Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00168
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: January 10, 2007
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00168
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text









Labor
Shortage

Opens Doors

Editorial, Page 4


Camellia Circle
Refurbishes

Ornaments

Story, Photos, Page 6
I 1111 1


Clerk Of Court
Farewell
Party Photos

Photos, Page 10


Good Turnout
Expected For
MLK Activities

Story, page 14


Wednesday Morning


Monticello


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


139TH YEAR NO. 2, 50 CENTS


Sws

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 2007


Rule Sets Share




of Road Costs




For Developers


Projects Of Regional

Impact Not Affected


MOTORISTS coming into Monticello from the west no doubt have noticed the new city
limit sign on the south side of US 90. Not only is the sign new, but it's located more
than a quarter mile farther west than the old city limit sign, an indication of the city's
growing boundaries through annexation. (News Photo)


Planners' Attendance,

Attie e Assesse


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Commissioners have re-
quested the attendance records
of Planning Commission mem-
bers,, with an eye to possibly
replacing planners with high
absenteeism.
The attendance -- or lack
thereof -- of Planning Com-
mission members at meetings
and workshops is an issue that
has surfaced periodically in re-
cent years.
It'surfaced again Dec. 21,
when planner Bud Wheeler
complained to county commis-
sioners about the poor atten-
dance and sometimes
unprofessional attire of some
of his colleagues.
"We need people who are
dedicated and who come regu-
larly to meetings and work-
shops," Wheeler said. "The
attendance of some people on
the Planning Commission is
atrocious."
The Planning Commission,
he pointed out, performs a job
that is critically important to
the county, in terms of plan-
ning and zoning decisions.
"We can ruin this county in
short order or we can make it
better," said Wheeler, who has
served on the Planning Com-
mission for nine years. "I don't
want to see this.place screwed
up."
He reminded commissioners
that the rules state that missing
three consecutive meetings is
cause for removal.
"We have some people on
the board who have gone way
beyond that," Wheeler said.
"They don't show up and when
they do, they don't even have
pencil and paper or the docu-
ments. They participate in the
discussions ad-lib. I tell it how
it is."
What's more, the casual at-
tire that some planners wore to
meeting, including cutoff jeans
and sandals, was inappropriate
for the conduct of county busi-
ness, he said.
"I don't mean they should
wear suits to meetings,"


Wheeler said. "But I think ap-
propriate clothes should be
worn. I'm not trying to be
mean spirited, but I believe I'm
on the right track."
Planning Commission mem-
bers are appointed by county


commissioners and serve at the
pleasure of the latter. Rarely, if
ever, however, have planners
been removed from the posi-
tion in the past, given the diffi-
culty that commissioners say
(See Planners, Page 2)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

County commissioners' in
recent weeks adopted an
ordinance that aims to mitigate
the impacts of development on
roadways through the
cooperative efforts of ,the
public and private sectors.
Known as the County
.'Px-oportionate Fair-Share
Program, the ordinance allows
developers to proceed with
projects despite the failure of
transportation concurrency,
provided certain conditions are
met and developers share in
the costs of the needed road
improvements.
Concurrency requires that
the appropriate infrastructures
be in place before a
development is approved.
The ordinance, among other
things, allows the county,
under certain circumstances,
"to expedite transportation
improvements by
supplementing funds currently
allocated for transportation
improvements in the Capital
Improvement Element (CIE)"
of the Comprehensive Plan.


It also allows the county to
coordinate efforts with the city
and the state for the mitigation
of roads that are impacted by
development but that are not in
the county's jurisdiction.
The Proportionate Fair-Share
Program applies to all
developments that lack
capacity to satisfy
transportation concurrency on
state or county roads. It does
not apply to developments of
regional impact (DRIs) or to
developments exempted from
the requirement by state law or
by county code.
Proportionate fair-share miti-
gation for concurrency impacts
may, according to the ordi-
nance, "include, without limi-
tation, separately or collec-
tively, private funds, contribu-
tions of land, and construction
and contribution of facilities."
The ordinance provides a
formula for the calculation of
the proportionate fair-share
contribution.
The formula takes into ac-
count such variables as the cu-
mulative number of trips that
are expected to reach road-
ways from the proposed devel-
opment during peak hours and


the construction costs of the
improvements that are neces-
sary to maintain the desired
level of service on the
roadway.
The ordinance prohibits re-
quiring that a development pay
more than its proportionate fair'
share.
Payment of the proportionate
fair-share contribution is due
in full prior to issuance of the
final development order or the
recording of the final plat and
will not be refundable.
Planning Attorney Scott
Shirley, who prepared the or-
dinance for commissioners,
explained that adoption of the
ordinance was a state require-
ment. As such, commissioners
really had very little say in the
matter, he said.
Furthermore, he expected
that lawmakers would ,make
changes to the proportionate
fair-share contribution in the
coming legislative session, as
problems had already surfaced
in other counties where the
rule was applied, he said.
Shirley added that he ex-
pected he would have to come
before commissioners again
with an amended ordinance in
the not too distant future, if
legislators proceeded with the
expected changes.
The board approved the
measure unanimously.


Officials Approve Small


Scale Comp Plan Change


BUD WHEELER, a member of the Planning Commission
for nine years, complained about the absenteeism and
lack of proper attire on the part of some of his colt
leagues. Talking with him is Commission Chairman
Junior Tuten. (News Photo)


Building Permits Slow

During December '06


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Building permits dropped
significantly in December,
compared with the same
month in 2005, a reflection of
both the continuing slump in
the housing market and the
time of year.
Building Inspector Wallace
Bullock said Tuesday that the
general downturn in the hous-
ing market is definitely having
a local impact. But he added
that this time of year building
activity tends to be slow, as
people wait to see how their fi-
nances will be before embark-
ing on new projects.
"Everybody's sitting back
and waiting now," Bullock


said.
Usually, spring brings an up-
surge in building activity, he
said.
Too, he said, new construc-
tion, and home repairs and ad-
ditions, tend to seesaw in
relation to each other. Nor-
mally, when new constructions
go up, additions and repairs go
down, Bullock said. And vice
versa.
"It seems to fluctuate," he
said.
The latest month-to-month
comparison released by his of-
fice for December 2005 and
December 2006 show a total of
29 permits issued last month,
compared with 51 issued dur-
ing the same month in 2005.
Total valuation likewise
(See Building, Page 2)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

County officials in recent
weeks approved a Comprehen-
sive Plan amendment that pos-
sibly paves the way for a new
hotel fo locate near the inter-
state.
Operators of a hotel, at least,
have reportedly expressed an
interest in purchasing part of
the property, a 19.28-acre par-
cel off Nash Road and US 19
South.
The land-use change, which
the Planning Commission rec-
ommended and the County
Commission approved Dec.
21, rezones the parcel from
mixed-use business residential
to mixed-use business inter-
change.
Mixed-use business residen-
tial allows commercial as well
residential developments,
whereas mixed-use business
interchange allows only com-
mercial development.
The latter designation also
raises the permitted intensity
of use from 65 to 80 percent.
That means that development
may cover up to 80 percent of
the total property with imper-


vious surfaces, such as build-
ings and parking spaces.
Because the change con-
cerned fewer than 20 acres, the
proposal is considered a small
scale land-use amendment,
which does not require the
level of state scrutiny that goes
into major land-use changes.
The former site of a gasoline
station, the property suppos-
edly contains some soil con-


tamination, which the new
owner is in the process of
cleaning up.
"Phase one of the project is to
clean the contamination on the
side," said a spokesman for the
owner, who happens to own a
Tallahassee-based contamina-
tion remediation services com-
pany. "This (cleaning site) is a
(See Comp Plan, Page 2)


COMMISSIONERS last week approved a small-scale
Comp Plan amendment that allows higher density use
on a 20-acre parcel near the interstate. (News Photo)


I L I


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PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 10, 2007

Lloyd Postmaster Ervin


Retires After 38 Years


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Lloyd Postmaster, Roberta
Ervin, retired after 38 years
with the Postal Service, last
Tuesday.
Employees provided re-
freshments throughout the
day and posted a sign on the
door encouraging all to stop
by and wish Ervin well in her
retirement.
Postmaster Rodney Boland
of Perry, will be present to of-
ficially turn over the office to
temporary Postmaster Wil-
liam "Arch" Rogers, who will
begin his official duties Mon-
day in Lloyd.
Ervin began her career with
the Postal Service, Oct. 14,
1968 as a part-time Flexible
Clerk. She began at the for-
mer Woodville Avenue office
in Tallahassee.
Her duties included, "Doing
all the dirty work," quipped
Ervin. "Everything from un-
loading trucks, to sorting
mail.
"In those days, we didn't
have machines sorting the
mail. It was all done by hand
so we had to memorize which
streets were on which Car-
rier's route."
After one year, Ervin be-
came a Full-time Clerk in the


same office, where she bid on
the job of Air Mail Clerk.
Shortly afterward, she also
served as a Window Clerk
In 1982, she became a Per-
sonnel Assistant in Tallahas-
see, where her duties
included, hiring, retirement
and completing the much nec-
essary paperwork.
"When I was there, I got to
know a lot of the area Post-
masters in the area because I
helped them with hiring and
retirements," said Ervin.
She said that in 1993, the
Postal service did away with
her job.
They were offering many
employees an easy out retire-
ment, which allowed them to
collect half a year's pay and
allowed them to retire, but
employees had to be 50-55
years old to take it," said Er-
vin. "A lot of employees did
take the offer, but I asked for
a transfer."
The Postal Service offered
her a transfer to the position
of Postmaster in Gretna in
Dec. 1995, because then Post-
master John Nixon was retir-
ing.
After three years, Ervin
placed a request for another
transfer, to Lloyd as the Post-
master, mainly because it was
close to her home.
"Gretna was a heck of a long
commute," said Ervin.


She said that she had pur-
chased land on Old St.
Augustine Rd. in 1970, and in
1971, she and her husband
Ronald, got married and
moved to the area.
They had three children, Jes-
sica, 32, who lives in the
county, John, 40, who lives in
Tallahassee with his wife and
two children, and Laura, who
lives in Marimba, with her
husband and two children.
Her responsibilities as Post-
master included, waiting on
customer, being a smaller
post office, paying bills, time
card completions, assuring
that all employees received
their pay, and the like.
Ervin enjoys traveling and in
her retirement, plans to do so.
"I'll have a lot more time for
it, she said. "Also, both of
my parents, who live in Talla-
hassee, turned 91 last year,
My dad had a stroke a few
years back and my mother is a
little disabled now, so I'm go-
ing to spend more time with
them and help them with
whatever they need."
Also on the agenda for re-
tirement, she and her hus-
band have been working on
building and remodeling their
home.
"There are still things to be
done and we're going to con-
tinue with that," she con-
cluded.


ROBERTA ERVIN


City Police Report

No Major Crime Here


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Monticello Police Depart-
ment Investigator Sgt. Chip
Springer, reports that there
was no major criminal activ-
ity in the city throughout the
holiday season (Thanksgiving
through New Year's).
SThere were no armed rob-
beries, though, Monticello
generally sees about one or
two armed robberies of con-
venience stores, during the
holiday season he said.
"We did pretty well this
year," said Springer. "In my
experience, law enforcement
doesn't usually get that
lucky."
He added that though Monti-
cello does border Tallahassee,
which was hit hard with crime

this year, the City was spared.
Springer did not have exact


number of traffic citations is-
sued, but said there were the
usual season fender-benders,
speeders, and drivers operat-
ing without a license.
"It's been a pretty quiet holi-
day," Springer added. "Over-
all, it's been a pretty quiet
year."
In related news, Springer
said that MPD saw a number
of thefts and burglaries in the
city.
"We've been getting reports
of people's utility sheds being
broken into and items stolen,
as well as some lawn equip-
ment being stolen out of the
yards of residents," he said.
"MPD warns residents to lock
their utility sheds and don't
leave lawn equipment in
plain view."
He concluded that if resi-
dents do witness any suspi-
cious activity, to call MPD at
342-0150.


FRAN HUNT
Staff W/iter

Signup deadline for Nonin-
sured Assistance program
(NAP) coverage is Feb. 28 at
the Farm Service Agency
(FSA.)
Crops covered for 2007 in-
clude: all beans, beets, black-
berries, blueberries, canta-
loupe, carrots, celery, Chinese
bitter melon, chufas, cucum-
bers, eggplant, gladiolus flow-
ers, grapes (muscadine,) grass
(hay and grazing.)
Greens, honeydew, lettuce,
milet, okra, onions, peanuts
(green), peas, peppers, peren-
nial peanuts, potatoes, pump-
kins, rutabagas, squash,
strawberries, sugarcane flow-
ers, turnips, and watermelons.
All losses or prevented
planting must be related to a
natural disaster that causes
catastrophic losses.
Notice of loss must be re-
ported to this office within 15
calendar days after the occur-
rence of prevented planting,
or end of planting period; or
the disaster occurrence or date
of damage to the specific crop
is apparent.
To be eligible to receive as-
sistance for an eligible crop, a
producer shall pay a nonre-
fundable service fee of an
amount that is equal to the
lesser of $100 per crop ad-
ministrative county; or $300
per producer per administra-
tive county, but not to exceed
a total of $900 per producer.
Payment of the service fee
is due at the time the producer
files for the CCC-471.

Comp Plan
(Continued From Page 1)
linchpin of development."
The spokesman said one of
the first priorities of the new
owner is to build a storm-water
retention pond, to ensure that
storm runoff does not enter a
nearby wetlands area.


Planners Attendance Becomes Issue


ELLEN CLINE, Relay for Life Chairman, left, Dana Lastinger, and Jo Morris, work on


strategies for the year. (News Photo)


Relay For Life Kickoff


SDinner Set

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

"Relay Goes Hollywood" in
2007, is the theme for this
year's American Cancer So-
ciety Jefferson County Relay
- for Life.
S The Relay for Life Kickoff
is set for 6 p.m. Thursday,


January 11
Jan. 11 at the Opera House.
The Kickoff Dinner fund-
raiser is sponsored *by the
Elizabeth Baptist Church
-team at the cost of $7.50 per
adult, and $5.00 per child.
The chicken and rice meal
will include a cold drink and
dessert.
Tickets may be purchased
in advance by contacting


Wanda and Jim Becker at
342-1742. Tickets can also be
picked up in town at Morris
Petroleum and at Morgan's
Garage, or by contacting any
team captain.
This will be the time to reg- -
ister your team for this year's
Relay. Learn more about Re-
lay for Life, Luminaria Sales,.
Survivor Registration, and
more.

For more information call
297-0588, ext. 127.


(Continued From Page 1)
they have in recruiting new
volunteers.
With the escalation of absen-
teeism in recent years, how-
ever, meetings and workshops
often have had to be canceled
because of the lack of a quo-
rum.
The cancellations not only


prove costly, in terms of
wasted legal advertisements,
but they frustrates citizens,
whose applications must then
be rescheduled for a later date.
In an attempt to deal with the
problem, commissioners have
requested that Planning Offi-
cial Bill Tellefsen provide
them with the attendance re-


cords of planners.

Tellefsen informed commis-
sioners last week that his of-
fice will have the records
ready for commissioners' re-
view by the Jan. 18 evening
meeting. He said the atten-
dance records date back to
2000.


Building Permits Slow During December


(Continued From Page 1)
dropped significantly, from
$1,624,989 in December of
2005 to $1,255,788 last month.
A closer reading of the num-
--bers shows that the biggest
changes between the two
months occurred in commer-
cial permits, and in repair and
addition permits.
The figures show that the
county issued zero commercial
permits and 17 repair and addi-
tion permits last month, com-


pared with one commercial
permit and 33 repair and addi-
tion permits in December
2005.
The differences are reflected
in the valuations, with the
county registering zero com-
mercial valuation and
$146,625 for repairs and addi-
tions last month, versus
$191,062 and $440,105 re-
spectively in December 2005.
The valuation of new home
construction, meanwhile rose


from $993,822 in December
2005 to $1,109,163 last month,
although the number of new
dwellings remained constant at
seven.
Building Inspector Wallace
Bullock explained that the dif-
ferences in valuations resulted
from differences in the size
and complexity of the houses
being built, as well as in the
higher costs of building mate-
rials.


THIS sign was photographed in front of
,Photo)


the office of CPA Luther Pickels. (News


NO RUNNING
Neuromuscular disease can say no running,
walking even breathing. Help MDA help people.


When was


the last


time you


made an


investment


that saved


lives?


SAVER


When you invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
enormous-healthier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. It's a dividend that builds a
strong community.


Muscular Dystrophy Association
Muscular Dystrophy Association


1-800-572-1717


307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL 32303 (904) 414-0844


fM Sign Up
S. CaNOW For

'Crop Help









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 10, 2007 PAGE 3
Lo al Man Arrested While at the residence, the
Stwo consumed some cocaine
He e On Felo y Cts and then engaged in a sex act.
ere On Fel ny Co nt The victim asked Larry to
stop, but he refused.
FRAN HUNT After leaving Larry's resi-
Staff Writer dence, the victim walked to a
Spay phone, called Police, and
A --reported the incident.


"- ionlicello man was ar-
rested and charged with three
felony counts by City Police
Friday.
MPD reports that at approxi-
mately 10:40 p.m., Jan. 4, a re-
port was received of a sexual
battery that occurred about one
hour earlier.
A male victim, 17, reported
that he had gone to the resi-
dence of Earnest Jerome
"Squeaky" Larry, Jr., 47, at
185 W. Georgia St. to receive
cocaine in exchange for sex.


LARRY


The t&en was transported to
The Child Protection Team in
Tallahassee for treatment and
a forensic examination.

Investigator Chris Eades
conducted a follow-up inves-
tigation and arrested Larry,
who was charged with Un-
lawful Sexual Activity With
Certain Minors, Procuring a
Person Under the Age of 18
For Prostitution, and Deliver-
ing a Controlled Substance To
a Minor By An Adult.


Dennis' Trading Post


To Reopen March 1


PROGRESS ENERGY raised approximately $2,500 in donations and toys this year to
distribute to the children in the North Florida Region. From left, Cpl. Stuart Tucker,
Progress Energy's Community Relations Assistant Gaye Hanna, and PFC Travis She-
drick.


County Christmas Drive


Most Successful To Date


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The County Christmas Drive
turned out to be the most suc-
cessful to date.
Though a greater number of
families needed assistance
than in prior years, members
of the community stepped for-
ward to meet the need.
A total of 100 families and
229 childrenwere served by
the Drive this year.
"We had several families
adopted by individuals and
organizations, which is a win-
win situation for the families
adopted and those who
adopted them," said Co-
cordinator Lucille Hunter.
"Most children received
several new toys, stuffed ani-
mals and books. Many chil-
dren were fitted with shoes
and jackets. $25 food certifi-
cates were given to 55 fami-
lies, and 55 children received
bicycles provided by the Jef-
ferson County Sheriffs Of-
fice Bicycle Drive."
Hunter added, "This Christ-
mas Drive could not happen
each year, if individuals and
organizations were not so
generous."
Coordinators would like to
express heartfelt thanks and
much appreciation to: Bethel
AME Missionary Youth De-
partment, Methodist Church,
Morris Petroleum, Dunn's
Furniture, Brotherhood of
Christ Episcopal Church, Big
Bend Hospice, County Fire
Rescue, Kiwanis, American
Legion, Altrusa, and the Re-
tired Teachers Association.
Also, Wayne and Cheryl
Searcy, Colby Kinsey, Brit-
tany Kinsey, Carter Searcy,
Lee Corbin, Muriel Love and
Santa and Jack Hokanson.
Marsha Elder, Alice Princi-
pato, Mrs. Vann Scoter, Mary
Madison, Mary Reichert,
Gwen Reshard, Carla Piggott,


Heidi Copeland, Bill
Hopkins, Mr. and Mrs.
Reichman, Mrs. Stover, Ron-
nie Cox, Virginia Carroll,
-Sandra Collins, and Cather-
ine Arnold.
Gentle Proctor, .Stephen
and Shanna Thomas, Emily
Anderson, Geoffrey and Pa-
tricia Monge, Paul and Edith
Adams, G. W. and Caroline
Hurley, Marceline and Jack
Hamilton, Buddy and Dianne
Westbrook, Lettie White, and
Mrs. Roberts.
Also, John and Caroline
Cooksey, Mrs. Kinsey, Carol
Ellerbee, and several persons
who wished to remain anony-
mous.
"If we have overlooked any-
one who donated, blame it on
our minds, not our hearts, we
thank all of you," said Hunter.
"We also want to say thanks
again to those that gave the
second time when toys were
running out and there were
children still on the list with
nothing to give them," she
added.
"We want to thank all the
helpers that sorted and
wrapped the gifts," said
Hunter. "It always takes
many hours of hard work to
be sure that all on the list
have presents on Christmas
morning."
She advises all businesses
and individuals that the ef-
forts of the drive needs indi-
viduals to "Help our United
Christmas Drive for our
county, to be sure our families
that are needing assistance
can be assisted."
Hunter explained that "Toys
for Tots" is a wonderful or-
ganization, but the toys that
are collected here by our mer-
chants, are going,out of our
county and do not help our
residents in need.
Hunter relates that organiz-
ers and volunteers are going
to have fundraisers through-
out the year, specifically for


the Jefferson County United
Christmas Drive.
"We are requesting assis-
tance from all, if only a few
dollars at a time, all year
long," she said.
Contributions will be taken-
throughout the year, they can
be mailed to Jefferson County
United Christmas Drive, PO,
Box 45, Monticello, FL,
32345, or they can be
dropped off at Fire Rescue to
Hunter, or by Jefferson Ele-
mentary School, to Co-
coordinator Gladys Roann.
Hunter relayed the follow-
ing sentiment from both her-
self and Roann, "Thanks for
making it a great Christmas
for the less fortunate, and we
hope each of you have a great
New Year."


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

A First Time Home Buyer-
workshop will be held Jan.
17, 18 and 24 at the County
Extension Office.
The workshops are sched-
uled 5:30 p.m to 8:30 p.m.
Jan. 17 and 18, and 5:30 p.m.
to 7:30 p.m. Jan. 24.
.Family and Consumer Sci-
ences Extension Agent Heidi
Copeland will conduct the
workshops.
Topics will include Money
Management, Home Selec-
tion, and Home Maintenance
and Care.
Participants must register
with Lola Hightower at the


Grants Office, located at the
former JCHS campus on S.
Water Street, in the Planning
Office building.
Copeland advised that any-
one who wished to participate
in the SHIP (State Housing
Initiative Partnership) pro-
gram, must attend all three
nights of the workshop, to be
eligible for the program.
For further information,
contact Hightower at 342-
0176.





-Ab~N'=l F


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Dennis' Trading Post, lo-.-
cated on South US-19, should
be completely back to normal
about March 1, following a
lengthy DEP contamination
cleanup of the property.
Business hours will be from
10 a.m. until 6 p:m.,
Thursday, Friday and Satur-
day.
"Moving the building was
stage one of the process," said
Owner Dennis Pitts. "They
should finish removing the
contaminated soil some time
this week."
Following the soil reipoval.
Pitts said he must reestclblsh
his inventory, paint and reno-
vate the building, and in-
crease his ornamental
concrete inventory, aftor the
parking lot is completed. "I
will continue to sell collecti-
bles, antiques and ornamental
concrete pieces," said Pitts.
He added that his antique and
collectible sales have dropped
since the cleanup began.
Cleanup efforts began in
September because the state


had recommended that the
building be moved back the
length of the building plus 20
feet, so clean up efforts could
take place.
DEP discovered contamina-
tion under the 100 year old
building (formerly' the Old
Hatchet Grocery Store), years


ago.

"I would like to thank the
Advanced Environmental Co.
for the cleanup and also thank
DEP for all of their work in
keeping our ground water free
of contaminants, safe and
clean," said Pitts.


Locals Named To Honor Lists


.Five Monticello residents
have been named to honor lists
at North Florida Community
College.

Named to the President's List
were: Ramsey Revell, Rebekah
Aman, and Stephanie Dobson.
To qualify for this honor stu-


dents must earn a grade point
.average of 3.8 to 4.0.
Named to the Vice-
president's List were Tristan
Sorensen, and Willaim Harts-
field.
To qualify for this honor,
students must earn a grade:
point average of 3.5 to 3.79.


-A--4
I IAoYC HOURS:: Monday-Friday 10-5
KITCHEN & BATHS V Satuy 10-
wc Ha M. ea VISIT OUR
SSHOWROOM TODAY!


S(8)222-2990
03Rim


1st Time Home Buyers

Workshops Scheduled









PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 10. 2007


Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly Ex-
cept for the weeks of July 4th, Thanksgiving, X-mas, &
New Years. Periodicals Postage Paid at,Monticello Post
Office. Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net
** ** -o .-- **........ .............



Labor Shortage


Opens Doors


It's estimated that most
; workers will hold seven jobs,
work for three employers and
follow two different career
paths in their professional life
span.
It's inevitable many Ameri-
cans will soon feel the itch to
meet a new career challenge,
and some will need direction
to ensure they choose a path
that's aligned with their true
interests, personality and natu-
ral abilities. Where to start?
"Current hiring trends sug-
gest that existing skilled labor
shortages and low unemploy-
ment rates will continue to
strengthen demand for workers
in the New Year," said Steve
Pogorzelski, Group President,
International for -Monster
Worldwide, parent company of
Monster.com.
According to the Monster
Employment Index, a measure
of online job demand for
workers, industries expected to
show strong growth in the
New Year include information
technology, health care, and
legal and protective services,
which offer jobs for police,
fire and transit workers.
Due to the vast number of
baby boomers who pursue
work postretirement- either
through part-time or consulting
positions- employers are in-
creasingly beginning to em-
brace second-career workers.
The Department of Labor
predicts that the number of
working retirees will increase-
by 2012, 65 percent of retired
baby boomers will be em-



From Ou

TEN YEARS AGO
January 8, 1997
The School District will
honor its Teacher of the Year
at a luncheon, noon Friday at
the Opera House.
Now that the collection of
ambulance fees is up, the
County Commission has
agreed to let Fire and Rescue
Chief Larry Bates establish a
special fund for the purchase
of emergency equipment.
"How sweet it is indeed!"
Gator football fans had some-
thing to crow abut Friday, fol-
lowing the University of Flor-
ida's 52-20 win over Florida
State University at the Super
Bowl in New Orleans. But if
local Gator fans were relishing
the long-awaited victory, some
were showing restraint and
graciousness on Monday.
William Roy Brown, 40, of
Monticello, was killed 2:25
p.m., Monday, Dec. 30, in a
tw lWU v rIII..I n API~IL I ;n 1 1-4


twu vehicle acciucent in
TWENTY YEARS A
January 7, 198'
Through the efforts
tional conservation gr
county may soon have
spring fed river which
entirely in public owner


LIoyu.
AGO
7
of a na-
oup, the
the only
will be
rship.


played, many in brand new
fields.
If waiting until retirement
isn't an option, and a career as-
sessment is in order, make it a
top priority now- most compa-
nies tend to have more oppor-
tunities available in the first
few months of the year, and
again in the early fall.
Use the following tips to
help jump-start a career
change:
When looking for new em-
ployment opportunities, work-
ers often limit themselves to
positions with in their current
industry.
I Instead, explore your com-
patibility with new fields by
completing self-assessment ex-
ercises, speaking with profes-
sionals in other fields or
engaging in volunteer work.
Once a new career direc-
tions has been set, update your
resume to showcase the key
qualifications most appropriate
and relevant for the new en-
deavor. Don't hesitate to focus
on skills and experiences ac-
quired outside of your current
job, as well.
Resumes often need to be
refocused to convey your po-
tential in another career path.
Don't expect an overnight
transformation- a complete ca-
reer change usually takes any-
where from several months to
a year.
Throughout the .process,
seek out new projects at your
current job in order to broaden
your horizons and expand your
professional network.


jr Files

The City of Monticello re-
cently adopted a tree ordinance
at its Tuesday night meeting.
No opposition to the ordinance
was presented to the council,
and it was unanimously ap-
proved.
Through the efforts of area
Shriners, 89 families with 232
children were assisted during
the holiday season.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
January 6, 1977
Dave Cone, an ambulance
attendance for the past four
years, was named acting direc-
tor of the Jefferson Ambulance
Service by the County Com-
mission Tuesday morning.
Hall Properties, Inc., of Jack-
sonville, plans to build a
53,100 square foot shopping
center in a five acre site on
South U.S. 19 and Cherokee
Street.
Jefferson County officials
came into being 150 years ago
this month.
FORTY YEARS AGO
January 6, 1967
Judge Kenneth E. Cook-
sey, president of the Jefferson
County Quarterback Club dur-
ing 1966, announced Wednes-
(See Files, Page 5)


RAINY DAYS pose special problems for moms with small children. In Aug., 1991,
Joy Delaney has a trio of youngsters to entertain. From left, Andrian Delaney, Kira
Delaney, Joy Delaney (mother,) and Thea Delaney. (News File Photo)




Opinion & Comment



Resolutions Often Fade Fast


If you made a New Year's
resolution, congratulations are
in order. Resolutions for a
New Year are kind of like
diets, we tend to stray rather
quickly.
A survey team checked.with
213 adults in Pennsylvania to
see 'how they made out with
resolutions the past two years,
and the results tell you how
quickly we abandon those well
intentioned resolutions.
A whopping 77 percent of
the people polled kept their
resolutions for one week.
Only 19 percent kept their
resolutions for two years.
You may have already aban-.
doned your New Year's reso-
lution. .
I haven't made a New Year's:
resolution in so many years I
just can't recall the last one.
New Year's resolutions are not
my thing.
If I've got to break a habit or
do something new which is in
by best interest, then why not
decide to do it on September
23rd or July 7th? Why wait for
a New Year?
This is my logical mind at


Publisher's


Notebook


Ron Cichon
---. Jj


work. I know, but waiting for a
New Year to quit smoking, or
diet, or take a night course, or
exercise regularly doesn't
make sense to me. If those
things are noble pursuits, then
they are worthwhile any time
of the year.
But if New Year's resolu-
tions make sense to you, then
have at it.
I've got a host of friends
who started diets right after
Jan. 1. I know, 'cause they told
me they would.
Some told me at a buffet ta-
ble at parties, others told me
while holding a plateful of
food on their laps, and still


others told me as they were
wolfing down a second
dessert.
Do I believe them when they
say "come the New Year, I'm
going to get serious about los-
ing weight?" No I don't. Of
course, 1 never say 1 don't be-
lieve it.
Once in a great while some-
body comes along who really
does what they say they'll do.
I'd hate to be the one who dis-
couraged them when they an-
nounce their plans....
Surveys show that half of the
adults make resolutions with
70 percent of them health re-
lated.


If you are in the half who do
make resolution, you have my
wises for success.
If you are in the half who
don't plan to make resolutions,
you have my congratulations
for honesty. You probably
know you won't keep any reso-
lutions you make anyway.
I would imagine by now
you've heard a lot of conversa-
Stion from co-works and friends
about resolution. It's the thing
to talk about fight after the
New Year holiday.
That kind of talk usually
fades in a week or two as the
resolution's are abandoned.
A few hints for resolution-
makers are in order.
Psychologist Ronald G. Na-
than advises setting one goal
and working toward small but
lasting changes. He says doing
that will help stay on target.
Psychologist John C. Nor-
cross says you'll have more
luck if you realize a lapse is
not a relapse. If you're trying
to quit smoking but take a few
puffs, it doesn't mean you
should give up.


Why Talk To Syria, Iran?


By DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

I do not understand what the
problem is with American
world politics and diplomacy
today. During most of my
years, the United States said
what it meant and meant what
it said, both in word and deeds.
We stood tall and most of the
world admired us.
Suddenly, all of our national
leaders seem to be groping for
any clue as to how to address
international problems. I un-
derstand the necessity to avoid
alienating so called allies, but
at what point do we stop the
nonsense and stand up like
adults and call a spade a
spade?
There isn't enough space in
this column to address my dis-


dain for the French leadership
ever since the end of the Sec-
ond World War or the rest of
the Europe, for that matter,
with the exception of Great
Britain, Poland and a few of
the newly formed eastern
block free nations.
Yet, our leadership wants to
bend over backwards to ap-
pease these socialistic morons
while allowing them to con-
tinually stick their finger in our
eye. We seem to be paralyzed
with fear that they won't like
us.
I have a news flash-- they
envy us, they are jealous of us
and they don't like us! I know
a major personality character-
istic of the left leaning mem-
bers of our society is to worry
about not being liked by eve-
ryone and easily having their
feelings hurt.


But please, we need to read-
just our thinking and approach
in dealing with other nations
away from trying to make
them like us and' back to re-
specting us. Like it or not, this
is going to take strong conser-
vative leadership and will not
be accomplished via a feel
good liberal kiss their back
sides philosophy.
We actually have national
leaders seriously recommend-
ing that the United States enter
into direct diplomatic talks
with the likes of Iran, Syria,
Hezbollah and North Korea!
Have they lost their minds?
For starters, we know for a
fact that the leaders of both
Iran and Korea are certifiable
lunatics. Syria openly harbors
and supports freedom hating
terrorists and Hezbollah has


one and only one goal, to anni-
hilate the nation of Israel.
Prior to and during WWII,
Adolph Hitler attempted no
less than four times to get Brit-
ish Prime Minister Winston
Churchill to enter into direct
talks. Then, like now, the nar-
row minded peaceniks saw
such talks as the panacea for
solving all the world's interna-
-tional problems.
Fortunately, Churchill
clearly saw through the diplo-
matic facade and said that
meeting with Hitler would do
nothing but give "legitimacy"
to him and his aggressive poli-
cies.
We need a little Winston
Churchill backbone today. Di-
rect' negotiations with the likes
of Iran and Syria would only
solidify the world's growing
(See Why Talk, Page 5)


Saving Water Is Important


As temperatures drop, and!
the word "drought" is no
longer in the news, it's easy to
stop paying attention to water
use.
Reminders to save water are
Sless-fequent and many Ameri-
cans believe our water supply
is abundant and constantly re-
plenished- when in fact it's a
finite resource.
While the U.S. population
has grown by almost 90 per-
cent over the last 50 years, our
water use during that same pe-
riod grew by a staggering.209
percent.


With demand outstripping
supply, at least 36 states antici-
pate local, regional or state-
wide water shortages by the
year 2013, even under non-
drought conditions.
Using water more efficiently
is the easiest and most cost-
effective way to help endure
adequate future water supply.
The average family of four
uses 400 gallons of water
(6,400 full drinking glasses)
each day and 70 percent of that
is used indoors.
This water use could easily
be cut by as much as 30 per-


cent if households took a few
simple steps to use water more
efficiently. In addition to help-
ing protect our water supply,
saving money on their water
and energy bills.
Here are some simple tips
from EPA's WaterSense pro-
gram for saving water year-
round:
1. Don't flush money down
the drain:
Check your toilet for leaks,
A leaky toilet can waste 200
gallons of water per day. Add
a couple drops of food color-
ing to your toilet tank and if


color appears in the bowl
within 15 minutes, you have a
leak.
If you replace your toilet,
shop for a high-efficiency
model that uses less than 1.3
gallons per flush. In 2007
you'll be able to find these toi-
lets by looking for the Wa-
terSense label.
2. Think before you turn
on the tap:
Scrape rather than rinse
dishes before loading them
into the dishwasher.
Keep drinking water in the
(See Saving Water, Page 5)
4. .* .


From Our Photo File

.9 Fl + ^ -^,w" ., f t


i,,r


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~1~)10 . ::' I" ;iIBS.i::'' %b~x~CM)t~pi~dp~: ~~pl 14r~31J~(~C~Y~.~~ (~P1ILIYIU'~L9Y~a~F. .? ~C 'Xllh*;s ~L. C.li.*~. *'









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 10, 2007 PAGE 5


"PEPPER," left, born Dec. 19, and mother Jackie, get better acquainted as they enjoy
their time in the field. The animals belong to Ruby and Brad Moore on Turney An-
derson Road, known for their love of animals. (News Photo)


YOU HOME CAN. CA SE B TW ICE S MNYGRENOS E S ASES SA* II
7Dicovr Itep yo Icn Ske*o edue *ir olutonfomyor.om5 ndcaia eegyta I v


Why Talk
(Continued From Page 4)
view of the United States as a
weak and inept world leader.
Additionally, such a move
would give legitimacy to un-
predictable lunatics and their
rogue nations.
Our bumbling and stumbling
politically correct and inept
wars in Vietnam and Iraq has
given world leaders of every
backwater country the oppor-
tunity to stand tall, and stand
up to the United States, the
world's most powerful and
free nation.
Our lack of political and na-



Files
(Continued From Page 4)
day that the annual football
awards banquet, slated for
Thursday night of this week,
has been postponed for Janu-
ary 26th.
Mr. and Mrs. Wilmer Bassett
and Dr. and Mrs. John Ward
were among those attending
the Inaugural Ball in Tallahas-
see Thursday'evening.
Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Dalton
and family left this week to
make their home in Quitman,
Georgia.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
January 6, 1957
The business growth of Jef-
ferson County was underlined
this week when the physical
count of names of businesses
listed in the November, 1956
Reference Book of Dun &
Bradstreet was completed. The
new count showed an increase
of 39.9 percent in the last ten
years according to C.L. Houck,
district manger of Jacksonville,
which office covers this area.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
January 6, 1947
Miss Mary Budd Holmes of
Jacksonville spent Christmas
week with her parents, Rev.
and Mrs. Henry Holmes.
Mrs. Annie Arndt and her
son, Mac Arndt and Mrs. Billy
Whitaker of Tallahassee, spent
the holidays in Clearwater with
relatives. On Christmas Day
they flew to Miami where they
were guests of Mr. and Mrs.
Paul Whitaker and children.


TO Syria, Iran?


tional unity, our collective
short memories, our national
impatience to do the heavy lift-
ing to achieve success and the
unwillingness to turn the war
over to our military experts to
win once they are committed,
clearly mean we need to get
out of the world leadership
business.
If the all powerful and su-
premely capable United States
can't scare the likes of peewee


Iran into submission, then we
need to pull back within our.
borders, reduce the size of our
armed forces and defense
budget and only offer military'
and financial assistance to our
most staunch allies.
Many would call this "isola-.
tionism". Until we can replace,
the spineless and politically;
correct national leadership and
feel good policies at the top, I
call this "common sense".


Saving Water Important


(Continued From Page 4)
refrigerator instead ot letting
the faucet run until the water is
cold. The average faucet flows
at a rate of two gallons per
minute.
Turn off the tap while you
brush your teeth or shave. You
could save more than 100 gal-
lons per month.
3. Use appliances wisely:
Wash only full loads or set
small loads to the appropriate
water level.
:, Replace old clothes wash-
ers with ENERGY STAR la-
beled appliances that use less
water.
4. Stop leaks:
Easily corrected household
water leaks can account for
eight percent of your water
bill. Read your water meter be-
fore and after a two-hour pe-


riod when no water is used. If
the meter doesn't read the
same, you probably have a
leak.
Repair dripping faucets'
and shower heads. Fixing a
faucet that drips at a rate of
one drop per second will save
2,700 gallons per year.

5. Test your Water Sense:
Find out how much you
know about the water you use
in your home. Go the Wa-
terSense ,Web site at
www.epa.gov/watersense and
take the Test Your Water
Sense quiz.
Look for the EPA's Water
Sense label, which makes it
easy for consumers to recog-
nize products and programs
that save water and perform
well.


The Jefferson County Recvclinq Proqram


accepts


the following items for recycling.


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?





Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.





Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 10, 2007


Redft e6ow~e'




U Md d VaPOP ehWt


KIELBASA AND CAB-
BAGE

1 1/2 Ibs. cabbage, shredded
2 Ed carrots, chopped
2 Ed red potatoes, peeled and
cubed
1 red bell pepper chopped
2 cloves garlic minced
2/3 cup dry white wine
1 1/2 lbs. Polish kielbasa, cut
into 3 inch links.
28 oz. can tomatoes, cut up
with juice
1 tbs. Dijon mustard
3/4 tsp. caraway seeds
1/2 tsp. pepper
3/4 tsp. salt

Combine all ingredients in
slow cooker or crock pot.
Cover an cook on low heat for
7 to 8 hours.

Submitted by:
Jeannie Beetsma

CHINESE CHICKEN
SALAD

3-4 chicken breasts, cooked
and cubed
1 head of cabbage shredded
4 green onions, chopped
3 tbs. sesame seeds
1/2 cup slivered almonds
2 pkg. Ramen Noodles,
chicken flavor, uncooked and
broken

Dressing:

3 tbs. sugar
1 tsp. salt
1/2 cup vegetable oil
4 tbs. rice wine vinegar
1/2 tsp. white pepper
2 pkg. Ramen seasoning


Willie Mae Austin
Willie Mae Austin (Mrs.
,Bill) 85 of Monticello died,
Saturday night January 6, 2007
at home. Mrs. Austin was born
September 25, 1921 in Monti-
cello, to the parentage of Paul
and Ethel Broxsie. At an early
age Mrs. Austin became a
member of Greater Fellowship
Baptist Church where her fa-
ther was one of the Deacons.
Later in her life she rededi-
cated herself to the church.
Mrs. Austin was predeceased
in death by her husband, Sam
Austin Sr., children: Brenda
Smiley, Joseph, Amos and Le-
roy Austin.
Mrs. Austin is survived by
her children, Constance Larry,
(Frederick) of Spartanburg
South Carolina, Sam Austin Jr.
(Rosa) of Royal Palm Beach,
Florida, W. Gerald Austin
(Yolanda) of Monticello,
Wade B. Austin, of West Palm
Beach, Arthur P. Austin (June)
of Riviera Beach, Paula D.
Morris (Thomas) of Monti-
cello. Twenty-one grandchil-
dren, fourteen great grandchil-
dren a host of nieces, nephews,
cousins, sorrowing friends and
church members.
Friends may visit the family


Toast almonds and seeds in
325 degree oven for approxi-
mately 7 minutes.
Mix chicken, cabbage and
onion. Mix dressing ingredi-
ents thorough.
Toss before serving.

Submitted by:
Alice Aldin

TORTELLININ SALAD

1 bag frozen tortellini
cucumbers sliced
celery sliced
broccoli sliced
cauliflower sliced
tomatoes sliced
carrots shredded
OR 1 bag stir fry vegetables
1 large bottle ranch dressing
salt and pepper to taste
cheddar cheese shredded
bacon bits
chicken, tuna, or ham,
chopped
hard boiled egg sliced

Cook tortellini in water with
a dash of olive oil and salt.
Rinse in cold water and place
in a large bowl.
Add vegetables in desired
amounts and salt and pepper to
taste.
Add bacon bits, cheese, meat
or tuna. Add most of ranch
dressing and mix well.
Can be refrigerated over
night. When refrigerated, add
tomatoes and cucumbers be-:
fore serving;'
Stir' fry egci.ible cn'ar'
used in place of the other
vegetables.

Submitted by:
Nancy Kinnee


Friday January 12, 2007 from
5:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. at
Greater Fellowship Missionary
Baptist Church. Funeral Serv-
ice will be 11:00 a.m. at
Greater Fellowship Missionary
Baptist Church, 690 Cypress
St., Monticello.

Where Rev. Dr. Melvin Rob-
erts is the Pastor. Interment to
follow in Pallbearers
Cemetery. Funeral arrange-
ments entrusted to Branch
Street Funeral Home 750
Branch Street Monticello.








S.... ... .. ... . .....

Growing.
.







Growing.





i i '5

Gone.



Remember. Only you can prevent forest fires,
r A public service of the U SDA
C I Forest Servyco, and your State ForsteruL


JANE DAVIS, left, hostess for the January meeting of
the Camellia Garden Circle, demonstrates the making
of holiday decorations, with Mary Ann Sauer making or-
ange slice decorations for the trees at the Opera
House.


CIRCLE members Bobbie Golden, left and Isabelle de
Sercey put to use their wine bottle corks and create a
cork tier cake, topped with cherry flower buds. (News
Photos)


Camellia Garden Circle


Refurbishes Ornaments


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Camellia Garden Circle
has been busy creating new,
and refurbishing old, decora-
tions and ornaments for the
holiday trees in various loca-
tions around town .
,uThe Opera House was
opened on several occasions
especially for the members to
decorate the trees that decked
the halls.
Christmas music could be
heard, and Wassail was en-
.joyed to help members get in
the spirit of the holidays.
Members enjoyed a Christ-
mas party in lieu of their De-
cember meeting at the home
of Bobbie Golden, at the
Golden Acres Ranch.
The party included a White
Elephant gift exchange with
comical and "regifts" for all.


The traditional Wassail was
served hot, along with lots of
goodies made and brought to
the party by members for the
occasion.
The Wassail recipe was
shared with members via e-
mail. It includes apple cider
or juice, a cinnamon stick,
nutmeg, honey, lemon juice
and peel, pineapple juice, and
a baked orange studded with
cloves. This is simmered over
a period of time and kept
warm for serving, or served
cold, if desired.
In other Circle news, Mary
Ann Sauer is selling a variety
of potted plants to raise
money for the PAWS organi-
zation.
Members jie invited to
come view her selection of
plants.
She may be contacted at
997-4606 or 508-9006 to
make sure she will be avail-


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able upon ones arrival.
The next meeting of the Ca-
mellia Garden Circle is 2 p.m.
Sunday, Jan. 21 at the Jeffer-
son Art Center.
Hostess for this. meeting
will be Jane Davis.
Hand painted yard orna-
ments will be featured and
members are asked to bring a
blow dryer.


'Got A Cute Photo?

Send It To Us And
We'll Share It With
Our Readers!

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Strange stuff, etc.

Monticello News
P.O. Box 430
Monticello, FL
32345

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Lifestyle


SHomes Of Mourning
^------I --M _...._. L_









ww MAW '~ C .
q (vg

i ,n County Safety rL,


Np
-'-4'


COUNTY SAFETY TEAM members provided car seat safety instructions at Jefferson
Square recently. From left, Amy Clark, Nita Mitchell, David Graham, Joyce Steele,
LPN, Debra Lookabill, MSW. (News Photo)


Ongoing Activities At


Local Boys, Girls Clubs
discussed issues such as asni- The Club Boy Scout and
DEBBIE SNAPP nence, exercise, and good nu- Girl Scout Troops are in full
Staff Writer trition. swing now too.
Scotty Ebberbach is often *The St. Phillip Club held a
Students enrolled in .the af- on hand to help with the Drawing for a $50 Wal-Mart
ter school programs at the cemetery cleanup and with gift card recently. Recruit-
County Boys and Girls Clubs donations for the parties and ment Coordinator Sabrina
are exposed to programs pre- other events held for the chil- Williams said the drawing
sented by community leaders dren. was for the Club Recruitment


on a variety of subjects.
Among the 'presenters are:
City Police Officer Fred Mos-
ley, and various 'staff mem-
bers of the County Health
Department.
Presenters discuss their ca-
reers and opportunities within
these careers.
Mosley spoke about steal-
ing and the consequences of
this illegal activity.
The Health Department team


The Jefferson/Monticello
Boys and Girls Club has a
new Parent Liaison, Doreatha
Manning, and a new PEP staff
member, Jeremy Plummer.
The Monticello Club is also'
very much involved in the
Project K.I.C.K. program. Re-
cently, Florida State staff
members visited with Club
members offering "peer coun-
seling and anger management
;ntrmnitionn


Drive.
All members, new and old
were included in the chance
to win.
CARD OF THANKS
The family of the late Gold-
burg Turner wishes to express
their sincere thanks and ap-
preciation for your prayers,
visits, telephone calls, mone-
tary gifts, food, flowers, and
all other acts of kindness
shown during the passing of
our loved one.
A special thanks to Al Hall
and the Tillman Funeral
Home staff.
Also, a special thanks to the
Union Branch AME Church
family.
God bless and keep you all.
The Family


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 10. 2007 PAGE 7

Traffic Safety Team Holds


Car Seat Safety Program


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The County Health Depart-
ment, Healthy Start program,
along with the Community
Traffic Safety Team held a
child safety seat checkpoint
recently at Jefferson Square.
*Several community mem-
bers participated by allowing
a certified child passenger
safety technician inspect the
car seat installation and edu-
cate parents about how to in-
stall the seats properly.
Each seat is checked against
a recall list for defective car
seats and usage age.
Handouts such as literature,
coloring books, pencils, and
crayons were offered to those
who stopped by.


National Safety Kids and
car seat manufactures recom-
mend no car seat be used over
five years as the parts may
weaken and become unsafe.
In addition to. the check-
point, a seat belt law compli-
ance survey was conducted on
all vehicles entering and exit-
ing the parking lot.
The results showed that 51
percent of the drivers were
buckled up and 49 'percent
were not.
Seat belt awareness and
compliance is up in Jefferson
County, compared to a survey
completed two years ago
which showed 38 percent
were buckled up and 62 per-
cent were not.
The Healthy Start program
offers monthly car seat
classes free of charge and
child safety seats for $10 for


low income community mem-
bers who meet eligibility
guidelines.
The Cpunty Health Depart-
ment's Child Passenger
Safety program is funded by
the Department of Transpor-
tation with the goal of all chil-
dren being transported safely.
David Graham may be con-
tacted at 342-0170 ext. 106 to
obtain information about the
program, or Joyce Steele at
342-0170 ext. 107 to check
for proper car seat
installation.



"Familiar

Faces And

Quiet Places"


A Pictorial

And Narrative

History Of

Jefferson

County


By Derelyne

Delp Counts


Available At

The Chamber

Office

And

Leading

Merchants


January, is Cervical Cancer
Month. Screening for cervi-
cal cancer is crucial because,
with early detection, it is
nearly 100 percent curable.
The County Health Depart-
ment offers the cancer screen-
ings. For further information
or to make an appointment
call 342-0170.
"Worldwide, cervical cancer
is the most common type of
cancer among women,"
Women's Health Officer
Nancy Humbert, AFRNP,
MSN, said. s
"We are committed to sup-
porting cervical cancer
screening to reduce the effect
of this disease for all. Ween-
courage women to be prQac-
tive in its detection."
Each year, approximately
15,000 women in the United
States learn they have cancer


of the cervix. The American
Cancer Society reports that
between 60-80 percent of
American with newly diag-
nosed invasive cervical can-
cer, have not had a Pap smear
in the past five and may have
never had one.
The unserved population
groups include older women,
the uninsured, ethnic minori-
ties (especially Hispanic
women, African Americans
and Asian Americans), and
poor women, particularly in
rural areas.
Women 21 years of age or
older, and those under 21 who
are sexually active, should
ask that pelvic examinations
and Pap smears be included in
their physical examinations at
least once every three years.


Library To Offer


Computer Classes


PAM KELLY, left, presents a check for $800 to Senior
Center Director Bobbie Krebs. (News Photo)


Krebs Accepts
Check For
Senior Center

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Coldwell Banker, Kelly and
Kelly properties hosted a
fundraiser this past year with
part of the proceeds going to
the Jefferson Senior Citizen
Center.
Center Director Bobbie
Krebs Was on hand recently to
accept an $800. check from
Pam Kelly.
Krebs says.the money will
be used to help care for the
frail and elderly in the county.


Elizabeth Suto.
Killed by a drunk driver
on February 27,1994, on Bell Blvd.
in Cedar Park, Texas.
If you don't stop your friend
from driving drunk, who will?


Boys, Girls Club Gets

Sports Equipment Grant


The Library will offer Digi-
tal Bridge Computer Classes
10 a.m. 12 p.m. beginning
January. 11.
Classes are offered free to
Library card holders. Cards
may be applied for at the cir-
culation desk.
A $10 fee per class will be
charged for supplies and lit-
erature.
Participants already attend-
ing classes will be given pref-
erence.
Class #1: Introduction to Mi-
crosoft Word 2003, will meet
every Tuesday and Wednes-
day during the weeks of Jan.
16 through Jan. 31.
The class will introduce
participants to all the basic
features they need to create
professional looking reports,
documents, and correspon-
dence.
Topics covered include
Word basics, editing docu-
ments, formatting fonts and
paragraphs, creating basic ta-
bles, working with basic page
layouts, using proofing tools,
and working with Web fea-
tures.
A prerequisite to this class
is that participants must be
able to use the mouse.


Class #2- Beginning Com-
puters, will meet every Thurs-
day and Friday during the
weeks of Jan. 11 through Jan.
26.
This class is designed for
users with little or no prior
computer experience.
Participants will learn about
the basic computer hardware
such as the CPU, keyboard,
mouse, printers, scanners, and
other peripheral devices.
Participants will also learn
,how to perform basic com-
puter operations, including
using the mouse, launching
programs, manipulating Mi-
crosoft Windows, working
with the desktop, and saving
files.
Angela Scott, Learning
Center manager, requests that
only serious applicants apply.
She may be contacted at 342-
0205,




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The County Boys and Girls
Club of the Big Bend was
awarded a USA Football
Equipment grant.
The equipment will be used
for the upcoming Boys and
Girls Club NFL Flag Football
season.
"I am very excited about re-
ceiving this grant because so
many youth organizations ap-
plied for it and we are very
fortunate to be a recipient,"
stated James Mercado, direc-
tor for the Boys and Girls
Club NFL Flag Football pro-
gram.
The Boys and Girls Club
NFL Flag Football season be-
gins its second season in
January.
Any questions relating to
the NFL Flag Football season,


may be directed to Mercado
at 519-1200.

To become a member of
any of the County Boys and
Girls Clubs (21st CLCC,) or
to receive information on
what the clubs have to offer,
contact Sabrina Williams,
membership coordinator, at
997-4226.


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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS. WED.. JANUARY 10, 2007


ppr


ts


Tigers Lose

To Madison

43-58 Fri.

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
school varsity boys basketball
team now stand 2-7 on the
season after falling to Madi-
son County, Friday, 43-58.
Jitavian Bennett led the Ti-
ger score with 18 points, two
assists, one block.
Tim Crumitie, eight points,
four assists, five steals.
Paul Huggins, eight points,
one-block.
Jon Dady six points, five as-
sists, three steals.
Lucius Wade, one point,
five rebounds, four steals.
Anthony Johnson and Jor-
dan Blair each had one re-
bound.
As a team, the Tigers
missed 16 free throws and
had 20 turnovers.


Lady Warriors split their
last two games to stand 10-4
on the season.
The girls fell to Wakulla, 39-
54.
"We had an off game and
Wakulla had a real good one,"
said Coach Daryl Adams.
"Wakulla had a lot of free
throws and that's what really
hurt us."
Brittany Hobbs led the score
Tor the Lady Warriors with
-nine points, three rebounds,
thir:e Assists.
Lindsey Day, six points,
eight rebounds, two assists
three steals one block.
Mallory Plaines, seven


points, four rebounds, five
steals.
Lisa Bailey, five points,
seven rebounds, two assists,
three steals.
Rikki Roccanti, four points,
three rebounds, two assists.
Bethany Saunders, three
points, two steals.
Caitlin Murphy, two points,
two rebounds, two steals.
Courtney Brasington, two
points; and Hannah Sorensen,
one point.
The Lady Warriors came
back to take a 43-31 victory
over Chiles.
Day led the score with 15
points, eight rebounds, four


LADY WARRIOR Lisa Bailey blocks the opponent on the court of a
ball game. (Photo by Lynne Saunders)


Tiger JVs Drop Two brig

Most Recent Games


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School junior varsity basket-
ball team dropped its two
most recent games, falling to
1-6 on the season.
The Tigers lost to NFC 65-
62, Dec. 12.
Marquice Dobson led the
charge with 24 points.
Maricio Scott, 16 points;


David Crumitie, 14 points;
Geondre Pittman, six points;
Curtis Hightower, two points;
and Harold Ingram, one point.
In the most recent game
with Wakulla, Dec. 18, Tigers
lost 58-36.
Ingram and Pittman, each
scored ten points; Hightower,
five points; Crumitic, four
points, Jarvis Aikins, three
points; and Laq antez
Francis, one point.


Sarah Sorensen Named All


B Big Bend Girls Cross Country


SARAH SORENSEN competes in the 2006 Florida State
meet in Dade City.


Sarah Sorensen, 14, Aucilla
Christian Academy Cross
Country runner, was recently
named to the second team of
the All Big Bend Girls Cross
Country with.a time of 20:52
in the 1A State Finals meet,
and for having outstanding
finishes throughout the year.
This was the second con-
secutive time she was named
to the team.
Sorensen began running for
the Lady Warriors while in
the sixth grade in 2004.
She began her first season
on the varsity team finishing
in fifth or sixth place and im-
proved her time throughout
the year to finish third and
fourth near the end of the sea-
son.
During her first meet, the
Lincoln Invitational, her fin-
ishing place was not men-
tioned, but her time was 24:47
in the 5K run.
In the second meet, she fin-
ished sixth on the ACA team
with 28:01; At the Madison,
Invitational, she finished the
short course in fifth for the
school with 19:24.
At Wakulla, she finished
third for the school with
27:00; while at the ACA Invi-
tational, she finished in third
place, improving her time to
23:56.
At the Brookwood Invita-
tional, she finished third for
Aucilla.
In her first District competi-
tion, she finished third with
22:30;
At Regional, she finished
fourth for the school with
23:19; and at State, she fin-
ished third overall for Aucilla
with 23:00.
Returning in 2005, Sorensen


worked from the constant
third place finish throughout
the year, improving to two
second place finishes at the
end of the season during fi-
nals.
She finished third in the
Lincoln Invitational with
23:22; third in the Brook-
wood Invitational with 2,3:50;
and third at FSU with 23:34,
improving her best personal
record by four and a half min-
utes.
During the ACA Invitational,
she again finished third with
22:47; third at Madison with
25:13; and third at the Bob
Cat Classic with 22:44.
At Jefferson County High
School, she finished third
with 25:33; and during the
District Championships, she
stepped up to take second
place with 20:25.
She finished third during Re-
gional with 21:59; and
wrapped up the season with a
second place finish during the
State Championship with
21:41.
Throughout the season, she
was also named to the list of
Big Bend Leaders in girls
cross country, often in third
place.
Returning for the 2006 sea-
son, Sorensen stepped up and
began with a second place
finish at Lincoln with 23:32
and finished all other races
during the season in the first
place slot for the school.
At the Cougar Challenge,
22:54; Prefontaine Forest
Run, 22:57; FSU, 22:03; and
the Tallahassee City Champi-
onship, 21:45.
In District, she finished with
21:29; at Regional, 21:14 and
at the State Finals, 20:52, her
best time of the season.


Sorensen is the daughter of
Patricia and Eric Sorensen of
Monticello.
Her mother stated that the
most time Sarah spent on any
sort of training is running
with her sister, Tristan, who
had run the first position for
Aucilla for several years.
ACA Girls Cross Country
Coach Dan Nennstiel added,
"Sarah has really shown
steady improvement and this
year was a big step for her,
running in the number one
slot.
"Tristan and Olivia are al-
ways on her heels pushing
and encouraging her all the
time," said Nennstiel. "Sarah
has really matured a lot this
year, but she is built right for
the cross country team, she's
long and lean."
"I don't expect that we've
seen the best of Sarah yet,"
Nennstiel concluded.


Gym Taking
Boxing

Applications


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Cherry Street Gym will
be accepting boxing applica-
tion Thursday 5-7 p.m., and
Friday, 4-6 p.m., at the former
gym location on Cherry
Street.
The gym will be partially
open Monday, 1-3 p.m. and
will open for full business,
Jan. 22, 4-8 p.m., Monday
through Friday..














8' .o 0 0.a377'5399


steals.
B".le,, ten points and ten
Jei b.ind for a double-double. i
S.a.idcr,, six points, three
rebounds, two assists, two

PF'li~e, five points, three
rebounds, four steals.
Hobbs, two points, three re-
bounds, five assists, four
steals.
Murphy, two points, five re- -
bounds, three steals.
Roccanti, two points, three
rebounds, two steals.
Brasington, one point, two
rebounds.


rec(


,pif R.
ii'i on


har't earned I
EInERGY STAR
rpu ,Our :

rc. I q r mncre
erlergystar go


11 | The Aucilla Christian Acad-
I| -., emy JV girls basketball team
S ;ii 1' defeated Wakulla 30-11, to
Si i -l stand 7-3 on the season.
i-j1i. ^ T Individual stats follow:
SMichaela Roccanti, one
S' i point, three assists, one offen-
k, g-t' sive rebound, two fouls, one
= --"'^ W block/steal, two turnovers.
Tiffany Brasington, two
JI points, one assist, one foul,
four blocks/steals, three turn-
overs.
I' Savannah Williams, four
S points, two assists, one offen-
s! !' sive and four defensive re-
[ I | bounds for a total of five, two
i I fouls, one block/steal, four
IL f I turnovers.
SChelsea Dobson, shot at 63
percent from the field, leading
the score with ten points two
ent ACA basket- offensive and three defensive
rebounds for a total of five,
one foul, three turnovers.
future Becky Turner, two offen-
sive rebounds, three fouls,
.,:e5 / '/ three turnovers.
S, Jodie Bradford, seven
R 10 points, three assists, one of-
""' fensive and two defensive re-
bounds for a total of three,
gqoro one foul, one block/steal, one
IV. turnover.
Miranda Wider, two points,
two assists, one offensive and
two defensive rebounds for a
total of three, one foul, one


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Dana Watt, four points, one
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Angela McCune, three de-
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Lady Warriors Split


Chiles, Wakulla Games


ACA JV Girls Beat


Wakulla 30-11


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IV rwe4t'Lervt A rt

Location 480 South Jefferson Street
Monticello, Florida 32344
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.. JANUARY 10. 2007 PAGE 9

Teen Center Beats


Boys, Girls Club

In Flag Football


JAMES MERCADO, center with cap, and members of the St. Phillip Boys and Girls
Club huddle up during a time out during the annual Boys and Girls Club Invitational.


Warriors Down


Cedar Key 52-45


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
St. Phillip Boys and Girls
Club (21st CCLC) and the
Boys and Girls Club at the
Teen Center (21st CCLC) re-
cently competed in the first
NFL Flag Football Invita-
tional.
Members between the ages
of 10 and 15 played at the
Teen Center field.
The St. Phillip Club team
was coached by James Mer-
cado, recreation director, and
the Teen Center Club team
was coached by Trey
Johnson, recreation specialist.
In a thrilling game, the Teen
Center team won 42-41 in
double overtime.


"It was a great day for foot-
ball, and both teams played a
great game. It was good prac-
tice for everyone for the up-
coming Flag football season,"
said Mercado.
The next season of the Boys
and Girls Club NFL Flag
Football Invitational will be-
gin Saturday, Jan. 20 again at
the Teen Center.
For more information about
upcoming events, contact
Mercado at 519-1200, or
jmercado@bgcbb.org
For information about be-
coming a member of any of
the county Clubs, contact
Sabrina Williams, member-
ship coordinator at 997-4226,
or swilliams@bgcbb.org


The First Step

I



To Any
Buying
Decision

Monticello

News

Cassifieds
r997-3

997-3568


The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy varsity boys basketball
team downed Cedar Key, 52-
45, in the second night of play
during the Christmas Tourna-
ment hosted at Branford.
"It was an excellent win for
us," said Coach Dan Nenn-
stiel. "It was a hard-fought
win for us, but a tremendous
victory.
During the fourth quarter,
three regular starters for the
Warriors, Stephen Griffin,
Luke Sadler, and Wade Scar-
berry fouled out for the re-
mainder of the game, and
Michael Kinsey,
Reggie Walker stepped up
to the plate and scored a lot of
big buckets for Aucilla, tak-
ing the Warriors to the
victory."
Nennstiel added that Jim
Stephens also did a good job
for the Warriors.
"There was a loose ball and
a scramble for possession. He
made a dive for it, retrieved


After the first four games of
the season the Jefferson
County High School varsity
girls basketball team individ-
ual statistics follow:
Shaumese Massey, 23
points, 7.6,6 average; 22 re-
bounds, 7.33 average; two
steals, .66 average; and five
blocks, 1.66 average.
Donna Ransom, 36 points,
average, nine; 33 rebounds,
average 8.25; 14 steals, aver-
age, 3.5; nine assists, 2.25 av-
erage; and five blocks, 1.25
average. /
Keneshia Coates, 18 points,
4.5 average; 15 rebounds,
3.75 average eight steals, av-
erage, two; two blocks, .50
average; and one assist, .25
average.


the ball and quickly called a
time-out before the referees
could call a traveling
penalty."
Leading the score for the
Warriors was Griffin with 15
points and 14 rebounds for a
double-double, two assists,
two steals, one block.
Walker, 13 points, seven.re-
bounds, one block.
Kyle Barnwell, nine points,
one rebound, one assist, five
steals.
Sadler, five points, two re-
bounds, one block.
Prateen Patel, four points,
two rebounds, two steals.
Scarberry, two points, one
assist, three rebounds, three
steals.
Kinsey, two points, one re-
bounds.
And Stephens, two re-
bounds.
Because the tournament
does not count on the regular
season, the Warriors remain
3-7 on the season.


Chandra Tucker, six points,
average, two; eight rebounds,
2.66 average; three steals, av-
erage, one.
Latoya Footman, 16 points,
average, four; 13 rebounds,
3.25 average; two steals, .50
average; and three blocks, .75
average.
Shanice Brooks, one point,
.33 average; 11 rebounds,
3.66 average; two steals, .66
average; and two assists, 66
average.
Jazmaun Hall, seven points,
1.75 average; nine rebounds,
2.25 average; two blocks, .50
average; and one assist, .25
average.
Kandice Griffin, six points,
average, two; 20 rebounds,


WARRIOR STEPHEN GRIFFIN jumps up to sink the shot
in a recent ACA basketball game. (Photo by Lynne
Saunders)





Calm and focus your mind
with the Taoist Tai Chi Society's
internal arts and methods.


To be held at
Christ Epsicopal
Church
425 N. Cherry St.
Monticello

Beginning January 9
Tuesday Evenings
for 16 Weeks
7:30 8:30 PM

Taoist Tai Chi Society of the USA l
2100 Thomasville Rd., Tallahassee
850-224-5438 www.taoist.org c


OFFER GOOD
TUESDAYS &
WEDNESDAYS
THRU
FEBRUARY 28, 2007


OPEN TO
THE PUBLIC!
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ST.JArAES 697-9606
8 A Y FOR TEE-TIMES


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ATTORNEY PAULA
A RADIANT Diane Clark, former deputy Clerk, gives Dale Boatwright a hug at his era.
farewell party. Clark presently works for the.Sheriff's Department.


THE CAKE, which the staff ordered from Publix, best expreses their sentiments,
"Good luck, Dale, we'll miss you.' i


NEW Clerk of Court Kirk Reams visits with some of his staff during the party. From
left, deputy clerks Deborah Curry and Rita Knecht and Reams.


SPARKMAN and Commissioner Skeet Joyner smile for the cam-


DAWN STIFF, longtime deputy clerk, visits with her former boss, outgoing Clerk of
i, Court Dale Boatwright. Stiff is presently with the Sheriff's Office.


LINDA HAMADANI, library director, appeared to be having a good time at the fare-
well party. In background is Gwen Reshard.


SANGIE HURTADO, with the State Attorney's office, and deputy clerk Jeri Peterson,

Carol and Dale Ellerbe.


DYNAMIC TRIO -- Judge Bobby Plaines, Sheriff David
Buck Bird share time during the party.


Don't trade it

- donate it.

Upgrading your car?
Avoid the hassles
of selling your old
car-and possibly
pocket a tax savings!


Call 1-800-LUNG-USA to find out how you can help.
Web site: http://www.lungusa.org


Hobbs and County Attorney


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Chillers Fuel Oil Furnaces
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EATING, AIR CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION
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IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY

DIAL 911


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Sleep Studies, C Pap, BiPap Titrations & Pilmonary Functions Studies
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We Have a Registered Polysomnographist
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850-973-8116 cell 850-464-4849
fax 850-973-8118
289 SW Range Ave. Madison, FL 32340
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 10, 2007 PAGE 11


Conservation Reserve Program


Signup Continues At FSA


Sign-up for the Conserva-
tion Reserve Program (CRP)
Longleaf Pin began Dec. 1,
2006, at the local Farm Serv-
ice Agency (FSA).
Enrollment runs continu-
ously until the 250,00 acre
goal is met, or until Dec.
31,2007, which ever comes
first.
To be eligible for this prac-
tice, land must be within the
historic range of the longleaf
pine and soils suitable for the
longleaf pine.
In addition, the land must
first meet the basic CRP eligi-
bility requirements.
Acceptable land is cropland
that was planted or considered
planted (including field mar-
gins) to an agricultural com-
modity in four out of six


years between 1996 and 2001,
and which is physically and
legally capable of being
planted to an agricultural
commodity.
A one-time up front signing
incentive payment (SIP) of
$100 per acre for CRP con-
tracts for 10 or more years,
which will be paid by CCC
after eligible criteria are met,
and the CRP contract is ap-
proved.
Also, there is a practice in-
centive payment equal to 40
percent of the eligible instal-
lation costs for certain
practices.
Commodity Credit Corpora-
tion will issue the payment af-
ter the CRP practice is in-
stalled, eligible costs are veri-
fied and other payment eligi-


ability criteria are met.
The annual'rental payments
that are paid are based on the
determined soil rental rates.
FSA bases rental rates on an
average value of dryland cash


It could happen to any one of
us. And if it did, wouldn't you
pray for someone to help you
put your life back together.
We're here for Sara Miller for
as long as it takes.


rents for the past three years
and adjusts rates to reflect the
relative productivity of soils
within each county.
For additional information,
contact the local FSA


Your donation
could change
Aff.e. Puas
call usat
1.800.899.0089
or visit
wwW.VOa.Org


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of America*
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TSaes TIMBER COMPANY CONSIGNMENT SHOP Transport & Setup
SIaBUYERS OF PINE AND DESIGNER CLOTHES, SHOES,
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SPECIALIZING IN PINE CHILDREN'S CLOTHES, Call For FREE Estimates
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Pam Wessels Mark Rebin Larry Nichols 562-2962
Brick & Block Realtor/Broker Realtor Associate Realtor Associate

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THIS SPACE Have you been Disappointed? Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled Fixtures-
Give me a call and let me help you. COULD BE Faucets Pumps Replaced Sewer & Water
COULD BE Serving Leon County for 50 years Connections Tanks Replaced Water heater
We Do Partiesl Tarot Cards*Palm Readings*Astrology YOURS FOR Repairs All Repairs
YOURsFO R Callinfor free questlonsl
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Questions,
EREA Anyone? A HMEAIUn i u
Just call toll-free: :ASSOC.JON
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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 10, 2007


LEGAL
LEGAL NOTICE The Jefferson
County Board of County
Commission will hold a joint
workshop with the Jefferson County
Planning Commission on January


No

Calories.


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Cholesterol.


...NO KIDDING. Our free
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U.S General Services Administration







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wwfnavyj~obs'i m


LEGAL
25, 2007 at 6:00 P.M.. The
workshop will discuss changes to the
Comprehensive Plan. The meeting
will be held in the Courtroom of the
Jefferson County Courthouse
located at the intersection of IUS
Highway 19 and US Highway 90 in
Monticello, FL. The meeting may be
continued as necessary. Information
concerning the meeting is available
at the Jefferson County Planning
Department, 445 W. Palmer Mill
Road, Monticello, FL 32344,
Telephone 850-342-0223. From the
Florida "government in the
Sunshine Manual', page 36,
paragraph c: Each board,
commission, or agency of this
state or of any political
subdivision thereof shall
include in the notice of any
meeting or hearing, if notice
of meeting or hearing is
required, of such board,
commission or, agency,
conspicuously on such notice,
the advice that, if a person
decides to appeal any
decision made by the board,
agency, or commission with
respect to any matter
considered at such meeting
or hearing, he or she will
need a record of the
proceedings, and "that, for
such purpose, he or she may
need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the
proceedings, is made, which
record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based
1/10/07,c
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING:
The District Board of Trustees of
North Florida Community College
will hold its regular monthly
meeting Tuesday, January 16, 2007
at 5:30 p.m. in the NFCC Student
Center Lakeside Room, NFCC, 325
NW Turner Davis Dr., Madison,
FL. A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by writing: NFCC, Office
of the President, 325 NW Turner
Davis Dr., Madison, FL 32340. For
disability-related accommodations,
contact the NFCC Office of College
Advancement, 850-973-1653. NFCC
is an equal access/equal opportunity
employer.
1/10/07,c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION File
Number: 06-117-PR IN RE:
ESTATE OF HELEN COVER
REEVES, Deceased. NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION The
administration of the estate of
HELEN COVER REEVES,
deceased, File Number 06-117-PR is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Jefferson County, Florida, Probate


LEGAL
Division, the address of which is
Jefferson County Courthouse,
Room 10, Monticello, Florida
32344. The name and address of the
personal representative and of the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below. ALL
INTERESTED PERSONS ARE
NOTIFIED THAT: All persons on
whom this notice is served who have
objections that challenge the
validity of the will, the qualifications
of the personal representative,
venue, or jurisdiction of this Court
are required to file their objections
with this Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM. All creditors of the
decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy of
this notice is served within three
months after the date of the first
publication of this notice must file
their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
TIIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM. All other creditors ol
the decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is January 10, 2007.
Attorney For Personal
Representative: T. BUCKINGHAM
BIRD P.O. Box 247 Monticello, FL
32345 850-997-3503 FL Bar ID #
0006176 HENRY LAWRENCE
REEVES 2017 Helms Avenue
Leesburg, Florida 34748
1/10,17/07,c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION CASE NO. 07-02-CA
MELVIN WILLIS, Plaintiff, vs.
UNKNOWN SPOUSES, LINEAL
DESCENDANTS, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND
ALL OTHER CLAIMANTS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST TURNER
.W. KINSEY, deceased; Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION TO:
Defendants UNKNOWN SPOUSES,
LINEAL DESCENDANTS, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND


The donation is tax deductible.
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Ih h 1* We take care of all the paperwork.







There's No Such Thing As

A Free Lunch!


HELP YOUR DOCTOR


HELPYOU
IN THREE EASY STEPS.
When you have a chronic illness,
there are steps you can take to
support your health care team, and
help them do their very best for you.
Ask questions.
There's no faster way to
understand your symptoms, your,
treatment, your dos and don't.
Remember, your doctor, nurses, and
therapists all work for you. They're
there to listen and answer your
questions.
Educate yourself.
Read up on your illness and your
medicines. Your library and the
Internet are great sources. Smart
patients stop acting like patients-
and become partners in their health
care treatment.
Network with others.
Whatever your illness, there are
others out there, just like you. In
fact; it's assured there's a national
agency to help people with your
condition. Groups like the National
SOsteoporosis Foundation and the
American Cancer Society can put
you in touch with people who
know what you're going through.
Ask your providers who to call.

It's your health.
You call the shots.



NATIONAL HEALTH COUNCIL
For assistance or more information, visit
www.NationalHealthCouncil.org or write the
National Health Council at 1730 'M" Street NW,
Suite 500. Washington. DC 20036-4505:
This message made posllble by an educational grant
from the Pflzer Health Literacy Initiative.


But We Do Offer




FREE ADS


If you have something to give

away We will help you with a

free classified ad

published twice



OR



If you have found something and

want to return it to its rightful

owner We'll help you with

Two free classified ads




Monticello News

997-3568



Classified Ads Work!


___________ ,.Wfrh ~


a-, .~ ~5"


For Sale by First United Methodist Church 2400 sq.
ft. home at 895 West Washington Street. This former
Methodist Parsonage with split floor plan has 4 bed-
rooms and 3 1/2 baths, refinished hardwood floors.
New tile floors in kitchen, laundry and baths, carpet
in the family room and master bedroom. Bathrooms
newly renovated. Wood stove insert in fireplace.
Large lot landscaped with magnolias, camellias, crepe
myrtles and azaleas. Large deck and screened porch.
$259,500. For more information
call 997-5545


ALL OTHER CLAIMANTS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST TURNER
W. KINSEY, DECEASED.
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN: You
are hereby notified that an action to
quiet title to the following real
property in JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA:
DESCRIPTION: All that property
in the Northeast Quarter of the
Northwest Quarter of Section 7,
Township 1 North, Range 6 East,
Jefferson County, Florida lying
North of U.S. Highway 90 (State
Road 10). LESS AND EXCEPT the
following described property:
(OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK, 252,
PAGE 81) Begin at the center of a
cement culvert located on the
Northerly side of U.S. Highway 90
as the Point Of Beginning, the same
being, station 351+45 on the State
Road Department survey map, and
run thence North to the Northerly
right of way boundary of said
Highway 90 run thence Easterly
along said Northerly boundary of
said Highway, a distance of 85 feet
for the POINT OF BEGINNING of
the lands herein described; From
said Point Of Beginning, run
Easterly along the Northerly right
of way of said Highway 90, a
distance of 315 feet, thence
Northerly and perpendicular to said
righf of way, a distance of 210 feet,
thence run Westerly and parallel
with said Highway 90, a distance of
315 feet, thence run Southerly to
said Highway 90 right of way


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boundary, containing I V acres,
more of less. ALSO LESS AND
EXCEPT the following described
property: (OFFICIAL RECORD
BOOK, PAGE 265) Beginning at a
point over the Western most culvert
in Section 7, Township 1 North,
Range 6 East, where the same
crosses U.S. Highway #90 (also
known as State Road #10) and in the
center of said highway, thence
running Southerly and along, the
center of said Highway, a distance
of 564 feet, thence running
Northerly and perpendicular to said
Highway to the Northerly right of
way boundary of said Highway for
the POINT OF BEGINNING of the
land herein conveyed: and from
said Point Of Beginning of the land
herein conveyed run thence
Northerly and perpendicular to said
Highway center, a distance of 210
feet, thence run Southeasterly and
parallel with said Highway center
420 feet thence run Southwesterly
and perpendicular to said Highway
center 210 feet and to the Northerly
right of way boundary of said
Highway, thence run Northwesterly
and along said Northerly right of
way boundary, a distance of 420
feet, more or less, and to the POINT
OF BEGINNING of the lands
herein conveyed. ALSO LESS AND
EXCEPT 200 foot right of way of
U.S. highway 90. ALSO LESS AND
EXCEPT the following described
property: (NEW PARCEL)
COMMENCE at the Southwest
corner of the Northeast Quarter of


NIGHT AT THE
MUSEUM
(PG)
Fri. 5:0d-7:30-9:55 Sat. 12:10-
2:35-5:00-7:30-9:55 Sun. 12:10-
2:35-5:00-7:30 Mon. Thurs.
5:00-7:30
NO PASSES
THE GOOD SHEPARD
(R)
Fri. 3:40-7:00-10:10 Sat. 12:15-
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CHARLOTTE'S WEB
(G)
Fri. 4:45-7:15-9:40 Sat. 12:00-
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ROCKY BALBOA
(PG)
Fri. 5:30-7:55-10:05 Sat. 12:30-
3:00-5:30-7:55-10:05 Sun.
12:30-3:00-5:30#7:55 Mon. -
Thurs. 5:30-7:55
NO PASSES
BLOOD DIAMOND
(R)
Fri. 4:15-7:05-9:55 Sat. 1:05-
4:15-7:05-9:55 Sun. 1:05-4:15-
7:05 Mon.- Thurs. 4:15-7:05
NO PASSES


All new high-
Sback seats and
more renova-
tions on the
way.







1-884gTOE rvii










MONTICE


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997-3568


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Monticello News
I PO Box 428
Monticello, Fla. 32345

SW~M11htiii ^ ,6i ....


LEGAL
the Northwest Quarter of Section 7,
Township I North, Range 6 East,
Jefferson; County, Florida and run-
North 89 degrees 38 minutes 22
seconds East 789.52 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING, thence
from said POINT OF BEGINNING
continue North 89 degrees 38
minutes 22 seconds East 191.63 feet
to a point, thence North 59 degrees
12 minutes 00 seconds West 163.97
feet to a point, thence South 30
degrees 48 minutes 00 seconds West
; 99.16 feet tot the POINT OF
SBEGINNING, containing 0.19 acre,
more or less, has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
. any, to it on CHARLES F. OTTO,
ESQ. of the law offices of
STRALEY & OTTO, P.A., whose
address is 2699 Stirling Road, Suite
SC-207, Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33312, on or before
2007, and file the original with the
Clerk of this court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorney or
immediately thereafter, otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Complaint. WITNESS my hand and
Seal of this court this 4th day of
January, 2007. Clerk of Court By:
Norm L. Wilkins
i10/10/17/07,c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
.JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION CASE NO. 07-02-CA
MELVIN WILLIS, Plaintiff, vs.
UNKNOWN SPOUSES, LINEAL
DESCENDANTS, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND
'ALL OTHER CLAIMANTS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST TURNER
W. KINSEY, deceased; Defendants.
AFFIDAVIT OF DILIGENT
SEARCH AND INQUIRY STATE
OF FLORIDA COUNTY OF
BROWARD Before me, the
undersigned authority, personally
appeared CHARLES F. OTTO,
ESQ., first being duly sworn,
deposes and says: 1. Affiant is the
attorney for Plaintiff in this action
and, as such, has personal
knowledge and authority to make
this affidavit. 2. Affiant has made a
diligent search and inquiry to locate
and discover the names of
:Defendants UNKNOWN SPOUSES,
LINEAL DESCENDANTS, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
: ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
. CREDITORS, TRUSTEE, AND
SALL OTHER CLAIMANTS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
SUNDER OR AGAINST TURNER
SW. KINSEY, DECEASED. 3.
Despite the above efforts of Affiant
as set forth hereinabove, Affiant has
been unable to determine the
names, residences, or whereabouts
of, or obtain personal service on
Defendants UNKNOWN SPOUSES,
LINEAL DESCENDANTS, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,


LEGAL
CREDITORS, TRUSTEE, AND
ALL OTHER CLAIMANTS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST TURNER
W. KINSEY, DECEASED. 4. It is
unknown whether or not the
unknown parties are over the age of
18 years. 5. Affiant knows of no one
and believes that there are no
persons in Florida on whom service
of process would bind Defendants
UNKNOWN SPOUSES, LINEAL
DESCENDANTS, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEE, AND
ALL OTHER CLAIMANTS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST TURNER
W. KINSEY, DECEASED. 8.
Affiant believes that Defendants
UNKNOWN SPOUSES, LINEAL
DESCENDANTS, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEE, AND
ALL OTHER CLAIMANTS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST TURNER
W. KINSEY, DECEASED, are or
may be interested in the subject
matter of this cause and who may
claim by, through, under, or against
TURNER W. KINSEY,
DECEASED, as heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, or other
claimants thereof and who after
diligent search and inquiry as
described-above, are unknown to
Affiant. FURTHER AFFIANT
SAYETH NAUGHT. CHARLES F.
OTTO, ESQ. SWORN to subscribed
before me this 29th day of
December, 2006. JACUELINE
VILLALOBOS Notary Public, State
of Florida My Commission #DD
333589 EXPIRES: October 27, 2008
Bonded Thru Notary Public
underwriters Personally known or
produced identification I .
Type of identification produced

1/10,17,07,c

HELP WANTED
Interviewing for skilled labor po-
position. Driver License &
background check required.
545-1776 M-F 8-5
1/10,
VMS, Inc. is accepting
applications for a Maintenance
Technician to work on State
Roads out of the Monticello,
Florida office. Thisis a full time
entry level position that
includes, but not limited to,
hurricane disaster response,
landscaping, litter removal, and
sign repair replacement.
Applicant must have a valid
Florida's driver's license with a
safe driving record, This
position requires a background
check & drug testing. Starting
salary $9.50 an hour. Benefits
available upon completion of
probation. Apply at 1455 N.
Jefferson Street, Monticello, FL.


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


HELP WANTED

(850) 997-5000.
R/D 1/ 10,12,17,19,c
Adjunct Instructor for adult
education classes needed at
North Florida Community
College Career and Technical
Center. Primary teaching
assignment is instruction of
special needs students and
includes the following classes:
Adult Basic Education, GED
Preparation, Vocational
Preparatory Instruction, and
Workplace Readiness Skills. In
addition to teaching duties,
position requires data collection
and reporting. 20 hours per
week, Monday through
Thursday, between 9 AM and
4:30 PM. Must have Bachelors
Degree with certification for
serving special needs students.
Applicant must have strong
computer and organizational
skills. Application is available
online at www.nfcc.edu. Send
application and resume to
NFCC Human Resources, 325
NW Turner Davis Drive,
Madison, FL 32340. Questions?
Call 850-973-1615 or email
andersenk@nfcc.edu EOE
R/D1/5,10.1217,c
Food Service Personnel/ Cook
for Correctional feeding
program food production
experience clean background &
drug screening required benefits
call Ms. Cox 850-948-6940
R/D 1/5,10,12,17,c
Waitress: Fulltime/ Parttime,
apply in person to Courtyard
Cafe, 110 East Dogwood Street.
Between ; 2 pm
12/1,tfn,c
Part-iime Accountant or
experienced Bookkeeper for
small business. Good working
environment. Must know Quick
Books. 322 6600.
S1/'',TFN,c

SERVICES
LPN, retired- will care for
elderly patient. Call Joan
948-7 "S8
R/rI1/10,12,17,19,24,26,31,2/2,
Child Care Services- infant to 3
years old. Reasonably low
prices, in my home. 997-5498
11/1 ,TFN,c

Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
new menopausal products.
Jackson's Drug Store.
5/1? tfn, c
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd, 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
FFN

LOST
REWARD!!' Deer Antlers on hwy.
19 South 12/31/06 or 12/31/06
933-3975.
R/I 1/10,12,pd

FOUND
Rottweiler 60 lbs+ Female on S.
Main Ave. 12/10/06, 997-3379.
R/D 12/20,22,29,1/5,nc
Keys on green key ring found
Sunday 11/26/06 on Lake Road
near Tecumseh Rd. Call Debbie
at 997-3568
11/29,12/1,6,tfn,nc


AUTOMOTIVE
2001 Mitsubishi Montero Sport
LE SUV. Great condition. Retail
$8,890 sell for $7,950. 997-2232
R/D I/10,12,17,19,pd
1996 Ford F-350 Diesel
Crewcab $5,000 O.B.O. No calls
after 9:00 pm please 251-2237.
1/10,TFN,nc
1989 International Dump
Truck. 18CY. Tandem Axles.
$18,000. 251-2437, 997-0901.
R/D 12/6,tfn,nc
1996 Ford Ranger XLT
Supercab 2wd 4.0 V6 127K AC
AT Toolbox Needs some minor
work, but driveable now. $3,000
251-0763 Sam 8pm
9/27,TFN,nc

FOR SALE
New "Wyndham Road" Baker's
rack. 36x73x14. Four shelves,
wine rack. Grape design. Pewter
finish. Beautiful $99 997-2232
R/D /10,12,pd
SHEDS- Custom built storage
sheds. See display on Hwy 221
North Greenville. Call Bob
242-9342
R/01/10, 2,17,19,24,26,31,2/2,7,
9,14,16,21,23,28,3/2,7,9,14,16,
Bantam chickens $5 each phone
997-3904 Leave message
R/D 1/10,12,pd
Pool- above ground 15x30 Oval-
w/deck & Jacuzzi- 5 yrs old.
$500, you move. 997-6072,
545-1698.
R/D 1/5.10,12,17,pd
Pool Table- Like new. 8 ft.
furniture quality, oak finishfi 1.2
in. slate, green felt, woven
leather pockets with full set of
cues. Ping Pong top available.
Asking $1,500.00 Call Mike
997-3975. 3.
R/D 1/5,10,12,17,pd

New Queen Plush Orthopedic
pillowtop mattress set in sealed
plastic, warranty. Sacrifice
$299. Can deliver.
850-222 9879
12/6, FFN,c
King Pillowtop mattress set.
Brand new brand name. Must
move. $225.(850) 222-2113
12/6.tfn,c
Formal cherry dining room
table, leaf + 6 chairs. New in
boxes. $450. (china cabinet &
delivery available).
850-425-8374
12/6,TFN,c
King size bedroom set New
bed, chest, TV armoire, 2
nightstands. $3,200 value, must
sell $900 850-545-7112
12/6 rFN,c

FOR RENT
House- 2-BDR, 1-BTH, Lamont,
old: very private $500.00 mth
about acre 519-4528 Plus
SSecurity idp.
R/D 1/10,12,17,pd
Two Bedroom House for rent in
City. Call 997-0950
12/6,tfn,c
For Rent or Sale you move.
Merritt 54x24 DW 3-BDR,
2-BTH w/fireplace. No calls
after 9:00 pm please 997-3318
or 544-7785.
R/D /l10.tfn.nc

REAL ESTATE
Nobles Subdivision- Newly
renovated 3/1 total under roof
1710 sqft. New doors- vinyl
windows -CHA- carpet Fenced
150x100 lot. Well landscaped
owner/REaltor $118,700 O.B.O.
997-2973, 997-6806
R/D 11. I15,TFN,c


These properties are being offered by the lenders for the first time!
Sales Thu. Jan. 25th Sat. Jan. 27th
DEBARY, FL MIAMI, FL PORT ST LUCIE. FL
* 12 Columbine Trail 5812 SW 163rd PI O 1002 SWWhittierTer
DAYTONA BEACH, FL MIAMI BEACH, FL TALLAHASSEE, FL
S37 Circle Or 1614 West Ave #604 863 Wilmon Ct
JACKSONVILLE, FL POMPANO BEACH, FL WAUCHULA. FL
* 1015 Powhattan St 856 Crystal Lake Dr *311 Riverside Dr
* 1418W24th St
Formore details: williamsauction.com 800.801.8003
Inspections: I-4pm Sun Jan. 21st and 2 hrs prior to sale.
Tallahasse, FL & Miami, FL homes also open Sun Jan. 14th.
FL RE LIC 3003737 DEAN C.WILLIAMS BROKERAUC LICAU327B MONTE WIL &
S LOWDERMANAUCTIONEER.W&WAUC LICAB-0000760 W LLIAM' & I LLIAMS


HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR EMPLOYMENT


II


Bulldozers, Backhoes, Loaders, Dump
Trucks, Graders, Scrapers, Excavators

-National Certification
-Job Placement Assistance


800-405-5833
Associated Training Services www.equipmentoperator.com


ELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 10, 2007 PAGE 13

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$9.00
Each Additional Line....$1.25
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:


Waukeenah Highway 27.99 acres fenced pas-
ture nice hill $545,000

Aucilla Shores 5 level wooded acres $75,000

Christmas Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath doublewide
with nice deck, fenced yard on 1 acre $73,500

Serious Buyers Looking for::
Small Farm 125-350 acres to
recreate with grand children
-30-70 acre investment to sell in
about 10 years
-20-130 acres investment for 2
brothers


Realtor Tim Peary


850-997-4340
See all our listings
www.TimPeary.ci

Realtor Tim Peary Sells Re
Simply the Best!


at
om

al Estate!


997-3568



Q ----- -~--*-- |
5 Housing Vouchers


SVWe accept Ial vouchers

N, 2/2 $615 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 $50 dep.

i Pool & Youth Activities

1l 575-6571
w



Serious About Sellinq?
List today!




Homes That "Tak" dust Sell Faster








REALTOR


(850) 997-4340


Property Manaqement Services!!!
S Residential and Commercial
Great Rentals
2/1 1/2 bath mobile home east of
town on 5 acres $650/month
2 bedroom cabin in the woods $750 mo

Wooded Tract 2.09 hillside acres east of town
on graded County Road $30,400

Lloyd Acres on a wooded hillside a 3 bedroom 2
bath modular home with oak floors, fireplace and
lots of very nice extras including shop for $87,500

Historic Budd House built ca 1882 by commu-
nity leader of the day for his family. Lovely wood
work, high ceilings, spacious rooms, grand fire-
places, marvelous porches, currently 4 bedrooms
and 2 baths $355,000

Waterfront Home!! Like New, roomy, 3 bedroom
2 bath home with big carport, nice shed with 5
acres on very nice lake near 1-10 and US 19
$385,000 See it at www.TimPeary.com

Amazinq Buy!!! Mixed Use Property 12 plus
partially cleared acres on US 19 south land use
designation permits 4 houses per acre near Den-
nis' Trading post only $36,500 per acre

New Listing 13.29 acres some wooded some
open $5,000 per acre

Terrific Location 3 bedroom 2 bath doublewide
with fireplace, big porch, garage, shed, above
ground pool, with big trees, fence paddocks, on
county maintained paved Cherry Tree Lane now
$127,500

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly wooded
acres Only $36,500

Pasture and Pecans 5-10 lovely acres on paved
road $15,500 per acre Very nice property, good
deed restrictions

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Country Living at it's Best! REDUCED Com-
fortable 4 bedroom 3 bath home on five fenced
acres with guest cottage w/bath, 2 car garage, big
shop, pasture 100 pecan-trees and a nice pool
Only $365,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South near
Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000










PAGE 14. MONTICELLO. (FL). NEWS. WED.. JANUARY 10. 2007


NFCC COMMUNITY CHORUS performed at Brynwood Center Dec. 17.


NFCC Chorus Performs


At Brynwood Center


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The North Florida Commu-
nity College Community
Choir performed a Christmas
program for the residents of
Brynwood Center and
visitors, Sunday afternoon,
Dec. 17.
CO-directed by residents
Rebecca and Arnold Burkart,
the concert brought the fall
schedule of the chorus to a
close.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Careless driving resulted in
two women transported to
TMH with serious injuries,
and two men receiving minor
injuries, in the County,
Wednesday afternoon.
FHP reports that at 3:10 p.m.
on US-27, just north of CR-
257, Arnold J. Monroe, 50,
and Sheree H. Monroe, 50,
both of Crystal River, FL
were driving a 2000 Ford
truck northbound on US-27.
At the same time William T.
Bellamy, 64, and Analaura I.
Bellamy, 64, both of Val-
paraiso, FL were driving a
202 Peterbuilt motor home,.
also northbound.
Arnold Monroe was pass-
ing William Bellamy in the
inside lane, lost control of his
vehicle, and the trailer he was


A Monticello man was killed
last week when he was hit by
a train as he walked along the
tracks in the vicinity of Tom
Brown Park.
The Tallahassee Police De-
partment reports that Thurs-
day morning, shortly before
8:49 a.m., Curtis Hamilton,
35, and longtime girlfriend
Andrea Hinds, 36, both of
Monticello, were walking
their two dogs eastbound
along the CSX train tracks,
when they heard a train ap-
proaching
When Hinds and Hamilton
heard the train, at about the
same time they saw it, they


The chorus consists of
members from Jefferson,
Madison, Taylor and Leon
Counties.
The Brynwood concert in-
cluded, "Joyful, Joyful Day"
by George Frederick Handel;
"Silver Bells" by Jay Living-
ston; "Salvation Is Created"
by Pavel Tshesnokov; "Rise
Up Shepherds and Follow.
"African Noel", a South Af-
rican folk song accompanied
by drums, native shakers and
tambourines; "I'm Going
- Home;""The World's Desire"


pulling began to fishtail,
swiping the left side of Bel-
lamy's vehicle.
Monroe was unable to regain
control of his vehicle and
swerved to the right, striking
the left front of Bellamy with
the trailer.
Monroe's vehicle rotated
sideways, going off the north
shoulder of the roadway,
overturning twice before
coming to a final rest.
Bellamy veered to the right,
coming to a rest on the north
shoulder of the road.
Sheree Monroe and Ana-
laura Bellamy both sustained
serious injuries.
All involved were wearing
their seat belts, except Ana-
laura Bellamy.
Monroe was charged with
-careless driving.
FHP determined that the in-
cident was not alcohol
related.


started to run off the bridge.
The two dogs, which were
unleashed, ran in opposite di-
rections..
One dog followed Hinds and
the other dog was confused as
to whom it to follow.
Hamilton started to run
back on the bridge to get the
dog off the track. He made it
across the bridge and was just
clearing the train track with
the dog, when part of the
train connected with the back
of his head.
Hamilton was pronounced
dead at the scene.
Hinds and the two dogs
were unharmed.


by Eleanor Dailey, and "Glo-
ria" by David Giardiniere.
Singers included, from Jef-
ferson County: Russell and
Janis Courson, Martha Creel,
Dan and Linda Hamedani.
From Madison County:
Linda Boyles, Joan Sootkoos,
Dolly Ballard, Mike and
Carol Miller, Barbara
McCauley; from Taylor
County; Mike Philyaw; and
from Leon County: Byron
and Bobbie Smith.
All interested newcomers
are invited to join the choir in
rehearsals 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Monday, at the Music Build-
ing, Hardee Center, Building
11 on the NFCC Campus in
Madison.
Since there are quite a few
singers from Monticello, they
carpool every week, and of-
ten ride in the Burkart's van.
The first meeting of the new
spring semester is Monday,
Jan. 8, when rehearsals be-
gin for the spring concert
planned for April.
For further information and
help with transportation, call
Rebecca or Arnold Burkart at
997-8803.



Sheriff Says

Holidays

Uneventful


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Sheriff David Hobbs reports
that during the entire holiday
season, Thanksgiving through
New Year's Day, there were
no serious crimes reported in
the county.
"We didn't even have one
DUI, I'm glad to say," said
Hobbs. "We need to be
thankful for that, we had a
good, uneventful and peaceful
holiday season this year."
Hobbs notes that there were
also no speeding citations is-
sued.
Last year, deputies issued
nearly 30 citations for speed-
ing between Capps and Wa-
cissa .
The speed limit is 45 MPH,
and 30 motorists were
clocked at 65-75 after area
residents filed complaints last
year.
"Everyone was pretty much
behaving themselves this
year," said Hobbs. "This is
the first time in a long time
that we have had an unevent-
ful holiday season."


ABGIlfadEiyNeyejyterrd nasrleo eetblydy


ABIGAIL, left, and Emily Neely enjoy their ride in a stroller, on a recent balmy day.
(News Photo)




Good Turnout Expected


For MLK Parade,


FAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Plans for events marking
the 27th Annual Martin
Luther King, Jr. ceremonies
and celebration, have been
completed, and this year's
events promise to* be the
biggest and best ever.
Activities begin Saturday,
-Jan. 13, with a Freedom Fund
banquet, 6:30s p.m. at
Memorial MB Church.
Guest speaker is Leon
County resident, Bill Proctor.
Ceremonies continue Jan.
14 with the MLK Membrial
service at the Memorial MB
Church, highlighting what the
community must do to keep
King's dream alive.
Guest speaker will be
Dr. Helen Johnson-Robinson,
Pastor Bethel AME Church.
The MLK Parade is slated
for 10 a.m., Jan. 15 beginning
in front of Capital City Bank
on South Jefferson Street.

Parade entries number 23,
including, the Buffalo;
Soldiers of Tallahassee, who
will ride motorcycles and
escort Grand Marshals, Dr.
Flossie Byrd, Ph.D. and
JCHS/HMS Principal Juliet
Jackson.
Among the entries are: the
Jefferson County High School
marching band, the Godby
High marching band, the col-
orful Junkanoos and Rhythm
Rushers, Classic Auto Clubs,
and Hiram Masonic Lodge.
Parade Chairman Gerrold


Austin said parade entries
will be limited to 50, and ap-
plicants must contact Austin
or submit an application be-
fore the Jan. 14 deadline.
Austinscan be reached at 997-
8817 during the evening or at
the Boys and Girls Club dur-
ing the Day. "I will take ap-
plications over the phone," he
said.
Immediately following the
parade, the Annual Celebra-
tion at the Park will begin
and continue to 3 or 4 p.m.
Coordinator Diane hall said
that as usual, the event is a
countywide family oriented
event.


Events
Radio station WHGH AM
of Thomasville will broad-
cast a live-feed during both
the parade and from the cele-
bration at the park.
Park events will include a
variety of vendors of food and
wares, and many games and
attractions for the children.
The JROTC Color Guard
will present the colors and re-
cite the Pledge of Allegiance,
and many groups including
gospel singers Carl Joseph
and the True-Tones of Madi-
son, the Junkanoos and the
Rhythm Rushers will be on
hand.
Greetings will be offered by
local dignitaries.


LET THE JOURNEY BEGIN


1-800-USA-NAVY


In Case Of Emergency Dial 911


Crash In County


Injures Four


Train Kills Local

Man In Tallahassee




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