Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00170
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: January 17, 2007
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00170
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text








Study

Examines Longer
Living

Editorial, Page 4
I


ROSS Named New
Director Of

St. Phillip Club

Story, Page 6


Relay For Life

Kickoff Dinner
Photos

Story Photos Page 10


Animal Shelter

Has Many Pets
Seeking Homes

Story, Photo Page 14
II


Wednesday Morning


Monticello


931 TH YEAR NO 4 50 CENTs


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17, 2007


Community Celebrates MLK Day


Day Includes Parade,

Rec. Park Festivities


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Hundreds of spectators lined
the streets, for the 27th an-
nual Martin Luther King, Jr.
Parade, Monday, with the
crowds thickening as the pa-
rade neared the Recreation
Park.
Approximately 50 units par-
ticipated in the parade, which
began promptly at 10 a.m.,
with members of MPD, FHP,
Sheriff David Hobbs, and
Community Red Cross Disas-
ter Relief leading the parade.
JROTC Color Guard
proudly marched behind and
displayed the colors, followed
by John Nelson, representing
the VFW, Grand Marshall
HMS/JCHS Principal Juliette
Jackson served as Parade
Grand Marshal.
Also included in the parade
were the Senior Center, Buf-
falo Soldiers of Tallahassee,
Mt. Morilla Church, Carrie
White Assembly #331, John__


White Chapter #65, Monti-
cello Boys and Girls Club,
Piney Woods Community
Youth, and Martha's Bounc-
ing Babies.
Also, Mt. Ararat AME
Church, two units from the
MLK Jr. Community Center,
Chi Upsilon Omega Chapter
AKA, New Bethel AME, and
Welaunee MB Church.
The Rhythm Rushers pro-
vided the heart beat of the pa-
rade with drums, and adorned
in their colorful, beautiful
costumes.
Also, Hickory Hill 4-H
Club, Mt. Pleasant MB
Church, Mt. Zion Church, Or-
der of Eastern Star Hadassah
Chapter #458, Jefferson
County Head Start, Fellow-
ship Greater MB Church, Tax
Collector. Lois Hunter, Bethel
AME Church, and Al Hall of
Tillman's Funeral Home.
Also, Al-dria Tours, three
units from Ahmed Temple
#37, St. Philip Boys and Girls
Club, two units from 300
Club 3 Vet, Ray's Odd Jobs,


Memorial MB Church, ten
units from Bellview Lowrid-
ers, and ten units from the
North Florida Ebony Riders.
As the parade proceeded
through town and neared the
park, hundreds of vehicles fell


in line behind them, en route
to the festivities also.
Approaching the Festivities
at the Park, Maimie Scott Rd.
and neighboring side streets,
were lined with many, vehi-
cles.


Some of those attending the
festivities had to ark down as
far as Jeffeison Elementary
School and further away, just
to get to the festivities.
One inside the gate, flocks
of people crowded the area,


L
i .. ...
A-d 1





THE RHYTHM RUSHERS added pageantry to the Martin Luther King Day parade fes
tivities with their colorful costume. (News Photo)


hundreds strolling about to
different vendors.
The aroma of foods wafted
through the air, everything
from seafood, to mullet, trout,
or grouper, to barbecue pork,
ribs and chicken, from grill-
ing hot dogs to whole turkey
legs.
The adults seemed to favor
the fish and seafood, while
younger people flocked
around the funnel cake booth
and sippedon their many dif-
S ferent colors of slushes.
The smaller children were
greatly attracted to the bubble
bounce, where they enjoyed
continuous bouncing from
one side of the attraction to
the other, and joyful laughter.
Vendors also included
clothing, jewelry, collectibles,
and the like.
Festival Chairperson Diane
SHall introduced emcee Dr. O.
SSylvia Lamar, who welcomed
the crowd; the JCHS JROTC
Color Guard presented the
colors and led the Pledge of
Allegiance, and greetings
were offered by County Judge
Bobby Plaines, Sheriff David
Hobbs, County Commission
Chairman Junior Tuten, Clerk
(See Community, Page 2)


City, State Deal With


Sizable Development


KIRK REAMS, new clerk of court, was duly sworn in to office Friday afternoon in a
brief ceremony at the courthouse. Judge Bobby Plaines performed the ceremony.
(News Photo)


112th Continental Trials


Start At Dixie Plantation


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Following city officials' ap-
proval last week of a zoning
map change that accommo-
dates a proposed large devel-
opment just west of town, the
Local Planning Agency (LPA)
was scheduled to review a re-
lated issue on Tuesday.
The City Council last week
approved the rezoning of a
combined 420-acre parcel
from residential-2 (291 acres
at two dwellings per acre),
agriculture-1 (125 acres at one
dwelling per acre), and resi-
dential low density (five acres
at five dwellings per acre), to
residential low density overall.
Developed to maximum ca-
pacity under the new zoning,
the property would allow for
the construction of 2,100 new
houses.


Under an agreement worked
out between the city and Mon-
ticello Plantation, Inc., how-
ever, the developer has agreed
to limit the number of dwell-
ings to 450 and to dedicate the
remaining acreage to conserva-
tion easement.
That information was sub-
mitted to the Department of
Community Affairs (DCA) on
Oct. 13, along with the Com-
prehensive Plan Amendment
that is required for such large
land-use changes.
The Comprehensive Plan, in
fact, goes hand-in-hand with
last week's approved zoning
map change, except that the
former must be reviewed and
approved by the state.
On Dec. 12, the DCA re-
sponded to the city's proposed
Comprehensive Plan Amend-
ment by citing several objec-
tions, which were scheduled to
be discussed by the LPA on


Tuesday night.
Among the DCA's cited ob-
jections:
* The city failed to "ade-
quately address the impacts to
its facilities and services".
That's because, according to
the DCA, the city conducted
its analysis of water, sewer and
transportation needs based on
the proposed limit of 450
dwellings.
"Since the analysis was not
done at the maximum density,
however, the true impact on
LOS (levels of service) stan-
dards and available capacities
are unknown," the DCA wrote.
Additionally, the Depart-
ment of Transportation (DOT),
in its evaluation of the pro-
posed change, found that the
city used an incorrect transpor-
tation analysis.
"The analysis did not use the
correct tables for the city and
(See City, State, Page 2)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Monday was the start of the
112th Continental Field Trials
at Dixie Plantation in the Ash-
ville area.
Dottie Taylor, Dixie Planta-
tion secretary, reports a total of
36 dogs in the derby category
(dogs under two years of age)
and 100 dogs in the all-age.
That's down from last year's
numbers of 53 and 109 dogs
respectively. The all-time high
in recent years was realized in
2005, when the trials saw a to-
tal of 174 entries -- 60 of these
in the derby category and 114
in the all-age.


With seven races at day, the
derby competition is expected
to finish Wednesday
afternoon, with the all-age
competition beginning imme-
diately after.
Expectations are that the all-
age competition will conclude
in about two weeks, weather
permitting. The dogs are not
run in heavy fog when visibil-
ity is poor. Nor are they run in
thunderstorms, where risk of
lightning exists.
Typically, the plantation runs
seven braces a day, with a
brace consisting of two dogs
and their handlers, or trainers.
The object of the trials is to
test the dogs' performance in
the pursuit of feathered quarry,


namely quails in this instance.
Judges ride in the gallery --
the cavalcade of horsemen and
horsewomen that follow the
dogs -- and score the dogs on a
number of factors, including
class, style, endurance and the
number of coveys that they
flush.
The bird dogs are trained to
point out quarry, freeze in po-
sition, and await the trainer's
command before moving
again. Dogs that move too
soon, that fail to find quail, or
that intrude on another dog's
point lose points. If enough
negative points accumulate, a
dog can be disqualified.
Dixie Plantation is regarded
(See Field Trials, Page 3)


Conley, Austin Reelected Mayor, Vice;

City Council To Meet More Frequently


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Councilwoman Julie Conley
was reelected to mayor last
week for a fourth consecutive
year.
Conley's fellow council
members, who reelected her,
acclaimed that she was doing a
good job as mayor.
The council reelected Coun-
cilman Gerrold Austin vice
chairman for the third con-


secutive year, equally acclaim-
ing his job performance
during the last two years.
Conley, formerly the city
clerk, was elected mayor in
2004, her first year on the
council. It was the first time
that a woman had served as
mayor in Monticello.
The office of mayor is
largely symbolic here, but
more and more, Conley has
been asserting a leadership
role on the council.
The council too has come a


long ways in professionalism
and attention to details, as op-
posed to earlier days when city
business'was conducted more
informally and cavalierly.
In another sign of the chang-
ing times, the council has de-
cided to meet more frequently.
Beginning in February, council
members will hold regular
workshops every third Tues-
day of the month. The work-
shops will begin at 4 p.m.
The decision to meet more
(See Conely, Page 3)


i











PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 17, 2007


Carswell Memorial Art Show |

Planned At Jefferson Arts
A memorial art show for the While in California, he stud- paint directly on his canvas '
late Jeffery Gadsden Carswell ied painting at Alameda in without sketching or drafting. .
is planned at Jefferson Arts, many fine Southern California Well-known local artist Te, M '
Sunday, Jan. 21, with a recep- homes and also was featured at rence Hughes, described himi "
tion from 2-4 p.m.. the "Rookie To" Fine Arts thus: For many reasons people
Gallery in Mendocino, FL. pursue art activities. A small
Carswell was one of the He had a one man show in percentage are born with a
original members of Jefferson the spring of 1997 in Los An- pure gift of expression. Jeff
Arts, Inc. His exhibition will geles, CA. was one of these special few. '.
continue through Feb. 6. Returning from the West His work has the hallmark of
A n e N h F a a Coast in 1989, Carswell a year authentic expression, devoid of
A native North Florida artist later established a studio in posing and learnt mannerisms
and descendant of two historic Monticello. and fting.
Florida families, Carswell, catn
Florida families, Carswellr He had an intense curiosity His visual voice is moving
from an early age was inter- about the human personality elegant and fluid. It will be,
ested in expressing himself and what distinguishes one in- without doubt, one those exhi-
with paint and brush dividual from another, bitions that will delight all who
He spent most of his life in He was interested in the attend.
and around Jefferson County, drama of personality, the way Jeff Carswell died in 2000.
except for a nine year sojourn people see themselves, and Jefferson Arts regular hours
to the West Coast, living first_ how he sees them. He built his are Wed and Sat 10 a.m. to 2
in California and then in Ore- own frames, stretched and pre- p.m, or call 997-2211, or 997-
gon. pared his own canvass, putting 2358 for a private tour.


JULIETTE JACKSON, principal at Howard Middle and Jefferson County High schools
and grand marshal for the MLK Parade, waves to the crowd during her ride
downtown. Driving the car is JCHS basketball coach Derrick Martin. (News Photo)


Community Celebrates MLK Day


(Continued From Page 1)
of Court Kirk Reams, and
Mayor Julie Conley.
Performers included Elder
Carl Joseph and the True
Tones of Madison; Rev. Ru-
dolph Neely recited the MLK
speech, -"I Have a Dream";
Maderia Shabazz, Rev. Mat-
thew William, Minister O. J.
Sloan; St. Tabernacle Church
of God in Unity Choir;
LeAshia Graham; Renee
Royster; Nikki Ransom-
Trammell; and Ann Blount
gave an MLK tribute.
Also, Presiding Elder Ralph
Wilson; The Holy Ghost Re-


City, State
(Continued From Page 1)
the highways that would be
impacted," the DCA wrote.
The DCA also expressed
concern about the amend-
ment's potential impact on the
area's hydrological and wet-
land resources.
Notwithstanding the devel-
oper's pledge to place 98 acres
of jurisdictional wetlands into
a conservation easement,, the
DCA found that the document
failed to identify the environ-
mentally sensitive areas on the
Future Land Use Map or to
identify the specific steps to be
taken to protect the species.
Among the DCA's recom-
mendations for correcting the
cited objections: The city
should revise the amendment
to include a site-specific policy
limiting the density on the
property to the proposed 450
units; it should provide addi-
tional data on the character and
extent of the wetlands and
identify the location and extent
of the listed species; and it
should provide population pro-
jections and vacant land analy-
sis to determine if the densities
represented by the amendment
are warranted.
The DCA made clear in its
response that the objections
were based on relevant por-
tions of the.state's administra-
tive code and law and must be
addressed.
"Objections that are not ad-
dressed may result in a deter-
mination that the amendment
is not in compliance", the
DCA wrote.


vival Choir; Febe and the
Chosen Ones; Rev. Bethel
Ransom; Billy Simmons;
Rev. Isaac Manning; Greater
Works Sanctuary Choir; Tri-
ple Anointing; the Rhythm
Rushers.
Commemorations began
Jan. 13 with a Freedom Fund
Banquet, at Memorial MB
Church.
The guest speaker was Leon
County Commissioner Bill
Proctor.
Beverly Sloan of the School
.Board, recognized Retired


Educators; and certificates of
appreciation were presented
to Bill Proctor, Charles Par-
rish, president of the MLK, Jr.
Community Center, Inc., Rev.
J. B. Duval of Memorial MB
Church, and Dr. Juliette Jack-
son, principal of HMS/JCHS.
Ceremonies continued Jan.
14 with the MLK Memorial
Service at the Memorial MB
Church, highlighting what the
community must do to keep
the dream alive.
The guest speaker was Dr.
Helen Johnson-Robinson,
Pastor Bethel AME Church.


Eye Development


It also noted that the recom-
mendations were optional.
"Other approaches may be
more suitable in specific situa-
tions," the DCA wrote.
City officials maintain that
the DCA's objections are not
serious. They say the DCA
failed to take into account the


limitations that the city im-
posed on the development.
They say once these limita-
tions are made clear to the
state agency, it will remove the
objections.
Fashioning a response to the
DCA was to be one of the
LPA's tasks 7 p.m. Tuesday.


Got A Cute

Photo?



Send It To Us

And We'll

Share It With

Our Readers!



Kids Dogs

Strange

stuff, etc.



Monticello

News

P.O. BOX 430

Monticello,

FL 32345




"You Can't

Be Without

It"



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It keeps
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Story Clarification


In last Friday's front-page
News story on the salaries of
local constitutional officers,
the impression may have been
given that the salary of the
county judge comes from the


county.
The county judge's salary is
actually paid by the state, as is
his secretary's. The News
wanted to make the distinction
clear.


Y O LEO S ED M


SMOKING REpATEIY


If you, a deceased spouse or parent suffered from any of the fol-
lowing ailments on or before November 21, 1996 and
were advised by a treating doctor that the condition was
a result of cigarette smoking, you may be eligible to file a lawsuit
against big tobacco.
Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer
Kidney Cancer Laryngeal Cancer
Bladder Cancer Pancreatic Cancer
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
Oral Cavity/Tongue Cancer
Call Fleming & Associates toll free at 1-800-940-3365 for more information.


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Sense of impending doom rapid,
Irregular heartbeat, cold chant
seat or paleness women
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January 8-20

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Sutphin Gets His Way

On Building Upgrade


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Score one for Commissioner
Jerry Sutphin, whose call for
the upgrade of the old high
school facility housing the
building, planning and grants
departments the other board
members embraced whole-
heartedly recently.
"First impressions are lasting
impressions," Sutphin said.
"One of the first things that
citizens and .developers do
when they come into the
county is to go see the building
inspector, and the building he's
in looks like an old, abandoned
circus wagon."
Sutphin suggested that the
board somehow find the
money to refurbish the build-
ing, which previously served
as a school counselor's office
and still retains the "guidance"
sign at the entrance.
"We're spending over $1
million to fix the buildings
across the road from it," Sut-
phin said. "It should take about


$5,000 or so to do what I rec-
ommend."
The other board members
agreed to the suggestion and
issued instructions for Build-
ing Inspector Wallace Bullock
to solicit estimates for the
work, which they limited to
"cosmetic improvements for
the exterior".
"I want to commend my fel-
low board members for jump-
ing on one of my
recommendations," Sutphin
said afterwards, not without
humor.
Regular attendees to com-
mission meetings are well
aware of Sutphin's practice of
presenting a laundry list of ob-
servations, recommendations,
pithy comments and' questions
toward the end' of each board
meeting.
Rarely, if ever, however,
have the other board members
acted on Sutphin's many sug-
gestions, which run the gamut
from the commonsense to the
more innovative, to say the
least.


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

When Michael Abt, Jr., 12,
died from sudden cardiac ar-
rest in school, his parents,
Taffi and Michael, Abt, Sr.
started a foundation in his
name, "The Michael Abt. Jr.
Have a Heart Fund."
The purpose of this founda-
tion is to provide Automatic
External Defibrillators (AED)
and training to school nation-
wide.
School officials reported
Monday that Jefferson County
Middle High School received
an AED throiigh' the founda-
tions. '
Conditions to be met to qual-


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Jefferson Elementary school
reports events planned for the
month.
Jan. 15, is a district wide
observance of the Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. holiday.
The SAC meeting, 5 p.m.,
Jan. 23 in the JES media cen-
ter.
Parents are asked to note
that the PTO meeting has
been changed from Jan. 16 to
Jan. 23, 6:30 p.m. in the me-
dia center. Pre-K will
perform.
Jan. 24 is an early release
day for all schools.


ify for the AED donation to
schools include:;
*You agree to adopt a car-
diac emergency plan for your
faculty.
*You .agree to place the
AED in a location accessible
to your staff and trained mem-
bers of the general public.
*You agree to maintain the
AED once it is donated to you.
*You agree to create or ar-
range positive press about the
donations in order to urge
other community members
business to match the
donation.
*You agree to place a small
plaque near the AED indicat-
ing that it was donated ini the
memory of Michael Chrisop-'
ther Abt. Jr.


Jan. 25, the third grade
FCAT and at 5 p.m., curricu-
lum night in the media center.
Jan 25 is also parent/teacher
conference night, 5:50 p.m.
until 7:30 p.m. in the class-
rooms.
Parents are informed that
JES is adding another VPK
class at the school.
There are currently four
VPK classes for four year-
olds, with children' currently
on a waiting list.
A new volunteer will be
joining the staff soon, and the
fifth class will be available to
those on the list.
Children must be four years
old by Sept. 1, 2006.
Call Brenda Cooks at 342-
0115 for further information.'


Got A Cute Photo?

Sent It To Us And We'll Share

It With Our Readers



Kids Dogs Strange Stuff,

etc.


Monticello News

P.O. Box 430

Monticello, FL 32345



"You Can't Be Without It"


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 17, 2007 PAGE 3


AMBER KNOWLES, of Girl Scout Troop 150 recently had her photo taken with Rob
Nucatola shortly after he won the Girl Scout Cookie Eating competition for the 7th
straight year. The Cookie Rally is the kick off for cookie sales that continue through
Jan. 20th.



Annual Bless The Beast


Plans Now Underway
Ticket sellers are needed to use help with mixing, chop-
FRAN HUNT. help reach the goal of selling ping and related tasks," she
Staff Writer 250 tickets. at $25 per person, said.


Bless the. Beast, Humane
Society's biggest fundraiser,
is slated for Saturday, Feb. 17
at the Opera House, and
plans are underway to make
the event the success it always
has been..
"I need people to sign up to
help, and there are many areas
that must be covered to make
this run smoothly," President
Caroline Carswell informed
members.
Already committed for the
event are a DJ and
auctioneer, as well as volun-
teer bartenders.,
Fresh flowers will adorn
tables, with tablecloths, do-
nated by the Moon in Talla-
hassee.


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A



tMimal rights actilsts say
hunters threaten species.
Its a lie. Thanks towildlife..
management progmms
involving sportsmen, moose
and other species are thriving.
Safall Club hiternadonal
Foundation
800.377.5399
www.SafariC]ubFoundation.org


Carswell will reprise the
heavy hors d'oeuvres, which
were so popular last year,
some followed trays of their
favorite items throughout the
evening.
Volunteers are also needed
to collect donations for both
the silent and live auctions.
"The items valued at least
$1,000, such as boats and
trips, will be reserved for the
live auction, all others will be
placed in the silent auction.
Donations can be dropped
off at her office, the former
Humane Society office, lo-
cated on W. Washington
Street.
For further information or
to volunteer, call Carswell at
997-4000.


Last year 238 tickets were
- sold for the event.
Volunteers are also needed
for placing signs and flyers,
to assist with the silent auc-
tion, greeters at the door, ta-
ble watchers, setup and clean
up crews, servers, waiters and
waitresses, and for similar
positions.
Members of Altrusa will as-
sist with the planning and op-
eration of the auctions, and
the event would be using Al-
trusa's "tried and true" guide
lines for a successful auction.
Carswell added that she will
prepare the menu, and wel-
comes volunteers.
"Even if you are not a
gourmet chef, I could always


Become an American Red Cross
Disaster Services Volunteer
The Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross is seeking to
train Disaster Services Volunteers
in your community. Contact us at
878-6080 or visit our web site at
www.tallytown.com/redcross.


+
American
Red Cross


Did Y




AL.F


L >SINCE 1934





FLORAL DESIGNS


When was


the last


time you


made an


investment


that saved


lives?




307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee,


Conlev
(Continued From Page 1)
frequently comes from the re-
alization that once-a-month
meetings are not sufficient to
deal with all the issues facing
the council.
Among the things that coun-
cil members want to undertake
are reviews of the city-
established Internet and the
operations of the various city
departments.


Field Trials
(Continued From Page 1)
as the premier wild-game field
trial in the country. The recog-
nition is one that the C. M.
Livingston Foundation, which
manages the 8,000-plus acre
plantation, takes seriously and
strives to maintain.
Dixie Plantation has been
hosting the Continental Field
Trials since 1937. The event
annually attracts trainers and
champion dogs from around
the country.
The plantation is located
about 10 miles northeast of
Monticello on CR-146, also
known as the Ashville High-
way.



Questions,
Anyone?
Get the answers you can
trust about government
programs, benefits, and
services from the Federal
Consumer Information
Center.
Just call toll-free:
1-800-FED-INFO
(That's 1-800-333-4636)
Mon-Fri 8am-8pm ET
Or visit
www.pueblo.gsa.gov/call
U.S. General Services Administration


:A*


io r t heBliffi


* The donation is tax deductible.
* Pick-up is free.
* We take care of all the paperwork.


I e 1-00DO ATE-ARS(-0-6-82


Du Know?
Monticello has over 90
websites! View them all at
w \w.gcllingsflowers.com
Click: Monticcllo Links
Hacv a website in
Jefferson County?

Get a FREE LINK....

Only at Gellings!
190 E Dogwood Street 850.997.2015


SAVER


When you invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
enormous-healtlhier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. It's a dividend that builds a
strong conmmnity.

FL 32303 (904) 414-0844


JCHS Middle/High

Receives Defibrillator


Jefferson Elementary

Tells January Events


"- `---- --









PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 17, 2007


Monticello News
(ISSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
SPublisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly Ex-
cept for the weeks of July 4th, Thanksgiving, Christmas,
& New Years. Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post
Office. Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774,
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net





Study Examines


Longer Living


People who live for 100 years
or more aren't just lucky. Re-
searchers have found that
those who live exceptionally
long and healthy lives often
have company- in their very
own families.
Scientists are now aiming to
understand what makes these
elders unique, so we can all
benefit.
Recent studies have revealed
that people who live past age
100 were usually healthier at
younger ages than their peers.
Unique "protective" factors
against disease and disability
may have been at work
throughout their lives, not just
at very old ages. So what ex-
actly protects these people and
contributes to their extraordi-
nary survival?
Genetics may play a role.
Studies of very old people and
their families in specific popu-
lations- such as those in Ice-
land and in Mormon and
Amish communities- have
shown that remarkably long
life runs in families.
Researchers have even found
specific genes that may con-
tribute to exceptional survival.
While genes likely play a
role, other factors that tend to
run in families, such as life-
styles, can also contributes.
You're probably already fa-
miliar with these from when


you were a kid: Eat your fruits
and vegetables, don't smoke,
get enough rest, exercise sev-
eral times a week, monitor
your health and see your doc-
tor regularly.
NIH's National Institute on
Aging (NIA) has begun a ma-
jor study of long-lived families
to learn more abut the factors
that lead to longer life
The long Life Family Study
(LLFS) will focus on what
protects against disease and
disability by following excep-
tional families overtime.
You may be able to help re-
searcher's discover the secrets
to a longer, healthier life.
LLFS investigators are looking
for people ages 80 or older
who have at least one living
brother or sister age 80 plus.
If this describes you and
your family, please go the
http://www.lon1 ifefamnilystud
v.or./ or call one of the re-
cruitment offices toll-free:
Boston University, (888) 333-
6327; University of Pittsburgh,
(800) 872-3653; or Columbia
University in New York,
(800)304-4317.
"The more families we get,
the better the chance we can
find robust results," Winifred
K. Rossi, deputy director of
NIA's Geriatrics and Clinical
Gerontology Programs, said.


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
January 15, 1997
His first day on the job,
Property Appraiser David
Ward was handed a certified
letter from the Department of
Revenue ordering him to bring
agricultural lands in the county
into compliance with state
standards or face possible
sanctions.
The combined efforts of the
School and County Public
Health Unit to reduce teenage
pregnancies have paid off.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
January 14, 1987
Newly sworn council-
woman Johnann Murdaugh
says she's ready to face the
challenge during the next four
years deciding city issues.
Since her election last Octo-
ber, Murdaugh has been busy
familiarizing herself with city
laws and attending council
meetings to gain a perspective
on issues which she now faces.
Garden Club member and
Tree Committee spokesperson
Dorothy Ward expressed de-
light over the recent passage of
the city tree ordinance and re-
ported that one violation of the
ordinance has already been
found and corrected.

THIRTY YEARS AGO
January 14, 1977
Annette Rea, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Grady Rea, Jr., has
been selected to be a finalist in


the 1977 Miss Florida Water-
melon Queen Pageant to be
held at the Sheraton Towers
Hotel in Orlando January 14,
15 and 16.
A Clearwater trucking firm,
Best Way, Inc., is moving here
and will soon be located in the
industrial park. The firm hauls
agricultural products. Gordon
Hutto, president of the com-
pany says the firm's 11 em-
ployees will move here with
the company.
Mayor E.S. Blair today pro-
claimed January 16-22 as Jay-
cee Week in' Monticello and
asked local organizations to
cooperate in the observance.
FORTY YEARS AGO
January 13, 1967
The Rev. James Shuman
of San Antonio, Texas will be
the guest speaker at the First
Baptist Church beginning this
Sunday, January 15.
Use of zip code will make it
easier to mail packages after
January 15, according to Tom
Braswell of the Monticello
Post Office.
The County School Board in.
regular session Wednesday
morning, voted to raise the
price of school lunches five
cents effective February 1.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
January 13, 1957
Mr. and Mrs. E.E. Atkinson,

(See Files, Page 5)


Frol


File




LIp


4 0


j ; .


FRYING FISH in Jefferson Square parking lot, in Sept., 1991, to raise money for the
Senior Center, were Bill Hawkins and Charles Parrish. (News File Photo)


Opinion & Comment


Judy Was Queen After All


The ultimate in stage moth-
ering was attempted by a
Texas woman, but she failed.
You may recall reading
about the case. Wanda Hollo-
way of Channelview was con-
victed of trying to hire a
hitman to kill the mother of
her'daughter's cheerleading ri-
val to further her own daugh-
ter's cheerleading career.
Clearly, Wanda was serious
about her daughter being a
cheerleader.
While Wanda's approach
was sick, to say the least, I
know women who have raised
stage mothering to an art form.
Beauty pageants and wed-
dings will bring out the stage
mothers like nothing else.
I think of the mom who
dashed in the office 30 minutes
after her daughter had brought
the announcement of her forth-
coming wedding. Mom leaves
with the announcement and re-
turns shortly after having re-
written it.
Back comes daughter. "Did
my mother come in and
change my announcement?"
Daughter changes the
announcement back to the way


Publisher's


Notebook


Ron Cichon
1; A


she submitted it.
In a little while the mother
was back demanding to. see
what her daughter had written.
The editor intervened and
suggested the two work this
out at home.
If the announcement caused
so much trouble, can you
imagine working out the de-
tails of the wedding?
I have lots of stage mother
stories collected in 40 years as
a newspaperman, but here's
my very favorite.
Judy's mom had taken her to
beauty contest after beauty
contest from the time Judy was
three years old.
Now Judy was 19 years old


and had never won a thing de-
spite entering loads of
contests.
She was a very nice young
woman but Judy was no
beauty. She was what you'd
call average, like most of us.
For years her mom perse-
vered through contest rejec-
tions, lots of money for
dresses, dance lessons, and
charm school. She did every-
thing she could do to make her
Judy a beauty queen.
Well, I had a hand in making
the dream come true and I
really enjoyed it.
I was working on a benefit to
collect food for the needy and
the attraction was a series of


boxing matches. For a couple
of canned goods you could see
half a dozen four round fights.
Everything was coming to-
gether perfectly when someone
on the steering committee sug-
gested we name a queen for
the event. I suggested Judy be
our queen. Everyone agreed
and I was given the task of
calling Judy's mother to make
the arrangements.
To say the mother was de-
lighted when I called would
be an understatement! She was
beside herself, with joy be-
cause her Judy was finally go-
ing to be a queen.
On the night of the big event,
Judy stood 'in the comer of the
outdoor boxing ring,'her bath-
ing suit and queen's sash cov-
ered by a robe, and boxing
gloves on her hands.
When the announcer intro-
duced, Judy her "cornerman"
removed the robe and Judy
walked to the center of the ring
and struck a pugilistic pose,
with the big gloves on her
hands. The crowd cheered.
I glanced at her mother and
such joy I have, never seen!
SHer Judy was a queen!


'Time Capsule' Predictions


By DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

Well it is time once again for
my fearless forecasts for 2007.
I am not going to use the horo-
*, scope and psychic technique of
throwing out a big glob of
probabilities, allowing a year
for you to forget these prog-
nostications and then point
proudly to the one or two I
happened to luck out getting
right.
Instead, I plan on opening
this "time capsule" again at the
beginning of 2008 so you can
be the judge regarding the ac-
curacy of my crystal ball read-
ings.
The war in Iraq: Iraq will re-
main a troubled and broken


country through 2007. The
struggle over policy and in-
volvement, along with the fin-
ger pointing, will continue be-
tween the President and mem-
bers of Congress.
American's impatience and
apathy will continue to erode
public support for the war and
the violence will continue to
escalate. We may see a down-
turn in the number of Ameri-
can casualties as a result of the
inevitable forcing of the Iraqi
government to assume more
combat and policing responsi-
bilities and the withdrawal of
some U.S. personnel.
The Shiites will garner more
and more power and authority
with the convert support and,
funding from Iran.
There will be another attempt


to address breaking Iraq into
three separate countries to end
the war, but the chances for
such a resolution are minimal
given the adamant objections
to Turkey. Sadly, or collective,
unwillingness to exercise our
tremendous super power and
clean up the mess we have got-
ten into in Iraq, will ultimately
be the undoing of our future
generations.
Ultimately, Iraq will become
a satellite nation of Iran and
their rich oil fields will provide
an endless source of funds to
carry out the world jihad
against all infidels and the free
world.
Politics: Don't except any
changes in the good old boy
network and legislative under-
takings in the nation's capital.


It will be partisan politics as
usual in the public eye and
back scratching behind closed
doors when it comes to floun-
dering away the American's
tax dollars.
Politicians on both sides of
the aisles will continue to be
spineless lackeys for their re-
spective parties in order to get
along and gain any advantage
for the 2008 presidential and
congressional elections. Pre-
pare yourself for the dirtiest
mud slinging and finger point-
ing political campaigns on re-
cord, leading up to the 2008
elections.
Americans (as usual) will
forget they eagerly voted the
Democrats in to end the war in
Iraq and staunch members of
(See Time, Page 5)


GOP Wasted Opportunity


By TOM DeWEESE
Columnist

After the fall elections where
Republicans were ousted by
voters, Sarah Chamberlain
Resnick, executive director of
the Republican Main Street
Partnership, said, "The Ameri-
can people made it clear that
our party's decision to ignore
the middle of the American
electorate was a disastrous
one."
So Ms. Resnick, which part
of the "middle" did Republi-
cans ignore:


The 85 percent who de-
mand the Republicans stop il-
.legal immigration, as the Re-
publican Administration and
Senate supports doing away
with border control all
together?
The 65 percent who op-
pose U.S. involvement in the
United Nations, as the Repub-
lican Congress rejoined
UNESCO?
The overwhelming major-
ity of Americans who are op-
posed to a North American
Union, now being secretly put
in place by our Republican
President?


The property owners who
desperately seek action to stop
eminent domain to save their
homes from the wrecking ball
of private developers, only to
see Republican Senator Arlen
Specter stop it?
The majority of the Repub-
lican base which fought in the
trenches of local precincts for
50 years to make Republicans
the majority party, expecting it
to reduce the size and power
government ?
All of these are natural con-
stituencies of the Republican
Party. All held out hope that a
Republican majority would


stand with them. All were be-
trayed. But, according to Ms.
Resnick, the dumb party only
lost because they "moved too
far to the Right" and weren't
more like the Democrats. As-
tonishing.
Worse, the day after the
election defeat, the "Republi-
can" President apparently
learned nothing. His first
words were of encouragement
that he could now work with
the Democrats to pass his am-
nesty guest workers scam that
he failed to get past the Repub-
lican House.
(See GOP, Page 5)


I -


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-~
- ~-


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s


i~IYbr-









.,, ONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 17, 2007 PAGE 5


,GOP Wasted Opportunity


(Continued From Page 4)
The Republicans want to
blame the election on the war
in Iraq. But it wasn't about
that. Had the Republicans
stayed true intheir old posi-
tions of limited government
and individual liberty, keeping
down spending and
regulations; blocked efforts to
intrude in our private lives;
supported a foreign policy that
looked after American inter-
ests; and protected our sover-
'eign borders, then the loyal
Base would have followed the
Republicans over the abyss in
the Iraq war.
Truth be told, if the Repub-
lican Party had stayed true to
its core beliefs, there never
would have been an invasion
and occupation of a foreign
land, That's not how true Re-


publicans operate. True Re-
publicans don't use fear to put
freedom in chains. True Re-
publicans don't use patriotic
sounding names for laws that
destroy liberty. That's how the
other side has always operated.
It's what we fought to stop.
Republican betrayal has
known no bounds.
Republicans could have been


the majority party for 100
years if they had respected the
Constitution and spent its time
in power restoring the Repub-
lic. That's what the
"electorate" really wants. In-
stead they squandered what
may well be the last chance for
the liberty that brought us here
in the first place. What a
waste.


KEEP THE GREEN LIGHT SHINING
Thanks to MDA research, the future
looks brighter than ever.

1-800-572-1717


Muscular Dystrophy Association
www.mdausa.org


'HAMBONE' and her piggies are fed by Autumn Peck, an MCA student on a class trip
to the Snapp Farm. Peck's class just finished reading "Charlotte's. Web." (News
Photo)



'Time Capsule' Predictions


(Continued From Page 4)
that party will accept Con-
gress's ranting that they are
helpless to do anything be-
cause the president is the Com-
mander in Chief of the armed
forces. Ethics in Congress will
remain cloaked in the good old
boy system regardless of any
new rules enacted by that
body.
Science and Health: Science
will continue to make great.
strides despite the frequent
roadblocks thrown in the way
by the government. Expect sig-
nificant advancements in the
area of stem cell exploration,
provided sufficient freedom is
available in this area of re-
search.
Watch out for the environ-
mental, whackos to-surge for-
ward and attempt to force


legislation -and massive tax
dollar funding for "do good"
programs under the banner of
global warming.
This, despite the fact that
very little empirical evidence
exists to support such a panic
attack. Americans will not be
ready to consume cloned food
products and the government
will be hard pressed to clearly
identify all cloned foods and
their sources on the product la-
bel.
We are overdue for both a
major medical achievement in-
volving a serious illness over-
due for a viral pandemic.
Sociology: Americans will
continue to accept the fast and
loose, (grab a dime today and
forget tomorrow), mentality
and lifestyles established and
portrayed by Hollywood and
on TV.


Citizen Thanks City

Worker For His Help
Dear Editor: We are very fortunate to
To the City of Monticello have a young man like Demott
and the First Responders: working for us in this county.
I want to thank Demott An- Again, thank you for 'being
derson for the outstanding job so kind and generous.
he did when my neighbor Sincerely,
called me at 12:35 a.m. in Leah Jane Cooksey
great distress.
Her husband was critically ill
and had fallen in the bathroom
that was flooded from a huge
overflow of water from the toi- WOff ICSLf l-
let, into the halls, bedrooms, YOUIR 9 MIEFTOW
closets, and the like.
Demott was mopping up wa-
ter, helping her husband and
telling them both he would
take care of everything, assur-
ing them th;,r he did things
like this all the ii;ne.
Demott was amazing. His
kindness and professional
manner were a 20, on a scale
of 1-10!


Files
(Continued From Page 4)
former residents of Jefferson
County, now residing in
Tampa, will celebrate their
golden wedding anniversary
January 17th.
On Friday night, Dec. 28,
members of the First Baptist
Church entertained at the ,,
Woman's Club with a recep-
tion honoring their retiring
pastor and his wife, Rev. H.
O'Hughes retired at the end of
this year after serving his
church for 13 years.

SIXTY YEARS AGO
January i3, 1947
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Earl
Cooksey of Valdosta announce
the birth of a son. Kenneth
Earl Jr., on Thursday, Jan. 2, in
Little Griffin Hospital, Valdo-
sta.
Mr. and Mrs. Isham Shep-
herd spent the Christmas holi-
days in St. Augustine with the
former's mother, Mrs. S.G I
Shepherd Sr.


Expect more activist pressure
on political leaders to embrace
the wishes of the gay commu-
nity and major political battles
over abortion, especially late
term abortions.
With the steady deterioration
of our nations moral compass,
we cannot over look the unfor-
tunate probability of continued
shootings in our schools and
work places.
Homeland Security: Jihad
terrorists will continue to plan
and organize for a major attack
,on American and British soil.
The recent setbacks for them
in the United States will more
than likely force the terrorists
to attack our interest overseas
to maintain credibility among
their followers.
A more significant attempt
could be planned to influence
or disrupt the 2008 elections.
Congress and the President
will continue to waffle on clos-
ing our southern border and
dealing sternly with illegal im-
migration. With the Democrats
now in control of both houses
of congress, prepare for an in-
tentionally bloated bureau-
cratic and unmanageable
amnesty program for 12+ mil-
lion (future democratic voting)
illegals, cleverly disguised as
"Comprehensive Immigration
Reform".


WZo NEWSI
7N NEWSPAPERS


The Jefferson County Recvclinq Proaram


accepts


the following items for recycling:


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
-Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection.
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?





Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)
di,
Used Oil & Oil Filters io

Household Hazardous-Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.





Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.



The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.















PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 17, 2007 L ife s t e


'I



'USea, aj r= pvo* to Am

w V; w w ",9'~'(iQQE4'P~'


ENCHILADA CASSEROLE

2 Ibs. lean ground beef
1 medium onion chopped
I clove garlic, minced, or 1
tsp. garlic powder
1 15 oz. can tomato sauce
2 to 3 tbs. chili powder, or to
taste
salt and pepper to taste
8 flour tortillas
1 can cream of chicken soup
3/4 cup milk
2 cups shredded cheese

Brown beef, onion and gar-
lic. Add tomato sauce aid chili
powder, salt and pepper.
Heat thoroughly. Spray
crock pot with Pam. Line with
two tortillas. Cover with 1/3
meat mixture and cheese.
Top with two more tortillas.
Combine soup and milk, and
pour over tortillas.
Sprinkle with .remaining
cheese. Cook on low for 4-5
hours.
Can also be baked in a casse-
role dish at 350 for 45
minutes.

Submitted By:
Erlinda Blake

MICROWAVE MEAT
LOAF

1 1/2 lbs. lean ground beef
1/2 cup bread crumbs, fine and
dry
1 egg beaten
3/4 cup milk
1/4 cup onion chopped
1 1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. pepper
1/4 cup ketchup
1/4 cup barbecue sauce


Mix ground beef lightly
with bread crumbs, egg, milk,
onion, salt and pepper.
Pack mixture lightly into a 2
qt. glass loaf pan. Cover with
waxed paper.
Cook in microwave oven 5
minutes at medium high. Mix
ketchup and barbecue sauce
and pour over meat loaf.
Cook covered with waxed
paper 20-25 minutes at me-
dium high, or until done.
Remove from microwave
oven and cover with foil for
five minutes.

Submitted By:
Helen Gleasman

BLACK CHERRY
CONGEALED SALAD

6 oz pkg. black cherry Jello
2 cups boiling water
8 oz can pineapple, crushed or
tid bits, not drained
10 oz. box strawberries, frozen
1 cup pecans, finely chopped.

Mix Jello in 2 cups of boil-
ing water until dissolved; let
stand a few minutes, and add
strawberries, which will thaw
soon in hot mixture.
Add pineapple and nuts.
Pour half of the mixture in a 2
qt. container and place in re-
frigerator to congeal.
Leave other half out of the
refrigerator.
Remove from the refrigera-
tor when firm, and spread the
sour cream over the congealed
Jello.
Pour remaining mixture on
top, return to the refrigerator
and let this layer congeal.


MR. AND MRS. JUSTIN BARFIELD


Angela Pico Marries

Justin Nash Barfield


Angela Ruth Pico of Talla-
hassee, and Justin Nash Bar-
field of Tallahassee were
united in marriage at 5 p. m.
on Friday, Nov. 24, 2006 at
Dorothy B. Oven Park in Tal-
lahassee. -
Pastor Mark McNees of
Element Three Church offici-
ated.
A reception was held imme-
diately following the cere-
mony at the Park.
The bride is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Timothv Pico of
Champaign, IL.
She is the granddaughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Ken Reed of
Galesburg, IL.
The groom is the son of
Timothee A. Barfield of Mon-
ticello, FL. and the late
Yvonne DeVaux Barfield also
of Monticello.
He is the grandson of Junice
Ricks Barfield of Pensacola,
FL. and the late Angus D.
Barfield.
Maid of Honor was Amy
Pico, sister of the bride.
Bridesmaids were Rebecca
Barfield, sister of the groom;
Natalie Trisilla, cousin of the
bride; Nina Trisilla, cousin of
the bride; and Amy Willis,


friend of the bride.
Best Man was Timothee
Barfield, father of the groom.
Groomsmen were J.P. Snead,
friend of the groom; David
Bums, friend of the groom;
B.J. Dollar, friend of the
groom; and Christopher Ter-
rell, cousin of the groom.
The bride is a 2000 graduate
of Judah Christian School in
Champaign.
She received a Bachelor's
degree from Florida State
University in Dietetics in
2005, and a Master's degree
in Clinical Nutrition in De-
cember 2006.
She. is employed by the
ARAMARK Corporation as
an assistant manager on the
FSU Campus.
The groom is a 1999 gradu-
ate of Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy in Monticello, FL.
He received .a Bachelor's
degree in December 2004
from FSU in Humanities.
He is employed by Element
Three Church in Tallahassee.
The couple Honeymooned
in Savannah, GA. and Puerto
Valletta, Mexico.
They reside in Tallahassee.


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ROSS

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Brian Ross is the new di-
rector for the St. Phillip Boys
and Girls Club.
He came to the area in 2000
from Raleigh, NC. He entered
Florida State University to
play football and to continue
his education.
He graduated in 2005 with a
Major in Criminology.
He went on to play profes-
sional football with the Flor-
ida Firecats Arena team, and
has recently signed on with
the new Tallahassee Titans, a
professional indoor team.
"I believe in education first,
and in the enhancement of our
youth," he says.


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"I want to broaden their per-
spective on just how far they
can go with a little persever-
ance and hard work," he con-
tinues.
"I want to encourage and re-
ward improvements in educa-
tion and in individual
development of their charac-
ter.
He began with the St. Phil-
lip Club in November, with
goals of making improve-
ments in all areas of the after
school program. And, he'd
like to add more field trips for
the students.


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St. Phillip Club Has


Incentive
Brian Ross, director of the
St. Phillip Boys and Girls
Club announces a new Incen-
tive Program.'
The program, which runs
from Monday, Jan. 8 through
Friday, Feb. 23, is for all
members with at least 80 per-
cent attendance; who show
progress on all FCAT prepa-
ration and in other school as-
signments;, have less than
three referrals and no suspen-
sions.
All those meeting the Incen-
tive Program expectations
will be presented with a ticket
and transportation to see Tal-
lahassee's new Professional
Indoor Football Team, the
Tallahassee Titans.
The Tallahassee Titans will


Program
be playing their first home
game in March at the Talla-
hassee Leon County Civic
Center.
Boys and Girls Club staff
are looking forward to their
members making progress,
and also in rewarding them
for doing so.
Ross is asking that each
member's emergency contact
and member information be
updated as soon as possible.
The, Club was closed Mon-
day in honor of Martin Luther
King Day.
Students from all three area
Clubs joined together to
march in the MLK Parade.
They held banners for'their
Boys and Girls Club, and
waved to the onlookers.


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Ross New Director

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Relay Co-Chairs


Speak At Kiwanis


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 17, 2007 PAGE 7

Foundation

Donates

$700 TO Club


Guest speakers at the recent
Kiwanis Club meeting were
Ellen Cline and Dana Last-
inger, 'Co-Chairs for the
American Cancer Society
County Relay for Life.
They brought members up
to date on last year's event
and preparations for the 2007
event.
The 2006 Relay -for Life,
event raised more than
$80,000 for the American
Cancer Society's efforts in
educating and supporting
those affected by cancer in
this county.
This figure represents the
highest per capital amount
raised by any county in Flor-
ida last year.
The goal for this year is
$90,000.
This year's event will begin


"Simply Florida" a taste of
flavors from the Sunshine
State, is the nev.e st cookbook
'or sale locally ,
Sponsored b) the Florida
Extension Association of
Family and Consumer Sci-
ences, it may be purchased at
the Extension Office by con-
tacting Extension Agent Heidi
Copeland at 342-0187, or
dropping l6y 275 North Mul-
berry Street.
Copeland began distributing


at 6 p.m. on Friday, April 13
and conclude around noon on
Saturday, April 14.
The reason the event runs
through the night is to illus-
trate the point that cancer
never sleeps.
Fundraising teams are cur-
rently being formed.
Each team is comprised of
10-18 members who make a
commitment to help raise
funds for the American Can-
cer Society.
Local businesses are en-
couraged to field a team to
walk during the Relay and 16
teams have already signed up.
The goal for this year is 38
teams.'
Corporate and local spon-
sorships at various levels are
also available.


the cookbooks in early Janu-
ary. She says the books sell
,for $23 and are filled with a
variety of:. nutritious- recipes.
for all age groups.
An example of a few of the
recipes are: Cheese ring with
strawberry preserves, Fish
chowder, Tropical gazpacho
soup, Microwave soy nut brit-
tle, Inside-out ravioli, Kum-
quat flan, Watermelon
spinach salad, Balsamic vinai-
grette, and Bacon and cherry.'
tomato bites.'


RELAY FOR LIFE Co-chairs Ellen Cline and Dana Lastinger were guest speakers at
the January meeting of the Kiwanis Club, discussing the importance of raising funds
for the American Cancer Society.



Extension Agent Offers Tips


TO Use Credit Cards Wisely.
!*. l.. f


MARIE HEINS
Marie Busselle Heins age
88, died Sunday, January 14,
2007 in Tallahassee.
Mrs. Heins was a native of
Chicago, Ill a former resident
of West Palm Beach, in 1990
she moved to Monticello. She
was a member of the First
Presbyterian Church of Monti-
cello and a graduate of Florida
State College for Women.
A Memorial Service will be
held 2:00 P.M. on Wednesday,
January 17, 2007 at the First
Presbyterian Church of Monti-
cello. The family will receive


friends after the memorial
service at the church. In lieu of
flowers donations may be
made to the Jefferson County
Humane Society, 1250 Mamie
Scott Dr., Monticello, Florida
3234.
Mrs. Heins is survived by
her husband Paul Heins of
Monticello, FL., and one
daughter Melinda Ramsey of
Monticello.
Mrs. Heins is preceded in
death by two daughters Can-
dace Heins and Kristina
Hughes of Tallahassee, FL.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Because so many residents
own and carry credit cards,
Family and Consumer Sci-
ences Extension Agent Heidi
Copeland provides tips to use
the cards wisely.
Some helpful tips to use
credit cards include:
*Do not get a card for the
promotional prizes. The
prizes are rarely worth the
cost.
*Shop around. Use multiple
offers to your advantage,
compare the annual percent-
age rate (APR), late payment
penalty fee, "Bonus Deals",
and the like.
Know the rules of your
card. Most cards have some
pretty intricate rules that they
require users to follow. Vio-
late one and you could end up
paying penalty fees, having
your rate raised or damaging
your credit record, which
would increase the costs if
you ever have to borrow
money This means that you
have to read all that fine print
that comes with the card.
*- Have your own rules for


using the card. Decide ahead
of time what the card is for
and how you will pay it off
when you do use it.
*Protect your credit rating.
This is a record of your per-
sonal information of how you
are handling your finances. If
you make any mistakes, they
stay on your record for years.
Read the credit card state-
ment as soon as it comes. Are
all of the charges yours? Are.
you being charged fees, you
don't owe?
*Use a card, and pay the bal-
ance. Evaluate what you need
and distinguish that from
what you want.
*Forgo cash advances.
Cash advances are very ex-
pensive, inefficient way to get
money.
* Know that card companion
exchange information. If you
have more than one credit
card account, make a mistake
with one card and the other
cards could also raise your
rates too.
Do not simply make mini-
mum payments. Making
minimum payments 'might
take years or even decades to
pay off a balance; Don't do it.


Be prepared to stand up
for yourself once in awhile.
Be polite but do not back
down when you talk to the
credit card company espe-
cially if they want to raise
your rates or charge you a
penalty or something. Let
them know you are willing tp
switch companies and take
your business elsewhere.
Look out for those warn-
ing Signals of too much debt.
When balances cannot be
paid off at the end of the
month. The balance is grow-
ing even if you are not charg-
ing. This is bound to spell
financial difficulty.


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DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The trustees of the Geraldine
C.M. Livingston Foundation
made contributed $700 to the
Monticello Boys and Girls
Clubs in December.
The funds were used to pur-
chase winter coats for mem-
bers of the Clubs who were in
need of the coats.
The Foundation has been
making these generous dona-
tions to the local Clubs for
some 10 years. This is the
fifth year that the money has
been used to purchase coats
for the children.
"This has been a Godsend,"
says Gerrold Austin, JES
Club director. "The reason for
purchasing the coats is be-
cause of the great need which
exists," he explained.
The Geraldine C.M. Living-
ston Foundation is the home
of the Continental Field Trial
Club.

Green Club

Volunteers

Increasing

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Friends of Green Industries
Institute (FOGII) have contin-
ued to grow in numbers and
productivity.._
Three new volunteers have
joined just recently for a total
of 36 individuals who have
given time to one or more
-FOGII projects.
The number of paid mem-
bers has also increased, with
a welcome to new member
Ileane Vorce by the group.
Judi Persons, community
outreach coordinator an-
nounces the total volunteer
hours since May is 794.73,
with 163.39 in November
alone.


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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 17, 2007


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 17, 2007 PAGE 9


Lady Warriors Split


FAMU, John Paul Games


Lady Warriors split their
two most recent games.
Coach Daryl Adams reports
that ACA had suffered a ter-
rible loss. One of the Lady
Warriors' leading, rebounders
this season, Mallory Plaines,
will be out of service for the
remainder of the year because
of a knee injury.
Aucilla fell to FAMU 47-
28..
Lisa Bailey led the score
with ten points, seven re-
bounds, two assists, one steal,
two blocks.
Bethany Saunders, six


points, one assist, five steals.
Brittany Hobbs, two points,
three rebounds, one assist.
Lindsey Day, six points,
seven rebounds, two steals,
two blocks.
Nicole Mathis, four points,
six rebounds, one assist, three
steals.
Caitlin Murphy, four re-
bounds, one steal.
Courtney Brasington, two
rebounds; and Rikki Roccanti,
two assists.
The Lady Warriors
squeaked by John Paul for a
32-28 win.


Saunders led the score with
11 points, one assist, four
steals.
Bailey, seven points, five
rebounds, one assist, two:
steals, one block.
Hobbs, six points, two re-
bounds, two assists, two
steals.
Day, six points, six
rebounds, two assists, two
steals, two blocks.
Mathis, two points, two re-
bounds, one steal.
Murphy, seven rebounds,
one assist; and Sarah
Sorensen, one assist.


ZL-
*\in i:-


.. .



t'
'". i;'j '


BETHANY SAUNDERS watches for the opportunity to
pass during a recent ACA game. (Photo by Lynne Saun-
ders)


Maclay squeaked by ACA
JV Girls 32-31in recent
action.
Michaela Roccanti had two
assists, one foul, two
steal/block, and two
turnovers.
Tiffany Brasineton had one
assist, two offensive
rebounds, five 'buls, four
steals/blocks, ano two turn-
overs.
Savannah Williams shot at
14 percent from the field,
dropping in two of 14 at-
tempts, one assist, three of-
fensive and four defensive re-
bounds for a total of seven,
two fouls, three blocks/steals,
and four turnovers,
Chelsea Dobson shot at 30
percent from the field, cinch-
ing three of 10 attempts, and
she shot at 33 percent, drop-
ping in two of six for a total


of eight points, one assist,
seven offensive and three de-
fensive rebounds Ior a total of
10, five fouls, and five
steals/blocks.
Becky Turner shot at 33
percent from the field, drop-
ping in one of three attempts,
and she -shot at 25 percent
from the free-throw line, sink-
ing one of four attempts for a
total of three points, one foul,
two steals/blocks and one
turnover.
Jodie Bradford shot at 27
percent from the field, hitting
three of 11 attempts, and she
shot at 25 percent from the
free-throw line sinking one of
four attempts for total seven
points, four of;:nsive and
eight defensive rebounds for a
total of 12, three fouls, three
steals/blocks, three' turnovers.


.rr .
ANGIE DELVICCHIO is a member of the A-3 team of the
Monticello Mood Swings.



Mood Swings To


Play Glen Arvin


Miranda Wider shot 40 per-
cent from the fieid, dropping
in four of ten attempts, total-
ing eight points, three assists,
two offensive and three de-
fensive rebounds for a total of
five, five fouls, two
steals/blocks and two turn-
overs.
Dana Watt had two fouls;
and Angela McCune shot at
50 percent from the free-
throw line, dropping in one of
two for onepoints, two offen-
sive rebounds and two turn-
overs.



MCA Beaten

By West

Meadows
The Monticello Christian
Academy boys basketball
lost to West Meadows 45-39,
Thursday.
The Chargers have improved
greatly as a team since the
previous game when they lost
by 17 points (70-53) to Vic-
tory Christian.
Luke Lingo led Chargers
with 12 points;. Philip Payne,
11 points; Chip Gallon, ten
points, two buckets were
three-pointers; Ian Morrow,
four points; and Cody
Vowell, two points.
The Chargers face off
against Old Plank Christian
Academy, 5 p.m., Friday,
here.


Tigers Fall

TO Hamilton

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School varsity boys basket-
ball team fell to Hamilton
County 83-72, with 16 turn-
overs, to stand 2-8 on the sea-
son.
Leading the score for JCHS
was Jitavian Benhett with 25
points, six rebounds.
Tim Crumitie, 20 points,
two assists, seven steals.
Paul Huggins, 14 points,
seven rebounds, two steals,
one block.
Jon Dady, five points, four
rebounds, three steals.
Anthony Johnson, five
points, one rebound.
Lucius Wade, one point,
four rebounds.
Jordan Blair, two points,
two rebounds.
The Tigers face NFC, 7:39
p.m., Thursday, there.


ACA Athletes Named rar

Big Bend Leaders 1R
TArLAT 1N14


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Athletes from Aucilla Chri-
tian Academy were named
Big Bend Leaders in the'latest
listing.
Stephen Griffin is #13 with
156 points, an average of 11.1
per game.
Wade Scarberry is #19 with
135, an average of 9.6.
In rebounds, Griffin is #3,
with 125, an average of 8.9.
In assists, Griffin is #1 with
20, an average of 1.4.
In steals, Scarberry is #3,
with 54, an average of 3.9;
Kyle Barnwell, #6, with 45,
an average of 3.2; and Griffin,
#7 with 43, an average of 31.
In girls basketball, scoring,
Lindsey Day #6 with 192, an
average of 11.3.
Mallory Plaines, #11, with
144, an average of 9.6.



Freedom of

the Press is

Ewrybody/ s

Freedwiorn.


In rebounds, Day stands at
#4 with 146, an average of
8.6; Plaines, #8 with 116, an
average of 7.7; and Lisa Bai-
ley, #11 with 112, an average
of 6.6.
In steals, Bailey and Brit-
tany Hobbs are tied at number
ten, both with 52, an average
of 3.0.



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The Monticello Mood
Swings, ladies A-league ten-
nis team, won three of six
matches last week against the
Hell's Angels.
Team #1, Katie Brock and
Lisa Jackson, lost by forfeit.
Team #2, Patty Hardy and
Cindy Wainright, lost the sets
2-6 and 3-6.
Team #3, Angie Delvecchio
and Laura Kirchhoff lost the
sets, 3-6 and 0-6.
Team #4, Susan Goodwin
and substitute player Lorei
Salie, won the first set, 6-2,
lost the second set, 5-7, and


JV Warriors dropped their
recent game with John Paul,
42-24.
Coach Daniel Roccanti said
the warriors did not play well
at all. "They weren't shooting
well and their fundamental
skills were way off," he said.
"Being the first game follow-
ing the holidays, I guess
they're still knocking any
holiday rust buildup off."


won the tiebreaker, 6-1,
Team #5, Lindsey Taylor
and substitute player Susan
Scarboro, who will serve on
the team for the remainder of
the year due to Roslyn Bass
receiving the news that she. is
a mother-to-be, won the sets
7-5 and 7-5.
Team #6, Maxie Miller and
Jennifer Ellis, won the sets,
6-0 and 6-2.
The Mood Swings will face
off against the Glen Arvin
Classics, 9:30 a.m., Thursday
at Tom Brown Park.


A. J. Connell led the score
with eight points; Luke Whit-
mer, four points; Casey' An-
derson three points; and
Stephen Dollar, Brandon
Dunbar, Matthew Harrington,
Wilson Lewis and Alex Dun-
kle, each scored two points.
The Warriors are slated to
square off against Munroe,
4:30 p.m., Friday, there.


F BODYWORKS

FREE
STIMATESp

r -------^ -- ----_--- --__ _------
Two Year Warranty m - A
Plus FREE -
* Intergrated Clear Coat PRI

I Was $500

OW 250SALE

l- - - - - - - -
k ~ JB^,, .H -^-^^^^-"."-^^ ..*^


Insurance ClaimWelomels" I
Vora, trud3 n oiWv6 oo.donoO 4o Wn6A.d
MAMO Auto Poklng & Rdywork ci mes ffi e p t Iri im O f n it Inc *m, honh sad o au a m yq my.


ivaclay Squeaked By


ACA JV Girls 32-31


JV Warriors Fall To

John Paul 42-24


'IRISR








PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 17, 2007


1 4
k e *r from.. .M
kickoff event are from left, Margie Cook, Bobby and


BERT AND NANCY BANKS attended the kickoff event and dinner for the County Relay
for Life. Bert gave a surprise testimonial.


Relay For Life Dinner


Honors Cancer Survivors


SVMS team members Johnny Ellis, Joyce Kinsey, Dana Lastinger ,share a table with
CarQuest team member Travis Bach.


BETTY BARFIELD, Ed
Church Team, taking a


and Brenda Register are members of the
break from serving the Relay kickoff dinner.


The County Relay for Life
held a Kickoff Dinner and
Program Thursday evening at
.the MonticelloOpera House.
"Relay Goes Hollywood In
2007" got off to a good start
with a chicken and rice meal
prepared by members of the
Elizabeth Baptist Church
team.
Father Mal Joplin gave the
Invocation, with Event. Chair
Ellen Cline welcoming the at-
tendees to the event Kickoff
and introducing the American
Cancer Society staff in atten-
dance.
Co-Chair Dana Lastinger
was introduced, and followed
by introducing :the' Steerinig
Committee.
A large screh video was
viewed relating t6-Florida Re-
Slay for Life and what it's all
about.
Sur i\ors %\ere honored and
recognized They offered their
stories v.hioh brought tears to
many an eye.
Team Captain Bill Hopkins
spoke a few words about this


year's event, and George
Hinchliffe stressed the need
to get involved.
Molly Wahl enlightened all
about where the money goes,
noting that only 4.4 percent is
used for management and
services.
Followed by 14.8 percent is
directed for detection; 15.6
percent is for prevention; 16.2
percent is for research; 21.5
percent is directed for fund-
raising; and 27.5 percent is
for patient services.
Total patients served in the
Big Bend Unit for the Sep-
teriber 2005/August 2006
yeai were 217.
52 patients were served
through the Road to Recovery
and Lifeline, with 1,772 total
trips made.
There are six patients at-
tending the Look Good, Feel
Better Session
Se en patients are receipt ing
Reach and Recov er, % sits.
And. si\ children ha\e beer
ser ed b) RO.C.K
Programs.


Elizabeth Baptist


NIGHT AT THE
MUSEUM
(PG)
Fri. 5:00-7:30-9:55 Sat. 12:10-
2:35-5:00-7:30-9:55 Sun. 12:1Q-
2:35-5:00-7:30 Mon. Thurs.
5:00-7:30
NO PASSES
PRIMEVAL
(R)
Fri. 5:10-7:25-9:45 Sat. 12:20-
2:45-5:10-7:25-9:45 Sun. 12:20-
2:45-5:10-7:25 Mon. Thurs.
5:10-7:25
NO PASSES
WE ARE MARSHALL
(PG)
Fri. 3:45-7:05-9:50 Sat. 12:30-
3:45-7:05-9:50 Sun. 12:30-3:45-
7:05 Mon. Thurs. 3:45-7:05
NO PASSES
PURSUIT OF
HAPPINESS
(PG13)
Fri. 4:00-7:10-10:00 Sat. 1:00-
4:00-7:10-10:00 Sun. 1:00-4:00-
7:10 Mon. Thurs. 4:00-7:10
CHARLOTTE'S WEB
(G)
Fri. 4:45-7:15-9:40 Sat. 12:00-
2:20-4:45-7:15-9:40 Sun. 12:00-
2:20-4:45-7:15 Mon.-Thurs.
4:45-7:15
STOMP THE YARD
(PG13) .
Fri. 4:30-7:20-10:10 Sat. 1:20-
4:30-7:20-10:10 Sun. 1:20-4:30-
7:20 Mon. Thurs. 4:30-7:20
NO PASSES
FREEDOM WRITERS
(PG13)
Fri. 4:15-7:00-10:05 Sat. 1:05-
4:15-7:00-10:05 Sun. 1:05-4:15-
7:00 Mon. Thurs. 4:15-7:00
NO PASSES


All new highback seats and
more renova-
S tions on the
way.


JOHN THOMAS WALKER, and his father Bubba are
members of the Elizabeth Baptist Church team for the
Relay for Life Event.

.III 1 1 1


ACS STAFF PARTNER Diane Huggins, Elizabeth Baptist Church member Jim Becker,
collects money from FMB team member Amanda Morris. r


ELIZABETH BAPTIST CHUCH team members Trisha Joiner and Betty Thurman serve
a chicken and rice dinner to Crickett Edwards at the kickoff dinner. (News Photos) -


Got A Cute

Photo?


Send It To Us

And We'll

Share It With

Our Readers!


Kids Dogs *

Strange stuff,

etc.


Monticello

News

P.O. Box 430

Monticello,

FL 32345


"You Can't Be
Without It"


I


I


GRAND OPENING

JANUARY 9, 2007


SIMPLY FIT
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Health Spa- Gym
Featuring:
10 State of the Arts Hydraulic Machines & 10
Rest Stations for a Complete Circuit Training
Program in Just 30 Minutes a Day, 3 Days a Week!
Wolf System Tanning Bed & Solarmax
Facial Tanner
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GRAND OPENING INTRODUCTORY
PRICES THROUGH
JANUARY 31, 2007
CALL 997-7339 FOR MORE INFORMATION
189 E. Valnullt St-cct
Monticcllo, FL
Simply Fi lfor Womcn is a limited liability company
HAVE FUN THIS YEAR
GETTING HEALTHYY!


_____________________________~P~ Whlmr)iW~ :~r'1


ENJOYING the Relay for Life
Jeanette Fountain.


--~-b --LIU


(!


p








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 17, 2007 PAGE 11



. Illihi I F---- I {O] II'L [0] -.


100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work Frame Straightening


WE TAKE THE
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(Located behind Langdale Auto Mall)


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And We're Serious About Stopping It.


Pass It O.
Pass It On.


-A Public Service Messagd From:
Florida
Retail
Federation
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OF FLORIDIMNC.


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We have a Bucket Truck available to set poles and
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Office (850) 948-4019
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Owned & Operated by Andy Rudd
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Melanie Mays


Private lessons, lessons from beginning to advanced in
crochet and knitting board. Call for class times. Crochet
club forming, call for information.
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www.oldfashionedknittingboard.com
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Licensed & insured Lt'-II I I .1


Commercial &
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Sales
Installation


FIRST IN SERVICE
FREE ESTIMATES
TIM. HUNT State License # CACO
Phone: 850-877-4136 2840-B Industrial P
Fax: 850-656-1275 Tallahassee, Florida:
Mobile: 850-251-4308 E-mail: Ihunt@cenlralheatingco


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Lic. & Ins.
Brick &'Block


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TIMBER COMPANY
BUYERS OF PINE AND
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(229)224-4331


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DESIGNER CLOTHES, SHOES,
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CHILDREN'S CLOTHES,
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Bell Mobile Home
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Relevel Tie-downs ~ Permits
Call For FREE Estimates
Kevin Bell 850-948-3372
WE INSTALL METAL ROOFS


SI I' 9 1


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STrust
Properties
220 Tenti St. S'E Steinhatchee, fL 32359
352-498-7770 'ToCC ree 877-498-7770
Pam Wessels Mark Rebin Larry Nichols
Realtor/Broker Realtor Associate Realtor Associate


Northside Mower and
Small Engine Repair
For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub
Cadet, Snapper, Murray & More,
Warranty, Repairs for all makes & models.
Pickup & Delivery Service Available
562-2962


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315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile Off US 19 South

997-2535


GULF COAST & M Transmission
gt he rocks PROFESSIONAL ROOFING METAL Foreign &Domestic
BARTENDING SERVICE, INC. Roof inspections, new roofs, ROOFING 7! -
Christopher D. Geib, Proprietor re-oofs, & repair specialist. All Types Front Wheel Rear Wheel
Phone: (850) 2514147 CCC#1325926 Of Metal Full Drive Train
Folsom Constructing, LLC.850-566-6504 Fu in. Roofing Differential
c s o is nst4 cNE Collin Keaesorlc in stocky Hwy
special Flashings MadeAll Types Warranted*Metal Available Madison, Fl. 32340
Mail: 823 Chestwood Ave. Cut to your desired lengths deliveryy Service Available
Tallahassee, FL 32303 ontherocksbartending@hotniail.com Call Toll-Free 888-393-0335 352-498-0778 Horseshoe Beach, FL 850-973-6677


North Florida Cabinets G1Barineau oSTINTROR A ND ~
& More LLC eating & Air 864NW US221
Conditioning .. ni p Greenville, Fl. 32331
Kitchen Cabinets, Counter Tops NeNae, Neu' Nutner, Pond* Land Clearing* Demoli-
and Vanities. Old Friends. 850-997-2672 Phone: 850-948-7891 tion* Hauling* Site Prep*
Built to last, quality guaranteed. 850694-9130 Road Work*
Built tLi n i guaranteed. 59 MONTICELLO FLORIDA LSAAOC Cell: 850-973-7135 Free Estimates and Consultation
Licensed/Insured 580-4029 LSJAGFAOL.COM Fax: 850-948-2482
SE-mail: Joe Reams, Jr.
850-264-3391 Keeping you comfortable is
hat850-264-3391 e do est. AUTO IARINE joeballreams@msn.com Owner
Lic # CAC057652

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S Have you been Disappointed? Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled Fixtures-
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Serving Leon County for 50 years Connections Tanks Replaced Water heater
YOURS FOR We Do Partiesl Tarot Cards*Palm Readings*Astrology YoURS FOR Repairs All Repairs
Callinfor free questions/
Licensed by County & City-9731404
ONLY $10.00 Mon.-Fri l0anm-pip, Suntl-Spm, 1729 Mahan Drive ONLY $10.00U, U
(850)878-9327

Questions,
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Just call toll-free: -ASSOCIATION
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Help us fight amyotrophic Get the answers you can
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rTiM HUNT


ec~ I
rs!


i


I


I&.]










PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 17, 2007


THE GENERAL IS

FIGHTING MAD!










Lt. Gen. Robert Johnston,
USMC Ret. 'Chief of Staff
of Operation Desert
Storm, is fighting mad.
He's joined MDA's battle
to save lives. The general
knows the enemy life-
threatening diseases.
Join the general. Vol-
unteer to help MDA. Call
your local office or
(800) FIGHTMD.


Muscular Dystrophy Assoc.
www.mdausa.org


LEGAL
IN TIE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY CIVIL
DIVISION CITIFINANCIAL
SERVICES, INC., SUCCESSOR
BY REASON OF MERGER WITH
CITIFINANCIAL SERVICES, INC.
344, LLC, SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO, ASSOCIATES
FINANCIAL SERVICES OF
AMERICA, INC., Plaintiff, vs.
CASE NO. 07-04-CA WILLIAM
SCOTT RANDERSON,
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
OF THE ESTATE OF KIM H.
RANDERSON A/K/A KIM H.
MARTIN, A/K/A KIM
HENDERSON MARTIN,
DECEASED; UNKNOWN HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, TRUSTEES OF KIM H.
RANDERSON A/K/A .KIM H.
MARTIN, A/K/A KIM
HENDERSON MARTIN,
DECEASED; WILLIAM SCOTT
RANDERSON; THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF WILLIAM SCOTT


There's No Such Thing As

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Or get a bite on the Consumer Information
Center website: www.pueblo.gsa.gov


A public service of this publication and the
Consumer Information Center of the U.S. General Services Administration


LEGAL ..: .
RANDERSON; WILLIAM SCOTT
RANDERSON, HEIR; AVERY
TERRELL MARTIN, HEIR;
TRAVIS RANDERSON, HEIR; IF
LIVING, INCLUDING ANY
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID
DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED, AND IF
DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE
UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND
TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS;
CITIFINANCIAL EQUITY
SERVICES, INC.; WHETHER
DISSOLVED OR PRESENTLY
EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH
ANY GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR
TRUSTEES OF SAID
DEFENDANTS) AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR
AGAINST DEFENDANTSS;
UNKNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendant(s). /
NOTICE OF ACTION TO:
WILLIAM SCOTT RANDERSON
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
OF TiHE ESTATE OF KIM H.
RANDERSON A/K/A KIM H.
MARTIN, A/K/A KIM
HENDERSON MARTIN,
DECEASED; UNKNOWN HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, TRUSTEES OF KIM H.
RANDERSON A/K/A KIM H.
MARTIN, A/K/A KIM
HENDERSON MARTIN,
DECEASED; WILLIAM SCOTT
RANDERSON; THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF WILLIAM SCOTT
RANDERSON; WILLIAM SCOTT
RANDERSON, HEIR; AVERY
TERRELL MARTIN, HEIR;
TRAVIS RANDERSON, HEIR; IF
LIVING, INCLUDING ANY
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID
DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED, AND IF
DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE
UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES.
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND
TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANT(S) Whose residence
are/is unknown. YOU ARE
HEREBY required to .file your
answer or written defenses, if any,
in the above proceeding with the
Clerk of this Court, and to serve a
copy thereof upon the plaintiff's
attorney, whose name and address
appears hereon, within thirty days
of the first publication of this
Notice, the nature of this proceeding
begin a suit for foreclosure of
mortgage against the following
described property, to wit: THE
NORTHERLY 165 FEET, MORE
OR LESS, OF A TRACT OF
LAND, MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS; COMMENCE
AT A POINT OF THE EAST
BOUNDARY OF THE RIGHT OF
WAY OF STATE ROAD NO 96
(PINHOOK ROAD), WHERE SAID
ROAD INTERSECTS THE
SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE
OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER
OF THE NORTHWEST
QUARTER OF SECTION, 8,
TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 4
EAST, AND RUNNING EAST
ALONG SAID SOUTHERN
BOUNDARY LINE, 20 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES
EAST 210 FEET; THENCE EAST
56 FEET; THENCE NORTH 351
FEET; THENCE WEST 261 FEET,
MORE OR LESS, TO THE EAST
BOUNDARY OF THE RIGHT OF
WAY OF SAID STATE ROAD NO.
96; THENCE SOUTHERLY 562
FEET, MORE, OR LESS. ALONG
THE EASTERN BOUNDARY OF
THE RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE
ROAD NO. 96, TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING; BEING IN
SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE
NORTHWEST QUARTER OF
SECTION 8 TOWNSHIP I
SOUTH, RANGE 4 EAST,
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA. To include a: Unknown
Unknown, VIN Unknown and
Unknown A/K/A 9215


: WAUKEENAH HWY
MONTICELLO, FL 32344 If you
fail to file your answer or written
defenses in the above proceeding, on
plaintiffs attorney, a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint or
Petition. DATED at JEFFERSON
County this 10 day of January,
2007. Clerk of Circuit Court By
Deputy Clerk Norm L. Wilkins In
accordance with the American with
Disabilities Act of 1990, person
needing a special accommodation to
participate in this proceeding
should contact the ASA Coordinator
no later than seven (7) days prior to
the proceedings. If hearing
impaired, please call (800) 955-9771
(TDD) or (800) 955-8770 (voice), via
Florida Relay Service. Law Offices
of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King
Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Tel (813) 915-8660 Fax (813)
915-0559 Attorney for Plaintiff
R/D 1/17,1/24,07,c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION CASE NO. 07-02-CA
MELVIN WILLIS, Plaintiff, vs.
UNKNOWN SPOUSES, LINEAL
DESCENDANTS, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND
ALL OTHER CLAIMANTS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST TURNER
W. KINSEY, deceased; Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION TO:
Defendants UNKNOWN SPOUSES,
LINEAL DESCENDANTS, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND
ALL OTHER CLAIMANTS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST TURNER
W. KINSEY, DECEASED.
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN: You
are hereby notified that an action to
quiet title to the following real
property in JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA:
DESCRIPTION: All that property
in the Northeast Quarter of the
Northwest Quater of Section 7,
Township 1 North, Range 6 East,
Jefferson County, Florida lying
North of U.S. Highway 90 (State
Road 10). LESS AND EXCEPT the
following described property:
(OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK, 252,
PAGE 81) Begin at the center of a
cement culvert located on the
Northerly side of U.S. Highway 90
as the Point Of Beginning, the same
being station 351+45.on the State
Road Department survey map, and
run thence North to the Northerly
right of way boundary of said
Highway 90 run thence Easterly
along said Northerly boundary of
said Highway, a distance of 85 feet
for the POINT OF BEGINNING of
the lands herein described; From
said Point Of Beginning, run
Easterly along the Northerly right
of way of said Highway 90, a
distance of 315 feet, thence
Northerly and perpendicular to said
right of way, a distance of 210 feet,
thence run Westerly and parallel
with said Highway 90, a distance of
315 feet, thence run Southerly to
said Highway 90 right of way
boundary, containing 1 V2 acres,
more of less. ALSO LESS AND
EXCEPT the following described


property; ur r mln L 1 LUIR '
BOOK, PAGE 265) Beginning at a
point over the Western most culvert
in Section 7, Township 1 North,
Range 6 East, where the same
crosses U.S. Highway #90 (also
known as State Road #10) and in the
center of said highway, thence
running Southerly and along the
center of said Highway, a distance
of 564 feet, thence running
Northerly and perpendicular to said
Highway to the Northerly right of
way boundary of said Highway for
the POINT OF BEGINNING of the
land herein conveyed: and from
said Point Of Beginning of the land
herein conveyed run thence
Northerly and perpendicular to said
Highway center, a distance of 210
feet, thence run Southeasterly and
parallel with said Highway center
420 feet thence run Southwesterly
and perpendicular to said Highway
center 210 feet and to the Northerly
right of way boundary of said
Highway, thence run Northwesterly
and along said Northerly right of
way boundary, a distance of 420
feet, more or less, and to the POINT
OF BEGINNING of the lands
herein conveyed. ALSO LESS AND
EXCEPT 200 foot right of way of
U.S. highway 90. ALSO LESS AND
EXCEPT the following described
property: (NEW PARCEL)
COMMENCE at the Southwest
corner of the Northeast Quarter of
the Northwest Quarter of Section 7,
Township 1 North, Range 6 East,
Jefferson County, Florida and run
North 89 degrees 38 minutes 22
seconds East 789.52 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING, thence
from said POINT OF BEGINNING
continue North 89 degrees 38
minutes 22 seconds East 191.63 feet
to a point, thence North 59 degrees
12 minutes 00 seconds West 163.97
feet to a point, thence South 30
degrees 48 minutes 00 seconds West
99.16 feet to: the POINT OF
BEGINNING, containing 0.19 acre,
more or less, has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on CHARLES F. OTTO,
ESQ. of the law offices of
STRALEY & OTTO, P.A., whose
.address is 2699 Stirling Road, Suite
C-207, Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33312, on or before
2007, and file the original with the
Clerk of this court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorney or
immediately thereafter, otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint. WITNESS my hand and
seal of this court this 4th day of
January, 2007. Clerk of Court By:
Norm L. Wilkins
10/10/17/07,c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR


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Call Toll-Free (800)231-9679


Blueprint To Your Dreams!

At Pennyworth Homes we can make building your

dream home a reality.

SServing North Florida
& South Georgia
since 1977


For Sale by First United Methodist Church 2400 sq.
ft. home at 895 West Washington Street. This former
Methodist Parsonage with split floor plan has 4 bed-
rooms and 3 1/2 baths, refinished hardwood floors.
New tile floors in kitchen, laundry and baths, carpet
in the family room and master bedroom. Bathrooms
newly renovated. Wood stove insert in fireplace.
Large lot landscaped with magnolias, camellias, crepe
myrtles and azaleas. Large deck and screened porch.
$259,500. For more information
call 997-5545


JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION File
Number: 06-117-PR IN RE:
ESTATE OF HELEN COVER
REEVES, Deceased. NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION The
administration of the estate of
HELEN COVER REEVES,
deceased, File Number 06-117-PR is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Jefferson County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Jefferson County Courthouse,
Room 10, Monticello, Florida
32344. The name and address of the
personal representative and of the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below. ALL
INTERESTED PERSONS ARE
NOTIFIED THAT: All persons on
whom this notice is served who have
objections that challenge the
validity of the will, the qualifications
of the personal representative,
venue, or jurisdiction of this Court
are required to file their objections
with this Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM. All creditors of the
decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of
this notice is served within three
months after the date of the first
publication of this notice must file
their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM. All other creditors of
the decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is January 10, 2007.
Attorney For Personal
Representative: T. BUCKINGHAM
BIRD P.O. Box 247 Monticello, FL
32345 850-997-3503 FL Bar ID #
0006176 HENRY LAWRENCE
REEVES 2017 Helms Avenue
Leesburg, Florida 34748
1/10,17/07,c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION CASE NO., 07-02-CA


+








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 17, 2007 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$9.00
Each Additional Line....S1.25
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568
.1


LEGAL

MELVIN WILLIS, Plaintiff, vs.
UNKNOWN SPOUSES, LINEAL
DESCENDANTS, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND
ALL OTHER CLAIMANTS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST TURNER
W. KINSEY, deceased; Defendants.
AFFIDAVIT OF DILIGENT
SEARCH AND INQUIRY STATE
OF FLORIDA COUNTY OF
BROWARD Before me, the
undersigned authority, personally
appeared CHARLES F. OTTO,
ESQ., first being duly sworn,
deposes and says: 1. Affiant is the
attorney for Plaintiff in this action
and, as such, has personal
knowledge and authority to make
this affidavit. 2. Affiant has made a
diligent search and inquiry to locate
and discover the names of
Defendants UNKNOWN SPOUSES,
LINEAL DESCENDANTS, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEE, AND
ALL OTHER CLAIMANTS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST TURNER
W. KINSEY, DECEASED. 3.
Despite the above efforts of Affiant
as set forth hereinabove, Affiant has
been unable to determine the
names, residences, or whereabouts
of, or obtain personal service on
Defendants UNKNOWN SPOUSES,
LINEAL DESCENDANTS, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEE, AND
ALL OTHER CLAIMANTS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST TURNER
W. KINSEY, DECEASED. 4. It is
unknown whether or not the
unknown parties are over the age of
18 years. 5. Affiant knows of no one
and believes that there are no
persons in Florida on whom service
of process would bind Defendants
UNKNOWN SPOUSES, LINEAL
DESCENDANTS, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEE, AND
ALL OTHER CLAIMANTS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST TURNER
W. KINSEY, DECEASED. 8.
Affiant believes that Defendants
UNKNOWN SPOUSES, LINEAL
DESCENDANTS, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEE, AND
ALL OTHER CLAIMANTS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST TURNER
W. KINSEY, DECEASED, are or
may be interested in the subject
matter of this cause and who may
claim by, through, under, or against
TURNER W. KINSEY,
DECEASED, as heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, or other
claimants thereof and who after
diligent search and inquiry as
described above, are unknown to
Affiant. FURTHER AFFIANT
SAYETH NAUGHT. CHARLES F.
OTTO, ESQ. SWORN to subscribed
before me this 29th day of
December, 2006. JACUELINE
VILLALOBOS Notary Public, State
of Florida My Commission #DD
333589 EXPIRES: October 27, 2008
Bonded Thru Notary Public
underwriters Personally known or
produced identification
Type of identification produced

1/10,17,07,c

HELP WANTED
Adjunct Instructor for adult
education classes needed at
North Florida Community
College Career and Technical
Center. Primary teaching
assignment is instruction of
special needs students and
includes the following classes:
Adult Basic Education, GED
Preparation, Vocational
Preparatory Instruction, and
Workplace Readiness Skills. In


HELPZ lIED LOST


addition to teaching duties,
position requires data collection
and reporting. 20 hours per
week, Monday through
Thursday, between 9 AM and
4:30 PM. Must have Bachelors
Degree with certification for
serving special needs students.
Applicant must have strong
computer and organizational
skills. Application is available
online at www.nfcc.edu. Send
application and resume to
NFCC Human Resources, 325
NW Turner Davis Drive,
Madison, FL 32340. Questions?
Call 850-973-1615 or email
andersenk@nfcc.edu EOE
R/D1/5,10,1217,c
Food Service Personnel/ Cook
for Correctional feeding
program food production
experience clean background &
drug screening required benefits
call Ms. Cox 850-948-6940
R/D 1/5,10,12,17,c
Part-time Accountant or
experienced Bookkeeper for
small business. Good working
environment. Must know Quick
Books. 322-6600.
11/17,TFN,c

SERVICES
Let 2007 be the year you come
back to church. Christ
Episcopal Church, three blocks
N of the courthouse. Sunday
services at 8:30 and 11:00 AM.
997-4116.
l/17,c
Child care & house cleaning as
well as tutoring provided. Call
997-6582 Michelle
R/D 1/12,17,pd
If you have a child attending
FSU/FAMU high schools, and
carpooling is not working, for
an affordable fee, you have an
option. Call Freeman Davis
510-5162, 421-8060.
R/D 1/17,19,24,26,31,2/2,pd
LPN, retired- will care for
elderly patient. Call Joan
948-2788
R/D1/10,12,17,19,24,26,31,2/2,
Child Care Services- infant to 3
years old. Reasonably low
prices. In my home. 997-5498
11/1,TFN,c

Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
new menopausal products.
Jackson's Drug Store.
5/12 tfn, c
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd, 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
TFN


REWARD!!! Deer Antlers on hwy.
19 South 12/31/06 or 12/31/06
933-3975.
R/D 1/10,12,pd
Bull dog mix male, black/white,
short tail, 90 Ibs. Old Lloyd Rd @
Casa Bianca. 997-2063
R/D 1/12,17

FOUND
Keys on green key ring found
Sunday 11/26/06 on Lake Road
near Tecumseh Rd. Call Debbie
at 997-3568
11/29,12/1,6,tfn,nc

FREE
Free oak desk 3'dx5'wx29"h
w/chair needs work on top rest
in good condition. Can be seen
at 1035 S. Mulberry St. call
997-2328
1/17,nc


AUTOMOTIVE
2003 Ram 1500 one owner 5.7
Hemi V8 Quad cab only 26,000
miles cloth, CD & cassette
keyless remote Call Anthony @
(800)217-8955
R/D l/17,c
2001 Toyota Camry gets 24
miles to the gallon CD &
cassette cloth seats only 3,000
miles Call Anthony @ (800)
217-8955
R/D 1,17,c
2001 Mitsubishi Montero Sport
LE SUV. Great condition. Retail
$8,890 sell for $7,950. 997-2232
R/D 1/10,12,17,19,pd
1996 Ford F-350 Diesel
Crewcab $5,000 O.B.O. No calls
after 9:00 pm please 251-2237.
1/10,TFN,nc
1989 International Dump
Truck. 18CY. Tandem Axles.
$18,000. 251-4.37, 997-0901.
R/D 12/6,tfn,nc
1996 Ford Ranger XLT
Supercab 2wd 4.0 V6 127K AC
AT Toolbox Needs some minor
work, but driveable now. $3,000
251-0763 8am -8pm
9/27.TFN,nc

FOR SALE
Sheds- custom built storage
sheds. See display on Hwy 221
o North Greenville. Call Bob
242-9342
R/D1/10,12,17,19,24,26,31,2/2,7,
9,14,16,21,23,28,3/2,7,9,14,16,
Pool- above ground 15x30 Oval-
w/deck & Jacuzzi- 5 yrs old.
$500, you move. 997-6072,
545-1698.
R/D 1/5,10,12,17,pd
Pool Table- Like new. 8 ft.
furniture quality, oak finish. 1.2
in. slate, green felt, woven
leather pockets with full set of
cues. Ping Pong top available.
Asking $1,500.00 Call Mike
997-3975.
R/D 1/5,10,12,17,pd
,Bank Foreclosures! Homes from
$10,000! 1-3 BR available!
Repos, REO's, HUD, FHA, etc.
These homes must sell! Listings


NURSE MANGER
MEDICAL/ONCOLOGY
$5000 RECRUITMENT INCENTIVE
Archbold Memorial Hospital, in Thomasville, GA is
currently seeking qualified applicants for the above
full-time position. Five years of nursing experience with
two years of management experience.
BSN preferred. CONTACT: Nurse Recruiter
Phone: 229-228-2713, FAX: 229-551-8733
Or email rtaylor@archbold.org.
Visit our website at www.archbold.org
EOE


Joann Bridges Academy in Greenville, FL

S . is currently seeking:
Special Education Teacher (ESE)
The candidate must be certified by the State Board of Education, hold a
certificate as a Special Education Teacher and be certified in a designated subject
area. Applicant will have to successfully pass a background screening.
Please fax your resume to the attention of Renee Johnson. Lead Teacher (850)
S 948-4227 or call (850) 948-4220 for more information.

Mental Health Therapist
The Therapist will provide individual, family, and group psychotherapy and
develop specific treatment goals for the youth. This person must be able to
document appropriate clinical information in the medical record in a timely
manner.
Applicants must have graduated from any accredited college or university with a
master's degree in social work. counseling and guidance, psychology or human
services as well as a successful background check. Experience working with
clients in a facility setting is preferable
Please fax your resume to the attention of Ms. Mobley. Facility Administrator
at (850) 948-4227 or call (850) 948-4220 for more information.
UJOANN BRIDGES ACADEMY
Youth Services International Southeastern
Programs, Inc.
950 S.W. Greenville Hills Road, Greenville. Florida 32331
(850) 948-4220 Fax: (850) 948-4227


KELLY AND KELLY
PROPERTIES


Pecan Hill
Subdivision


LOTS


FOR


SALE

STUNNING

CITY
SUBDIVISION

BUY 5 LOTS

AT $50,000

EACH

20 lots

available

with

infrastructure


VIRGINIA

BLOW
Broker Associate
850.509.1844

Each Office Is Independently Owned and Operated


5VMS, Inc.

is accepting applications for a Maintenance
Technician to work on State Roads out of the
Monticello, Florida office. This is a full time
entry level position that includes, but not
limited to, hurricane disaster response,
landscaping, litter removal, and sign repair
replacement. Applicant must have a valid
Florida's driver's license with a safe driving
record, This position requires a background
check & drug testing. Starting salary $9.50 an
hour. Benefits available upon completion of
probation. Apply at 1455 N. Jefferson Street,
Monticello, FL. (850) 997-5000.


Housing Vouchers


S \ We accept all vouchers

:, 2/2 $615 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 $50 dep.

Pool & Youth Activities i

575-6571




Serious About Sellinq?
List today!




Homes That "Tal;k"Just Sell Faster


- ----


FOR SALE
call (800) 425-1620 ext. 4237.
1/17,19,fc

Queen pillow-Top Mattress set.
New in plastic with warranty,
can deliver $129. 850-222-9879
12/6,TFN,c
New King PillowtopChiro Rest
Mattress Set still sealed w/
warranty. $225. (850) 425-8374
12/6,tfn,c
SOLID WOOD Cherry sleigh
bed Brand New in box. $275.
850-545-7112
12/6,TFN,c
Micro-Fiber sofa and lovseat.
$450. Earth tone, hardwood
frame, lifetime warranty, new in
crate, delivery available.
850-222-2113.
12/6TFN,c
FOR RENT ":
House- 2-BDR, 1-BTH, Lament,
old, very private $500.00 mth
about acre 519-4528 Plus
Security dep.
R/D 1/10,12,17,pd
Mobile home- 2 BR near 1-10
$475. mth Modular- 3 BR near
JCKC $675. mth 421-3911
R/D 1/12,17,19,247,26,31,pd
1 RM efficiency Apt $300 per
month 997-6492. Leave mess.
R/D 1/17,c

REAL ESTATE
Nobles Subdivision- Newly
renovated 3/1 total under roof
1710 sqft. New doors- vinyl
windows -CHA- carpet Fenced
150x100 lot. Well landscaped
owner/REaltor $118,700 O.B.O.-
997-2973, 997-6806
R/D 11/15, FN,c
* LAND AUCTION 300 Props
Must be Sold! Low Down / E-Z
Financing. Free Catalog (800)
937-1603
www.LANDAUCTION.COM
NRLL East: AB2509, Bulziuk:
AU3448, Johnston: AU3449,
Mauk: AU3447
1/17,19,fc


Property Management Services!!!
Great Rentals
2/1 1/2 bath mobile home east of
town on 5 acres $650/month
2 bedroom cabin in the woods $750 mo


Wooded Tract 2.09 hillside acres east of town
on graded County Road $30,400

Just Listed!! 1 bedroom cabin on 4+acres,
screened porch, covered deck, woods, creek
a very pleasant place $117,500

Lloyd Acres on a wooded hillside a 3 bedroom 2
bath modular home with oak floors, fireplace and
lots of very nice extras including shop for $87,500

Historic Budd House built ca 1882 by commu-
nity leader of the day for his family. Lovely wood
work, high ceilings, spacious rooms, grand fire-
places, marvelous porches, currently 4 bedrooms
and 2 baths $355,000

Waterfront Home!! Like New, roomy, 3 bedroom
2 bath home with big carport, nice shed with 5
acres on very nice lake near 1-10 and US 19
$385,000 See it at www.TimPeary.com

Amazinq Buy!!! Mixed Use Property 12 plus
partially cleared acres on US 19 south land use
designation permits 4 houses per acre near Den-
nis' Trading post only $36,500 per acre

New Listing 13.29.acres some wooded some
open $5,000 per acre

Terrific Location 3 bedroom 2 bath doublewide
with fireplace, big porch, garage, shed, above
ground pool, with big trees, fence paddocks, on
county maintained paved Cherry Tree Lane now
$127,500

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly wooded


acres Only $36,500


Pasture and Pecans 5-10 lovely acres on paved
road $15,500 per acre Very nice property, good
deed restrictions

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Country Living at it's Best! REDUCED Com-
fortable 4 bedroom 3 bath home on five fenced
acres with guest cottage w/bath, 2 car garage, big
shop, pasture 100 pecan trees and a nice pool
Only $365,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South near
Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Waukeenah Highway 27.99 acres good home
site fenced pasture $545,000

Aucilla Shores 5 level wooded acres $75,000

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath doublewide
with nice deck, fenced yard on 1 acre $73,500


Help! Serious Buyers Looking
for::
Small Farm 125-350 acres for
grand kids
-20-130 acres investment for
2 brothers

Realtor Tim Peary

850-997-4340
See all our listings at
www.TimPeary.com


Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


REALTOR


(850) 997-4340


-


;;h










PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 17, 2007

Shelter Director Says Pets

Waiting For Good Homes


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Currently 102 animals, re-
side at the animal shelter, in-
cluding 24 cats. over one
year; 47 kittens, under one
year; 20 dogs, over one year;
and 11 puppies, under one
year.
There are four animals in
foster care, including two
dogs and one horse at the
home of Treasurer Margaret
McMurray, and one dog at
Veterinary -associates, who
had been returned from a fos-
ter home.
There were 15 animals
adopted during the month,


they include; two cats, two
dogs and two puppies from
the shelter; and three kittens,
two dogs and four puppies at
Petsmart.
Director Xan Baker said
there were four animals hu-
manely released during the
month, one cat to a disabled
girl who loves it dearly, two
cats to a supervised feral col-
ony; and one dog to a veteri-
nary technician because the
animal had special needs and
needed immediate medical at-
tention that she was able to
provide, and she would con-
tinue to do so for as long as
the dog needed it.
There were also five ani-
mals returned "to the shelter


during the month, including
four yellow labs, two of
which at McMurray's home
in foster care, and two back at
the shelter; and one cat was
returned. Baker said the girl
adopted the cat a couple of
years ago from the shelter,
was going to college and had
no one to care for it, so she re-
'turned it to the shelter so it
would be taken care of.
Three canines had to be
euthanized during the month,
one for sever aggressiveness
and the other two for heavy
infestations of heart worms.
She talked about those ani-
mals still available for adop-
tion at the shelter, "The
average age of our kittens is
between five and 12 months.
There are only about 12 that
are ten weeks to four months.
Most of our cats are of an
adult size, which makes them
harder to place.
"All of our cats are very col-
orful, there are a large variety
of colors, some very
common, but most are very
different or unique," said
Baker. "They all have short
hair, but there are two or three
that have a medium length
coat. Most of them are very
socialized friendly and play-
ful. There are a few that need
a little more hands-on, but
they are coming around."
She addressed the canines
of the shelter, "The average
age of our puppies is about
six to ten months, but we do
have a few that just celebrated
their first birthday. There are
six puppies that are three
months old, five are chow
mixes with soft, long curly
coats, and they are all black.
"The other three are a Bor-
der Collie mix with a smooth
coat," she said. "Then they
go up from there beginning at
six months old. This makes
them hard to place because
they are big and playful and
they don't have all their man-
ners, but'we are working with
them.
"All of our adult dogs are
well-behaved and sweet," she
added. "We have a great se-
lection of breeds, colors and
sizes with all four dogs.
She concluded that she des-
perately needs new ideas on
how to help these animals
find new homes.
Anyone with suggestions or
interested in adopting any of
the animals, can contact the
shelter at 342-0144.


MY NAME IS BOBBY. I am grey, smoke, and white, and
have all my shots. I'm neutered, playful and frisky.
Won't you take me home? (News Photo)


KEN WISNEWSKI and Siera'Alencikas check out a pet,
at a recent Humane Society adoptable event. (News
Photo)


HK'eartS-1 -

I'-3'A
.1ri f


WALK-IN

BATH TUB


Cal Nw1'9 08-1827


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Big Bend Hospice (BBH)
recently appointed Rebecca
"Becky" Baker Harp, RN to
serve as a nurse in Jefferson
County.
The daughter of Bert and
Jim Baker, Harp earned her
Bachelor's of Science in
Nursing from Auburn Univer-
sity in Montgomery, AL. in
1988.
She brings extensive nurs-
ing experience to BBH.
Prior to joining BBH, she
nursed in the CCU at Arch-
bold Hospital, was a public
health nurse with the Jeffer-
son County Health Depart-
ment, nursed in the
cardiovascular surgical inten-
sive care at Tallahassee Me--


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

December rainfall in the-
County was at 6.26 inches, the
highest of any of the counties
-comprising the Suwannee
-River Water Management Dis-
trict.
Counties in the District in-
clude: Alachua, Baker, Brad-
ford, Columbia, Dixie,
Gilchrist, Hamilton, Jefferson,
Lafayette, Levy, Madison, Su-
wannee, Taylor and Union.
Average rainfall in Decem-
ber for Jefferson County is
4.25 inches.
The District received on av-
erage 4.94 inches of rain dur-
ing December, an increase of
56 percent over the average
December rainfall of 3.17
inches.
As of Dec. 31, the District




GfT



IN THE


SWIM


.morial Hospital, and was a
home health nurse with
TMH's Home Health Care.
"Hospice nursing provides
an opportunity and challenge
that no other form of nursing
offers.
"I am so honored to provide
the comfort and care that is
needed by our hospice pa-
tients and their families," said
Harp. '
"Being a part of BBH, the
original hometown hospice
for Jefferson County, and
continuing the tradition ex-
cellence is a privilege," she
adds.
Harp made Monticello her
home 18 years ago.
She and her son JT, a sec-
ond grade student at Aucilla
Christian Academy, enjoy
spending time with family
and friends, going to the
beach, and traveling.


had a rainfall deficit of 14,54
inches
The year ending Dec. 31, is
the fifth driest year since 1931.
The Aucilla River at La-
mont was at 46.1 inches
The Governing Board de-
clared a Phase I Water Short-
age Advisory Nov. 14, 2006,
requesting voluntary reduc-
tions in water use by all Dis-
trict water users.
This advisory remains in ef-
fect.
Water is conserved by using
the minimum amount needed
for specific applications, and
by irrigating lawns, plants, and
crops only when necessary,
and in the morning before 10
a.m. and in the evening hours
after 4 p.m., when lower tem-
perature and wind velocity re-
duce the amount of water lost
to evaporation.


Help us fight amyotrophic
lateral sclerOsis,.better known
as Lop-Gehrlg's disease.
Muscular Dystrophy Assocation
1-0-572-717- ww*.mdauan.org


How TO KEEP
YOUR KIDS
FREE OF DRUGS.



Rule


#7.


Educate

Yourself.

It's not a matter of
learning the latest
street talk. It's a mat-
ter of learning why
crack is so dangerous.
That marijuana can
often lead to hard
'drugs. That every
illegal drug has the
potential of causing
catastrophic damage
to your child. To learn
more about drugs and
how to talk with your
kids about the subject,
call for a free parent's
handbook.

1-800-624-0100










With your help,
MDA is building a
tomorrow without
neuromuscular diseases.

1-800-572-1717

Muscular-Dystrophy Association
www.mdausa.org


2501 E. Shotwel Street Bainbridge, GA




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leather 23knie car
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stepside, Ithr, sunroof, loaded, 19k, at, cd, clean, all power
W !j~'"Q~ $11 Oa'


at sunroof, x-clean 13k, reg cab, nice truck
.**685, *Mfa.


CA.] Cc Rer m oC 2A s lssnen "rarmerA Coepary Al nqhr mr'cry')


-AFFORDABLE.^
ORDABLE DENTURES


$500.00
#510 #520
Complete Upper and Lower Dentures

BEACHTON DENTURE CLINIC
NOW OFFERS
SAME DAY SERVICE
ON
DENTURES, ACRYUC PARTIAL, REUNES
REPAIRS AND EXTRACTIONS
BY APPOINTMENT
WILLIAM T. MCFATTER, III, D.D.S., P.C.
__ 0 ^OFFICE HOURS:
S. 1-800-521-7275 :00 4:30
NO CHECKS
HWY. 319 (1 1/2 Miles Inside Ga. State Line) -


* Certain Insurance Companies Arc Paying 1.00,.,!!!
Start the New Year right!

Join Curves today!
2 Locations to serve you


14815 US Hwy 19S
Thomasville, GA
229-228-1899


2020 W. l.Pcnsicola St
or Tallahassec, Fl
850-575-5ill'


I Happy NeBhIw Year! I


Becky Harp Named

Hospice Nurse Here


December Rain Here

Greatest In District


It you know
a child with
muscular dystrophy
who can benefit
from a special
getaway, tell him
or her about MDA
summer camps.
They're fun and free!


~i
i.
4ru


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