operation is possible in Wash-
ingtoHi when: it comes to the
really lieavy lifting.
I am also eager to'hear what
I predict will be the watered
down new ethics rules the
Democrats plan to introduce.
At the present time, there are
several former congressional
representatives serving time in
prison for wrongdoings com-
mitted while in-office and they
continue to draw their taxpayer
provided full pensions.
I would be very, very im-
pressed if they included per-
manently eliminating the
pension of any congressional
member found guilty of com-
mitting a felony while in
office!
That would stop all the pay-
offs, bribes, page philandering
and the like for sure. But don't
hold your breath that the Con-
gressional "Good Old Boy's
Club" will ever get that serious
about their ethics.



Chemistry
(Continued From Page 4)
ceded by deeper spiritual ques-
tions: Do we know God and
his purpose for our lives? Are
we trusting him or looking to
chemicals and other surrogates
to fill the hole in our souls? Do
we use chemicals to glorify
God or to fulfill narcissistic
yearnings?
In the Garden long ago, God
granted human beings the
power of reason and com-
manded us to use that power to
develop culture and steward
the earth and all that is within
it for his glory. So, incredible
advances in medical science
and technology are direct de-
scendants of that ancient di-
vine mandate. God also
granted humanity the freedom
and moral responsibility to
choose.
Our choices regarding the
chemicals we place in our bod-
ies should be determined by
how the results will honor
God, whether the results would
harmn our beings, and how the
results will affect others.
Chemistry is a gift from God
that can be used wisely or
W'1 wastefully.


that retirees withdraw no more
than 4 percent of their savings
each year in order to poten-
tially outpace inflation and
lower the risk of outliving their
money.
In light of the heightened risk
of outliving your sayings, it has
become apparent that Ameri-
cans need to determine a plan
to replace their working pay-
check with a retirement pay-
check.
It used to be that employees
were rewarded for their loyalty
with guaranteed retirement in-
come. But with the freezing of
company pensions becoming
commonplace, workers may
not be able to rely simply on
their employers to provide
them with income during their
retirement years.
Instead, workers should de-
velop a comprehensive plan,
made up of several savings and
income vehicles..
Variable annuities are
becoming more popular as one
important part of a retirement
income plan.
' In fact, the first tuarter'of
2006 showed record vai-iable
sales. This indicates that as
baby boomers are beginning to
retire, they are realizing the po-
tential effects of outliving their
savings.
Unlike 401(k)s, which are
savings plans, a variable annu-
ity is an income vehicle that
usually offers a guaranteed re-
tirement income. stream. This
guaranteed stream of income
becomes very reassuring to re-
tirees looking ahead to a long
retirement.


Variable annuities have ,
other-benefits as well. Owners
can purchase a wide range of
life, insurance benefits to pro-
tect against retirement risks.
Variable annuities also pro-
vide tax-deferred savings dur-
ing the accumulation years,
and they may allow owners a
variety of options to access
their money, depending on
specifics of the annuity con-
tract.
"To many retiring baby
boomers, variable annuities are .
viewed as a retirement income
contract, offering a predictable
income stream much like tradi-
tipnal pensions,' explains Mike
Buchholz, whose company,
ING U.S. Financial Services,
offers several kinds of variable
annuities to consumers through
brokers and financial advisors.
Retirement could now last
20 to even 40 years. Planning
is more important than ever to
ensure that retirement savings
can be stretched not only
across years but potentially
decades.,
A plan that includes variable
annuities as one component
may be a smart choice that can
make the difference between a
golden and tarnished retire-
ment. (NAPS)


Ftrieedlomi of

.the Press Is

Elverybiofy/

Freedboal 11.


What's New


With Jim!
At Roy Campbell Chevrolet


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Cruise, CD Player, "Loaded", Factory Warranty,
GM Certified L-


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I "We Just Do It!" I
229-226-3901 206 Moultrie Road
www229. -39me. 1 Thomasville, GA
I ; (just past 19 on Hwy 319N)


The Jefferson County Recvclinq Proqram


accents


the following items for recvclina:


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

Al cI'ardboard products'- gro'cry bag's cereal boxes, food boxes,
'latridry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.


All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?





Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.





Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


SPlease visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


-accents16%


- - - l-# - - - - - --I - ,


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PACE 6. MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 19, 2007


Lifestyle


U --


V3~ft~a cc c aE~ e 7-356s'


The Monticello Woman's
Club held its Spaghetti Dinner
Thursday.
Proceeds fund the scholar-
ships awarded by the club,
and helps with the cost and
upkeep of the clubhouse.
Viewers particularly en-
joyed the Rhythm Rushers
and their colorful costumes in
the MLK Parade, Monday,
I'm told.
Ballroom dancing classes
began Tuesday evening at the
Library, sponsored by the
Health Department.
The response was so over-
whelming, that a second class
was formed an hour earlier.
Both classes are full to ca-
pacity Michelle Brantley at
the Health Department relates
that the classes are taught by
Maurice Smiley of Tallahas-
see.
They will continue every
Tuesday evening for eight to
ten weeks, depending on the
progress of the students.
The Camellia Garden Circle
will meet at the Jefferson Arts
Center 2 p.m. Sunday. They'll
be making garden ornaments
and such.
Karen Hebert reports that
her "Simply Fit For Women,"
a new health and fitness spa,
has some 80 members to date.
She is still offering a spe-
cial rate for sign-up through
Jan. 31. Hebert can be
reached at 997-7339.
Triple L Club meets 10:30
a.m. Tuesday at First Baptist
Church, Monticello.
I was in touch with Gloria
Murphy Smith over the
Christmas holidays. She has a
few copies of her book of po-
ems titled "Mirror is the Soul
of a Woman" left for sale at
the cost for $15.
Coldwell Bankers Kelly and
Kelly Realtors have recently
made generous donations to
the Jefferson Senior Citizen
Center and to the County Hu-
mane Society.


The Jefferson Nursing Cen-
ter staff thanks all who
helped make the holiday
memorable for the residents.
June Campbell of the Lloyd
Lions Club stopped by to re-
port that members will host
another Bingo 3 p.m. Satur-
day, Jart 27 at their club
meeting location, 7337-A Old
Lloyd Road (the old Blue Bell
Ice Cream office building.)
If you need help with the
cost of a new pair of glasses,
contact Lions Club member
June Campbell for more in-
formation and an application.
She adds that the Lions
Club also collect used and un-
wanted glasses, cases, and
hearing aids.
Dianne and Walter "Buddy"
Braren celebrated 30 years of
marital bliss Sunday, Jan. 7.
The Alpha Royals Keystone
Club members are having so
much fun hosting the "after
game" dances, that they are
considering having them
more often and on a regular
basis.
The Mission/Evangelism
Committee of the First United
Methodist Church, Monticello
held a Blanket Drive for
needy county seniors. As of
Wednesday morning they had
collected 10.
Alice Stadin tells me that
they are hoping for more this
week, She says the collected
blankets will be given to Bob-
bie Krebs at the. Senior Citi-
zen Center for distribution.
She also tells me that the
committee will continue to
accept blanket donations.
The City will plant a tree in
honor of Arbor Day, Friday at
Chase Street Park.
Likewise, Jefferson County
Middle/High School will cele-
brate Arbor Day with plant-
ings Thursday.
Community cleanup at the
Recreation Park is set 10 am
to 3 p.m. Saturday.


LLL Club Hear Speaker

On Prison Ministry Life


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Members of the LLL Club
will meet 10:30 a.m. Tuesday,
Jan. 23 in the Fellowship Hall
at the First Baptist Church,
Monticello.
They will gather to hear
Fred Wilder speak about the
Prison Ministry.
Hostesses for this month's
meeting will be Fran Black,
Hilda Cobb, Shirley Conover,
Voncile Hunter.

IN MEMORY
James Johnson, Sr.
July 1921 -January 1997
Gone but not forgotten.
We miss you.
The Johnson Family.


Members are asked to bring
a favorite covered dish item
for the buffet style luncheon.
LLL meetings are held on
the fourth Tuesday of each
month. The meetings include
guest speakers and a brief
business discussion and up-
date. The senior community is
welcome to attend, and to en-
joy the friendly atmosphere
and home cooked meal. For
more information contact
President Phyllis Weldon at
997-4093.


Help us fight amyotrophic
lateral sclerosis, better known
as Lo.u Gehrlg's disease.

Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717 ww*.mdaisa.org


EF ON... C .
S- -4-H nF DS IT''





f- -


', -

APRIL BYNUM, Alana Chambers, Arsenio Bright, John Lilly and Alex Farmer, con-
clude events at the installation of officers at the recent County 4-H Banquet.


Kim Kennedy Joins

Green Industries Staff


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Green Industries welcomed
Kim Kennedy recently.
Before joining the staff, she
was a faithful volunteer who
contributed a great deal of en-
thusiasm and energy to the or-
ganization.
She will be in charge of the
tropical greenhouse, the shade
house, and annual, herb and
bedding plant propagation
and care.
She will be spending an in-
creasing amount of time over-
seeing volunteer activities.
Kennedy brings with her 20
years of floral design experi-
ence to the job, and has al-


1 .
S-
. '. .:..




PLEAS



Church


New Bethel AME Church
will observe its annual Men
and Womens day, 11 a.m.
Sunday.
Speaker is Minister Ethel
Gibbs Associate Minister at
Pleasant Grove MB Church.
Pleasant Grove Choir will
also provide the music service.
Dinner will be served after


2 L ,

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Sl-t'- F i. GovssJ C4ktil......nd uch t.



lu "Im a'
Im 41
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00 ff22 lliom. i; c, IIIA14OR; ~nd Mttth Iie
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ready made great
improvements to the looks of
the offices at Green Industries
Institute.
In addition to her "paid"
work, she continues to con-
tribute a great number of vol-
unteer hours to Friends of
Green Industries Institute
(FOGII.)
She deserves most of the
credit for the design and
decoration of the FOGII
Christmas tree that was on
display at the Monticello Op-
era House.
When not at GII, she works
on her own landscape, tends
her salt water reef tank, and
spends as much time as possi-
ble with her husband Jack.


Pleas Wins
$50 Gift Card

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Leketra Pleas won a $50
WalMart gift card, recently,
in a raffle held by the St. Phil-
lip Boys and Girls Club.
The raffle was planned to
help boost enrollment in the
Club's after school program.
All club members had the
opportunity to participate in
the contest.


i News
h NeOWS


the worship service.

Mr. Ararat AME Church
Women's Month Program
takes place 11 a.m. Sunday at
Concord AME Church in Mic-
cosukee.
Guest speaker is Evangelist
Gussie Williams.
***


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Starts January 12th!

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S(between Mosaic & Narcissus)
Monday Saturday 10 6
Closed Sundays 850-668-0466
SSpa Pedicures & Manicures
FAbREANA also available, call to schedule!
I rm L n M www.fabreana.com


If yu havn'ttoldyou





p
famlyyo'r a
ora ndbsuednr,


Central
Church of
Christ
'US 19 South at
Coopers Pond Rd
Join us for a series of
discussions on the
ever important
subject of LOVE!
Based on the fun and
informative book,
Habits of a Loving
Heart by author and
speaker Willard
Tate.
Sessions will be held
Sunday evenings,
January through
April, at 6p.m.
For a full schedule
of dates and
subjects, call Jay at
997-1166


MENNEN


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Jefferson Elementary


Tells Conduct Roll


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 19, 2007 PAGE 7
t-


Jefferson Elementary School
Principal Kay Collins reports
the Conduct Honor Roll for
the second nine week period.
Students and their grade
levels follow:
In K-5: Stevie Allen, Kayla
Burns, Caleb Fender, Fre-
dricka Coasey, Justin Gran-
tham, Maggie Kellogg, Cam-
eron Mast, Zaida May, Ja-
kayla Meeks, Tazarria
Nelson, Alexis Parker, Jamari
Pringle, Tremeine Robinson,
Janine Singleton, Makayla
Ward, Zaria Pleas, Detrevian
Nealy, Kelvin Norman, Por-
schea Shipley, Alic Trout-
man, Tanaijsha Bruton, and
Melanie Webb.
Also, Brandon Bates, Wil-
liam Branch, Anthony Burn-
ley, James Collins, Mickayla
Courson, Amantez Ford, Ja-
Kayla Gallon, Phillip Harris,
Charles Jackson, Van 'Shawn
Lewis, Tron Nealy, Aaron
Pflieger, Mark Prevatt, De
'Ongla Williams, Karisha
wade, Kayla Collins, Jasmin
English, and katelyn Clark.
Also, Cole Rudd, Alantez
ford,Shaylwee Waller, Ricy
West, Kamesha Adams, Lily
Akers, Janiya Graham, Donja
Mast, Jacob Grubb, Quinn
Diehl, Jujuan Dean, Kimiri
Thomas, jerilin Green, Kortez
Carroll, Jerrica Henry, Kieya
Edwards, JonathanTinnell,
Benjamin Jones, and Tommy
Williams.
Also, Sah'Quiria Broxie,
Kendra Brooks, Tahja Chavis,
Taylor Mitchell, YuNijha
cooper, Treyu Rebb, Montari-
ous Williams, Kentavis
Hawkins, Lashadra Woody,
Vanaja Holmes, Kenneth.
Prather, Sontee Harville, Jose
Romero, Tra'von McCray,
Kalvontay Huggins, Montrell-
Lee, Ariasnna Jopnes, and Ta-
lya Roach.
In grade 1: Charlie Ervin,
Jayshawn Francis, Destiny
.Gathers, Blaze Goode, Kay--
shala Grayson, Samyla How-
ard, Jermaine Jones, Monica
King, Dylan Rudlaff,
Sha'Myria Simmons, Kenijah
Smith, Nicholas Toelle, Ver-
non Waldron, Charlesir
Carter, Tyriq Hill,Tykeria
Howard, Markell Johnson,
Berooke HJosey, Shoshanna.
Mast, Tamia kellogg, Yaisha
Murray, Rockelle Norton,
Chris Savage, Davion Brock-
man, Lynecia Dawson,
Anakaren Delgado, and Ja-
mari Hallman.
Also, Liset Jiminez-Perez,
Jason Joiner, Virginia Herald,
Destiny Kishore, Lazareya
Morris, Christian Steen, Caleb
Young, Denze, shaw, Allison
parker, Ya 'Lhena Howard,
Matquis Robinson, Rodricka
Beverly, Jaquan Williams,
Evander Bend, Kyshawndre
Wade, Shania Mosley, Bri-
anna neely, Jarrett Jones, and
deldrick Geathers.
Also, Jadica Arnold, Janaz-
hia Beverly, Jasmine Boyd,
Sumemr eades, Eduardo Ji-
menez, Kaleyah Parrish, Otis
Scott, Eddie Thompson, Las-
urus Tucker, Nicole Dollar,
Antwante Dye, Tikeya John-
son, Tanesha Jones, Sara
McElveen, Rashone Miller,
Ricky Murray, Joshua Ste-
phenson, Morgan Sysskind,
Maliki Thompson, and An-
drew Tilk.
In grade 2: Janunika Ball,
Chyna Frazier, Kameelia
Grayson, Jhaneycia Johnson,
Darius Jones, Gabrielle
Lewis, Anar Keyiana Mcln-
tyre, Kyle McElveen, Amar-
keyuana McIntyre, Jamorris
Mosley, Kelnisha Norton, Ke-
neshia Robinson, Terriana
Robinson, Tremelody Robin-
son, Omari Sloan, Jordan
Smith, and Mia Smith.
Also, Miguel Barron, Kam-
eron Burns, Asia Charlton,
Anthony Circone, Chanel
Green, Clevan Greene, Keilan
Greene, Esprit Jean, Sara


Joiner, Kheica Jones, Ja'Mya
Madry, Misty Price,
Shaderica Virgil, Briaana
Webb, Anthony Circone, Ke-
meron Burns, Emmarald Gra-
ham, Alonzo Dariety, Tane-
shia Scott, Mikeria Andrews,
Nikeir Bradley, Austin Har-


rell, Christopher Jones, As-
sante McDowell, Tyler Oates,
Kelvin Scott, Keyanna Scott,
Matthew Shelley, Mon'Treze
Simmons, Franklin Steen,
Duke Arrequin, Cecelia Cas-
tilo, Daniel Cook, Taneshia
Green, Estella Morales, Pat-
rick Rebb, Grace Sanders,
Mercedes Saunders, Akeicah
Williams, and Edwardo Ro-
mero.
In grade 3: Keandra Allen,
Damien Crumitie, L'Kerah
Haire, Jacquezs Hayes, Jab-
riya Oliver, Calvin Parrish,
Meghan Plain, Nikia Steen,
Niya Thompson, Terrance
White, D'Neja Williams,
Mykayla Dean, Delvontrez
Bellamy, Jeremy Eidson, Ci-
cra Fishbum, Thaddeuws
Francis, Andrianna Noel,
Azende Gary Weaver, Savan-
nah Welch, Zahkia Wilson,
Caleb Wilson, and Haley
Eure.
Also, Kenneth Andrews,
Anthony Footman, LaShawn
Ghee, Shonycia Graham,Alli-
yah Bradley, Cassidy Camp-
bell, Mira Jones, Delondre
Nealy, Anthony Pflieger,
Sarah Sanders, Brittany
Tarver, Bryan Witfield, Jaka-
shia Ball, Markashia Ball,Car-
lie Barber, Zackary Bell,
Major Bellamy, Takaya
Broxie, Alaysja Burnley,
Zachary Eidson, Porsha Guy,
Alexsis James, Michael
Mathis, John Norris, Cody
Oates, Deaundra Steen, Ty-
shun Thurman, Jonathan
Washington, Maurice Watson
and Hattie Wotherspoon.
Also, Kaieychia Davis, Al-


exa Palzone, jamarl Greene,
Dalton Hollie, Cedric Jones,
Spencer Lacy, Jacob Long,
Michael Martinez, Antonio
Parker, Tremumis Parrish,
Diamond Robinson, Brandon
Rudlaff, Felix Serna, David
sysskind, and Lauren Wil-
liams.
In grade 4: Janeshia Aikins,
Charlene Austin, Shawnterius-
Blue, Samuel Bouie, Bran-
dley Bradley, John Brooks,
Robert Counts, Ambrosia
Graham, Robert Holmes,
Kary Kelly, Agueda
Martinez, Danella Potter,
Tearra Scott, Raheem Trum-
pet and Alvin Wright.
Also, Jacob Baxter, Ashley
Bennett, Brian Bowman, Ta-
nia Cazares, Allen Dorsey, Si-
erra Fain, Monica Jones,
Aaron Mccoy, Marcosy Ma-
rales, Dyulan Rodriguez, kasi
Rowland, Estela Valdainos,
katherin Vinson, Andre
woods, Dewayne Saunders,
sand Michael Johnson.
In grade 5: Phidell Lewis,
Yasmire Whighham, Caitlyn
Holland, Shakayla Rooks,
Crerardo Cazares, Josemiguel
Rosas, Savannah Akers,
Kevon Alexander, Alexis Al-
len, Karolyn Gillyard,
Ja'Lexia Sloan, Dedtrecia
Thomas, Roxie Bellamy, Jas-
mine Allen, Estefania Barron,
Payal Chadhauri, Alonso Ro-
mero, Guadalupe Serna,
Corbin Young, Early Brew-
ster and Amanda McClendon.
Grades 3-5 ESE, Khorey
Gallon, Matquis Harris, Cal-
vonta Parker, Marese Houston.
K-2, Nqai Azia Foster.


1st Baptist Plans Dinner

For Mission Worker


The First Baptist Church will
host a fundraiser for Garret
Getch
S:Hes is the grandson oft Sje
and Lewis *Getch, :owners:. of
Monticello Printers.
Garrett will leave in May for
a Mission Field in Burkino
Faso, Africa, where he will

Homes Of

Mourning

MICHAEL BUZZETT
Michael Austin Buzzett,
also known as Buzz passed
away after a short illness on
January 12, 2007, at the V.A.
hospital in Lake City, Florida.
A friendship celebration will
be held at Better Body's in
Lamont, FL. Saturday, January
20, 2007. In lieu of flowers
contributions may be made tot
he V.A. Hospice House, 16900
S. Marion Ave., Lake City,
Florida 32025-5808, where he
was treated and loved with
great care.
Buzz will be greatly missed.
(See Home, Page 14)


. a


serve for one year.
Soup, salad, bread, dessert,
and beverage will be served
for a donation of $5 per meal.
Take out will be available.
For additional information,
contact the church office at
997-2349.

American Heart i
AssociationOPW
Fighting Heart Disease
and Stroke

It keeps
more than
memories
alive.


The County Extension Of-
fice shares some US Food and
Drug Administration food tips
to help prevent food borne ill-
nesses:
*Wash hands and food-
contact surfaces often. Bacte-
ria can spread throughout the
kitchen and get into cutting
boards, knives, sponges, and
counter tops.
*Separate foods. Do not
cross-contaminate. This is es-
pecially true for raw meat,
poultry and seafood.
Experts caution to keep these
foods and their juices away
from ready-to-eat foods.
*Cook to a safe internal
temperature. Foods are prop-
erly cooked when they are
heated for along enough and
at a high enough temperature
to kill the bacteria that cause
foodborne illnesses.
Use a food thermometer to
measure the internal tempera-
ture of foods.
*Refrigerate promptly to
keep most harmful bacteria
from growing and multiply-
ing.
Tips for produce safety:
*Purchase produce that is
not bruised or damaged.
*When selecting fresh cut
produce, such as a half a wa-
termelon or bagged mixed


rallahassee's First Avon
Fully Stocked Retail Store
3111 Mahan Drive, Suite #30
SLafayette Place (Publix Shopping Center)
850.386.AVON (2866)
-"" www.youravon/adasilva Vl


Heart,


Hand


:Yvga


SHEPHERD


DOROTHY
SHEPHERD
Dorothy Waneta Shepherd
age 56, died Tuesday, January
16, 2007 of ovarian cancer.
Dorothy was born, raised
and lived all her life in
Monticello.
A Memorial Service will be
held in the Chapel of Beggs
Funeral Home in Monticello at
2:00 p.m., Saturday, January
27, 2007. In lieu of flowers,
Dorothy requested that
memorial contributions be
made either to St. Jude's


Classes held Monday & Friday
at 9:00 AM, 10:00 AM & 5:45 PM
$12.00 per class at the door or
$100.00 for 10 classes within one month
Jefferson Arts
575.W Washington St.
Monticello, FL 32344
All ages and fitness levels welcome:
children must be accompanied by adult
(Da coare not provided)
Linda Ricke
Yoga/ Pilates Instructor
Yoga 4Aliance Certified 1-:1 7Trained
(850) 997-3518 (850) 590-7-17
limlaricke neatl lill.coml
I'll., .... 1 ... ......


salad greens, choose only
those items that are refriger-
ated or surrounded by ice.
*Bag fresh foods and vege-
tables separately from meat,
poultry and seafood when
packing them to take home
from the market.
*Certain perishable fresh
fruits and vegetables (like
strawberries, lettuce, herbs
and mushrooms) can be best
maintained by storing in a
clean refrigerator at a tem-
perature of 40 degrees Fahr-
enheit or below.
*All produce that is pur-
chased precut or peeled
should be refrigerated within
two hours to maintain both
quality and safety.
Begin preparing produce
with clean hands. Wash hands
for 20 seconds with warm wa-
ter and soap before and after
preparing fresh produce.
Many precut, bagged pro-
duce items like lettuce, are
pre-washed. If so it will be
stated on the packaging. This
pre-washed, bagged produce
can be used without further
washing.
Precut or pre-washed pro-
duce in open bags should be


washed before using.
SCut away any damaged or
bruised areas on fresh fruits
and vegetables before prepar-
ing and/or eating. Produce
that looks rotten should be
discarded.
All unpackaged fruits and
vegetables, as well as those
packaged and not marked pre-
washed, should be thoroughly
washed before eating. This
includes produce grown con-
ventionally or organically at
home, or produce from a gro-
cery store or farmer's market.
Wash fruits and vegetables
under running water just be-
fore eating, cutting or
cooking.
*Even if the produce will be
peeled before eating, it is still
important to wash it first.
*Washing fruits and vegeta-
bles with soap or detergent or
using commercial produce
washes is not recommended.
*Scrub firm produce, such
as melons and cucumbers,
with a clean produce brush
under running water.
*Drying produce with a
clean cloth towel or paper
towel amy further reduce any
bacteria that may be present.


It's a Brand New Year --

What better time to join

Friends of Greer) industries?

GREEN'I-N DUSTR S
I ..I, T, I T U 'T E

For Prufussional DvBelopment
Join a group of folks who love plants and
have a great time playing in the dirt! No
experience is necessary we train!
For more information call Judi Persons at 997.4088
or e-mail judi@greenindustries.org




GRAND OPENING

JANUARY 9, 2007


SIMPLY FIT
't Women


Monticello's New Womien's
Health Spa- Gyn
Featuring:
10 State of the Arts Hydraulic Machines & 10
Rest Stations for a Complete Circuit Training
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JANUARY 31, 2007
CALL 997-7339 F( )R MN()RIF INF( )RM.'VII( )N
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HAVE FIN TH11IS YEAR
GETTING HEALTH IY!!


ELCOIVF TO: "8
rRSON COUNTY
RDS BANQUET

i:3














ANGELA SCURRY passed the secretary handbook to April Bynum, newly elected as-
sistant secretary.




Tips To Help Prevent



Food Borne Illnesses
FO Od Borne Illnesses


FREE CHILDBIRTH CLASSES
ARE AVAILABLE AT THE JEFFERSON
COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT
For more information, or to register
CALL JOYCE STEELE, LPN
Healthy Start Care Coordinator
At 342-0170 x107
CLASSES BEGIN MON. Jan. 22 Feb. 12, 2007
2:00 -4:00 pm



AVON







PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 19, 2007


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SDorts


S--- ..


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 19, 2007 PAGE 9


0Good Turnout At


Soccer Program
grade children, Dan
FRAN HUNT Nennstiel, who worked with
SStaff-Writer second through fourth
graders, and longtime former
The Youth Soccer program participant in the soccer pro-
Sat the Recreation Park saw a gram, tenth grader Matthew
huge turnout Saturday with Smith, who helps out all day
approximately 100 young ath- long.
letes and many family mem- Barker said the crowd of
bers in attendance, spectators was huge and in-
Coach Phil Barker said that cluded, parents, grandparents,
: everything went very well and aunts, uncles, cousins, cheer-
Sthe weather was really nice. ing and shouting constant
"We had all of our volun- words of encouragement for
teers there," he said. Those their favorite little soccer
volunteers include Matt Staf- players.
ford and Katrina Walton, who "We had some warm-up
work with the K-5 and first drills for the kids, including



Middle School Girls


Beat Maclay 31-20


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

After winning their fifth
-,game straight, 31-20 over
Maclay, Friday, the Aucilla
Christian Academy middle
"-school girls basketball team
stand 7-2 on the season.
Coach Mac Finlayson said
that Thursday night's game
against Steinhatchee was
; postponed due to Stein-
'ihatchee team illness. The
game has been rescheduled
Sfor 3:30 p.m., Thursday, Jan.
25, there.
'"The girls played exception-
ally well against Maclay,"
said Finlayson.
Sarah Sorensen led the
Charge for the Lady Warriors


with 14 points and she
dropped in seven of 12 at-
tempts in the field. "Any
time a player can shoot at bet-
ter than 50 percent from the
field, it is exceptional," said
Finlayson.. "Especially for
such a young player."
Taryn Copeland, 11 points;
Caitlin Murphy, four points,
seven rebounds; Skyler
Hanna, two points; and Nikki
Hamrick, three steals.
The MS Lady Warriors face
Georgia Christian, 4 p.m., Fri-
day, there.
Finlayson said it would
prove to be a really tough
game, but the girls were going
to perform at their best levels.
"The last time we played
Georgia Christian, they beat
us 31-19," concluded Finlay-
son.


JCHS Loses To Leon,

4Wakulla In Hoop Play


-FRAN HUNT
-, .Staff Writer

JCHS varsity boys basket-
Sball team lost to Wakulla,
-' Leon County in recent hoop
action.
The Tigers fell to Wakulla,
67-58.
Tim Crumitie led the score
with 32 points, three
rebounds, three steals.
Jon Dady, 13 points, four
rebounds, one assist, four
steals.
Lucius Wade, 1.1 points,
;- two assists, one steal.
SAnthony Johnson, six
points, five rebounds, two as-
sists.


Anthony McDaniel, two
points, two assists.
Harold Ingram, five re-
bounds, three blocks; and Jor-
dan Blair, two rebounds.
The Tigers were skinned by
Leon Tuesday, 70-30.
Wade led the score with
nine points, one rebound, two
assists, one steal.
Crumitie, six points, three
rebounds, one assist, two
steals.
Johnson, six points, five re-
bounds.
Ingiam five points, three re-
bounds; and Blair, one re-
bound.
The Tigers square off
against Taylor County, 7
p.m., Friday, here.


JV Tigers Drop Three

Of Last Four Games


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


SThe Jefferson County High
.School junior varsity boys
basketball team dropped
._ three of the last four games to
stand 2-9 on the season.
The JV Tigers downed
Madison, 59-51.
Maricio Scott led the Tigers
S with 24 points; David Cru-
"mity, 13'points; Geondre Pitt-
'. an, and Marquice Dobson,
-each scored nine points; Cur-
tis Hightower, four points;
''' nd"" HarolaI Ingram, two
points.
The Tigers fell to Hamilton
County, 74-63.
: Dobson led the score with
21 points; Scott, 18 points; In-
gram, 14 points; Crumity,
nine poi .a.znd Hightower,
""bn point. -
The Tigers lost a close,
hard-fought game against
NFC, 65-62.
Dobson led the score with


24 points; Scott, 16 points;
Crumitie, 14 points; Pittman,
six points; Hightower, two
points; and Ingram, one point.
The JV Tigers were de-
feated by Wakulla, 58-36.
Pittman and Ingram each
scored ten points; Hightower,
five points; Crumitie,. four
points; Scott and Jacarri Ross
each scored three points; Laq-
uantez Francis, one point.
JCHS will face Taylor
County, 5:30 p.m., Friday,
here.











ITvnRg sorsmn, moos


dribbling, heading, and trap-
ping, and during play I could :
see a lot of the kids using.,
those techniques," said ;
Barker.
"It was really good to see.
They are good listeners and
really know how to follow in-
structions."
He added that many goals
were made by the children
throughout the day. Scores
are never kept as the goal is to
teach the skills of the sport.
SBaker said that as usual Park
Director Kevin Aman did a
fantastic job having every-
thing set up and ready to go
for the program. "Everything
was very well-organized,"
said Barker.
He added that the children
have not yet been taught goal
keeping skills, but students in
grades four through eight,
will be taught those skills this
weekend during drills.
"I understand that the
weather is supposed to be
much cooler this weekend, so
I just want to remind parents
to assure that their children
are dressed appropriately for
it," said Barker.
Soccer action continues Sat-
urday with teams five and six,
9 a.m., teams seven and eight,
10 a.m., teams one and two,'
11 a.m., and teams three and
four, noon.


JV Warriors

Defeat

Carabelle

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

JV Warriors defeated Cara-
belle 49-21, last week.
Koda Clark led the score for
the Warrior JV's with 14
points; Casey Anderson, eight
points; Luke Whitmer and A.
J. Connell each scored six
points.
Wilson Lewis, five points;
and Alex Dunkle, Brandon
Dunbar, and Matthew Har-
rington, each scored two
points.
The Warriors face off
against Munroe, 4:30 p.m.,
Friday, there.



MCA Drops

Game with

Grace, 28-18
The Monticello Christian
Academy girls basketball
team dropped the recent game
against Grace Christian, 28-
18.
Rayne Baker led the score-
with eight points; Kanisha
Jordan, six points; and Chris-
tina Morrow, four points.
The Lady Chargers face Old
Plank Christian in the next
challenge of the season, 4
p.m., Friday, here.


1 .

**1 F: --
- .-s, i4;


JIw-
4-. "".fJG


*c,~(~~ 4 C


WARRIORS on the basketball team include: Rob Searcy, Kyle Barnwell (Photo by
Lynne Saunders)


ACA Beats Carabelle;


To Play Apalachicola


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy
defeated Carabelle 46-34.
"We played very well," said
Coach Dan Nennstiel. "We
got to play our nonstarters
more and didn't have our best
team on the court at any time
but the boys stepped up to the
plate and took the win."
Wade Scarberry led the
score for the Warriors with 11
points, four assists, four re-
bounds, one steal.
Luke Sadler, eight points,


one assist, two rebounds, two
steals.
Kyle Barnwell, eight points,
one assist, three rebounds,
five steals.
Stephen Griffin, six pints,
six assists, six rebounds, two
steals, one block.
Prateen Patel, four points,
one assist, nine rebounds, one
steal.
Michael Kinsey, four
points, seven rebounds, one
steal.
Reggie Walker, three points,
five rebounds, two steals, one
block.
Jim Stephens, two points,
two rebounds; and Rob


Searcy, four rebounds.
The Warriors squared off
against Apalachicola Tuesday
night and Nennstiel said he
was looking for a very com-
petitive game.
"The last time we played
them, they beat us by 20
points," said Nennstiel. "It
will be a tough game. I hope
that we have improved, but
overall, we should do well."


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

SThe Warriors fell to Apala-.
chicola, 62-30, Tuesday
night.
"It was close for a while,
but Apalachicola was sizzling
in the third and outscored us
by about 20 points,' said
Coach Dan Nennstiel.
Leading the score for the
Warriors was Kyle Barnwell
with eight points, one assist,
three rebounds, six steals, one
block.
Stephen Griffin, six points,
three assists, nine rebounds,
four blocks.
Prateer Patel, six points,
two rebounds, three steals.
Jim Stephens, two points,
one assist, one rebound, two
steals.
Reggie Walker, one point,
five rebounds, three steals,
two blocks.
Michael Kinsey, two assists,
one steal; and Rob Searcy,
one steal.


TALLAHASSEE 850-575-7134

4317 W. Pensacola Street
Insurance Claims Welcome! [
1, tk, ltl and w ,omnmrl hid s c by e shain. 4 lilt, lr ha and srh ,ig d nnllolT fid lliRl
M(.. lu l P0oling & Ba4 nl0rks nnlnn ie hnimtnpdl n m ron MIA(O Enjns, In hou, and 1nin m UT.
II I I Il II"'IOVA


The Warriors now stand 4-
10 on the season.
Aucilla faces off against
Georgia Christian, 7:30 p.m.,
Thursday, there.
In the previous game
against Georgit Christian ear-
lier in the season, Aucilla lost
by approximately 10-12
points.
"They're a tough team and
they have one really big guy
who plays extremely well,"
said Nennstiel. "If we can
keep him defended, we
should do pretty well."



E ci
Reieet


TAi, N aIN G















850-575-8628
7596 W. Tennessee St.
Tallahassee, Florida


.. ...
Get unlimited access until 2008 to
Wild Adventures Theme Park Cypress Gardens Adventure Park
and both Splash Island Water Parks
- .. v" r .;' .* : ;
.. UPCOMING CONCERTS
S r ye rIbbett & .A...........Feb 10
Jl sh Turer' nr WBOes. .......... Feb 17
SaturdayJanuary 20 MongomeryGetr .......Mar 10
3 00pm'm Jenny Cam Steven Curtis Chapman
Newsong, Hawk Nelson & Solius Real
.........................Mar 17',
Sara Evans................Mar 24
Brooks Dunn............ Apr 7
All C,,me rts adm. Evesn f
SREE with part admission .


Warriors Fall To

Apalachicola 62-30


I). ~I


. "'-;..:.i-








PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 19, 2007


Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration


JOHN NELSON enjoys a famous VFW fish dinner at the park.


JROTC Color Guard frequently participates in area events.


LOIS HUNTER, tax collector, at the wheel of her vehicle.


EMCEE Dr, Ola Sylvia Lamar and festival chairperson Diane Hall.


HOLY GHOST Revival Choir was among the entertainment at the park.'


S CARS line Maimie Scott Drive as citizens attend activities at the park.


EME RACIAL INDUSTRIAL
i RESIDENTIAL
Service When You Need It!
Chillers Fuel Oil Furnaces
and Boilers Air Compressors
SNatural Gas
HEAT PUMP SPECIALIST
HODGES
HEATING, AIR CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION
PHONE (850) 576-1401
GLENN HODGES SR.
TALLAHASSEE, FL LIC # CMC 1249486


were among the units in the MLK parade.
armmunelamme.8


MLK


"Familiar Faces And Quiet Places"

A Pictorial And Narrative
History Of Jefferson County

By Derelyne Delp Counts

Available At Thie Chamber Office
And Leadiig Merchants
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KYSHNBRE WADE and jajuan Dean appear engrossed
in the excitement surrounding them. (News Photos)


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White 18" Chrome rims 4- Speed
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Window/ p Door, CD, Cloth Seats,
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OF CAIRO

Sales Repesentative
150 8TH AVE. N. E. CAIRO, GA 39828
PHONE (229) 377-4162* (800) 217-8955 FAX (229) 377-9789


GERROLD AUSTIN,
Parade Chairman


~ .:
7,P
Rsesslll~~


ii. IAF









Consuming Winter Fruits,

Vegetables Keeps Us Healthy


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Family and Consumer Sci--
ences Extension Agent Heidi
Copeland notes the impor-
tance and health benefits of
consuming winter fruits and
vegetables.
"With the winter season
comes an arra\ of delicious
fruits and vegetables that are
not only great for holiday
feasts, but also to enjoy as
part of your daily diet," said
Copeland.
Winter fruits and vegetables
include: pumpkin, butternut
squash, acorn squash, sweet
potatoes, carrots, apricots,
cantaloupe, kale. broccoli, as
well as dark green leafy vege-
tables and rich colored fruits.


"Not only are these fruits and
vegetables healthy and deli-
cious, many of them can be
used for decorating," she
added.
"Winter fruits and vegeta-
bles are a rich source of beta-
carotene," Copeland said.
"beta-carotene belongs to a
family of natural chemicals
found in plant food, known as
carotenes or carotenoids.
Roods high in carotenoids
produce rich red, yellow, or-
ange and green color."
She said that the body has
two methods in which to gain
access to vitamin A. It can be
directly from foods contain-
ing vitamin A or it can be ac-
quired through the conversion
of Beta-carotene to vitamin
A. Copeland noted that Beta-
carotene is not listed on the
"nutrition Fact" labels; it is


Listed as vitamin A.
Beta-carotene, like all ca-
rotenoids, is an antioxidant.
Antioxidant help protect the
body cells and tissue from
damage caused by oxidation.
Antioxidant have proven in-
valuable in protecting the
body's immune system. As
well, they promote healthy vi-
sion, bones and skin.


"Eating a variety of deeply
colored fruits and vegetables
is an excellent way to t insure
adequate intake of beta-
carotene," she concluded.

P0

NOT

ENTER

Greart/'i6neersdn'! 'lth 8 t#e.0'
MDA reseaiittpursu$s:
"everyposslbile.daenue.


REPORTING Crime DOES PAY

Call N

574-TIPS ( S

Anonymous REWARDS up to $1000!
Paid for by the Attorney General, Crime Stoppers Trust
i ,


'ICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 19, 2007 PAGE 11


BUSINESS



DIRECTORY


U1 U


B & M Tractor Service
Specializing in Food Plots, Bush Hogging,
Liming & Fertilizing, Spraying, and Fencing



Brad McLeod
Cell: (850) 210-2942 Mack McLeod
Cell: (850) 545-2325 Cell: (850) 510-0346
Home: (850)'997-1451 Home: (850) 997-3091
10534 South Salt Rd, Lamont, FL. 3233'6


Don't LBetBAn OldJoh

Call For quality work
45 Years In' The Trade
Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
850-997-7467 850-544-2917
*Residential Commercial Interior Exterior
Wall Paper Hanging


"I Do Windows, Etc."
Margie Woods
Highly Recommended / Good References
Reasonable Prices
"The nicest gift you could give anyone....even yourself"


Kessler Quality Service The Trash M asters Inc.
Th+'Wy- lConstruction LLC o Family Owned & Operated
SERVING JEFFERSON COUNTY
JACKS BOATS AND TRAILERS, INC. Repair; Remodeling & New Construction Call for Weekly Household
Hunting, Farming, Ranching HOWDY'S trash pick-up
S Sales, Service & Factory Prts Licensed and InsuredPortable Toilet Rentals 997-2027
A Store Hours. Mark Kessler 56-A wforIe Steve or Tim
M-F 8-5:30 5565-A.C.a...rtviele Rd
.. sa8-5:Tallahassee, FL32305 Owners,, S teveorTim
Sat 8-12 S850-656-8633 .ALLEN JENKINS...
UTIT (850) 584-2162 Phone:850-997-4540 FAX 850-656-6150 A www.thetrashmasters.com
VEHICLES 449US 19 North, Perry AT CRE 1324001NDA JE


Register's Mini-Storage 1-10 CHEVRON RHB Mowing, Inc. The Decorato's
+tax pk 3pks Ct. and Tractor Service W warehouse, LLC
315 Waukeenah Hwy. 305 $1.69 $4.63 $15.06 Bush Hogging, Box Blading, Root Raking,
(1/4 Mile Off US 19 South) DTC $1.83 $5.00 $16.28 Harrowing, Driveways, Fire Bs, E
Marlboro $3.18 $8.99 $28.94 260 N.
997-2535 Newport $3.35 $9.34 $30.11 cense ns 545-9724 Chery Street
Roland Brumbley Fax: (850) 224-8795 Furnishing & Accessories
Kayak Snuff $.99 can

PortableTbilets Grizzly Snuff $1.87 can www.vanguardnorth.com
Billy Simmons Septic Swisher Sweet Cigarillos It can be done...
850-509-1465 cell Buy One Get One Free On schedule r
850-997-0877 home $1.99 5ct. ,.' On budget Keaton Tire Repair
"Service Is Our Business on and off the Road"
Clean Portables for construction sites, Just the way you imagined!
family reunions, parties WE ACCEPT ALL MANUFACTURERS Call EDKEATON 850-997-0903 ho
WE> .lrll EDD KEATAN MANU-FAC-TUER .Snop
Ty i. *-*"" 5 TRAVIS KEATON 850-264-6871 Ceil
Events and Types COUPONS M.c"C3 e,997 0016U 54 Capps Hwy 850-997-0937 Fax
La'mont, FL 32336 850-997-5443 Home

-.- Ann Windham FRITH ABSTRACT Septic Tank & Land Clearing LARICHIUTA Craig
Reverse Mortgage Specialist Larichiuta
'-W'es ReverseMortgageSpealist & TITLE CO. Complete Septic Service & Repair Loyd, F 3233
Wells Fargo Home Mortgage Lloyd, F1 32337
MAC M1880-021 Owners & Mortgage Title Lot Preparing & Land Clearing e
1701 Hemitage Blvd. Insurance Policies
Suite 101 Title Searches Real Estate Closings Thomas B. Scott, Sr. Limerock 997-6788
Tallahassee, FL 32308 Serving Taylor County 9 Alexanr Rd lay
U 850 906-0022 Office 339 Alexander Rd Clay
850 906-0033 Fax 501 N. Byron Butler Pkwy. Perry, Fl L tFl 32 Sand
850 210-4282 Cell/ 800 549-1440 Toll Free 850-584-2672 Lamont, Fl. 32366 TopSoil
joann.b.windham@wellsfargo.com ph: 997-5536 cell: 933-3620


DOUG'S TREE & LAWN
SERVICE
Trimming Stump Grinding
Mowing Aerial Device
Removal Bush Hogging
Maintenance


997-0039 Lie. & Insured


& WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!
W H;997-6500
WHEN YOU NEED To SOLVE COMPUTER PROBLEMS.
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY ONSITE SERVICE
*Diagnosis.* Repair *Upgrades *Installations *Consultations:
:Tutorialsi*Removal of Viruses, Adware, Spywafe


PSYCHIC READER
PALM TAROT CARD
READINGS
ADVICE ON ALL
MATTERS OF LIFE
(850) 536-7236
3845 N. MONROE ST
TALLAHASSEE, FL


North Florida Interiors, LLC
Specializing in all of your cabinetry needs
Kitchen, Counters and Vanities
Raised Panel, Solid Wood Drawers,
All Plywood Construction
Family business for over 25 years in south
Florida *Free Estimates Licensed & Insured
Call Mike Hilinski
850-997-6931 850-445-2188
We accept credit cards


Herndon Trucking
Truck Rental Custom Hauling
Sand Gravel Refuse
SBackhoe Service
Light Clearing & Driveways
Office (850) 948-40.19
RAYMOND HERNDON Mobile (850) 570-0458


U'


---Y aI A


*Lot Cleaning *Driveways *Dig Ponds *Road
Building *Culvert Installation *Fill Dirt
*Limerock *Gravel
Billy Simmons, Owner
Backhoe and Hauling Septic TanksContractor &
Excavation Contractor
Phone: (850) 997-0877
Cell: (850) 509-1465
Insured D.O.H.Lic. #SR0971265 "
Visa & Mastercard Accepted!


The many

faces
of caring
Find out what you can do. Contact uis
at 1(800)899-0089 or www.voa.org
V Volunteers
of America-


Your Local Professional Painters
Interior Exterior
Lie. & In. #4676

John Wil s on
Painting Servj^Tiu
^^^342-3288^B


CALT DETS


CALL TO ADVERTISE
YOUR BUSINESS


997-3568
._


Residential
New Construction


(850) 997-6637
Cell # (307) 840-0004


ga










PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 19, 2007
1 7 ViBan- isPurat raLEGAL


FAIRGROUNDS JAN. 27TH & 28TH
Tallahassee, FL SAT. 9AM-5PM SUN, 10AM-4PM

FREE PARKING
SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE LADIES ESPECIALLY WELCOME
BUY SELL TRADE BROWSE
Bring Your Gun and Trade for the Gun You Always Wanted. And see the Many Displays of
New, Used and Collectable Guns, Ammo, Gun Parts, Books, Knives, Knife Sharpening,
Pepper Spray, Stun Guns, Militaria, Camouflage and Related Items at Discount Prices.
Military $1 Off WithMilitary 10& ConcealedWeapons Permit Class 1$40
This Ad Limit 1 Ad per Ticket Sat. or Sun.:11 am or2 pm
Adults $6.00 Law Enforcement Officers in Uniform
Children Under 12 Free Admitted Free


If It Happens In Our County
You'll Read It In
Your Local Newspaper


Order Your Subscription Today!

In State.....................$45.00

Out Of State.............$52.00
Extensive Coverage of Jefferson County
Every Wednesday & Friday

Mail Your Check To:
Monticello News
P.O. Box 428
Monticello, Florida 32344



Monticello News

'You Can't Be Without It'

I .,


H -Ir* tagc The donation Is tax deductible.
for theB*lin Pick-up Is free.
r I We take care of all the paperwork.








Can't Afford An Attorney?
COMMUNITY LEGAL NETWORK
We can help you...
Divorce Bankruptcy
Child Custody Real Estate
Child Support Criminal "lusiice will PreIail"
Living Trusts Probate & more!e Are Here To He You
We Are Here To Help You!|
Call Toll-Free (800)231-9679


NOTICE OF LAND
DEVELOPMENT CODE
PROPOSED CHANGE Jefferson
County Commission will have a
public hearing on the following
proposed land development code
change on February 15, 2007 at
6:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as
such matter may be heard, in the
courtroom of the Jefferson County
courthouse located at the
intersection of U.S. Highways 90
and 19. The meeting may be
continued as necessary.
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS ORDINANCE
NO. AN ORDINANCE
OF JEFFERSON COUNTY
FLORIDA, RELATING TO
CONSERVATION

School Lunch Menu

Monday
Parmesan Chicken, Pasta, Broc-
coli, Fruit Choices, Hot Roll, Milk
Tuesday
Snow Capped Meatloaf, Peas
and Carrots, Fruit Choices, Hot
Roll, Milk
Wednesday
Early Release
Corn Dog, Potato Wedges,
Fresh Fruit, Orange Juice,
Milk
Thursday
Turkey and Ham Sub, Salad
Choices, Fruit, Cookie Bar,
Milk
Friday
Taco Over Chips, Lettuce, To-
mato, Cheese, Whole Kernel
Corn, Oatmeal Muffin Square,
Milk



Gotcha!










1. The first rule of
Advertising is to get
their attention.




2. The second rule is
sustained, repeated
Advertising



Advertising

doesn't

cost...

IT PAYS!!!!



Call Us!



997-3568


Monticello
News
'You Can't Be
Without It!'


LEGAL
SUBDIVISIONS; PROVIDING
FOR FINDINGS OF FACT;
PROVIDING FOR PURPOSE;
ADDING LAND DEVELOPMENT
CODE SECTION 5.10.00 TO
ESTABLISH STANDARDS FOR
THE DESIGN AND PERMITTING
OF CONSERVATION
SUBDIVISIONS; PROVIDING
FOR SEVERABILITY;
PROVIDING FOR CONFLICT:
PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY;
AND PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE. Information
concerning the proposed Ordinance
can be viewed at the County
Planning Department, 445 W.
Palmer Mill Road, Monticello, FL,
Telephone 850-342-0223. From the
Florida "Government in the
Sunshine Manual", page 36,
paragraph c: Each board,
commission, or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision
thereof shall include in the notice of
any meeting or hearing, if notice of
meeting or hearing is required, of
such board, commission, or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the
board, agency, or commission with
respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she
will -need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings, is made, which record

includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be
based.
1/19/07,c
Notice of Public Hearing The
Jefferson County Planning
Commission will review and make a
decision to approve or not approve
a site plan development proposal for
a public horse arena to be built
behind the Agricultural Experiment
Station on U.S. 90 Highway
Monticello, Florida on parcel
number 34-2N-4E-0110-0000-1730.
Interested parties may present their
concerns at the Jefferson County
Planning Commission meeting on
February 8, 2007 at 7:00 P.M., or as
soon thereafter as such matter may
be heard, in the courtroom of the
Jefferson County Courthouse
located at the intersection of U.S.
Highway 19 and U.S. Highway 90 in
Monticello, Florida 32344. From the
Florida "Government in the
Sunshine Manual", page 36,
paragraph c: Each board,
commission, or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision
thereof shall include in the notice of
any meeting or hearing, if notice of
meeting or hearing is required, of
such board, commission, or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that. if a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the.
board, agency, or commission with
respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she
will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings, is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be
based. Prior to the meeting
interested persons may contact the
Jefferson County Planning and
Building Department at
850-342-0223 or write the
Department at 445 W. Palmer Mill
Road, Monticello, FL 32344 and
provide comments. The
development proposal may be
reviewed during business hours at
the Department office.
/ 19/07,c
LEGAL NOTICE The Jefferson
County Planning Commission will
hold its regular monthly meeting on
February 8, 2007 at 7:00 P.M. The
meeting will be held in the
Courtroom of the.Jefferson County
Courthouse located at the
intersection of US Highway 19 and


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Houston, TX 77056-3019


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The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience.


LEGAL

US Highway 90 in Monticello, FL.
The meeting may be continued as
necessary. Information concerning
the meeting is available at the
Jefferson County Planning
Department 445 W. Palmer Mill
Road, Monticello, FL, Telephone
850-342-0223. From the Florida
"Government in the Sunshine
Manual", page 36, paragraph c:
Each board, commission, or agency
of this state or of any political
subdivision thereof shall include in
the notice of any meeting or
hearing, if notice of meeting or
hearing is required, of such board,
commission, or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the
board, agency, or commission with
respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she
will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings, is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be
based.
1/19/07,c

THE SCHOOL BOARD OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
NOTICE OF INTENT TO ADOPT
RULE The School Board of
Jefferson County, Florida, hereby
gives notice of intent to adopt.
revision to Rule for operation of the
Jefferson County School System.
This revision, upon adoption, will
replace and supersede the
applicable current rule of the
School Board. PURPOSE AND
EFFECT: The purpose of this
action is to revise the current Rule,
consistent with existing legal
requirements and authorizations, in
order to update policy guidelines
under which the School System will
be administered. SUMMARY: The
rule to be amended is as follows:
7.418 Student Dress Code
RULEMAKING AUTHORITY:
Section 1012.22 Florida Statutes
SUMMARY OF THE ESTIMATE
OF ECONOMIC IMPACT: There
is no way to precisely compute the
economic impact of this adoption;
however, it is considered to. be
minimal except for the costs of
printing and distribution. IF
REQUESTED WITHIN 28 DAYS
OF THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE,
A HEARING WILL BE HELD AT:
TIME; 5:00 p.m. PLACE: Jefferson
County School Board Office DATE:
March 12, 2007 NAME OF
PERSON ORIGINATING
PROPOSAL: Dr. Kelvin L. Norton
NAME OF PERSON APPROVING
PROPOSAL: Phil Barker
Superintendent A COPY OF THE
RULE PROPOSED FOR.
REVISION MAY BE EXAMINED
AT : Jefferson County School Board
Office 1490 West Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32344
1/19/07,c

NOTICE
BINGO- sponsored by Lloyd.
Lions Club. 3 p.m. until,
Saturday, Jan. 27 at 7337-A Old
Lloyd Road, $50 Bonanza!
Proceeds for club projects.
997-1754
R/D 1/19,24,26,pd


BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
-TRAVEL AGENCY- Full
Service INTERNET *
Turnkey Under $1,000
www.TravelsWithClara.com
www.HowifiredMyBoss.com
R/D 1/12,17,19,24,pd


HELP WANTED
Seeking substitute teachers for
Kids Incorporated Early Head
Start, Jefferson. Call Norma for
interview 997-4736
R/D 1/19,24,c










NIGHT AT THE
MUSEUM
(PG)
Fri. 4:1.0-7:30-9:55 Sat. 1:00-
4:10-7:30-9:55 Sun. 1:00-4:10-
7:30 Mon. Thurs. 4:10-7:30
NO PASSES
PRIMEVAL
(R)
Fri. 4:05-7:25-9:45 Sat. 1:30-
4:05-7:25-9:45 Sun. 1:30-4:05-
7:25 Mon. Thurs. 4:05-7:25
NO PASSES
WE ARE MARSHALL
(PG)
Fri. 7:05-9:50 Sat. 7:05-9:50
Sun. 7:05 Mon. Thurs. 7:05
PURSUIT OF
HAPPINESS
(PG13)
Fri. 4:00-7:10-10:00 Sat. 1:00-
4:00-7:10-10:00 Sun. 1:00-4:00-
7:10 Mon. Thurs. 4:00-7:10
CHARLOTTE'S WEB
(G)
Fri. 4:45 Sat. 1:10-4:20 Sun.
1:10-4:20 Mon.-Thurs. 4:20
STOMP THE YARD
(PG13)
Fri. 4:30-7:20-10:10 Sat. 1:20-
4:30-7:20-10:10 Sun. 1:20-4:30-
7:20.Mon. Thurs. 4:30-7:20
NO PASSES
FREEDOM WRITERS
(PG 13)
Fri. 4:15-7:00-10:05 Sat. 1:05-
4:15-7:00'-10:05 Sun. 1:05-4:15-
7:00 Mon. Thurs. 4:15-7:00
NO PASSES
THE HITCHER .
(R)
Fri. 5:40-7:50-10:15 Sat. 1:15-
3:30-5:40-7:50-10:15 Sun. 1:15-
3:30-5:40-7:50 Mon. Thurs.
5:40-7:50
NO PASSES

All new highback seats and
more renova-
f// tions on the
way.


PACKAGE DEAL! 49955


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For Sale by First United Methodist Church 2400 sq.
ft. home at 895 West Washington Street. This former
Methodist Parsonage with split floor plan has 4 bed-
rooms and 3 1/2 baths, refinished hardwood floors.
New tile floors in kitchen, laundry and baths, carpet
in the family room and master bedroom. Bathrooms
newly renovated. Wood stove insert in fireplace.
Large lot landscaped with magnolias, camellias, crepe
myrtles and azaleas. Large deck and screened porch.
$259,500. For more information
call 997-5545


I


r )


I










To Place Your Ad




997-3568


SERVICES .


If you have a child attending
FSU/FAMU high schools, and
carpooling is not working, for
an affordable fee, you have an
option. Call Freeman Davis
510-5162, 421-8060.
R/D 1/17,19,24,26,31,2/2,pd
LPN, retired- will care for
elderly patient. Call Joann
948-2788
R/D
1/10,12,17.19,24,26,31,2/2,pd
Childcare Services- infant to 3
years old. In my home. Call
997-5498 reasonably low prices.
I1/1,TFN,c
Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
,new menopausal products.
Jackson's drug store.
5/12 tfn


veways,
Sshrub
Contact
)7-3116,


Backhoe Service: Driv
roads, ditches, tree and
removal, burn piles.
Gary Tuten @ 99
933-3458.
tfn

Appliance Repairs: w
dryers, stoves, refrigi
Owned and operated b:
Rudd. 997-5648.
message.
2/ 11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Gr
509-8530, quick response
6/22, tfn


LOST
Deer Antlers on Hwy. 19 South.
12-30 or 12/31 933-3975. REWARD!
R/D1/10,12,17,19,pd
FOUND
Keys on green ring found
Sunday 11/26/06 on Lake Road
near Tecumseh Rd. Call Debbie
@ 997-3568
11/29,tfn,nc


Free oak desk 3'dx5'wx29"h
W/chair needs work on top rest
in good condition. Can be seen
at 1035 S. Mulberry ST. call
997-2328.
1717,19,nc

A.TOMOTWE
2003 Ram 1500 one owner 5.7
Hemi V8 Quad cab only 26,000
miles Cloth, CD & Cassette
Keyless remote Call Anthony @
(800) 217-8955
R/D 1/17,19,c
2001 Toyota Camry gets 24
miles to the gallon CD &
Cassette, Cloth seats only 3,000
miles Call Anthony @ (800)
217-8955
R/D 1/17,19,c
1996 Ford F350 Diesel Crewcab
$5000, O.B.O. No calls after
9:00 p.m. please 251-2237
1/10,tfn.nc
2001 Mitsubishi Montero Sport
LE SUV. Great condition. Retail
8,890 sell for 7,950. 997-2232
R/D 1/10,12,17,19,pd
1989 International Dump
Truck. 18 CY. Tandem Axles.
$18,000. 251-2437, 997-0901.


R/D 12/6,tfn,nc
1996 Ford Ranger XLT
Supercab 2 wd 4.0 V6 127K AC
AT Toolbox Needs some minor
work, but driveable now. $3,000
251-0763 8am 8pm
R/D 9/27,tfn ,nc

FOR SALE
SHEDS- custom built storage
sheds. See display on Hwy. 221
North, Greenville. Call Bob
242-9342
R/D
1/10,12,17,19,24,26,31,2/2,7,9,14
,16,21,23,28,3/2,7,9,14,16,
BANK FORECLOSURES!
Homes from $10,000! 1-3
bedroom available! Repos,
REO's, HUD, FHA, etc. These
homes must sell! Listings call
(800) 425-1620 ext. 4237
1/17,19,fc


Queen Pillow-Top Mattress set.
New Chiro Rest in plastic with
warranty. $129. 850-222-9879
rashers, 12/1,-1/31,c
orators. BEDROOM: New complete 6
y Andy piece set still boxed, $500, can
Leave deliver (850) 425-8374
12/1,-1/31,c
Dining Set, Solid Wood Pub
finding. Table, 4 stools, Brand new.
s. $299. 850-545-7112
12/1,-1/31,c


Sofa, loveseat & chair. New
micro fiber, stain resistant,
family friendly. $600, must
move, delivery available.
850-222-7783
12/1,1/31,c


Southern Forestry Realty
www.soforest.com

83+ac, W Jefferson Co. -
15-20 yr old loblolly, natural
pines & hardwoods. 5 ponds,
great fishing & hunting tract.
Power available
58+ac, Madison Co. 30 ac
12-yr old planted pines,
frontage on Aucilla River &
Hwy 90, beautiful oaks, road
system. $5172/ac.
199+ac, Jefferson Co. 35
min. E of Tallahassee. Natural
upland pines & hardwoods. Full
of turkey & deer, ponds w/fish
& ducks. Power available.
111+ac, Jefferson Co. 18-
20 yr old planted pines, 50 ac
hardwood bottom. Nice rolling
topography, 35 min to Tallahas-
see. Full of game near Aucilla
River. $5000/ac.

Rob Langford
850-556-7575
Many more investment opportu-
nities available in North Fl,
South GA, and Southeast AL.


NURSE MANGER
MEDICAL/ONCOLOGY
$5000 RECRUITMENT INCENTIVE
Archbold Memorial Hospital, in Thomasville, GA is
currently seeking qualified applicants for the above
full-time position. Five years of nursing experience with
two years of management experience.
BSN preferred. CONTACT: Nurse Recruiter
Phone: 229-228-2713, FAX: 229-551-8733
Or email rtaylor@archbold.org.
Visit our website at www.archbold.org

EOE

Joann Bridges Academy in Greenville, FL
is currently seeking:
Special Education Teacher (ESE)
The candidate must be certified by the State Board of Education, hold a
certificate as a Special Education Teacher and be certified in a designated subject
area. Applicant will have to successfully pass a background screening.
Please fax your resume to the attention of Renee Johnson. Lead Teacher (850)
948-4227 or call (850) 948-4220 for more information.

Mental Health Therapist
The Therapist will provide individual, family, and group psychotherapy and
develop specific treatment goals for the youth. This person must be able to
document appropriate clinical information in the medical record in a timely
manner.
Applicants must have graduated from any accredited college or university with a
master's degree in social work, counseling and guidance, psychology or human
services as well as a successful background check. Experience working with
clients in a facility setting is preferable
.Please fax your resume to the attention of Ms. Mobley. Facility Administrator
at (850) 948-4227 or call (850) 948-4220 for more information.
U JOANN BRIDGES ACADEMY
Youth Services International Southeastern
Programs, Inc.
950 S.W. Greenville Hills Road. Greenville, Florida 32331
(850) 948-4220 Fax: (850) 948-4227


MONTICEL



CLASSIFIED

Your Community Shopping Center


FOR RENT -
1 Rm. efficiency Apt $300 per
month 997-6492 Leave mess.
1/17, tfn,c

3 miles West of Courthouse 4
BD 2 BA MH Carport and Lg.
Deck $900 mth + Dep. Shown by
appt. 850-893-6500
R/D 1/19,1/24,pd
Mobile home- 2BDR near 1-10
$475.mth Modular- 3BDR near
JCKC $675.mth 421-3911
R/D 1/12,17,19,24,26,31,pd
Jefferson Place Apts., 1 & 2 BR,
HUD Vouchers Accepted 1468
S. Waukeenah St. Office 300,
Monticello. 997-6964. "This
institution is an Equal
Opportunity Provider and
Employer".
9/6,tfn, c

REAL ESTATE
Nobles Subdivision- Newly
renovated 3/1 total under roof
1710 sqft new doors- vinyl
windows- CHA carport, fenced


V KELLY AND KELLY
j -PROPERTIES

..l Pecan Hill
S Subdivision


LOTS

FOR

SALE

STUNNING
CITY
SUBDIVISION


BUY ONE
BUILDING
LOT

$50,000
Additional
19 lots with
infrastructure
available

VIRGINIA
BLOW
Broker Associate
850.509.1844
Each Office i Inde lcndcnlly Owned and Opcrated


UEALESTATE.
150xl00 lot. Well landscaped
owner/ Realtor $118,700 O.B.O.
997-2973 or 997-6806.
11/15,TFN,c
* LAND ACTION 300 Props
Must be Sold! Low Down/ E-Z
Financing. Free Catalog (800)
937-1603
www.LANDAUCTION.com
NRLL East:AB2509, Bulziuk:
AU3448, Johnston:AU3449,
Mauk:AU3447.
1/17,19,fc

CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots,
Land We Make
Mortgage Loans,
Reverse Mortgages!
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc
878-3957


Rental- 3Bdrm,
Greenville $550.00 per
month
Lease- Store Bldg
$800.00 per month
Grandma style house
$95,000
Walk to town,
$100,000'
Airstrip, Home &
Hangar, 5 acres,
$269,000
Two Homes, 5 acres,
$234,000
4 Bdrm, 2 acres,
$159,000
5.34 acres, secluded,
$50,000
Gas & Grocery +
Home
Business Location, 5
acres $90,000
Owner Financing 5
acres Near Major State
Park
River lot $55,000
Camper lot $8500.00
20 acres $180,000


/ SA 933-6363
All Realty Servlces
Big Bend FlkRa
LYNUTE SfWRMON
REAL TOR
MRS*. .s t


i VMS, Inc.

is accepting applications for a Maintenance
Technician to work on State Roads out of the
Monticello, Florida office. This is a full time
entry level position that includes, but not
limited to, hurricane disaster response,
landscaping, litter removal, and sign repair
replacement. Applicant must have a valid
Florida's driver's license with a safe driving
record, This position requires a background
check & drug testing. Starting salary $9.50,an
hour. Benefits available upon completion of
probation. Apply at 1455 N. Jefferson Street,
Monticello, FL. (850) 997-5000.


,LO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 19, 2007 PAGE 13

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$9.00
Each Additional Line....S1.25
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


Housing Vouchers

.: We accept a11 vouchers

: 2/2 $615 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 $50 dep.

0 Pool & Youth Activities _

575-6571 *



Serious About Sellinq?
List today!




Homes That "Talk"Just Sell Faster


(850) 997-4340


Property Management Servicesl!!
S Great Rentals
S 2/1 1/2 bath mobile home east of
IF town on 5 acres $650/month
2 bedroom cabin in the woods $750 mo

Wooded Tract 2.09 hillside acres east of town
on graded County Road $30,400

Just Listed!! 1 bedroom cabin on 4+acres,
screened porch, covered deck, woods, creek
a very pleasant place $117,500

Lloyd Acres on a wooded hillside a 3 bedroom 2
bath modular home with oak floors, fireplace and
lots of very nice extras including shop for $87,500

Historic Budd House built ca 1882 by commu-
nity leader of the day for his family. Lovely wood
work, high ceilings, spacious rooms, grand fire-
places, marvelous porches, currently 4 bedrooms
and 2 baths $355,000

Waterfront Home!! Like New, roomy, 3 bedroom
2 bath home with big carport, nice shed with 5
acres on very nice lake near 1-10 and US 19
$385,000 See it at www.TimPeary.com

Amazing Buy!!! Mixed Use Property 12 plus
partially cleared acres on US 19 south land use
designation permits 4 houses per acre near Den-
nis' Trading post only $36,500 per acre

New Listing 13.29 acres some wooded some
open $5,000 per acre

Terrific Location 3 bedroom 2 bath doublewide
with fireplace, big porch, garage, shed, above
ground pool, with big trees, fence paddocks, on
county maintained paved Cherry Tree Lane now
$127,500

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly wooded
acres Only $36,500

Pasture and Pecans 5-10 lovely acres on paved
road $15,500 per acre Very nice property, good
deed restrictions

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Country Livinq at it's Best! REDUCED Com-
fortable 4 bedroom 3 bath home on five fenced
acres with guest cottage w/bath, 2 car garage, big
shop, pasture 100 pecan trees and a nice pool
Only $365,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South near
Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Waukeenah Highway 27.99 acres good home
site fenced pasture $545,000

Aucilla Shores 5 level wooded acres $75,000

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath doublewide
with nice deck, fenced yard on 1 acre $73,500


i;


Help! Serious Buyers Looking
for::
Small Farm 125-350 acres for
grand kids
-20-130 acres investment for


2 brothers

Realtor Tim Peary

850-997-4340
See all our listings at
www.TimPeary.com

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!









PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 19, 2007

Kessler Construction LLC


New Business In County


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Kessler Construction, LLC
is'a new business operating in
the County, owned by Mark
Kessler and his wife, Teresa.
The Kessler's moved
here from Cape Coral, FL,
where they had previously
worked in construction.
He primarily worked on new
residential construction,
some remodeling, and trim
carpentry and she served the
company as estimator and ac-
countant, as she continues to
do with the new company.
Kessler said that in ten years
of construction, he has built
approximately 70-75 homes.
"We came to Monticello for


KESSLER


two reasons," said Mark
Kessler. "We love it here and
the charm that is Monticello,
and we wanted to be closer to
out daughter Nicole, who is
attending FSU, majoring in
music.
The Kessler's goal is to pro-
vide personalized attention to
their customers, attention to
every little detail, and quality
craftsmanship for all custom-
ers.
"Home owners should be
proud of the homes they pur-,
chase," said Kessler. "Be it a
"small, low income home, or a
large, high income home."
Kessler said they help cus-
tomers design their homes,
take their customers through
the process of obtaining loans


and purchasing a new home."
Kessler said that there is a
personal company joke that
he has with his family, "I tell
them we should name the
business, DTRT, Do the Right
Thing."
He added that he and his
wife have always been very
community oriented, and they
plan on getting heavily in-
volved with community or-
ganizations here, including
the Humane Society.
"We're both animal lovers
and volunteered for an animal
organization when we lived in
Cape Coral," he said.
Kessler concluded that since
they are community oriented,
they intend to patronize local
businesses, whenever possible.
Kessler Construction, LLC
is located at the Kessler home
at 1715 Casa Bianca Rd.
Appointments can be made
for by calling 997-4540.


Cleveland Earns

Certification in

Horticulture


MCA student Austin Narezo feeds fish swimming in the
cow's trough during a class trip to the farm. The fish
keep the water trough clean.





;. . .


4 .-


JAMARRION COASEY collects eggs, two at a time, dur-
ing his class trip to the farm. (News Photos)


(Continued From Page 7)
Children's Research Hospital,
501 St. Jude Place, Memphis
TN 38105 (e-mail at donors
@stjude.org 1-800-822-6344)
or to Big Bend Hospice, 1723
Mahan Ctr. Blvd., Tallahassee,
FL 32308-5428 (e-mail at
hospice@bigbendhospice.org
(850)878-5310).
Dorothy is survived by her
loving husband, John B.
Timms; one son, John F. Bar-
rett (Lisa) of Tallahassee; a
brother, Bill Shepherd of Hay-
esville, NC and his fiance Bar-
bara; and her mother, Dot
Shepherd, of Hayesville, NC.
Dorothy was preceded in
death by her father, Wilson
Shepherd.

LILLER JONES
Liller Campbell Jones, age
90, Retired Dry-cleaning
Presser, died Sunday, January
14, 2007 in Tallahassee.
A native of Jefferson
County, Mrs. Jones spent the
majority of her life in the
Lloyd Community where she
was a longtime member of
Greater Elizabeth Missionary
Baptist Church. In recent
years, she has been a resident
at Brynwood Nursing Center
in Monticello.
Funeral service will be held
11:00 am on Saturday, January
20, 2007 at Greater Elizabeth


Missionary Baptist Church,
Lloyd, with the pastor, Rev.
George Proctor, Jr., officiating,
with burial at Spring Field
Cemetery in Lloyd. Viewing
will be from 2:00 p.m. to 7:30
p.m. Friday, January 19, 2007
at Tillman Funeral Home.
Survivors include a.son, Ed-
die Brundage and a sister-in-
law, Filey Copeland, both of
Rivera Beach, FL and her care-
takers, Kelvin and Imogene
Reddick of Thomasville, GA,
along with numerous. other
relatives and friends.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Jane Cleveland of Total
Landscape Supply, Inc. in
Monticello is a member of a
group of professionals who
are FNGLA Certified Horti-
culture Professionals
(FCHPs.)
This designation was earned
by Cleveland after an exam
that measures horticultural
knowledge and professional
skills through an extensive
written exam.
In demonstrating her skills
in many areas such as plant
identification, disease and in-
sect control, landscape design
management and retail proce-
dures, is earned.
Established by the Florida



Got A Cute

Photo?


Send It To Us

And We'll

Share It With

Our Readers!


Kids Dogs

Strange stuff,

etc.


Monticello
News

P.O. Box 430

Monticello,

FL 32345


"You Can't Be
Without It"


El Mission- -N.-- f
LJPHARMACAL W'
ca AC' Ck } 2 ," P. co-p 'r, A



The Rare Door

Restaurant
'UndCer Jew Management

Opening

Monday Jan. 22, 2007

Goocdoe' Home Cookin'
-At it's Best
from Our FamiCy To yours

Dinner Specials every T'iursday, friday andSaturday
Night
Serving Dinner 5pm lopm
Dine-In or Carry Out
229 Nrthi Cherry Street
Monticello, fL 32344
850-997-3133


Nursery, Growers & Land-
scape Association (FNGLA,)
the FNGLA Certified Horti-
culture Professional program
has been administered since
the mid 80s.
The program was designed
to increased professionalism
among Florida's growers,
landscape professionals and
retail employees.
This is the industry's only
standard for measuring horti-
cultural knowledge.
"When dealing with horti-
culture professionals, people
want someone who has the
professional know-how to
solve horticulture problems,"
says Ben Bolusky, FNGLA
Executive Vice President.
"Individuals who take steps
towards certification develop
the background to answer
consumer questions."


ROVER $2 MILLION


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