Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00166
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: January 27, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00166
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text


404 LDIA -DA ~&W


WWII Vets
Living National
Treasures

Editorial, Page 4


Birdwell New
Red Hats
Queen Mum

Story, Photo, Page


[4 Friday Morning





Montic


138TH YEAR NO.08, 50 CENTS


Publ


.11


ACA, JCHS
Athletes Named
Big Bend Leaders

Story, Page 9


Wednesday & Fridays


Chamber Hears
Coffee Roaster's
Presentation

Story, Photo, Page 12


ews


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27. 2006


*Initiative Aims



To Recruit 620



iLocal Mentors


LT. GOVERNOR TONI JENNINGS talks with gram. Jennings was here to kickoff the gov-
School Superintendent Phil .Barker prior to ernor's mentoring initiative. (News Photo)
the commencement of Wednesday's pro-


Preparations Begin For


56th Watermelon Fest


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Plans for the 56th Watermelon
Festival got underway Monday, as
the Festival Committee set the dates
for the event, and named event
chairpersons.
Mary Frances Drawdy will chair
the 56th Festival, June 1 -17, with
Co-chair Katrina Walton.
The Kickoff Dinner Thursday,
June 1, and Bed Race open the festi-
val, which continues through Satur-
day, June 17, with the Parade, Arts
and Crafts, and Platform Events,
among items planned.
The combined Princess Pageant
and Little King and Queen Event is
scheduled Saturday June 3, with the
Queen's Pageant set for Saturday,
June 10.
Other events and dates discussed
include a Willow Pond Event, Fri-
day, June 9; Fashion Show, Thurs-
day, June 15; Rotary Barbecue and
Street Dance, Friday, June 16.
Despite rumors to the contrary, the
Watermelon Festival Committee,
which in incorporated, decided to
continue the event, which always
draws large crowds.
Drawdy told the committee that a
large number of last year's unsold


tank top festival shirts was donated
to Dr. Wes Scoles for his missionary
work.

Event To Kick
Off On June 1
Pageant chairpersons would look
for a new sound and video person
for the pageants and street dance.


It was decided that the Street
Dance would return to the festival
this year. Last year a sock hop took
its place. No decision was made
about which band to obtain for the
dance.
Liz Beaty is secretary and treas-
urer of the 56th Watermelon Festi-
val
Chairpersons for events include:
(See Festival Page 2)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Commissioners have their work
cut out for them, insofar as trying to
stay ahead of the proverbial eight
ball of coming development, as
Congressman Allen Boyd made
clear to them last week.
"Change is coming," Boyd told
commissioners on Thursday, re-
minding them that they were at the
level of government where "the tire
meets the road."
To underscore his point, Boyd
told his often-told anecdote of the
time he was newly elected to Con-


gress. It happened that a storm had
made county roads impassable and
he got a call from an elderly resident
whom he described as a former
teacher and member of his mother's
generation.
The woman told him he had to do
something about the condition of
her road, which was making it im-
possible for her to go to town or for
school buses and emergency vehi-
cles to travel on.
"Have you thought of calling your
county commissioner," Boyd says
he suggested to the lady.
"Oh, my," Boyd says the lady re-
sponded, "I didn't know I had to go
(See Growth Page 2)


Kick-Off Held

At JES School

LAZARO ALEMAN
| Senior Staff Writer
Lt. Governor Toni Jennings was
in town Wednesday to launch a new
mentoring initiative that aims to im-
prove the academic performance of
students at Jefferson Elementary
School (JES) -- one of 13 "strug-
gling schools" in the state.
Meaning that JES is one of 13 ele-
mentary schools in eight Florida
counties that received a grade of F
on the State School Report Card, a
..,ociument compiled ,annually from
the FCAT scores.
SThe new initiative, being pushed
by Governor Jeb Bush in conjunc-
tion with the Florida League of Cit-

ies, seeks to recruit government,
corporate and local leaders to serve
as mentors.
"All statistics show that children
who are mentored have the right
demographics," Jennings said.
She referred to research that she
said showed that children who par-
ticipate in mentoring programs were
less likely to get into trouble with
the law, experiment with drugs,
drop out of school, or engage in
other aberrant or destructive behav-
ior.
"It's all about giving back to the
community," Jennings said. "In this
world, know that you can make a
difference. And you can change the
world for one person."
All that was being asked, she said,
was that volunteers donate one hour
of their time each week to mentor a
child. Certainly, if the governor
could find the time to do it -- busy
as his schedule was -- "we can find
an hour," Jennings said.
Steve Uhfelder, chairman of the
Florida Mentoring Partnership (for-
merly the Governor's Mentoring Ini-
tiative created by Gov. Bush in
1999) broke it down to simple num-
bers.
What it meant for the local initia-
tive, Uhfelder said, was that 620


volunteers had to step forward to
mentor each of JES's 620 students.
"Mentoring does make a differ-
ence," Uhfelder said. "Kids can in-.
crease up to 50 percent of their
scores on the FCAT."
The different speakers invariably
touched on the connection between
improved academic performance
and economic development.
"As mayor of Monticello, I care
about the quality of our schools,"
Mayor Julie Conley said. "Success-
ful schools are intricately tied to our
economic development efforts and
-- most importantly-- to the happi-
ness and satisfaction of Monticello
families."


Conley, in fact, has taken on the
challenge of leading the local effort,
in conjunction with a group of other
community leaders. Members of this
group include Police Chief David
Frisby; Pastor Tobie Berrian, of
Casa Bianca M.B. Church; Rev.
Jimmy Brookins, president of the
Jefferson County Ministers Confer-
ence; David Ward, president of the
Kiwanis Club; and Tom Conley, in-
coming president of the Rotary
Club.
Other speakers at the brief morn-
ing ceremony at the elementary
school were JES Principal Sandra
Kay Collins and School Superinten-
(See Initiative Page 2)


STEVE UHFELDER, chairman of the Florida Mentoring Part-
nership, looks on as Lt. Gov. Toni Jennings signs the volun-
teer sign-up sheet at the front of the room. (News Photo


Local Relay For Life Garners

Honor From Cancer Society


CONGRESSMAN ALLEN BOYD talks with
county officials following last week's County
Commission meeting. Boyd came to the


meeting to tell commissioners he had se-
cured $1 million for the repair of the
Sneads Smokehouse bridge. (News Photo)


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Relay For Life of Jefferson
County has been recognized with
the American Cancer Society Pace-
setter Award.
This award is given to Relay For
Life events that are "setting the
pace" for other Relays in Florida.
Relays must meet certain criteria
including recruiting 25 percent of
the teams goaled, recruiting 30 per-
cent of past teams and holding -an
Early-Bird event.
The 2006 Relay For Life of Jef-
ferson Steering Committee has
been hard at work since last May to
earn the Pacesetter Award.


Dedicated volunteers have sur-
passed the Pacesetter requirements
and made plans for the future Re-
lays in Jefferson County through
development of volunteer succes-
sion plans.

More Than 20
Teams Signed

More than 20 teams have com-
mitted for the 2006 Jefferson
Relay.
"The Pacesetter Award shows
this community's commitment to
Relay as a year-round event," said
American Cancer Society Commu-
nity Representative Diane Huggins.
"Most importantly, the committee


has done the advance work neces-
sary to ensure a successful local
2006 Relay For Life, and we are
very proud of its
accomplishments."
Relay For Life is an 18-hour team
fundraising event where partici-
pants walk around a track relay
style and camo out over night.
Teams of cancer-fighting enthusi-
asts will gather at the former Jeffer-
son County High School track on
Water Street on Friday and Satur-
day, April 21 and 22 to show their
support and dedication to fighting
this disease.
Additional volunteers from the
community are needed to organize
teams and work with committee
members to plan the event.
(See Relay Page 2)


Boyd Tells County Officials

TO Expect Explosive Growth


'rN ^s







PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 27, 2006
1 I4 B


MEMBERS of the Jefferson Legislative Com-
mittee met with Lt. Gov. Toni Jennings fol-
lowing the presentation at the elementary


I -j
r--BrR '",,a. i .. a,


school. The committee wanted to impress
on Jennings the county's needs for the com-
ing legislative session. (News Photo)


Commissioners Eye



Another Impact Fee


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Commissioners have put off for
the time being consideration of a
transportation impact fee that would
be applied to new developments. It's
their plan, however, to revisit the is-
sue as soon as the legislative session
ends.
That's because it's expected that
the Legislature will be addressing
impact fees in the coming session.
And commissioners want to see
what rule changes the legislators
make before the county commits to
the measure.
Melissa Proctor, of Government
Service Group Inc. (GSG) -- the
Tallahassee-based company that
conducted the study for the ambu-
lance and fire impact fees imple-
mented in August -- last week pre-
sented commissioners with a pro-
posal for the-feasibility study that
must precede imposition of the
transportation impact fee.
The first thing commissioners
noted was that GSG's charge for the
study was "considerably higher"
than what the company charged for
the fire and ambulance impact fees
study. Try $43,535, versus $15,000.


Proctor explained that the trans-
portation impact fee was a totally
different animal, based on value
rather than on service. The bulk of
the cost, she said, involved the serv-
ices of an engineer, who would cal-
c.ulate the road requirements that
could be paid by the impact fee,
such as lane additions and the wid-
ening of a road.

Cost Of Study
IS $43,535, But
Rate of Fee Is
Supposed TO
Be Higher Also

"It's very involved when you
bring in an engineer," Proctor said.
Bottom line, she said, all the calcu-
lations would be factored into the
equation, with the result that the
transportation impact fee would be
much higher than the ambulance
and fire impact fees.
Proctor reminded commissioners
that the county could recoup the cost
of the study from the monies gener-
ated once the impact fee was im-
posed. What's more, the county was
entitled to an automatic $5,000 re-


New Initiative


(Continued From Page 1)
dent Phil Barker.
"This team is up and running and
we're going to take that F and make
it an A," Collins said.
Barker noted that mentoring pro-
grams were one piece of the educa-
tional process to ensure success. The
other piece, he said, had to do with
the teachers, staff and site
principals.
"And I've never been so optimistic
as I have this year with the school
site principals," Barker said.
At the conclusion of the 30-
minute presentation, those in atten-
dance were urged to sign the large
sign-up board at the front of the
room, with Jennings the first to sign
up.
The lieutenant governor subse-
quently met with representatives of


Growth
(Continued From Page 1)
that high up."
His point, Boyd said, was that
commissioners were at the level of
government where they had to deal
with problems on a personal level.
And more and more, he said, com-
missioners were going to have to
deal with the problems of develop-
ment and growing pains.
"Change is coming and we can't
stop it," Boyd said. "The baby
boomers are starting to retire, and a
lot of them are coming to Florida.
There will be a great amount of
pressure put on rural areas."
Among other things, Boyd said
Americans would also see the devel-
opment of alternative sources of en-
ergy in the coming years.

Catch It Here At The
Monticello
News


the Jefferson Legislative
Committee, who tried to impress on
her the need for the state to fund the
county's priority projects in the
coming legislative session.
"What can we do to have some
things happen?" Dick Bailar asked.
"What buttons should we be
pushing?"
Jennings assured the group that it
was doing everything that it needed
to do to ensure success, by lobbying
key legislators and others in the ad-
ministration. But she would keep the
group's request in mind, she said.
Those requests touched on the ag-
riculture center and the Emergency
Operation Center, among other
things, that county officials are
hoping to get funded in the coming
session.


*1 1.- ''-~

- .. I.


'it


duction, which would reduce the
cost of the study to $38,535.
Absent the study, Proctor said the
county would be vulnerable legally
if the impact fee were challenged.
The courts, she said, would want to
see that the fee was not arbitrary,
but based on reliable and verifiable
data.
"I'm in favor of a transportation
impact fee," Commissioner Skeet
Joyner said. "But I think we would
be getting ahead of ourselves if we
proceeded with this at this time,
given the potential that the Legisla-
ture may change the law."
Possible changes in the law, as de-
scribed by Proctor, include exten-
sion of the time period between the
adoption and implementation of im-
pact fees, and the stipulation of how
long the fees can be collected before
the money has to be used for a pro-
ject.
"If you wait, it will take longer,"
Proctor concluded, reminding com-
missioners that it would take six
months or longer simply for the
study.
Even so, commissioners opted to
wait and see what the legislators
did. But they encouraged Proctor to
stay in touch.
Impact fees, by definition, are
one-time charges levied against new
construction -- both residential and
commercial -- to help pay for the
cost of the increased government. -
services demanded by the growth.
,According to the experts, growth
imposes actual and potential de-
mands on government services, as
well as adding to traffic congestion
and increasing wear-and-tear on -
roads.
Impact fees are a compensatory
tool that allow governments to re-
coup a portion of the costs they in- .
cur in providing the additional
services demanded by an increasing
population.
Impact fees, moreover, are consid-
ered politically palatable, in that
they principally affect people who'
are not yet part of the community
and so can't voice objections.


H&R BLOCK


Festival
(Continued From Page 1)
Frances Yeagher, Food Court; Bob-
bie Krebs, Arts and Crafts; Roslyn
Bass and Lindsey Taylor, Queen's
Pageant; Nicole Honcell, Princess
Pageant; Lauren Blank, Little King
and Queen; and Lisa Reasoner and
Jaunice Hagan, Parade
Nan Baughman, festival booklet,
Leslie Rabon, Baby Contest; Cather-
ine Arnold and Ray Cichon, public-
ity; Bill Beaty, Rotary Barbecue;
Rosemary and Tom Turner, Kickoff
Dinner; Amanda Ouzts, Fashion
Show; and Ferd Naughton, Melon
Run.
Cindy Lambert and Ray Fosky,
Antique Car Show; Becky Clayton,
Art Show; Joe Anderson, FMB
Breakfast; Kevin Aman, Softball
Tournament; and Catherine Arnold
and Margaret Levings, Gospel Sing.
The Festival Committee meets
next 5:15 p.m., Monday Feb. 6.
Event chairperson are urged to at-
tend the meetings to help with the
planning of the Festival.


Relay
(Continued From Page 1).
The American Cancer Society is
the nationwide community-based
voluntary health organization dedi-
cated to the elimination of cancer
as a major health problem by pre-
venting cancer, saving lives, and
diminishing suffering from cancer,
through research, education, advo-
cacy, and service. k


The Jefferson
County Utility
Coordinating
Committee
will meet at 9:00
a.m. February 8,
2006 at the
Jefferson County
Extension Office
275 North
Mulberry Street


UICc 2005 F Wilson Carraway, Sr. Award for Excellence and
I CorUmtmni Service is awarded to o.tnina Young, Assistant
B. Brandi MaNinager ofdie banjIksThomasville, Georgia office.

Young joined FM B of Thoims County in 1988, as a teller. She
advanced to senior telltr, proof opcraior, ctLstomer service repmesentaui.'e,
and is currently assistant b.inch nmaiger. She is an active professional
citzen, serving her community in mnun ways, such as helping with the
Salvation Army, the Thomasville Chamber of Commerce Women's
Forum, as well as several other community organizations.

Joanna and her husband, Kenny, have two children, and reside in
Thomasville, Georgia.


Congratulations, Joanna,
from the Can'away family,
and the enthe FMB Banking
corporation .
M? wikon a Gmnnay Sr., devoted his lift
to helping othen. He ans Prsident of dthe
Middle Florida Ice Company and of the
lilahmsee Coca-Cola Company He was
the fist Chairman and later President of
Tallahssee Bank and Trust Companyt and
Chairman ofFannes & Merchants Bank,
Monticello.
A lifelong resident of Tallamssee, Mr:
Carmway represented Leon County in the


Florida Legislature, servingin both the
Joanna continues to play a key role in the operation of the FMB Houseand Senate. He was resident of the
Thomasville office. Senate in the early 1960s.


Fred Beshears
Owner, Simpson Nurseries


Why I ama


Republican
When I was 21, I registered to vote in Jacksonville as a
Democrat because back then everyone was a Democrat.
But I have to tell you that I didn't make a very good one.
Johnson's "Great Society" was in full swing and I couldn't
help thinking that the whole concept went against the very
core of what I understood America to be about. I believed
in self reliance, capitalism and free enterprise and it
seemed to me that the unique part of this country (what
made it great) was the freedom individuals had to work
hard and become anything they wanted to be.
But the Democrat's picture of America in the sixties was
that our "unjust society" had caused poverty and the way
to eliminate it was to relieve a lot of people of their
responsibility to support themselves. But I always thought
you overcame poverty by working your way out of it. Of
course, a country as wealthy as ours has a moral obligation
to take care of those who can't take care of themselves, but
those programs went too far, and created entire gen-
erations of people who became totally dependant on the
government and that didn't help anyone.
I was still an uncomfortable Democrat when I moved to
Orlando a year later. When it came time to register there, I
was again told that I had to be a Democrat to vote in local
elections. I also knew that all of my co-workers in the job I
had taken in the State's agriculture dept would be staunch
Democrats. But this time I wasn't, buying I decided that I
was willing to give up voting in some of the primaries and
take some ribbing from my fellow workers in order to
register with the Party that stood for what I stood for.
Then in '73, when I moved here, I proudly took my place
as one of Jefferson County's 33 Republicans. And,. you
know, I've never regretted it.



Are you sure You're

SMnot a Republican ?

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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 27, 2006 PAGE 3

Ramsey Describes Army


Tour Of Duty In Iraq


SGT. JEREMY RAMSEY paused for this
photo while working on a tank in Iraq. He re-
cently completed a tour of duty there, and


with other combined service is half way to
retirement.


Threat Of Rain Cancels


Scheduled Ghost Tour


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The first monthly ghost tour and-
hunt hosted by the Big Bend Ghost
Trackers, scheduled for last week-
end, was canceled due to the threat
of rain.
Founder Betty Davis said it was
sprinkling and the rain chances
high, and though they had 20 in-
quiries and reservations for the
tours, the BBGT thought it best to
cancel this particular one.
"We will have another one Feb.
18, 8 p.m.., starting in front of the
Chamber," said BBGT Founder
Betty Davis., "We're just going to
take the people who made reserva-
tions for last week's tours and take
them and whoever else signs up on
the next one."
She said many spots were still
available and promises that a good
time will be had by all.
The haunted tour and ghost hunt


will be offered every third Saturday
of each month, by reservation only.
Additional tours can be set each
night, depending on how many
people make their reservations.
"If there's enough people, we
will conduct second tours," said
Davis.
The tours and hunt last 90 min-
utes each and cost $10 each, per
person. BBGT members will not be
in period dress during these par-
ticular tours, but they will lead
groups through the different desti-
nations in Monticello by lantern
light.
BBGT continues to offer private
tours and hunts for groups of at
least 10 people for company em-
ployees, birthday parties, corporate
groups and the like.
BBGT members will be in full
period clothing during these private
tours, which are also led by lantern
light.
Also on the agenda, members are


February 3 Marks 61

Years Since Iwo Jima


planning a spring workshop around-
the first of April.
The all day classes contains top-
ics covering ghost hunting tech-
niques, education, and equipment
used during investigations, and a
guest speaker, as well as the.
haunted tour and ghost hunt in the
old 1827 Cemetery.
The workshop includes segments
concerning the anatomy of a ghost
hunt, who can be a ghost hunter,
where to find ghosts, spirit commu-
nication, ghost photography, videos
of ghost hunts, how to capture
.-ghosts on film, how to record
voices of the dead, how to conduct
a ghost investigation, the ghost
hunters tool kit, "The where, what,
why and when of ghost hunting."
Davis added that those interested
in having a resident ghost investi-
gated, can contact the BBGT, who
will conduct the investigation of
the residence free of charge, and
confidentially, if resident requests.
To make a reservation for the
monthly tours, private tours or in-
vestigations, call Davis at
562-2516.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

County Resident, 29 year-old
Sgt. Jeremy Ramsey, recently com-
, pleted a tour of duty in Iraq, and
enjoyed a visit home with family
and friends.
Ramsey is the son of county resi-
.' dents James and Sandra McKown
and a 1995 graduate of Jefferson
County High School.
While at JCHS, he served in the
JROTC during his junior year.
"I basically decided to go into the
military to get out of Monticello,"-
said Ramsey.
"I knew it was a good career
choice and right now, I'm already
halfway to-retirement."
He added that he was also highly
encouraged by his parents to join
the military.
Ramsey underwent Basic Training
in Ft. Jackson and then went on to
AIT at Ft. Knox; where he learned
about and worked with tanks for
" three years. He then went to Ft.
Carson, Colorado, and subse-
quently deployed to Egypt.
"I was in Egypt for about a
month and I got to see the
pyramids, the Sphinx, King Tut
and King Ramasies and all their
stuff," said Ramsey.
Following his tour in Egypt, he
was sent to Korea for 15 months,


School Menu
Monday
Pizza, Vegetable Salad, Cookie,
Fruit, and Milk.
Tuesday
Chicken Fajita Wrap, Lettuce & To-
mato, Vegetable Sticks, Fruit, and
Milk.
Wednesday.
BBQ Chicken, Macaroni and
Cheese, Greens, Red Apple Smiles,
Combread, and Milk.
Thursday
Hot Ham and Cheese on Bun, Salad
Choices, Fruit, Brownie, and Milk.
Friday
Hot Dog, 'later Tots. Fruit, Peanut
Butter Bar, and Milk.


NO U
TURN
This is no time to turn back.
Keep MDA's lifesaving research
moving forward.

MI DW
Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717


where he also worked on tanks.
While in Korea, he underwent
much training. "I trained in tanks
two to three times a month, and had
to qualify with the M-16 twice per
year.
After serving in Iraq, he was sent
to Ft. Riley, KS, where he is .cur-
rently stationed.
Ramsey has served in the Army
since he graduated in '96 and he
was assigned to Iraq in Feb. 2005,
where he had spent the past year.
He was stationed with Alpha Com-
pany, 2nd Battalion, 70th Armored
Regiment as an M-1 tank
mechanic.
"The first few days there, I didn't
find it a scary place to be, just dif-
ferent and unique," said Ramsey.
"The constant gunfire and bombs
going off affected a lot of guys
harshly, but not me. It was more of
an adrenaline rush at first. It's after
a while that the reality of the hits
and attacks sets in, and you're glad
you're still in one piece."
He added that he had had a few
close calls with direct gunfire, mor-
tar rounds, 1-80's and car bombs.
"On one occasion, I was standing
about 25 meters from an IED (Im--
provised Explosive device) when it
went off," said Ramsey. "I was
very lucky, I didn't sustain any in-
juries.
He added that during his time in-
Iraq, five of the men in his unit


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

February 3 marks the 61st anni--
versary of the battle of Iwo Jima in
1945 and the historic flag raising
which took place during that battle,
and ultimately took the life of
Boots Thomas, March 3, 1945.
County resident Dr. Jim Sledge,
often speaks to groups about his
good friend and Monticello school
mate, Ernest "Boots" Thomas, who
participated in the battle and the
flag raising.
In a recent conversation, he re-
called that Thomas' platoon of the
28th Marines was ordered to take
the top of Mount Suribachi which
was heavily defended by the Japa-


nese.
Time after time, they were re-
pelled, and finally at 10:30 a.m. on
Feb. 3, 1945, the platoon took the
mountain top and raised a small 2'
x 4' American flag, at which point,
pandemonium broke out.
Later-in the afternoon, a 5' x 8'
flag was raised, which is the now
famous photo in history books and
on the "Boots" Thomas Memorial,
west of town.
When the news flashed around
the world President Roosevelt was
very pleased, requesting a photo-
graph for the American people,
Sledge said.
He spoke of how ships blew their
horns and whistles and the men
yelled for joy at the sight of the
American flag atop the mountain.


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were killed. "All of them were
really close to me," said Ramsey.
"I patrolled with them and we
served on some snatch and grab
missions.
He said that a "Snatch and Grab"
was when the soldiers kicked in
doors, grabbing all the military
agents and detained them.
"Some times you have to do more
than your job description calls for,"
he added.
While on duty, he also had to go
retrieve tanks and trucks when they
broke down.
After returning to Ft. Riley fol-
lowing his recent leave home,
Ramsey plans to train as a Drill
Sgt. "That training takes eight
weeks, I'll be able to train the new-
comers and keep myself out of Iraq
for a minimum of about two years,"
he said.
Ramsey added that he feels that
joining the military has helped him
to grow immensely as a human be-
ing.
"I'm more mature, more respon-
sible and I have more responsibili-
ties," he said. "Right now, I have
eight guys that work under me."
To those contemplating a military
career, Ramsey said, "It's a good
career choice, especially if you go
the full distance, and they pay 100
percent of all the college that you
want to take. It's also a good op-
portunity stand up for your
country."


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 27, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.


RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER sepd addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, Fl,32345 Phone; (850) 97-3568 .
Fax. 850-,997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net,




WWll Vets Living


National Treasures


BY
VF


JIM L.. Families had to nation sugar, cof-
W JIM MUELaL.ER ' 'fee. 'gasoline, and other commodities
W Commader-inChiewe now take for granted, and entire
,-.. communities banded together to re-
Someone I knew died the other cycle rubber and metals.


Opinion & Comment.


day. I didn't get. a chance. to say-
good-bye, but J have thanked hip
for the life helped as a'imemb e of.
America's Greatest Generation.
He came from an ordinary family
that taught traditionall ,alki,"lik
right from wrong and respect for
others .. .-: -
He learned that the measure of a
man was in deeds, not words, .a40
that hard work wasn't something to
fear.
He also learned to take care of his
neighbors, so when the -world.
needed our help during World War,
II, he, and 16 million other Ameri-'
cans answered that call to military
duty.
World War 'II was a defining'Miio-
ment'fdr kAmerica.- -
We saw the end of the Great De-
pression and the emergence of the
United States as a world leader, but
we also witnessed the impact of the
war on the home front, and the tre-
mendous resiliency of the American
public to overcome all challenges.
Women entered the workforce in
greater numbers and nontraditional
roles.


After .the war, the only thing this
generation asked for was to be nor-
mal again to .wear= the. current
styles, watch the latest movies, and
settle down and raise families.
Most of hJem' took advantage of
the GI Bill, hose home loan pro-
gram created., the. suburbs, and edu-
cational" behefifs produced the
leaders who guided the tremendous
era of growth and prosperity our
country enjoyed in the second half
'df the'20th'eenflitiry;'
America has been blessed to have
had three Greatest Generations: one
foiinded our country, another saved
our Union, and the most recent one
helped save our world from tyranny.
Fewer than-3.5 million World War
fI veterans remain,' a 'nhIber 'that is'
expected to halve within the next
five years.
I was able to thank my friend for
his service to this country before he
passed; now I urge all Americans to
do likewise.
They are'living national treasures,
and they. and their generation de-
serve our eternal gratitude and re-
membrance.'


Short Takes & Other Notions


BY MERRY ANN FRISBY

I am amazed by the power of
words, in some instances a single
word. When we first moved to town,
we were at a party in a friend's
home. I ate a small sausage pierced
by a toothpick. It was a wonderful
taste experience. I remarked that it
was the best sausage that I have ever
eaten. My hostess says "Qh yes that
is Caps sausage." She meant Cip
Shuman's sausage, but being new to
town, I did not know who he was.
I thought she said Cat sausage. I
only hope that the horror I felt was
not reflected on my face. I pre-
tended to cough and then spit the
sausage into a napkin. I could not
have imagined, and have never
heard of using cats in sausage.
I did have a Russian pen pal for


many years, and she alleged that her
cat would not eat the government
sausages because they were filled
with cat meat. I was not quite sure,
but believed that Monticellans did
not stuff the famous sausage with
feline tenders.
Like the Cap/cat word usage, we
should be aware of the effect of the
words we use. I agree that when
words are hurtful to others, they
should be -examined. However,
should we scrub 'and saniitize our
word usage tot he point of obscuring
our shared history'?

"The difference between the
almost-rightf 'word and the ,right
word is really, a large matter: it's the
difference between the lightening
bug and the lightening." Mark
Twain,
A case in point:


I have read in several papers that
Sen. Steve Geller of Hallandale
Beach, wants to change the name of
the Slave Canal at Nutall Rise. Ap-
parently no one asked us in advance.
County Commissioner 'Gene Hall
and Clerk of Courts Dale Boat-
wright were consulted late in the
process.

It was reported that no one in Jef-
ferson County is in or or oa narie
change, arid' I agree. I'recently read
R.C: Balfours's botdk "hIi Search 'bf
the Aucilla" which talks about this
building project. Try to imagine
hard physical work, in the muck of a
mosquito infested swamp. I doubt
that many contemporary people
could survive that.
In my view this is' our history to
be shared by both black and white,
to learn from this terrible


experience. Slavery while!
detestable, is a part of our common
history. To eliminate the word
'slave' from our history dismisses
and dishonors the labors of people
unfortunate enough to be trapped by
the institution of slavery. We need
to acknowledge slavery's existence,
learn from the sad experience and
move on.
Getting rid of the word "slave"
frndm6ourt Slave Canal denies our his-
toty:. The getting fid of words,' also
scared George OrWell. A theme in
his book 1984 is the government's
attempt to control people by limiting
their ability to think complex and'
treasonous thoughts by eliminating-
troublesome words.
In modem society we can ban to.
disuse words that make us uncom-,
fortable but we may run the risk or
forgetting our mistakes.


Think Independent


Of Party Positions


BY REX M. ROGERS
Columnist

The late Reverend E.V. Hill, sen-,
ior pastor of the Mount Zion Mis-
sionary Baptist Church in Los Ange-
les, once said, "I've had experience
with the Left wing and I've had ex-
perience with the Righf 'wing,' and
I've discovered those Wvings come
from the same bird!"
This dynamic African American
leader is gone now, but let's hope his
wisdom didn't die with him.
Neither the Left nor the middle,
the Moderates nor the Right have a
comer on the truth. When it comes
to political and social issues, these
ideological wings of American po-
litical, thought try to present fairly
consistent views, consistent with
their values and consistent with their
positions over time and across
issues.
But none of them always get it
right, primarily because these wings
are comprised of finite people
whose egos, loyalties, and self-
aggrandizing desires get in the way
of their better judgment.
Any given group may get it wrong


simply because the people involved
willingly ignore. objective data. As
Jack Nicholson's character said it in
"A Few Gbod Men," "You can't
handle the truth' "
If you are inclined to consider
yourself a part of the Left,
Moderate, or Right, acknowledging
that your wing doesn't always get it
right is not a matter of disloyalty but
a matter of independent thinking.
You're functioning more like the
informed citizenry the Founding Fa-
thers envisioned. You're ruminating,
cogitating, not just following the
lemmings over the cliff.
If the Right rejected Harriet Miers
while the Left rejects Samuel Alito,
you can support either these or a hy-
brid position. If the Left wants an
immediate withdrawal from Iraq,
while many on the Right want to
stay the course, you may support ei-
ther position, no matter how you
typically align ideologically.
Think independently. Think criti-
cally, but by all means think. This is
the truly American ideal.
Rex M. Rogers, Ph.D., a syndi-
cated newspaper columnist in al-
most 100 newspapers and president
of Cornerstone University, Grand
Rapids, Mich.)


Biodiesel Is Alternative Fuel


B'
Ra



ou
th,
pro
ve
so
int

Ci
Ca
Un
ou
thr
ga
rui

can
ser
the
eq
I
can
erg
de'
Ira
an


pummeled the Gulf Coast.
Y CHAD OSBORNE The world's turmoil, many claim,
adford (UA) University is- largely responsible for the rising
cost in crude oil, which rose sharply
In 1977, President Jimmy Carte- to $70 a barrel in August, greatly in-
itlined an aggressive energy plant creasing the expense of filling gas
at called for better environmental tanks and heating houses. Cheap oil
otection, conservation and the de- prices in the past have somewhat
lopment of alternative fuel ufidercut the development of other
urces that could be relied upon fuels, but recent cost trends have
to the next century. reignited interest in alternative fuels.
At the time of his proposed plan,i So, naturally, with the price of
carter was. concerned that the gasoline at pump reaching the $5-a-
nited States would soon face seri- gallon mark in some regions, there
s energy shortages, saying that: is increasing interest in development
ree-quarters of the oil and natural; of alternative fuels.
s we consumed for energy was: "There has always been an interest
inning dangerously thin. in alternative fuels among environ-
He claimed the decisions Ameri- mentalists and other grassroots
ns made then about energy would groups," said. Radford University
rve as a character test and called' chemistry professor Francis
ose difficult decisions the "moral Webster. "But now, with the price of
uivalent to war." gasoline so high, everybody is inter-
Now, nearly 30 years later, Ameri- ested. Every day you see an article
ns still have concerns about en- in. a newspaper or magazine about
;y. Much of those concerns have developing alternative fuel sources."
veloped through a very real war in This increased interest is bringing
q, political unrest in Venezuela to the forefront more information
d the surge of hurricanes that about alternative fuels, some of


which now work and some .of which
are in the works.
One of those alternative fuels be-
ing praised is biodiesel, a fuel
source Webster and his students
have been working on for nearly
two years.
The interest has been so high,'
Webster and a handful of RU stu-
dents have built a biodiesel reactor
in the professor's basement at. his
house and use the fuel they create to
power a 1970s model Mercedes.
Webster recycles waste cooking
oil donated by a local Sonic restau-
rant, whose owner has taken a, deep
interest in the project. The Mercedes
was donated to the RU chemistry
department by engaged parents of
an RU student.
"It's unbelievable how many peo-
ple have taken an interest in what
we're doing," Webster said. "It used
to be a few people were interested.
Now, it's teachers and parents and
friends and neighbors. People are al-
ways asking about our project and
about these fuels."
At the moment, biodiesel is the al-


Prepaid Phone Cards PC


BY LISA POIAK EDGAR
Chairman PSC

Prepaid phone cards are a way to7
purchase long distance telephone,
'service before actually placing long
distance calls. They are usually sold
at convenience stores, discount
stores, large retail stores, service sta-
tions, and airports.
They are typically sold in $5, $10,
or $20 denominations, and look like
a credit card. These cards may also
be called "phone cards," "prepaid.


debit cards," "telecards," "prepaid
telephone cards," or "prepaid calling
services."
Are prepaid phone cards the
same as credit calling cards?
Prepaid phone cards and credit
calling cards are not the same. Pre-
paid phone cards represent tele-
phone calling minutes that are paid
for.before actually placing the calls.
You will not be billed later for the
calls made with your prepaid' phone
card.
With a traditional credit calling
card, you receive a bill and pay after


making the call.
What should you know before
purchasing a prepaid phone card?
How much does each minute of
the conversation time cost?
Does' it cost more to make an in-
ternational call'?
Will minutes be used for ring-
time, or conversation time? You
should only be charged for conver-
sation time.
Will there be any additional fees
for each call'?
Is the card "rechargeable?" (Can
more minutes be purchased once the


temative fuel getting most of the at-,
tention. President George W. Bush
recently touted biodiesel as one of
the nation's top alternative., fuel
sources, '
Even country music star Willie
Nelson is in, on the' act, burning7
biodiesel in his cars and tour bus.
Nelson also has partnered with a
group to. form a company that mar-,,
kets a biodiesel blend, called BioW-.r
illie, at truck stops. t
Perhaps the popularity of biodiesel
comes partly because it's relatively"
simple to produce. Many plants pro- 1
duce burnable oils, and in the U.S.,s
soybeans are the most common
source for biodiesel, while rapeseed)
is the popular choice in England.i
This also creates an upside for farm-)
ers who could reap the benefits of i
increased demand for their crops.
However, as popular as the clean-
burning fuel has become, skeptics'
say that while it can help, is not I
enough to meet American's fuel
needs.
Other alternative fuels include
(See Biodiesel Page 5)


1pular
initial amount is depleted?) If so,!
will the per-minute rate be the same#
as it was originally? Will there beP
any additional fees for each call*
once the card is "recharged"? Some
cards can be recharged through a.,
credit card, making the card even
more convenient.
Is there an expiration date on the I
card? Be sure to use the minutes be-
fore the expiration date. Some
phone cards expire even if there are
unused minutes left on them,.
Is the Personal Identification'
(See Phone CardsPage 5)
V `


1- A
From Our Photo File
. '



lll~i" .


COUNTY AGENT Larry Halsey, left, 4-H Co- Mullis discuss plans, in July 1990, for a
ordinator John Lilly, and sociologist Ann DARE workshop here. (News File Photo)


Letters to the Editor Welcomed

500 Words or Less

Letters must be signed

and include

phone number of writer


r












'Letter


Writer Ex

I Growth, I
SDear Editor:
i I'd like to address Bernard Peters'
better in the Wednesday, January
S5"' edition. I find it refreshing that
he thinks the Commissioners are do-
S ng such a fine job.
It was only a few years ago that
( r. Peters called my house crying
bout the poor decisions being made
Sy the County Commissioners and
SPlanning Committee regarding his
t. -roperty.



'Bless The


SSeeks Vol

FRAN HUNT
+taff Writer

Plans for the annual Humane So--,
ciety's Bless the Beast are in full
swing, and some donations have
come in, and many have stepped
forward to volunteer for the event.
Organizers relate that additional
donations and volunteers are
needed to help make the fundraiser
a success.
Volunteers currently in place in-
clude: Society President Caroline
Carswell chairing the event, Jane
Cleveland, silent auction; Patty Reg-
ner, T-shirts and note cards sales;
Mary Helen Ringe, food
'preparation; Angela Henderson,
baking brownies.
Martha Jean Martin will help
wherever she is needed with the
food; Joseph Bautista, who has
worked in the food service industry
for years will also be working on
the preparations.
Carswell will also assist with the
food and the Jefferson County
High School Key Club has volun-
teered as servers for the event.
Some of the. donations already
made include a refinished antique,
mantle clock, 'The Moon in Talla-
hassee has donated linens, tables,
chairs and decorations for the event
and Milady's owner Barbara
Hughes has volunteered to help
with decorating.
A vacation which was donated is
a week-long stay at a house in the
SinSmokey Mountains.
A 'listing of further donations
made for the auctions will be forth-
coming.
"We're still going to need volun-
teers for food preparations, set up,
clean up, and accumulating both
door prizes and auction items," said
Carswell.



JCHS Posts 3

Weeks Hono


Jefferson County High School re-
ports the honor rolls for the third six
week grading period, and for the
first semester.
Appearing on the third six week
"A" honor roll are: Shayne Broxie,
Johnnie Mae Larry, Tyler Murdock,
and Shuamese Massey.
On the A/B roll are: Keneshia
Coates, Ireshia Denson, Shanka
Farmer, Latoya Footman, Khier
Gallon, Courtney Holmes, Andrew
Redmond.
Ana Martha Rosas, Michael
Silcio, Kayla Strait, Lariesha
Wilson, Zanquisha Jones, Nicole
Bynum, Jonathan Counts, Brittany
Harvey, Michelle Keaton, Tony


WAGS


asege



(plains Question is Not

But Unplanned Growth


Phone Card
(Continued From Page 4)
Number (PIN), which is printed on
the card, out of sight and hidden
from view? Be sure that no one has
access to the PIN. This will protect
minutes from being used prior to
purchasing the card.
TQ Ol.~-p q t(%11 AfP r<*_-~


If he remembers, I stood on his sioner's decisions. e Ul1L a lUii-1u mbULUII1V
behalf, as his property should have This is not about property rights. service number?
been grandfathered in on the map. It has to do with taking a piece of What is the issuing company's
Mr. Peters is among the misguided property that is designated a particu- refund policy?
ones. These people do not under- lar zoning on the future land use Is this your first purchase of a
stand the real issues at hand con- map and changing that land to a prepaid phone card? Purchasing a
coming comprehensive land higher density. card with a small amount of minutes
amendment re-zonings. This allows for more lots on the will allow you to sample the service
If they attended the meetings, they same parcel of land. The developer and limit loss should the card fail to
would have a better idea of what the sells more lots, gets more money in operate properly.
real issues are, and why we are his pocket for the same parcel of Why would someone want to use
speaking out against the Commis- land. Get the big picture? It does a prepaid phone card?
not benefit the County.
.not benefit the County. Potential Savings: Regardless of
B e a s _Mr. Peters is right in that the' `- t
e. 't ^ J.g t G -our distance from the person you
B a tt County is going to grow Growth is, .
w *," are calling, the prepaid phone card's
that is important. price per-minute is usually the same.
that is important.
If people develop their property as' .
u n te e rs it is currently zoned on the future
land use map, and by the guidelines'' Biodiesel
Member George Carswell is in the Comp Plan and Land Devel- (Continued From Page 4)
looking for an auctioneer, enter- opment Code, no one can say any- ethanol, solar and wind power and
tainment and a bartender. thing different. ethanol, solar and wind power and
"We need volunteers to ask mer- The only stipulations that can be hydrogen.
chants for gift certificates and nice made are by the Planners or Corn- Hydrogen has become ahit with
live auction items," Carolyn Car- missioners on roads, drainage, and nvironmentalists because it prom-
swell continued, the like. lses to reduce greenhouse gas emis-
Tickets are now being sold for the The people speaking out are not sions while increasing energy
event, set for 6 p.m., Feb. 18, at against growth or property rights, efficiency.
the Opera House. We are against unmanaged and un- When used in a fuel cell, hydrogen
The live auction will begin at planned growth in the County. We can power a car without using gaso-
7:30 p.m., at which time, the silent are against the Commissioner's lack line while emitting pure water into
auction will cease. of visioning for the future of this the air instead of gas fumes. How-
There are 250 tickets available County. We are against the prob- ever, cost for research and develop-
and the cost is $25 each. Also lems and effects that will be caused ment into perfecting hydrogen 'as a
available are tickets for two horses by their decisions. fuel for automobiles could be ex-
up for raffle. It .is not just a certain few people tremely expensive.
The horses include Bella, a Chest that are against this process. Hun-
The horses include Bella, a Chest- dreds have spoken out in the meet- Despite the costs or development,
nut 15-hand Quarter horse mare ings or signed petitions. Not all Webster said he believes hydrogen
and Bo, which was donated by write letters. has a strong future in becoming a
Mercer and Katie Farington, a Many residents feel intimidated or fuel source Americans turn to for
Chestnut 17-hand Quarter horse hold a position within the commu- their ever-increasing energy needs.
Theld tickets for the horse raffles nity that may not allow them to "I think fuel cells and hydrogen
are $5 each, 5 for $20 or 30 for speak their true feelings, will eventually win in the end,"
are$100, which will be sold until the You don't have to own the Webster said. "But it must become
County. It doesn't have to be in cost effective to enter the main-
night of the event. your backyard or within your sight. stream. I do hope that, in the future
Theproposed menu for the heavy It only has to be in this County for we take a broad approach to energy
hors' devoures event includes; pork citizens to be concerned. and not iust toward one fuel source."


or beef tenderloin on a roll, cock-
tails, coffee, shrimp and artichoke
marinade, grouper and oysters,
cheese rings and crackers, bro-
chette, spinach dip, bread and fresh
vegetables, chicken salad sand-
wiches, egg salad sandwiches, arti-
choke dip and Greek pastries
stuffed with spinach and fetta
cheese.
Also during the event, members
will be selling Humane Society T-
shirts, $10 each, and note cards, art
provided by JES art students, for
$8.
To donate for the live or silent
auction, to volunteer for the event,
purchase tickets or further informa-
tion, contact Carswell at 997-4000
or 264-5927.



Srd Six

ir Roll


Roberts.
Crystal Brinson, Jisheng Chen,
Loran Cox, Scott Goodlin, Alex
Lingle, Vuk Lutovak, Charles Pitts.
On the first semester "A" Honor
Roll is Loran Cox.
On the first semester A/B Honor
Roll are: Shayne Boxie, Ireshia
Denson, Shanka Farmer, Latoya
Footman, Courtney Holmes, Tyler
Murdock, Andrew Redmond.
Micheal Silcio, Shanadria Alexan
der, Nicole Bynum, Brittany
Harcey, Michelle Keaton, Shaumese
Massey, Jennifer Blake, Crystal
Brinson, Johnnie Mae Larry, Alex
Lingle and Charles Pitts.

'Wags' Named

Pet Of Week
The Humane Society has named
Wags as the adoptable canine Pet
of the Week.
Wags is a female mutt, born in
March 2005. She is black with
some white blended in on her chest,
neck and face.
She has been spayed and all vac-
cinations are current.
Wags is also housebroken and
very well-behaved.
Shelter Caretaker Cheryl Bautista
describes her as being an excep-
tionally sweet animal. "She's just a
big baby, a natural born snuggle-
bug," said Bautista.
To adopt Wags or any. of the
other many animals at the shelter
call 342-0244.


Don Lee
If It Happens In
Jefferson County,
You'll Read It In The
Monticello News








BIG MOMMA'S
HOUSE 2 (PG13)
Fri. 5:30 7:50 10:15 Sat.
12:50 3:10 5:30 7:50 -
10:15 Sun. 12:50 3:10 5:30 -
7:50 Mon.-Thurs. 5:30 7:50
NO PASSES

MEMOIRS OF A
GEISHA (PG13)
Fri. 4:00 7:05 10:10 Sat.
12:55 4:00 7:05 10:10 Sun.
12:55 4:00 7:05 Mon.-
Thurs. 4:00 7:05
NO PASSES

LAST HOLIDAY
(PG13)
Fri. 4:05 7:00 9:40 Sat. 1:05
- 4:05 7:00 Sun. 1:05 4:05 -
7:00 Mon. Thurs. 4:05 7:00

HOODWINKED (PG)
Fri. 5:20 7:25 9:35 Sat. 1:10
- 3:15 5:20 7:25 9:35 Sun.
1:10 3:15 5:20 7:25 Mon. -
Thurs. 5:20 7:25

WOLF CREEK (PG)
Fri. 4:15 7:10 9:50 Sat.
1:15- 4:15- 7:10 9:50 Sun.
1:15 4:15 7:10 Mon.-
Thurs. 4:15- 7:10
NO PASSES

SYRIANA(R)
Fri. 4:10 7:15 10:05 Sat..
1:00 4:10 7:15 10:05 Sun.
1:00 4:10 7:15 Mon..-Thurs.
4:10-7:15
NO PASSES

UNDERWORLD: EVO-
LUTION (R)
Fri. 4:30 7:30 10:00 Sat.
1:30 4:30 7:30 10:00 Sun.
1:30 4:30 7:30 7:20 Mon. -
Thurs. 4:30 7:30
NO PASSES


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 27, 2006 PAGE 5
Convenience: Prepaid phone cards you want to call.
provide a convenient way to make Many prepaid phone cards give
long distance calls from a payphone you voice prompts at each step, tell-
without using coins, or from any- ing you how many minutes you
phone without being billed for the have remaining on your card, or
call. when you are about to run out of
call time.
Security: If your prepaid phone What if my card doesn't work?
card is lost or stolen, the amount of You may have sedall the min-
loss is limited to the value of the ues on the card.
card. With lost credit calling cards, Check for an expiration date on
you may be subject to additional the card. The card may have
charges for calls made by others expired.
prior to your canceling the card. expired.
prior to your canceling the card. Call the toll-free customer serv-
How do you use a prepaidphone ice number printed on the card and
card? request assistance.
Dial the toll-free access number request assistance.
Dial the toll-free access number Write to the company that issued
printed on the card. the card. The mailing address should
Enter your personal identifica- be printed on the card.
tin n e (be printed on the card.
tion number (PIN). Call the Florida Public Service
Dial the number of the person Commission (PSC).








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on a settled lawsuit? Get More Cash.
Deal Direct with the Leaders.
NovationCap.com 1-800-337-6409



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5'


AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY'S
2006 RELAY FOR LIFE '- JEFFERSON COUNTY
APRIL 21 AND 22, 2006

Would you like to be involved???
We need all the help we can get....
Here are the ways you can be a part!!


I in 3 Americans will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. The American Cancer Society Relay
For Life gives everyone the opportunity to fight back and to make a difference in the battle against
cancer. Relay always raises awareness of cancer prevention, early detection, treatment, and patient
support (including transportation to treatment, peer support group programs, and resources for
practical assistance). Relay brings people together from all walks of life with the common goal of
eliminating cancer. Relay honors cancer survivors and their caregivers. There's a place for you at
Relay. Please join us today!!

Be a part of the committee! Committee members are now being recruited for Team Recruitment;
Corporate Sponsorships; Logistics/Facility; Entertainment; Survivorship; Public Relations; Onsite
Volunteers; Onsite Survivor Activities, and Food.

Form a Relay For Life team! Gather together 8-15 of your favorite people who love making a
difference and having fun.

Volunteer at the event! We need volunteers who will help with the needs at the site itself on the days
of April 21-22, 2006.




YES! I want to participate in Relay.
1 Learn more about forming a team
2 Information on survivor activities
3 Volunteer to help with the event
4 Learn more about becoming a sponsor

Name
Address
E-Mail
Phone
(Please mail to Relay For Life, 710 W. Washington St.,
Monticello, Florida 32344)




The American Cancer Society Relay For Life represents the hope that those lost to caacer will never
be forgotten, that those who face cancer will be supported, and that one day cancer will be
eliminated.


'................ ....................., .................................................. ..........
*


I T


I






PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 27, 2006


For


Our




Seniors'


Reading, helping someone write a letter, taking a walk,
being a friend, lending a helping hand....
Make a Difference in 2006
Contact Marilyn Nations
878-5310 ext. 274
Big Bend 205 Mulberry St. Monticello, Florida
Hospice 997-2827
Your hometown Hospice since 1983


Covenan t
HOSPICE2
a special kind of caring since 1984

End of Life Care for the
Body, Mind and Spirit

1545 Raymond Diehl Road, Suite 102
850-575-4998
www.covenanthospice.org
A not-for-profit charitable organization providing dignified, compassionate
end-of-life care to patients and their loved ones for the past 21 years.
A JCAHO-accredited hospice in the Big Bend 8-County region.


IMF


Knowing your best
friend will be at your
side makes
HarborChase home.

cBRBORCHASE
ASSISTED LIVING ALZHEIMER'S CARE
(850) 531-0404
100 .lohn Kno' Road


Archbold Home
Health Services

We Offer


Skilled Nursing Care
Physical Therapy
Speech-Language Pathology
High Tech Therapy Services
RNs Available 24 hours a day,


7 days a


week
* Home Health Aide Services
* Complete Reimbursement Management


Archbold Home Health Services
555 North Jefferson Street
850-997-4030
FL Lic. 20143096 GA Lic. 136-037
Visit our web site at www.archbold.org


When was
the last
time you
made an
investment
that saved
lives?


When you invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
enormous-healthier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around.I 'is a dividend that builds a


strong com777uni/ity.
307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL 32303 (904) 41 4-0844


eeds...


ELDER AFRIRS

S A SHfINE

Terri White, Secretary

SHINE (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders:
is accepting applications for volunteers! We provide
the required training, you provide a little of your time.
MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN
THE LIVES OF ELDERS,
CAREGIVERS AND FAMILIES!
For more information, call Laura Gulley at The Area Agency
on Aging for North Florida at (850) 488-0055
SHINE is a program of the Florida Department of Elder Affairs, offered in partemship with the
North Florida Area Agency on Aging. Funding provided by a grant from the
Health Care Financing Administration.


HICP4-*%c 4 wlge' VIC 444 4.04.














Lifestyle


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 27, 2006 PAGE 7


* MEMBERS of the local Red Hat Chapter Minnie Stokley, who reigned for four years.
name Thelma Birdwell as the new Queen (News Photo)
* Mum. She was crowned by outgoing Queen

SFounders Garden Circle Members

SLearn To Create Dish Gardens


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Members of the Founders Garden
Circle met for their January meet-
ing recently to enjoy a program on
the making of a Dish Garden, dem-
onstrated by Jan Wadsworth.
Prior to the meeting, held at the


Library, members and their guest:
were asked to bring in a decorative
container to create their garden.
Attendees chose to display thei:
finished creations in such things a!
metal pots, clay bowls, and omn
member used a conch shell.
Wadsworth brought in all the
items necessary to create the Gar-
dens. She selected flowers, plants,


s and foliage that would grow best in
e the containers. "
She also selected the potting soil
r and items needed to hold every-
s thing together, and make them look
e more pleasing to the eye.
- Wadsworth is a member of the
Mignonette Garden Circle and past
chairman of the Monticello Garden
- Club.


Red Hat Members Name


Birdwell New Queen Mum


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Ladies of the Red Hats of Amer-
ica held their January meeting at
the Oriental Buffet in Thomasville
leaving many pleased with the low
cost for the dining pleasure and
large selection of foods.
The ladies wore their hats deco-
rated in the finest of the 2006 New
Years expression.
After four years of leading these
local Red Hat ladies, Queen Mum
Minnie Stokley has decided to step
aside for a bit of rest. She passed
the reins and her duties over to
Thelma Birdwell during an ex-
travagant crowning ceremony.
Stokley gently, and with shaking
hands, placed the jeweled tiara on
Birdwell's head.
A brief reminiscing of the past
Red Hat years followed.
"I have thoroughly enjoyed my
position and all the friends and ac-
quaintances I've made along the
way," she says.
Stokley began her 'Mum' status
March 17, 2001, at 'The Coffee
Break' then in the Cherry, Street
Commons.
At this meeting it was agreed the
ladies would call themselves 'The
Rhode Island Reds.'
Coordinators for this Red Hat
Movement that is sweeping the na-


tion were Stokley and Rowena
Daniel.
This 'Movement' all began with
an English poem titled 'Warning,'
- by Jenny Joseph, and describes the
thoughts of a women beyond her
child bearing age.
The first line reads: "When I am
an old woman I shall wear purple,
with a red hat that doesn't go, and
doesn't suit me."
The poem goes on to depict how
a woman plans to act when she
stops caring what others think.
At this first meeting awards were
given to the lady wearing the pret-
ties hat, the most original hat, aind
the most outrageous hat.
With 23 ladies in attendance, the
Chapter was Chartered.
Red Hat Society was founded, by
accident, by Sue Ellen Cooper of
Fullerton, CA.
She was just 54 when she read
the poem and decided to celebrate
the freedom of getting older.
She wore a crazy red hat when
she went out with her friends, and
women-everywhere just caught on
to it.
Barbara Sheats provided a New
Year's program, and read a poem
by Helen Steiner Rice, with
thoughts about "Facing Life, With
Cheer."
She spoke about easy to keep
resolutions for the new year, like


Homes Of Mourning


Ann Frishmuth Hewlett
Ann Frishmuth Hewlett, 93, died
recently in Charleston, SC.
Funeral Services were held on Fri-
day, Jan. 13, 2006 at Carolina Me-
morial Cemetery in Charleston.
Born in Riverton, NJ. she moved
to Monticello while young, attend-
ing and graduating from Jefferson
County schools.
She married Dr. Clifford Gay who
practiced medicine in Monticello.
In later years she married Jarvis
Hewlett and resided in Charleston.
Her mother, May Oberdorpha
Frismuth, father Whitney Frismuth,
stepmother Mary Byrd Frismuth,
and brother J.C. Whitney Frismuth
II, preceded her.
She is survived by her children
Patricia Gay Hughes, Jack Gay,
Cherie Hewlett Jeffry, David Hew-
lett, and her stepsister Maria
(Cookie) Clark.

Cathryn Bates Hicks
Cathryn Bates Hicks age 85, re-
tired from the Federal Government
died Wednesday January 25, 2006
in Monticello, Florida.
Funeral Services will be at 11:00
am Friday January 27, 2006 at
Beggs Funeral Home Monticello
Chapel Monticello, Florida. Family
will receive friends one hour prior to
services. Interment and graveside
services will be Saturday January
28, 2006 at 10:00am in Childersburg
City Cemetery, Childersburg, Ala-
bama. Contributions can be made to
First Baptist Church Sound systems:
First Baptist Church Monticello
West Washington Street,
Monticello. Florida 32344.
Mrs. Hicks was a native of
Childersburg, Alabama and move to
Monticello in 1954. She was a mem-


ber of the Triple "L" Club and the
TEL Sunday school class at the First
Baptist Church. A avid Motor Home
Camper who travel all over the
United State aid all. te way to
Alaska. She was also cattle Framer
of Jefferson County.
She is survived by one son Oliver
J. Hicks Jr. of Monticello, Florida,
two daughter, Cathryn Rebecca
Clayton and Jackie Day both of
Monticello, seven grandchildren and
ten great grandchildren.
John Gordon Sparkes
John Gordon Sparkes born Janu-
ary 3, 1925 in New York City, New
York died January 24, 2006 at the
Presbyterian Home in Quitman
Georgia.
Mr. Sparkes was a resident of Jef-
ferson County for 7 years and a
longtime resident of Captiva
Island/Ft. Myers Florida.
John Gordon Sparkes is survived
by two sons, John Christian Sparkes
and wife Jeannine of Ft. Myers,
William Jonathan Sparkes of Pine
Island, a daughter Cynthia Ann
Hughes and husband Terence of
Monticello. Grandchildren Thomas
and Melissa Sparks of Ft. Myers,
Jennifer Shaw and husband Ed and a
great grand daughter Maria Shaw all
of Stillwater,Ok.
He served in WWII in the Marine
Corp, 4th Division in the Pacific
Theater, Rio-Nanue, Saipan, Tinian
and IwoJima. He was a retired
Landscape Contractor/Nurseryman.
No flowers requested, please send
contribution to the Salvation Army:
206 West Virginia Street, Tallahas-
see, Florida 32301.
The family will have a graveside
service at Elmwood Cemetery: Bir-
mingham, Alabama at a later date.


MIGNONETTE Garden Circle members Caminez, M
learned to create dish gardens at their re- Norma Wil
cent meeting. L-R: Leah Cooksey, Linda Photo)

Mignonette Garden Circle
Enjoy Lunch, Plant Exchange


DEBBIE SNAPP


Mary Ellen Given and Jacque Lang-
ford.


Staff writer Members spent time visiting and
talking about the different plants
Mignonette Garden Circle mem- -brought in for the exchange, includ-


bers met at the Monticello Opera
House and enjoyed a Plant Ex-
change at their January meeting.
A luncheon of fried chicken and
complements was served by hostess


CARD OF THANKS
The family of Jimmy Sloan would
lis to thank you for your prayers
and other acts of kindness shown to
us during the unexpected passing of
our beloved Jimmy.
Your expressions of love and
sympathy have been a source of
consolation and strength during this
most difficult time.

While we mourn our loss, we are
comforted in knowing that we have
friends like you.
We pray that God will forever


ing Hens and Bittys, and discussing
what to pot next.
The Feb.. 8 meeting will be held
noon, at the home of hostess Shirley
Widd. Dottie Jenkins will co-host.

.keep you in His loving care.
Minister Joretha Sloan,
Minister "OJ" Sloan,
Kaye Sloan,
"JR" Sloan,
Cassandra Kiser,
Stephanie Johnson,
Beatrice Sloan,
Beverly Sloan


argaret Calhoun, Sallie Worley,
son, Jan Wadsworth. (News


remembering birthdays.
Hostesses for this month's meet-
ing were Nancy Kinnee and
Rowena Daniel.
Kinnee gave a brief description
of the duties of a hostess and what
is expected of them, "which is not
much," she added. She said that in
order to have meetings hostesses
were needed. She then passed
around a sign-up sheet for a list of
future hostesses.
Mary Davis was introduced as a
new member.
After the meeting, the ladies car-
pooled over to the WalMart store to
do some shopping before they
called it a day.


g GOSPEL SING e

y featuring

SCavaliers From Perry & Greenville
' January 28, Saturday at 7:00 p.m.



g Lamont United 7

7 Methodist Church

J7 Lamont, Florida i7
J; Join us for refreshments after the sing -

JJ73jwj


i 7 O Roses & Flowers 9
v Chocolates & Candy V

FLORAL ESGNS stuffed Animals
SINCE 1934 VGreeting Cards
I Gourmet Baskets
q"Flowers always make people better, Blo
happier, more helpful; they are sunshine, looming Plants
food and medicine for the soul."
Luther Burbank



f 190 E Dogwood Street Monticello V 850.997.2015 V www.gellingsflowers.comy
'V VVV VV^ VY V V VYVYVY VY, VVV


Steel's Jewelry

(2 Jayon Longieliere Photography

Executive Travel

January 28, 2006
10:OOam-5:OOpm
James H. Rainwater Conference Center

Come out and meet with over 50 of this areas
top merchants specializing in wedding preparation.

GRAND PRIZES
Jewelry valued at $1500 tifrom Steel's Jewelry.
a $1500 Photography package trom lavon Longielier Photography, and
a $1500+ Sandal's Honeymoon Package from Executive Travel. Door Prizes
awarded throughout the day. For more information call (2,9) 241-7590.
S$5,00 Admission


Central

Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166
Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
6 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

This week's
question:
,What is the
Great
Commission?
Answer next
week

Come and hear...
Wayne Warren, Minister







PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 27, 2006

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SABOR REALESTATE
MARK VOLLERTSEN
Ms; Realtor N
SALES ASSOCIATE
850-997-1691 OR 850-459-4864
MARKRV7@AOL.COM
"SERVICE You DESERVE / PEOPLE You TRUST"
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL ~ INVESTMENT ~ LOTS ~ ACREAGE


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Homeowners who owe the IRS
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IRS charges you a hefty "conven-
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(3) You can borrow from a friend
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This is your best option and we
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WTACHOVIA
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Mortgage Consultant
Wachovia Mortgage Corporation
FL1925
1997 Capital Circle Tallahassee, FL 32308
Tel: 850-320-1094
Fax: 850-920-1089
timbre.denmark@waclovia.com


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garage, ceramic floors, vaulted ceilings, french
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Visit our website for virtual tours
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L 0


true southern charm. Features hardwood floors,
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fireplaces. S3.9,900. Linda Tolkmitt 850-545-
2514. MLS#143139.


tion, 4/3.5 features a large master suite with
walk-in closet. On 2.68 acres. To be completed
by May 2006. $388.500. Lauren Garcia 850-
209-2045. MLS#140270


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Heated.........2406SF
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We will build on your land or our land. Stop by for a free floor plan book
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Heated..........1823SF
Garage............484SF
Porch..............385SF


Total............2692SF


j I3 t I I I J I .^I .1 --- I U I l.. ...i F. ** .
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Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 27, 2006 PAGE 9


, ACA Ladies Split


Last Two Games


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lady Warriors split their last two
- games, standing 12-11 on the sea-
son.
When the Lady Warriors faced off
against Brookwood, ACA lost 48-
32.
Leading the score for the Lady
Warriors was Bethany Saunders
with 11 points, two rebounds, three
assists.
Mallory Plaines, nine points, eight
rebounds, three steals; Lindsey
Day, 10 points, nine rebounds, two
blocked shots; Rikki Roccanti, two
points, three rebounds; Brittany
Hobbs, five rebounds, two steals;
Caitlin Murphy, three rebounds;


and Stephanie Dobson, two re-
bounds.
Facing Monroe, the Ladies won
57 36.
Leading the score for ACA was
Plaines with 23 points, nine re-
bounds, three steals.
Saunders, 15 points, two re-
bounds; Hobbs, four points, five re-
bounds, five steals; Murphy, five
points, three rebounds, two assists,
two steals; Day, five points, nine
rebounds, two assists; Corie Smith,
one point five rebounds, two
assists, two steals; Roccanti, four
points, five rebounds, two steals;
and Dobson, four rebounds.
In the final game of the regular
season, the Lady Warriors face off
against Branford, 6 p.m., Friday,
there.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The varsity Warriors. defeated-
arch rival R. F. Munroe, 80-51 last
week for the biggest win of the sea-
son.
Coach Dan Nennstiel said that
Munroe was playing without its
highest scorer, which put them at a
disadvantage.
"Eighty points is our highest
score all year," said Nennstiel. "I
think it's the highest we've had in a
few years."
Leading the Warrior charge was


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Boys and girls from both Aucilla-
Christian Academy and Jefferson
County High School were named to
the list of Big Bend Leaders last
week.
In Boy's scoring, Demario Riv-
'ers (JCHS) stands at number one'
with 317 points.
..Ben Grantham (ACA) and Ste-
phen Griffin (ACA), stands at num-
ber 21, each with 131 points.
Ih rebounds, Grantham stands at
number nine with 99.
Griffin stands at number 13 with
81; Rivers at number 18 with 75;
apd James Skipworth (JCHS) at
number 24 with 60.
In steals, Rivers stands at number
one with 52; Casey Gunnels at
number four, with 31; Tim Crumity
(JCHS) at number five with 35;
tied with Griffin at number five;
Grantham, at number eight with 31;


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The registration for the Jefferson-
County Recreation Department's
T-ball, Coach Pitch, Little League
baseball and girl's youth softball
has been set for 9-11 a.m., Satur-
day, Feb. 25 at the park.
Recreation Director Kevin Aman
relates that parents may pre-register
their children any time during the
month of February.
A copy of the child's birth certifi-
cate must be presented at registra-
tion registrations will not be taken
over the phone.
Aman stressed that Feb. 25 is the
absolute deadline for registration
and anyone who misses registration
will be placed on a waiting list,
without exception.
"Players will be given a choice of
playing on the same team as last
year, if they are returning to the
same league," said Aman.
"Or they will be placed in a draw,


Stephen Griffin with 25 points, five
assists, seven rebounds, one steal
and two blocks,
Ben Grantham, 24 point sand 10,
-rebounds for a double-double, two
assists, five steals, four blocked
shots; Casey Gunnels, nine points,
four assists, six rebounds, two
steals, two blocks; and Luke
Sadler, four points, four rebounds.
Wade Scarberry, nine points, one
assist, six rebounds; Reggie
Walker, seven points, two assists,
five rebounds, two steals and Jim
Stephens, two points, two
rebounds.
The Warriors now stand 11-9 on
the season.


Lamarkus Bennett (JCHS) at num-
ber 12 with 27; and Lucius Wade
(JCHS) at number 14, with 18.
In assists, Crumity stands at num-
ber five with 57; Rivers at number
eight, with 47.
Griffin and Bennett each stand at
number 13; Griffin with 32 and
Bennett with 35; Gunnels stands at
number 18 with 24; and Grantham
at number 19 with 25.
In girl's scoring, Mallory Plaines
(ACA), stands at number 23 with
243.
Shaumese Massey (JCHS) and
Keandra Seabrooks (JCHS) each
-stand at number 27 with 114.
In rebounds, Plaines stands at .
number seven with 216; Donna
Ransom (JCHS) at number 12 with
88.; Lindsey Day (ACA) at number
13 with 166; Nikidra Thompson
(JCHS) at number 17 with 75; and
Seabrooks at number 19 with 70.
In assists, Massey stands at num-'
ber nine with 37; and in steals, Se-
abrooks stands at number ten with
41.


with one exception, all girl's will
be placed in the draw."
Aman alerted parents that the
date by which a' child must have
reached a given age, before partici-
pating in league play has changed,
permanently, to April 30.
T-ball is for children ages 6-7,
who are six years old by April 30,
2006.
Coach Pitch is for children ages
8-9, who are eight years old by
April 30, 2006.
Little league baseball is for chil-
dren ages 10-12, who are ten years
old by April 30, 2006.

Girl's Youth Softball is for girls
ages 10-13,.who are ten years old
by April 30, 2006.
The registration fee for T-ball,
Coach Pitch and Girl's Youth Soft-
ball is $30.
Little League Baseball registra-
tion fee is $35.
For further information contact
Aman at 342-0240.


Brookwood Beats


ACA Boys 54-38


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy
varsity boy's basketball team lost
to Brookwood 54-38, last week.
"Last time we played
Brookwood, we beat them by one
point," said Coach Dan Nennstiel.


3


JAMES SKIPWORTH at 6'6"
makes a slam dunk look like
a piece of cake.



Lady Bees Fall
To Havana 32-2;
End Season 1-7

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Howard Middle School
girl's basketball team fell to Ha-
vana, 32-2, to stand 1-7 on the sea-
don.
The lone scorer for the Lady Bees
was La'Ashle Norton, who was the
top scorer for HMS this season.
Coach Corrine Stephens also
named Drucilla Shaw as the Lady
Bees leading rebounder.
Shataviah Anderson was named
outstanding defense and hustle; and
Breana Harvey and Simone Wil-
liams named for hustle.
-- - ------__ -


"We did not play well, especially in
the first quarter."
He added that starter Stewart
Williams was out of town and that
the Warriors should have been able
to handle it.
"We should have played better
than we did," he said. "We did not
play as a team, and you win as a
team, and you lose as a team."
In the first quarter, ACA scored


Tigers End Soccer

Action 3-8 On Season


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Tiger soccer team wrapped.'
up 3-8 on the season after three
losses, one by forfeit, one win and
one cancellation.
In the game against Bozeman, the
Tigers lost 4-1.
The lone goal was scored by
Eduardo Barron.
In the second game, the Tigers
downed Apalachicola, 7-3.
Thomas Lyle scored three goals;
Barron, two; and Jashawn Moore
and Alex. Lingle each scored one
goal.
In the game against Godby, the
Tigers lost, 10-2.
A goal was scored by Barron and
one by Lyle, assisted by Scot
Goodin.
As goalie.during the game, Jesus
Rosas had 15 saves; Goodwin, four
saves; and Brian Brock, two saves.
Suwannee County didn't show up
,for their game, so the Tigers won
by forfeit, and the game against La-
9 fayette was canceled.
t In the first round of the four-day
$district tournament, the Tigers' sea-
son came to a halt when they fell to
SBozeman for a 5-1 loss.
Coach Earline Knight said that at


Bees Lose To

,Havana 54-41


the end of the first half, the score
was 4-1 and the Tigers only gave
up one goal during the second half,
and that was a penalty shot with 20
seconds remaining in the game.
The lone goal was scored by
Lyle, assisted by Barron.
As the goalie for the first 20 min-
utes, Rosas had six saves.
The goalie was changed for the fi-
nal 20 minutes of the first half.
"We played exceptionally well
during the second half," said
Knight.
Goodwin had 11 saves; Brock
and Lingle each had two saves..


four points to Brookwood's 16; in
the second, ACA scored 12 to
Brookwood's 18; in the third, ACA
.scored nine to Brookwood's 10;
and in the fourth, ACA scored 13
to Brookwood's 16.
Returning after a badly sprained-.,
ankle, Ben Grantham was the lead
scorer for the Warriors. He had 15.
points, two assists, one steal, one.
block, and six rebounds.
"He's not as quick and as he usu--,.
ally is, only at about 85 percent
right now, but he'll be better in no
time," said Nennstiel.
Casey Gunnels, who Nennstiel
said did an outstanding job, had
four assists, five steals, one "tre-
mendous" blocked shot, and six re-
bounds.'
Stephen Griffin, 11 points, one
assist, one steal, three rebounds; -,
Wade Scarberry, nine points, one
assist, five steals, one rebound;
Luke Sadler, three points, one as-i- -
sist, one rebound; and Reggie
Walker, two steals.


NOW AVAILABLE!
New Pool Tables
Balls Cues
Other Supplies
Soft Drinks Beer Wine *
850-668-7665
1698 Village Square Blvd.'Tallahassee
Open Noon'til 2 am 7 Days aWeek!


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Howard Middle, School
boy's basketball team fell to Ha-
\ana. 54-41 in the final game of the
season.
Coach Steve Hall said the Bees
ended the year 11-4 on the season.
He added that the Bees were out-
scored for the first three quarters,
which helped the Havana Bears
take (lie win.

Devondrick Nealy, 25 points,
three rebounds; Demontray John-
son, four points, four rebounds;
Harold Ingram, one point, five re-
bounds; Teylor Richard, two
points, seven rebounds; DeAndre
Tucker, five points, 12 rebounds;
Ja'Cari Johnson, four points, four
rebounds; and L. Thomas, eight re-
bounds.

Hall concluded that the Bees had
a great season, and there will be
nine players returning to the court
for the Bees next year.


Warriors Down Arch


Rival Munroe 80-51


ACA, JCHS Athletes

Big Bend Leaders


Park Posts Sports

Registration Deadline


Quality Crane and Sign

Service, LLC

735 E. Washington St.
Monticello, FL 32344
(850) 997-8500
qualitycrane05@msn.com

We lift roof trusses, a/c units etc.
Bulb replacement for parking lot, stadium lights, etc.

115' boom length
John Morris, Owner

QUALITY SER VICE GUARANTEED


.


lww w we p r event., or g







PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 27, 2006


LEGALS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 05-315 CA. In the Matter of
Adoption of CARLEY MARIE DUPREE,
a minor. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: The
unknown father of CARLEY MARIE
DUPREE Address Unknown YOU ARE

k %t 1 FIIFrida
KidCare
Free or Low
Cost Health
insurance
for Kids


LEGALS
NOTIFIED that a Petition for Adoption
has been filed and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it, on MICHAEL A. REICHMAN,
petitioner's attorney, whose address is
P.O. Box 41, Monticello, FL 32345, on or
before February 20, 2006. and file the
original with the clerk of this court either
service on petitioner's attorney or
immediately thereafter, otherwise a
default will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint or
petition. DATED on December 28, 2005.
CARL D. BOATWRIGHT as Clerk of the
Court.
1/6. 1/13, 1/20, 1/27, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA


LEGALS
PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO:
06-08-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF JESSE.
BARRINGTON, Decease. NOTICE OF
ACTION TO: To All Unknown Heirs of
Jesse Barrington Addresses Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition tor
Summary Administration of the estate of'
JESSE BARRINGTON, deceased, hais
been filed and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if any ,to it,
on MICHAEL A. REICHMAN,
petitioner's attorney, whose address is
P.O. Box 41, Monticello, FL 32345, on or
before March 16, 2006 and file the original
with the clerk of this said court either
before service on petitioner's attorney or
immediately thereafter, otherwise a
default will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the petition. Dated on
January 24, 2006 CARL D.


LEG ALS
BOATWRIGHT, As Clerk of the Court.
1/27, 2/3, 2/10, 2/17, c
The Jefferson County Planning
Commission will hold its regular monthly
meeting on February 9, 2006 at 7:00 p.m.
The meeting will be held in the Courtroom
of the Jefferson County Courthouse
located at the intersection of US Highway
19 and (IS Highway 90 in Monticello, FL.
The meeting may be continued as
necessary. Information concerning the
meeting is available at the Jefferson
County Planning Department, 445 W.
Palmer Mill Road, Monticello, FL 32344,
Telephone 850-342-0223. From the
Florida "Government in the Sunshine
Manual", page 36, paragraph c: Each
board, commission, or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision thereof shall


LEGALS .., .
include in the notice of any meeting or
hearing if notice of meeting or hearing is
required, of such board commission or
agency, conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to appeal
any decision made by the board, agency pr
commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing ihe
or she will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such purpose,
he or she may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings, is
made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based.
1/27, c
The Jefferson Community Water System
Board will meet 7 p.m. February 2, 2006
at 395 Water Mill Road (Tank Site).
1/27, c


LEGALS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 05-120-
PR IN RE: The Estate of: JOSH SIMP-
KINS Deceased. NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: PEARLIE MAE SIMPKINS MILLS,
JESSIE L. BROWN, PAULINE BROWN,
JIMMY LEONARD, WILLIE T. LEON-
ARD, GEORGIA MAE L. GREEN,
WYNELL GALLON, GRIFFIN L.
MACK, MARION J. ANDERSON, JER-
OME SIMPKINS, PATRICIA S. MAR-
SHALL, TERRANCE SIMPKINS,
JESSIE SIMPKINS, SHARON SIMP-
KINS, WILLIAM SIMPKINS, WILLIE
MAE SIMPKINS, CREOLA SIMPKINS
BROWN LEE, ROBIN L. MITCHELL,
DAVID MITCHELL, and any unknown
heirs at law, assigns, devisees, grantees,


BUSINESS




DIRECTORY


Your Local Professional Painters
Interior Exterior
Lic & Ins #4676


t WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!
997-6500
WHEN You NEED To SOLVE COMPUTER PROBLEMS.
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY ONSITE SERVICE
*Diagnosis Repair *Upgrades *Installations *Consultations
'Tutorials *Removal of Viruses, Adware, Spyware


A&S Flooring, L.L.C.
43 Years experience
CERAMIC, TILE, CARPET, VINYL,
LAMINATE, REPAIRS & SALES
342-9922 HoME
570-6593 CELL
LICENSED & INSURED


Lawn & Landscaping
r- -.- -------------
I Mention This Ad & receive
I A 10% Discount I
11025 East Mahan 877-4550

11025 East Mahan 877-4550


Septic Tank & Land Clearing
Complete Septic Service & Repair
Lot Preparing & Land Clearing

Thomas B. Scott, Sr.
Rt 1 Box 137
Lamont, FL 32366
ph:997-5536 cell: 933-3620


Register's Mini-Storage

315 Waukeenah Hwy.
(1/4 Mile Off US 19 South)


997-2535


DOUG'S TREE & LAWN
SERVICE


Trimming
Mowing
Removal
Maintenance


0 Stump Grinding
0 Aerial Device
0 Bush Hogging


997-0039 Lic. & Insured


We accept all manufacturer coupons.


1-10 Chevron
Swisher Sweet Little Cigars
Buy One Get One Free
$1.99pk. $8.89 carton +tax
Regular, Light, or Cherry Flavors


Swisher Sweet Kings
5ct. pk $2.19 +tax

Black & Mild Cigars
.42 ea. $1.79pk +tax


Prices Good Thru Jan. 31, 2006
We have another order of leather purses
Free Crystal Lighter with each carton
cigarettes or cigars.




Call for quality work
45 Years In The Trade
Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
850-997-7467 ~ 850-544-2917

*Residential ~ Commercial *Interior ~ Exterior


Portable Toilets
Billy Simmons Septic I


850-509-1465 cell
850-997-0877 home
Clean Portables for construction sites,
\ family reunions, parties
Events and Types


LARICHIUTA



*Limerock
*Clay
*Sand
*Top Soil


Senior Mortgage Specialist
17 Years Of Service
850-224-2427
FHA/VA/CONV.
Self Employed New Construction/Land
Credit issues OK


Craig
Larichiuta
Lloyd, FL 32337

997-6788


JEFFERSON PLACE APARTMENTS
1468 S. WAUKEENAH ST.OFFICE 300
MONTICELLO, FL 32344
1+ 2 BEDROOM / HUD VOUCHERS ACCEPTED
CALL 850-997-6964 TTY-711


I


Residential & Commercial Lic.# cgc# 1507547

YEAGER CONTRACTING CO. INC.
CUSTOM HOMES

Commercial and Agriculture Buildings

PH: 997-2296 CELL: 508-2383


B & Tractor Service o*Lot Cleaning *Driveways *Dig Ponds *Road
Specializing in Food Plots, Bush Hogging, Building *Culvert Installation *Fill Dirt
Liming & Fertilizing, Spraying, and Fencing *Limerock *Gravel
S'Billy Simmons, Owner
Backhoe and Hauling Septic TanksContractor &
Excavation Contractor
SLeod ... Phone: (850) 997-0877
Cel 120-29.42 Mack McLeod
C(ed' 50) 45-2:25- Cell: (850)510-0346 Cell: (850) 509-1465
ion11 (S06)997--14 51 Home: (850) 997-3091
Insured D.O.H. Lie. #SR0971265 -
10534 South SAlt Rd. l.amom, FL. 32336 Visa & Mastercard Accepted!


Ultimate

U87age Auto

877-7222


'I ,e,u Davis Very large selection to choose from
sales Manager All trade-ins are welcome


A Best rates as low as 4.5%
A Free warranty on every vehicle sold


TfradeI. prag
ft II! --,


Keaton Tire Repair
Service Is Out Business on and ofl the Road"


EDD KEATON
TRAVIS KEAION
54 Capps Hwy
Lamont, FL 32336


VehiCL
.,nie!


00 (po[iT W IAAoTr[


850-997-0903 Shop
850-264-6871 Cell
850-997-0937 Fax
850-997-5443 Home


Since 1977
*Licensed *Bonded *Insured
Residential & Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES ~ 997-4100


Richbourg Nursery, Inc.
99 Richbourg Road
Monticello, FL 32344
Tel. 850- 997-3764 Fax 850-997-8388


Sim-
ply
the dL




Best! REALTOR







Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
www.TimPeary.com
Simply the Best!


U Ii


ATTENTION
BUSINESS OWNERS
-SHOP KEEPERS-

LOCAL PROFESSIONAL
SALES & SERVICE


NOW AVAILABLE:
SECURITY CAMERA SYSTEMS
ACCESS CONTROLS
ALARM SYSTEMS
TELEPHONE SYSTEMS
DATA NETWORKS

BIG BEND


COMMUNICATIONS Co.

997-4150


MR. MERCHANT

THIS SPACE COULD

BE YOUR FOR

$10 PER WEEK


Call Andy Rudd For

Appliance Service

Needs @

997-5648


CARROLL HILL Auro EiLECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service




Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


iris


Pam Bowling
Broker Associate

997-4789
1-888-701-2205


Www.pamb@nettally.com


U


MONTICELLO'S ONLY LOCAL HEATING & COOLING COMPANY

STEWART
HEATING & COOLING INC.

Sales ~ Service ~ Installation ~ Change Outs
Residential Commercial

Family Owned V Office: (850) 342-3294
Lic. # RA0067121 CELL: (850) 509-2903


Mr. Merchant

This Space

Could Be

Yours For

Only $20

Per Week


- I


SCP


CHASE
Jena Fernandez


I I


.Call TYRO.NE,.hes, makin.g,,i.t

,hapPon TheI Ultimate Way


I .


1121
PUL.Alim-
"a Ty











To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 27, 2006 PAGE 11

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday... $7.00
Each Additional Line....$l1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


---------------- -------"I-- -------- ---- ---- ---- ------------------


LEGALS
and any other parties claiming any inter-
est by or through aforesaid parties, YOU
ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition For De-
termination of Heirs and Beneficiaries has
been filed in the above entitled estate rela-
tive to your interest in the following de-
scribed real property located in Jefferson
County, Florida: The North Half of the
North half of the Southwest Quarter (N1/2
of NI/2 of the SW1/4) of Section One (1)
Township One (1) North, Range Four (4)
East, containing Forty (40) acres, more or
less, and being a portion of the lands con-
veyed to said parties of the first part by
Preston B. Bird, Sr. by deed dated July
llth 1929 and of record in the Office of
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Jefferson
County, Florida in Deed Book "UU," page
457 and to which reference is hereby
made. You are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any on the Peti-
tioner's attorney, Harold M. Knowles, Es-
quire, whose address is 3065 Highland
Terrace, Tallahassee, Florida 32301 on or
before the 28th day of February 2006, and
file the original with the clerk of this court
either before service on the Petitioner's at-
torney or immediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the Petition.
1/13, 1/20, 1/27, 2/3, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.:
05-134-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHN
THOMAS SCHLEIFER, Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION: The
administration of the estate of JOHN
THOMAS SCHLEIFER deceased, File
Number 05-134-PR is pending in the
Circuit Court for Jefferson County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is Jefferson County Courthouse, ,
Room 10 Monticello, FL 32344. The
names and address of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below. All interested persons are required
to file with this Court WITHIN THREE
MONTHS OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE: (1)
all claims against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the Will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdiction of
the Court. ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED. Publication of this
Notice has begun on January 27, '2006-
JOAN HEYSER SCHLEIFER Petitioner;
MICHAEL A. REICHMAN Post Office
Box 41 Monticello, Florida, 32345 (850)
997 5100 FL. BAR NO: 183518
!/27, 2/3, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO:
05-115-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF CLARA
NEARLY, Deceased. NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: To All Unknown Heirs of Clara Nealy
Address Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED
that a petition for summary
Administration has been filed and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on MICHAEL A.
REICHMAN, petitioner's attorney, whose
address is P.O. Box 41, Monticello, FL
32345 on or before March 16, 2006, and
file the original with the clerk of this said
court either before service on petitioner's
attorney or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the petition.
Dated on January 24, 2006. CARL D.
* BOATWRIGHT As Clerk of the Court.
1/27, 2/3, 2/10, 17, c
NOTICE OF SALE: Notice is hereby
given that the School Board of Jefferson
County, Florida, Desmond M. Bishop
Administration Building, 1490 W.
Washington Street, Monticello, Florida
will receive sealed bids on or before
January 30, 2006 at 2:00 p.m. for the
purchase of the following described real
property owned by the School Board of
Jefferson County, Florida. One acre of
land in SW 1/4 of SW 1/4 of NW 'A DB
"YY" Page 193. The Parcel Number is
Section 20-2n-7E-0000-0110-0000. This
property is being sold in its "As Is
Condition" and no representations are
made as to zoning, access, or its suitability
for specific uses. The land is situated in
Jefferson County, Florida. Bids received
will be opened publicly at 2:00 p.m. in the
Board Room of the district office located
at 1490 W. Washington Street, Monticello,
FL 32344. No bid will be opened if
received after 2:00 p.m. Please mark on
envelope, "Surplus Real Property Bid
Opening 2:00 p.m. on January 30, 2006."
Anyone desiring information on the
procedure for submitting bids should
contact Hal Wilson at (850) 342-0100. It is
anticipated that the highest bid will be
presented to the School Board for
approval on Monday, February 13, 2006.
The School Board of Jefferson County
reserves the right to reject any or all bids.
Fred Shofner, Chairman, Jefferson
County School Board, Phil Barker,
Superintendent, Jefferson County School
Board.
1/13, 1/18, 1/20, 1/25, 1/27, c
HELP WANTED
The Jefferson Counti Road Dept. "ill
be accepting applications for the
following position: "Truck driver


with CDL class A Florida License.
Must have excellent driving record,
high school diploma, 2 years
experience driving trucks, and
experience using backhoe. For
application stop by the Road Dept.
office week days 7:30 a.m. to 4:00
p.m. Jefferson County is an equal


HELP WANTED

opportunity employer and a drug free
workplace. Phone number 997-2036.
Closing date will be February 1,
2006."
1/20, 1/27, c
Registered Nurse Home Health $1500
$3000 Recruitment Incentive
Archbold Home Health Services is
currently seeking qualified applicants
for the above full time position to
serve Leon, Jefferson, Madison
Counties. One year of home health
experience preferred. We offer
competitive compensation and an
excellent benefit package.
CONTACT: Nurse Recruiter,
Archbold Medical Center. Phone:
229-228-2713, Fax: 229-551-8733.
Email: rtaylor@archbold.org Visit
our website: www.archbold.org EOE
1/25, 27, c
Driver Covenant Transport. Excellent
pay & Benefits for Experienced
Drivers, 0/0, Solos, Teams, &
Graduate Students. Bonuses
Available. Refrigerated Now
Available. (888)695-7279 x19.
01/27, fcan
Taking Applications. Our business is
striping, seal coating, asphalt repair,
etc. Ideal candidate can' take on
anything and do it right without
supervision. EOE. Druggies need not
apply. 545-1776.
9/23, tfn
Leading national propane marketer
Southeast Propane has immediate
opening for an energetic route sales
driver for their Monticello based
operation. Candidates must possess
strong customer service skills, team
player attitude along with a Class B
CDL license with an air brake
endorsement and have the ability to
obtain a hazmat & tanker
endorsement Clean driving record a
must. Excellent starting salary with
competitive benefit program for the
qualified candidate. EOE. Apply by
Fax 850-997-2808 or in person @ 500
South Jefferson St. Monticello, FL.
1/18, tfn,c
Cashier, available to work shift work
iar, weekends @ Capital City Travel
Center. Call Sharon @ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/2C, tfn
Drillers helper, excellent pay and
benefits. High school diploma
required, valid Florida drivers
license, CDL a plus. Drug free work
place. Travel required. Please call
1-800-487-9665.
1/25, tfn, c
Office Assistant wanted at North
Florida Community College. Monday
- Friday 8:00 to 4:30. Partial Duties
include: Thorough knowledge and
experience in Microsoft Office
including Outlook, Word, Excel, and
Access (must be able to create and
maintain spreadsheets and
databases); Updating and
maintaining computerized Board
Policy Manual and Procedures
Manual; Coordinating

schedules/meeting; Maintain budget
information; Record/transcribe
minutes (The ability to take
Shorthand dictation a plus). Full job
description on website. Qualifications:
AA/AAS degree (Preferred) plus two
(2) years related experience. Send
application & resume to NFCC,
Human Resources, 325 NW Turner
Davis Drive, Madison, FL 32340.
Application must be received' by
1/31/2006. Application can be
downloaded at www.nfcc.edu. EOE.
1/79 27. 2/1. 3. c
GARAGE SALE
Yard Sale on side of Johnson's Meat
Market. Western Store going out of
business. 20% off everything. Jeans,
hats, boots, leather goods & apparel,
hunting jackets & coveralls, winter
coats & paint. 342-3288, 997-5814.

AUTOMOTIVE
1995 Ford Cro"n Vic. New Tires,
Looks & Drives Like New. $3,800
997-6806
10/21, tfn, c
1977 Olds Cutlass 89,252 miles $3500
CASH. Clean, new tires. Call
997-2646 M-Th 9-5.
tfn, c
93 Ford F250 New tires, brakes, tune
up $4,500
89 Accura Legend SR 6 cylinder,
NADA Book is $2,400 Selling Price
$1,295
96 Ford Mustang Convertible- Red,
New tip, new tires, 6 cyl. $4,200;
997-6066, 997-6806 Wilson Auto,
LLC.
tfn, c


WANTED
DOG OWNER NEEDS HOME:
Responsible 51 year old male looking
for small home to rent with outside
space for dogs. Will provide
nonrefundable pet deposit. Local
references available. William @
850-212-8337.


FOR SALE
Rhode Island Red Roosters $10
each. Beautiful Purebred Limousin
bull, 15 months old. Call 997-0901,
leave message or 997-3568 ask for
Debbie.
01/4, 6, 11, 13, 18, 20, 25, 27, pd
4' (like new) Gondolas, $45 each,
shelves $7 each, heavy duty circular
garment rack (approx. 58" diameter)
$75. Call (850) 997-2519.
1/18, 20, 25, 27, c
$275 Brand New King Double
Pillowtop Set in sealed plastic with
warranty. Can deliver. 850-545-7112.
1/27, c
6 PC Bedroom Set Brand new sleigh
bed, dresser, mirror, and nightstand.
$650, still boxed, can deliver.
850-222-9879
1/27, c
BED a solid wood sleigh bed:
headbroad, footboard, & rails. NEW
in box $275. Call 850-222-7783
1/27, c
Bed Queen Double Pillowtop Set New
in plastic, warranty. $149, can deliver.
850-425-8374
1/27, c
Bedroom All New 7 PC set: All
dovetailed, all wood-still boxed. Retail
$4K, must sell $1400 can deliver.
850-222-2113
1/27, c
Chair/Loveseat/Sofa $650 NEW
Micro fiber upholstery, hardwood
frame & warranty, unopened
850-545-7112
1/27, c
DINING, NEW table with in lay, ball
& claw, feet, leaf, 2 arm chairs, 4 side
chairs, hutch/buffet. $4500 sug. list,
sacrifice $1750 850-222-9879
1/27,c
Dining Room New Queen Anne table
with leaf, 8 chairs, & lighted china
cabinet. Still boxed. $1000. Can
deliver 850-222-9879
Leather Sofa, Loveseat & Chair still
wrapped: Retail $3400; sell brand
new with warranty $1250.
850-425-8374
1/27, c
Mattress New Full set in plastic with
warranty, $99. 850-222-9879.
1/27, c
Mattress/Box bed Set: pillow plush
double sided pillow top mattress/box
set, 4 inch pillow top. List $989.00, sell
for $248. 850-528-1422
1/20, 25. 27, 2/1, 3, pd
LEFT OVER- Merchandise from Big
Chief Pawnbrokers, Electronics,
Handtools, DVD's, VHS, Jewelry,
Reasonably Priced. 342-2105
01/6, 11, 13, 18, 20, 25, 27, pd
METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ By
Direct From Manufacturer. 20 colors
in stock with all Accessories. Quick
turn around! Delivery Available Toll
Free (888)393-0335.
01/27, fcan

FOR RENT
Prime downtown office space now
available in Cherry Street Commons.
Jack Carswell, 997-1980.
11/30, tfn, c
One bedroom, on one acre. Partially
furnished, no pets. $575 per month,
credit check. 997-6991.
1/27, 2/3, 2/10, pd

REAL ESTATE
Nice 3 bedroom, 2 bathbrick home,
approx. 2 acres, living room, Florida
room, fireplace, hardwood floors,
country setting, in Jefferson County,
997-2387, 033-0904, $249,900.
1/20, 25 27, c
5 Bedrooms! 3 Baths! Plenty of room!
Buy for under $550 a month.
850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
In-town LOT $22,000 SE of Square,
88'x79' 345-7116 or 222-5658
Sumnimer's Realty of Tallahassee, Inc.
1/25, 27, 2/1,3 8, 10, 15, 17, pd

"Fixer Upper" $22,000. 4 bedroom,
1+baths 2nd St. 345-7116.
1/25, 27, 2/1,3, 8, 10, 15, 17, pd
FIRST TIME home buyers. If you
have enough money for a deposit on
an apartment you can probably own
your own home. Call 850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
DISCOUNTED MODELS Only 2
homes left, must go! Save $$$$ Call
today! 850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn


REAL ESTATE
NEW HOME 1370 square foot. 4
bedroom, 2 bath for under $475/
month payments. University Homes -
850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
SERVICES
Backhoe Service: Driveways, roads,
ditches, tree and shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @ 997-
3116, 933-3458.
tfn
Servers: Must be 18 years old. Call
Brian for interview 284-7899.
1/25, 27, 2/1, 3,c _
Christian Girl will clr" 'ur home.
New in town. r- e"p ,-1437.
1/18, 20, 25, C XC
Are you concerned about the high
cost of college? Would you like to
learn how to pay for college? Attend a
3 hour seminar Saturday, February
4th. Register at
www.eaircollegecash.coin
1/20, 25, 27, 2/1, c
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and op-
erated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648.
Leave message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quick responses.
6/22, tfn
Are you concerned about the high
cost of college? Would you like to
learn how to pay for college? Attend a
3 hour seminar Saturday, February
4th Register at
www.earncollegecash.com
1/20, 27, 2/1, 3, c
Peter Satellite -- Your Satellite dealer.
We offer equipment, installation,
repair, parts, and prompt service. We
also offer Go-Kart, utility tailors and
lawn mowers. Located at: 1150 Old
Lloyd Road, Monticello, Fla.
850-997-2377
1/25, tfn, c
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drug, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn
fat and increase energy levels
resulting in considerable weight loss
over time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key
ingredients incorporated into rice
bran oil with natural flavorings to
give it a palpable taste. In addition to
weight loss, you may see benefits for
the hair, skin and nails from the
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in rice
bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is a cactus
found in the Kalahari Desert of South
Africa. Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
s/d 5/18, tfn
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for assessment of
your needs. 997-3553. UPS NOW
AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn

CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots, Land!
We Make Mortgage Loans,
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc.
Lic. Mortgage LENDER
878-3957


HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT
t



Bulldozers, Backhoes,
Loaders, Dump Trucks,
Graders, Scrapers,
Excavators
Train in Florida
-National Certification
-Financial Assistance
-Job Placement Assistance
800-383-7364
Associated Training Services
www.atsn-schools.com


KELIVY & KElLY
PROPERTIES
215 N. Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL 32344
997-5516


For all our listings see
us on theweab!


* .20 acres on the Sop choppy River for great
week-end getaways. $ 70,000
* 2 acres on N. Jefferson prime Bus/Res with
frontage on Hwy 19 N. adjacent .60 acre
available, & must be purchased together.
* Kylee Dr. 5 acres with beautiful pecan trees.
High & dry. $ 95,000
* 6 acres great location on Whitehouse Rd.
mixed pines/hardwoods. $111,000
* 6.42 acres Pretty acreage with Ig. stocked
pond. $ 89,880
* 9.25 acres Lots of privacy on Gamble Rd.
Convenient to Tallahassee. $ 155,000
* Beautiful waterfront property 16.50 acres
with frontage on Lake Miccosukee. Mostly
wooded, with small creek. $ 247,500


kL Simply the Best!


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Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only $16,500 per acre

Very Reasonable! 2 bedroom 1 bath home
with small fenced yard, nice family room
$87,500

Choice Buildinq Lots in Cooper's Pond


Area cleared and ready to build on, nice
trees, paved road $27,500 each


Look at This! Comfortable 4 bedroom 3 bath
home on five fenced acres w/guest house/
playhouse w/ bath, big shop, 2 car garage,
pasture, 100 pecan trees and a nice pool a
real dream for a growing family $400,000

Hard to Find 5 choice acres on hillside with
planted pines on quiet graded county road
Asking $12,000/acre

Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom home
in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000.

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane off Rocky Branch Road and Sunset Street
100'x220' in the City $15,500 each

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Choice Building Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Look at the Price Contract Pending 5
wooded acres on Blue Lake Road only
$22,500

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 10 acres on the
east side of town high and dry in quiet loca-
tion with lots of game, 9 year old planted
pines, profitfrom both appreciating land and
growing pine $12,000 /acre.


Home Site-Under Contract close to town
on West Grooverville Road only $14,500
Rentals Available
2/1.5 mobile home on 2 ac $450
3/2 mobile home Xmas Ac $650
3/2 mobile home Lloyd Ac $650
2/1 home on Dogwood St $850
Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
We have qualified buyers!
Are you interested in selling?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!


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Housing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers

2/2 $615 3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571
*hwv^rvAf^/^/^>/^/ww^"f^/W^







PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 27, 2006


Chamber Hears Coffee


Roaster's Presentation


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


The January meeting of the
Monticello/Jefferson Chamber of
Commerce featured homemade
chili by Mary Frances Drawdy and
a presentation by David Morrissey
with Crooked' House Coffee Roast-
ers.
An array of coffees were brewed
and served by David Morrissey
with Crooked House Coffee Roast-
ers in Waukeenah.
Morrissey spoke briefly about the
local coffee business mentioning
the origin of the imported beans,
and how the every day business op-
erates, and how it came about.
President Margaret Levings en-
couraged members to purchase and
solicit the sale of "Familiar Faces
and Quiet Places" a history of Jef-
ferson County and Chamber book
project, penned by local resident
Dee Counts.
Books can be purchased at the
Chamber and at Farmers & Mer-
chants Banks for $39.95.


She noted that a total of 138
books have been sold to date.
It was decided that the Chamber
will research an advanced phone
system complete with voice mail,
call waiting, caller ID, and event
announcement features.
Levings notes that "As our town
grows, the Chamber has an increas-
ing responsibility to our business
community. More demands are be-
ing made on our simple one line
phone system and answering ma-
chine than what can be handled:."
"An advanced phone system will
allow folks to call in at any hour
and access current events or leave a
message if the phone is in use, she
continued.
"Messages may be retrieved from
other phones and blackouts will not
affect the voice mail feature."'
The Chamber budget cannot af-
ford this system at this time so
members will have to raise the
money for it.
There is a one time cost for this
system in addition to the monthly
service. So, anyone wishing to do-
nate to the Chamber Phone Fund,-


can do so now.
"We appreciate all the help we
get towards this project and look
forward to our new system and
serving the community better," she
says.
Kim Barnhill gave an update on
YMCA news and how things are
progressing with the possibility of a
Jefferson location.
Eleanor Hawkins mentioned the
Tour of Homes, sponsored by the
Historical Association, has been
scheduled for Mar. 25 and 26 with
a list of homes to be forthcoming..

* She needs volunteers to help with
the Tour and asked Chamber mem-
bers to consider becoming a part of
the County Historical Association,
and distributed information and ap-
plications.
The Chamber meets at noon on
the second Tuesday of each month.
The next meeting is scheduled for
Feb. 14, which will feature the first
"One Dollar" raffle. For one dollar
members can be a part of the raffle,
or members can donate a gift to be
raffled off during one of the meet-
ing.


'. ". ".' "











with David Morrissey of Crooked House Coffee Roasters, at
the Chamber meeting last week. (News Photo)


Barrington

Named Student
of Month

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Maresja Deshon Barrington has-
been chosen as the Jefferson
County High School Boys and
Girls Club Youth of the Month.
Nicknamed 'Esha,' this 15 year
old enjoys the sports of track, vol-
leyball, and softball.
Barrington says she likes the
Boys and Girls Club because "it is
fun and educational at the same
time." She adds that she enjoys the
environment and the attention the
staff gives her.
James Mercado is the PEP coor-
dinator at the JCHS Club and en-
courages contact from students and
parents alike. He will make himself
available to them any time. He can
be reached at 519-1200 'or at:
jmercado@bgcbb.org



a a a


: ,MLK Center

SWork Day Set

t *. DEBBIE SNAPP
SStaff Writer


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Members of the Triple L Club,
met Tuesday morning at the First
Baptist Church and were
entertained by the nine members of
the Pine Cone Band, who are
residents of the Southern Pines
Assisted Living Community.
They group performed a patriotic
program using kitchen utensils
such as pots and pans, ladles and
pails, spatulas and pan lids, as their
instruments, and sang along:
Out of the blue, the band banged
out "Don't Break My Heart, My
Achey, Breaky Heart."
When it did, the oldest member
of the band, Ruth Wood, 107, stood
up and started to "cut the rug,"
while the audience roared.
Wood also sang 'Amazing Grace'
acappella later on in the program.
A skit was presented by the
activity directors that included the



Commodities
Distribution
New Bethel A.M.E. Church in
conjunction with Elizabeth M.B.
Church and the Second Harvest
Food Bank will provide food to
needy infants, the elderly, and any-
one needing assistance from the
USDA Commodities Food
Program.
Distribution will take place from
9 a.m. until 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan.
28 at New Bethel Church, 6496
Ashville Highway.
This program will continue on
the fourth Saturday of each month.
For additional information contact
Essie Norton at 997-5683 or 997-
6929.

Monticello News
Keeps You
Informed!!


Marie de Waard, Dorris Toney, Braxton Bry-
ant, and Fate Jones. Standing, Angel
Brooks, Maxine Rayburn. '(News Photo)


Before ending the meeting, Presi-
dent Mary Helen Andrews re-
minded members of the trip to
Woodville Thursday, Feb. 16.
The group will met at the church
and carpool to the Seineyard Res-
taurant for a seafood dinner and
fine fellowship.


band members. Angel Brooks and
Maxine Rayburn dressed as "little
old ladies" named' Millie and
Maude, who were window
-shopping at a local mall, for
see-through negligees, and joking
about their wrinkles.
After the program and during the
mealimembers of the LLL sat and
visited with the band members.
One band member L.W. Fate
Jones, 92, announced that he is the
oldest living member of Monti-
cello's First Baptist Church.
A long time resident of the Jeffer-
son County community, he now re-
sides at the Southern Pines
Community
Jones lived his entire adult life
three doors down from the house
where he was born.
Executive Director Carol Whit-
ney says of Jones, "His gift for hu-
mor and laughter, his easygoing
personality, and his wonderful sto-
rytelling skills make him a treas-
ured member of our family."



Every
20 Seconds...
Osteoporosis
Causes a Fracture


SPINE Causes posture change,
height loss, and often chronic pain.
U -N [ 0 N A L
OSTEOPOROSIS
(-, U I'iD AT 0 N
FIghting Osteoporosis & Promoting Bone Health
www.nof.org
0 Nai ourl ,1 Oipo)oro.s Foundation 2001


A Work Day is scheduled for all
parties interested in volunteering at
the Martin Luther King Center
building 8 a.m. until you are tired,
Saturday, Jan. 28.
The ladies of the MLK Commit-
tee will be serving lunch.
Bring a hard hat and a friend and
help the MLK Committee to reach
its goal.
To learn more about the MLK
Center and its fundraising efforts,
plan to attend the next committee
meeting 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 30 at
the Memorial MB Church at the
corner of Rhodes and 2nd Streets.
Questions can be directed to
Chairman of the Board and Presi-
dent Charles J. Parrish at 997-3760.

Church News
Greater Fellowship MB Church
will hold a Fashion Show Ex-
travganza 5:30 p.m., Saturday, at
Howard Middle School. A Baby
Contest takes place 2:30 p.m.
Sunday.
Family and Friends day is set Su-
day, Feb. 5.

The Terrell-Williams Missionary
Fifth Sunday Serive will be held at
Salem AME Church, F1 a.m. Sun-
day. Speaker is Rev. Barbara
Frazier.


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ATTENTION

To better serve our valued customers,
Madison Employment Connections will have a new address
effective Monday, January 30, 2006. You may visit us at
200 West Base Street, Madison ~ 2nd Floor (Wachovia Bank Bldg.)
------* SO *-S .1 I""i S Mill


Job Seeker Service
Career counseling skill & skill level assessment
Job search & placement assistance
Use of computers with internet access/faxes, resource
room, copiers, phones
Workshop for interviewing & resume writing
Veterans services and benefits
Information on unemployment programs, claims fil-
ing, job openings, insurance, labor market, job open-
ings

Youth Services
Objectives assessment
Individual service strategies and planning
Paid/unpaid work experience
Comprehensive guidance and counseling
Occupational skills training
Follow-up services for 12 months


Work s


Employer Services
* Easy posting of job openings on Employ Florida
Marketplace
* Access to worker profiles, resumes
* Recruitment assistance
* Job Fairs
* Information on employer prevailing wages, unem-
ployment
* OJT, skills upgrading and retraining
* HR consulting services (skills assessment for employ-
ees, job description preparation)
* Rapid response service to avoid dislocation j


Florida


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-ai II I U~i I, i


MEMBERS of the Triple L club were enter-
tained by the Pine Cone Band at a recent
meeting. L-R: Bob Holbrook, Harriet Burns,
Grace Cline, Ruth Wood, Glenn Willis. Back,


Triple L Club Program


Features Pine Cone Band


M,




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