Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00165
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: January 25, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00165
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text

LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
--^..,,TTT IT. 159411


USO Celebrates
65 Years
Of Service

Editorial, Page 4


Wednesday Morning


r^^(


a


Montic


138TH YEAR NO.07, 50 CENTS


Refuge House
Grant Provides
Programs

Story, Page 7


II


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2006


Ceremony Celebrates Annex


Health Dept.

New Facility

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Praises abounded Friday at the af-
ternoon ceremony celebrating the
Health Department's acquisition of
the former TMH building on West
Washington Street.
"I'm here to tell you that we're
state government and we're excited,"
Health Department Director Kim
Barnhill said about the acquisition,
relating an incident from early in her
career when a higher state official
informed her that people in state
government were pleased about for-
tuitous events, but they did not get
excited.
Barnhill went on to relate the long
history of the building's acquisition
and to praise the numerous individu-
als who made the acquisition possi-
ble, most notably former legislators
and present-day lobbyists John Cul-
breath and John Kiser and TMH
President and CEO Mark O'Bryant.


Others who came in for Barn-
hill's praises were Robert B. Eadie,
deputy secretary of the Florida De-
partment of Health (FDOH); Mike
Paredes, legislative planning direc-
tor for the FDOH; Senators Al Law-
son and Nancy Argenziano and
State Representative Will Kendrick
and Loranne Ausley; and the Jeffer-
son Legislative Committee.
But ultimately, the praise went to
Barnhill, the one who truly made the
project happen, as noted by O'Bry-
ant in his brief remarks to the crowd
of 70 or so people attending the
ceremony.
"She's given me and TMH the
credit," O'Bryant said. "But make no
mistake about it, it was Kim's pas-
sion, energy and focus that drove
this project forward."
Indeed, it was about four years
ago that Barnhill first approached
the County Commission with the
idea of acquiring the former TMH
building to expand her growing op-
eration.
At the time, Barnhill had been
talking to TMH officials and had
learned that the hospital was willing
to sell the building -- formerly the
home of the Tallahassee Memorial


Family Medicine Monticello clinic
-- for $290,000.
The negotiations led to TMH leas-


ing half the building to the Health
Department, with the understanding
that, ultimately, the department's


goal was to purchase the building.
Barnhill continued to work on the
goal and in 2003 she got the legisla-


- -, - - - .
-CUTTING the traditional ribffon at the cere- Chairman Danny Monroe, Health Depart-
mony celebrating the acquisition of the an- ment Director Kim Barnhill, and TMH Presi-
nex are, from left, County Commission dent and CEO Mark O'Bryant. (News Photo)


tive delegation to take on the
project, with Ausley in particular
spearheading the effort.
Subsequent negotiations between
Barnhill, Ausley and TMH officials
-led to the hospital lowering its ask-
ing price to $250,000. But insofar as
the legislative effort to have the
state allocate the $250,000 for the
purchase, the effort ultimately
failed.
Barnhill, however, persisted in
pursuing-the project. And last year,
she came up with the idea of trans-
ferring $250,000 from her depart-
ment's budget to the county for the
purchase of the building, with the
understanding that her department
would then get to use the building
rent-free.
As Barnhill explained the situa-
tion at the time, health departments
across the state were required to
maintain a certain percentage of
their budgets in a trust fund for the
eventuality of having to cope with a
major emergency.
In the wake of the four hurricanes
that struck the state in 2004 -- and
the fact that the trust till retained an
(See Ceremony Page 2)


City, Garden Club Hold Annual Arbor


Day Ceremony At Oakfield Cemetery


COMMISSIONER JUNIOR TUTEN, left, gives Congressman
Allen Boyd a handshake in appreciation of the $1 million
Boyd secured in federal funds for the repair of the Ashville
Highway bridge over the Aucilla River. (News Photo)


Boyd Secures $1M


For Bridge Repair


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Congressman Allen Boyd was the
bearer of good news Thursday
night, particularly for Commissioner
Junior Tuten of District 1.
After three years of effort, Boyd
was happy to report that he had been
able to secure $1 million in federal
funding for the repair of the Snead
Smokehouse bridge, which has been
deteriorating for the last 15 or so
years.
Boyd jokingly said that Tuten had
captured his attention about the im-
portance of repairing the bridge
when the latter had informed him
that the county might have to close
the bridge that affords him access to
his farm.
The bridge, which spans some 200
feet of the Aucilla River on CR-146
-- commonly known as the Ashville
Highway -- has had to be repaired at
least twice in the past. Even so, its
piling continue to deteriorate, so that


lower weight limits have had to be
imposed in recent years.
Tuten said absent the repairs that
the $1 million will make possible, it
was his concern that the bridge
would have to be closed down even-
tually.
Such a closure, Tuten said, would
present a severe hardship to resi-
dents in the northeastern part of the
county, who would then be forced to
take a lengthy detour to access Mon-
ticello and parts south and west of
town.
"It would cut off that part of the
county," Tuten said.
He estimates the age of the bridge
to be about 50 years.
Tuten said the federal funds that
Boyd secured have already been
transferred to the Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation, which is in
the process of working out the work
schedule for the project.
He said it was his understanding
that the DOT will construct a tem-
porary bridge while the main bridge
is being repaired, so that the road
won't have to be closed.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Representatives of the City and
of the four garden circles in the
county, assembled Friday morning
at Oakfield Cemetery for the an-
nual Arbor Day Ceremony.
Six trees were planted, three Live
Oak and three Shumard Oak, do-
nated by Simpson's Nursery.
City Superintendent Don Ander-
son said that this is the 20th year
that Monticello had been conduct-
ing the ceremony.
He related the number of trees,
types of trees and where they were
planted over the years.
City Clerk Emily Anderson, on
behalf of the City, thanked the
:. embers of.theGarden Circles lor
adl of the work and beatification
that they do in the community.
"We want to thank you for your
help and interest. It is greatly ap-
preciated. All that you do makes a
big difference in the beauty of our
community," she said.
The City's Arbor Day Proclama-
tion reads:
Whereas, Arbor Day is symbolic
of the Early Conservation Move-
ment and has been observed in the
United States in various ways for
over a hundred years; and
Whereas, the citizens of Monti-
cello have shown an increased in-
terest of planting trees because of
the tremendous role that such trees
play in furthering and improving
the environment; and
Whereas, trees are responsible for
producing oxygen, for controlling
floods, and for providing wildlife
habitat; and
Whereas, the City of Monticello
takes great pride in its variety and
number of trees, and concern that
Arbor Day should be commemo-
rated by the planting of trees;
Now, therefore, I, Julie Conley,
Mayor of the city of Monticello, do
hereby proclaim January 20, 2006,
as Arbor Day in the city of Monti-


cello, with the sincere conviction
that the enhancement of the beauty
of the city's landscape by the plant-
ing of trees furnishes not only an
economic value, but also the hu-
man value that is priceless and
benefits all. I
Monticello Garden Club Presi-
dent Dianne Braren said that the
Monticello Garden Club represents


the four garden circles in the com-
munity, which include the Magno-
lias, Mignonette, Founders, and
Camellias, and that they are always
seeking new and additional mem-
bers to their groups.
"We worked on many projects
for the city in the past and will be
landscaping at the library soon.
"Whenever the City needs our


help on a project, all you have to do
is ask and we'll be there', Braren
said.
Monticello Garden Club Vice
President Toni Lane added that
joining the local groups is a good
way to not only meet new people
and learn all about Florida plants,
it's a great way to help beautify the
community.


PLANTING a tree at Oakfield Cemetery "on Anderson and Garden Club members Dianne
the coldest day of the year" for the annual Braren, Isabelle de Searcy, Toni Lane and
Arbor Day are, from left, City Clerk Emily Dottie Jenkins. (News Photo)

Round 2 Of Howard Middle School

Relocation Meetings Is Scheduled


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

In the continued effort to solicit
ideas from parents concerning the
relocation of Howard Middle School
to the Jefferson County High School
campus, a second round of meeting
has been scheduled.
Sherry Heyen, executive director
of school improvement advised par-


ents by letter that principals from
HMS and JCHS met to address the
issues and concerns discussed at the
first meeting, and to make decisions
for the 2006-2007 school year.
She wrote that this second round
of meetings is designed to share de-
veloping plans, and to address other
issues concerning the relocation.
A meeting is scheduled 6 to 7:15
p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 31, at Howard
Middle School.


Another meeting is scheduled at
Jefferson County High School 6 to
7:15 p.m., Feb. 2
The meetings take place initially
in the cafeteria, and then move to
classrooms for a rotation in three
groups.
Each group will discuss specific
information.
The first group will address the
topics of: Facilities, Modulars, Traf-
(See Relocation Page 2)


Casey Gunnels
Shines
On Court

Story, Page 9


Hospice Training
Benefits
Cancer Caregivers

Story, Page 12
I E







PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 25, 2006


THE JEFFERSON LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE
played their part in lobbying the Legislature
for the acquisition of the Health Department
annex. From left, Dick Bailar, Ron Smith,


ceremony
(Continued From Page 1)
inordinate amount of money -- gr
Barnhill said lawmakers were look- ou
.' Jing to take $30 million from the ac- fir
count. tic
Before that happened, she said, it
was her goal to transfer $250,000
from the account for the purchase of
the building. The only potential ob- E
stacle to the transaction, she said,
was that the Legislature had to ap- (
S'' prove proviso language allowing for fic
the transfer to proceed. cu

i That's where the four named legis- to1
,.. L lators and the local lobbying com- Pa
'"':^ : ?' __, mittee did their jobs,' as noted by De
....... Dick Bailar, spokesman for the Jef- Cc
ferson Legislative Committee.


David Ward, Jerry Sutphin, Julie Conley,
Larry Halsey, David Frisby, Junior Tuten and
John Culbreath. (News Photo)


Bailar attributed the success of the
project to the cooperative effort of
four sectors: the Health Department,
TMH, the County Commission and
the four legislators, and the local
lobbying committee.


Change Would Make It Easier For


Developers To Get Projects Online


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Commissioners want the Planning
Commission to reconsider the pro-
cedure that requires developments to
undergo a second review, in cases
where the development undergoes a
minor modification after the initial
county approval.
Charlie Ward, developer of the
375-acre Millcreek Ridge Subdivi-
sion near Lloyd, brought up the is-
sue recently.
Ward's initial development plan,
which the county approved last year,
called for 300 acres to be built up
with houses and 75 acres to be dedi-
cated to conservation. Which would
make for a total of 53 lots on the
property.
Because the property includes
wetlands, however, the Department
of Environmental Protection (DEP)
must also review the plans. And the
DEP won't review the plans until the
county has given its approval.
In this instance, the DEP required
that the developer modify at least
one of the subdivision roads to ac-
comodate a wetlands area. Which
caused Ward -- on his own volition
and for aesthetic reasons, he says --
to reconfigure the layout and ulti-
mately reduce the number of lots.


"Instead of 53 lots, we've now
got 51 lots," Ward told commission-
ers. "The only change is that the lots
are bigger. Arredondo (Planning Of-
.ficial Bob Arredondo) feels that we
need to go through the Planning
Commission and County Commis-
sion again.
"I don't feel we need to do that.
We've reduced the density. The
roads are the same. I paid my fees
and jumped through' the hoops the
first time. I don't feel I should jump
through the hoops again."
Realtor Barry Kelly, speaking on
behalf of Ward, said it was his inter-
pretation of the Development Code
that the rules did not require a sec-
ond review, in cases that involved
minor modifications.
Kelly cited six changes that he
said the Development Code permit-
ted as minor modifications, as he in-
terpreted the definition.
"Even under major modifications,
the way I read it, it says that you or
the Planning Commission can re-
view it," Kelly said. "It doesn't say
that the developers have to go
through the entire process."
Arredondo stood his ground.
The way the code was written and
the way that he and Planning Com-
mission Attorney Scott Shirley in-
terpreted it, "the code does not give
an alternative way to review minor


Fire Officials Providi


For Home Heating SC


As temperatures drop, Fire Safety
Officials note that citizens'are turn-
ing to alternative sources of home
heating, in addition to their main
heat source.
Space heaters are coming out of
storage. Fireplaces are burning
wood or manmade logs. All of
these supplementary heat measures
can be good, but they can introduce
the danger of fire into homes.
Officials provide these safety tips
*Never use fuel burning appli-
ances without proper vents to the
outside. Burning fuel such as kero-
sene, coal or propane, produces
deadly fumes.
*Be sure your heater is in good
working condition. All room heat-
ers need frequent checkups and
cleaning. A dirty or neglected heater
is a fire hazard.
*Keep gasoline, or other flamma-
ble liquids, stored outside of the
home at all times.
*Maintain adequate clearance in
all directions around space heaters
and heating stoves. Surrounding
surfaces should not become too hot
for your bare hand.
*Use a screen around stoves or
space heaters which have open
flames. Give the heater adequate
clearance from walls and combusti-
bles, such as a clothes rack, curtains,
beds or other furniture.
*If you use an electric heater, be
sure your house wiring is adequate.
Avoid overloading the circuit,
and/or extension cords.
*Avoid using electric space heat-
ers in bathrooms, and do not touch
one when you are wet.
*When refueling an oil unit, avoid
overfilling it. If cold oil is used, it
will expand as it warms up inside
your home and may cause burner
flooding, which could cause flare-
ups. Don't fill your heater while it is


burning.
*Keep young children away from
space heaters, particularly when
they are wearing nightgowns, which
can be sucked in by a draft created
by the heater, and ignited.
*If you are using an approved UL
space heater or heating stove in your
bedroom, turn off your heater or
turn it low before going to bed.
When using a fuel burning heater
in the bedroom, open the window.
Ventilation prevents suffocation that
can be caused by a heater consum-
ing oxygen.
*Use only safety listed equipment.
If you chose an oil heater, look for


or major modifications," Arredondo
said.
As if was, he had yet to see the
DEP letter, he said.
"We don't have that letter in
hand," Arredondo said.
He further pointed out that in the
case of Turner Heritage Homes (an-
other large subdivision in,the Lloyd
area), the developer had been made
to go through the entire process a
second time, when the DEP had re-
quired modifications to the original
plan.
"This is a very similar situation,"
Arredondo said. "This change re-
configures a number of lots and the
location of a roadway. You have
made a public contract with the citi-
zens to approve lots in a certain
way."
Commissioners decided that ab-
sent the legal advice of Shirley, they
could not make a decision on the is-
sue at the time.
Last week_ the issue resurfaced
again. Shirley, who could not attend
the meeting because of a prior com-
mitment, wrote a legal memo stating
his interpretation of the code.
That interpretation essentially reit-
erated Arredondo's statement that
the code presently provided no alter-
native method for addressing modi-
fications to developments, once the
initial approval was given.


e Tips


safety
the UL label; a gas appliance, the
AGA or UL label; or an electric
heater, the UL label.
*Fireplaces should be used safely,
thus:
*Do not use flammable liquids to
start the fire.
*Keep a metal screen in front of
your fireplace. Flying embers can
start fires.
*Don't use excessive amounts of
paper to build roaring fires in fire-
places. It is possible to ignite soot
in the chimney by overbuilding the
fire.
*Never burn charcoal in your fire-
(See Fire Safety Page 6)


H&R BLOCK
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Open year round



1267 SOUTH JEFFERSON

(WINN DIXIE SHOPPING CENTER)

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of:
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He


"Put yourself in my shoes," Ward
told commissioners. "Would you
want to pay the fees twice?"
But more than the fees, it was the
time involved, he said. He asked
commissioners to consider changing
the procedure, if not for his sake
then for the sake of the develop-
ments that would surely follow.

"This is going to happen more and
more," Ward said. "I'm just the tip
of the iceberg."
Commissioners agreed. They
asked that the planners review and
amend the procedure, so that minor
modifications -- especially ones re-
sulting in a lower density -- will no
longer require an entire second re-
view.
Commissioners are scheduled to
revisit the Mill Creek Ridge Subdi-
vision issue 6 p.m. Thursday, Feb.
.16.


a 3**( u l t r at o a '
Is S SOlo


Celebrates Annex


Working together, he said, the four
oups had undertaken the "labori-
us but democratic process" that had
ally brought the project to frui-
on.
Following the officials and other's


Relocation
Continued From Page 1)
;, Transportation, and Safety/Se-
rity.
The second group will address
pics of: Curriculum, Programs,
rent Involvement, Professional
development, Technology, and
communication.
The third group will address topics
. Staffing, School Food Service,
hedules, Activities, Athletics, and
nance.
Heyen urges parents to note the
te of the meetings, and to contact
r at 342-0100, with any questions
out the meetings.
Parental input is valuable and im-
rtant in the relocation process,
yen stresses.






Manatees live
in Florida's
Coastal areas...
Watch out for manatees when
boating near seagrass beds.
Obey the posted waterway
markers and help
protect Florida's
k I manatees.
myfwc.org/psm


remarks, participants were invited to
.partake of food and refreshments
and tour the department's annex and'
main building.
If I Happens In
Jefferson County,
You'll Read It In The
Monticello News







Your retirement savings
could be earning a higher
rate if you open an Edward
Jones IRA by April 17th.
Which just might make
your retirement even more
pleasant. If you already have
an IRA, you can transfer it
to. Edward Jones easily,
without taxes or penalties.

To learn more about Edward
Jones IRAs, with rates that
make sense, call today.

Robert Davison
Investment Representative
205 E. Washington St.
Monticello, FL 32344
850-997-2572
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC

EdMM--ne
MAING rl^ ^ SES FINETN


NOTICE

The City's Trash Truck has been
out of service for 10 days for repairs.

The truck is now working and we hope to
have your yard trash picked up soon.

Please be patient, as we will remove all
debris as soon as possible. Thank You.


CITY OF MONTICELLO


r' Ihie 2005 E Wilson Carraway, Sr. Award for Excellence and
I Community Service is awarded to Joanna Young, Assistant
SBrianch d .uiager of the bank'sThomasville, Georgia office.

obung joined FMB of Thomas County, in 1988, as a teller. She
advanced to senior teller, proofoperator, customer service representative,
and is currently assistant branch manager. She is an active professional
citizen, serving her commaniry in nany ways, such as helping with the
Salvation Army. the Thonuas'ille Chamber of Commerce Women's
Forum, as well as several other community organizations.

Joanna and her husband, Kenny, have two children, and reside in
Thomasville, Georgia.

Joanna continues to play a key role in the operation of the FMB
Thomasville office.


Congratulations, Joanna,
from the Canrraway family,
and the entire FMB Banking
Corporation.
F IVison Cl,n..l.' Sr dtd-J A/u b
t., l.'.if'ig cdmn He uwas e.ledn oi qjde
,1'4 FRand, Ic- Conmp.my and7 df'e
Talahassee Coca-GbG Cnimpawy He uwa
the fist Chairman and later PIrsident of
Tallahassee Bank and Trust Company and
Chairman of Farmen drMerancts Bank,
Monticello.
A lifelong resident of Talladnssee, Mr
Canmway represented Leon County in the
Florida Legislature, serving in both the
House and Senate. He was President of the
Senate in the early 1960s.


FMB Honors Joanna Young

with the E Wilson Carraway, Sr. Award,






MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 25, 2006 PAGE 3

Be"..M'm .*- @LI;.:?.s' .'..'?k *,;,fc .-rrta "-S[.. .


Democrats Host

Rep. Will Kendrick


The Jefferson County Democratic
Executive Committee (JCDEC)
hosted a Precinct Party Thursday, at
Waukeenah United Methodist
Church, featuring Rep. Will Ken-
drick as the keynote speaker.
Some 30-40 Democrats from Pre-
cincts 11, 12, and 13, and other sup-
porters, attended the spaghetti sup-
per event.
Kendrick commended the JCDEC
for the outstanding job it has done in
reinvigorating the Jefferson County
Democratic Organization.
He said that it was only through
the grassroots efforts of involved
Democrats that he was able to win
election to the state house.
Kendrick thanked all for the warm
support he has received from Jeffer-
son County, and pledged to continue
to work diligently in the state legis-
lature to address the problems that
are of particular concern to citizens
of the county.
He noted that recent cuts to the
Medicaid budget, and the transition
to an HMO style Medicaid program,
would create a hardship for many
rural citizens dependent upon Medi-
caid to meet their medical needs.


However, as the newly appointed
Minority Whip, Kendrick stated that
he and other Democratic leaders
would continue their efforts in the
legislature to protect the rights anc
interests of all citizens, including the
poor and elderly.
When asked about the upcoming
gubernatorial election, Kendrick
stated that this was a "golden oppor-
tunity" to return a Democrat to the
Governor's office.
However, he said that the party's
ultimate success would again de-
pend upon the ability to mobilize
grassroots support for the Demo-
cratic nominee.
He urged the Jefferson County
Democratic organization to continue
with its outreach efforts to the com-
munity, and for all of those inter-
ested in making a change to become
involved in the local organization.
The JCDEC will meet 7 p.m. Feb.
14 at the Jefferson County School
Board Office.
Senator Skip Campbell, Demo-
cratic candidate for State Attorney
General, has been invited to speak.
The meeting is open to the public,
as always.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Members of the Retired Educa-
tors recently learned facts about
Medicare's new coverage for pre-
scription drugs.
Rashad Mujahid, public affairs-
specialist, North Florida Social Se-
curity Administration,consultant
for Medicare Part D, and Claims
Representative Brenda Anderson,
provided information about the
new prescription drug plan.
Mujahid emphasized even if a
person does not use a lot of pre-
scription drugs now, he/she should
consider joining a plan. . :
"If you don't join by May 15,
2006, and you don't have a drug
plan that covers as much or more
than a Medicare prescription plan,
you will pay more each month to
join," added Retired spokesperson
Mary Madison.


Mujahid shared handouts with
pertinent facts and the Medicare
and You, 2006 handbook which
lists Medicare prescription drug
plans available in the area.
"He also provided web sites and
telephone numbers to help make
the best choices when trying to
-choose a plan," Madison added.
She said that SHINE, Serving
Health Insurance Needs of Elders,
was highly recommended for con-
tact.
Also present during the meeting
was Elder Care Services Represen-
tative Lisa Golden, VISTA
supervisor/RSVP Volunteer Coor-
dinator and Angel Williams,
VISTA representative for 'Jeffelson
County.
Special certificates were pre-
sented to Mujahid from the
JCREA, to Stokes and JCREA
President Willard Barnhart, from
Williams for dedicated services.


ih 'Mugsy' Named
Pet Of Week
"Mugsy" has been named
mU adoptable canine Pet of Week.
"Mugsy" is a male, white Ger-
B man Shephard mix, born in Jan.
S 2005.
He is neutered and all vaccina-
[ tions are up to date.
: [ Shelter Caretaker Cheryl Bautista
u "describes him as playful, loving
S and affectionate.
He enjoys playing Frisbee, fetch,
tug of war, nuzzling, belly rubs and
running.
To adopt Mugsy or any of the-
other many loving animals avail-
able at the shelter call 342-0244.


4 ..' .'
H


REP. WILL KENDRICK, left, was the guest speaker at the
Democratic Precinct Party Thursday. Also at the table are
Franklin Hightower and Charles Boland.


BETH AND BOB DAVIS perform kitchen duties, assisted by
Debbie Craig and Stan Monroe in background, at the Demo-
cratic Precinct Party, Thursday.


Christmas Drive Coordinators


Thank All Volunteers,
"State Attorney's Office, Ruth DiBi-
FRAN HUNT ase, Lettie and Karl White, Broth-
Staff Writer erhood of Christ Episcopal Church,
Kiwanis Club, Monticello News,
Co-coordinators of the Annual Jack and Santa Hokausen, Joe and
County Christmas Drive, Lucille Catherine Arnold and G. W. and
Hunter and Gladys Roann, express Carolyn Handley.
their appreciation to all involved in Also, Russell and Janis Courson,
making the 2005 drive a huge suc- Dennis and Evie Foggy, B. A and
cess. Allene Sandell, Geoffrey and Patri-
Nine families were adopted, with cia Monge, Davis Motors, W. B.
a total of 31 children; and 90 Dunn Company, Westbrook Realty,
households, including 16 seniors Badcock & More, Michael and Ju-
and 153 children, were served by dith Carney, Cayco Barnhart, Julie
the drive. Conley, Jefferson County Health
Children each received several Department, Nicole Honcell, Elise
toys, boo! s and clothing. All Principaito, Wayne Searcey, Colby
households received a $25 gift cer- Kinsey, Sarah McClellan, and any-
tificate from Winn Dixie, and chil' one else who may have been left
dren 12 or older, each received a inadvertently off the list.
$25 gift certificate from either Wal- "To all the volunteers that helped
mart or Fred's. sort, wrap, shop and get everything
Some 25 bicycles, courtesy of the ready for the families, we are grate-
Jefferson County Sheriff's Depart-. ful," Hunter and Roann said.
ment, and one from a private citi-. Volunteers include: Judith Jones,
zen, were given to children but not Devonna Arnold, Dorothy
more than one bicycle per home. Crumity, Kathy Walker, Derylene
The Annual Christmas Drive
owes its success to the many indi- 1
viduals, groups and organizations iO R LIFE IINF
..li i:,uh pu it the cause, .. .. .. .. ... ,
SDonois to the ChnsimasDrie. T
include: Jefferson County Kennel I UsTO LL:FR H E
Club, Presbyterian Church, Eliza-,;
beth Baptist Church, Jackson's.- Grab the line and
Drug Store, Morris petroleum, let us help you.
Sally Waldron; Paula Alder,
George and Mary Turner, Carla
Brooks, Mimi Vanscoter, Larry
Marcella, Mrs. Michael Reichman, THE VOICE OF HOPE
Pat Corbin, Marine Toys For Tots
and Jefferson County High School. 1800-572-1717
Jefferson County Elementary AMuscularoDysrophy
School, Girl Scout Troops #407, Association


Donors
Proctor, Jerome Aikins, Louise
Proctor, Nellie Aikins, Crystal
Dory, Gina Deihl, Fontella
Mitchell, Tonya Scott, Jackie Guy-
ton, Nan Baughman, Carol Elerbe,


and anyone who may have been
left inadvertently off the list.
"God has always blessed us and
hope He will continue to enable us
to help the less fortunate. We hope
everyone had a very blessed Christ-
mas and will have a great new
Year," were the sentiments of
Hunter, Roann, and Larry Bates,
Sr.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

On February 7, 2006, 7:00 p.m. at City Hall, the
Monticello City Council will consider the following
development site plan applications:

Commercial/Residential: E. Walnut Street
Jack Carswell, Owner

Commercial: Ice Vending Machine,
845 E. Washington Street
George Koller, Owner

Copies of the site plan applications are available at
City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Street, Monticello,
Florida 32344. For further information, contact
Emily Anderson, City Clerk, at 342-0153




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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 25, 2006
,.. . . ...... ....%- .


Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net

:~* ~:E:EME:E:!:: **~i W........


From Our Photo File


EYEING the US Congressional Seat of Bill
Grant, in July 1990, Pete Peterson, right,
was in town at a reception given by Mark


USO Celebrates --


65 Years Of Service opinion & Comment


The USO turns 65 this year, and
the venerable organization is more
robust than ever.
From celebrity tours entertaining
troops around the world to the rec-
reation centers supporting service
members and their families, the or-
ganization continually challenges it-
self to find new and better ways to
support the morale, welfare and rec-
reation activities of our U.S.
military.
In 1941, Army camps sprang up
across the nation in preparation, for
war; morale was a huge issue for
lonely recruits far from ihome.
President Franklin R6osevelt
brought together six powerful na-
tional agencies to form a non-profit,
non-government entity called the
United Service Organizations.
The USO's tasks were to raise
money and, as a LIFE magazine ar-
ticle from that era reported, "teach a
still-skeptical America its own re-
sponsibilities toward its fighting
men."
Then, USO volunteers held
dances, served coffee, and wrote let-
ters home for soldiers; now, the
USO provides a touch of home with


comfortable places to unwind from
stressful duties, movies to watch and
CDs to listen to, Internet and e-mail
access and long-distance phone
cards to stay close to loved ones.
Then, Bob Hope and a slew of
mainstream movie stars and enter-
tainers performed for the troops;
now, television and film actors, co-
medians; sports figures and country,
pop, rap and Latino musicians enter-
tain and meet-and-greet the diverse
men and women who make up our
military.
7 The USO's proud tradition is to be
where the troops are.
Today, more than 120 USO Cen-
.ters serve military service members
and their families stateside and over-
seas. 33,000 volunteers provide an
estimated'450,000 hours of comfort
and help annually.
In 2005, the USO delivered more
than $100 million in services and
goods using donations from indi-
viduals, organizations and corporate
partners. 4 ...
The USO is celebrating 65 years
of service in 2006, and will continue
to support our troops until every
one comes home.


U


Exploding Toilets Made News


You think we've got problems
here dealing with growth issues?
Shucks, that's nothing compared to
the problems at the King County
Courthouse in Seattle.
It seems somebody flushed a toilet
in the courthouse and 20 to 25 uri-
nals and commodes exploded! There
was porcelain everywhere!
How would you like to be the per-
son who innocently flushed the
commode?
What happened? Well, it seems
somebody hooked up an air com-
pressor to the water lines in error
and pow, one flush and no more toi-
lets.
How would you like to be the per-
son who made the mistake with the
air compressor'?
How would you like to be a
worker in the King County Court-
house with no facilities'?
Truly, this is a major problem and
I sympathize with the county fathers
in King County. This is not the sort
of crisis that easily passes.
My guess is legend was made


Publisher's

Notebook


.Ron Ci /ion


,'hen the toilets exploded. People
will remember this for years to
come and generations will pass
along the story about the "porcelain
explosion."
Pity the county commissioners
who must campaign for re-election
explaining what happened to the
courthouse toilets.
I can see it now, voter says to his
commissioner: "And what were you
doing when the toilet exploded?"
There may be a candidate or two


running on a platform of safe court-
house toilets. "Elect me and I'll see
to it we'll never have such a disaster
ever again. Courthouse workers can
expect safety in the restrooms and
I'll see that they get it!"
Headline writers must .be. hainga,
ball with The story... "Courthouse'
Commodes Explode, Long Lines at
Service Station." "Commission
Chairman Vows To Get To Bottom
of Commode Commotion."
Here's my favorite possible head


for the story: "Courthouse Com-
mode Caper Costs County Cash."
I hope commissioners in King'
County have a sense of humor
'cause they'll need it!
How about the person who hooked
up the air compressor to the water
lines? He's probably in a different'
line of work now.
Once identified, he probably got"
bad press. Some suggested heads for'
his story. "Commode Bomber
Canned" "One Mistake And His Ca-,
reer Is In The Can" "Courthouse,
Workers Irate With Commode Ca-
per."
Far be it for me to make a lot of-,
fun with such a delicate matter as,.
exploding toilets.
I sincerely hope our courthouse
never experiences something as aw-
s.u1,,:.what.,Kipg- County ,.went*
..through.. ." -. . ,
Something as tragic as exploding
toilets would upset the equilibriumZ
of our county fathers and unnerve,
the courthouse staff.
We couldn't have that, could we?


From Our
TEN YEARS AGO
January 17, 1996
The State Attorney's Office has
determined that there is no basis to
allegations of wrongdoing raised by
police chief candidate Muriel Wald-
mann in the Sept. 14 election.
In accordance with state laws, the.
School Board last week approved a
three-year assistance and interven-
tion plan for each school that does
not make adequate progress toward
meeting the goals and standards of
its approved school improvement
plan.
A capacity crowd attended the 4th
annual Dr. Martin Luther King Me-
morial Church program sponsored
by the Jefferson County Branch of
the NAACP at Memorial Missionary
Baptist Church on Sunday
afternoon.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
January 17, 1986
Police Chief Nelson Blount took
office Tuesday morning. Blount said
that he had been busy all day "famil-
iarizing himself with the office and
feeling things out."
The Jefferson County Branch of
the NAACP will sponsor the 4th an-
nual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Pa-
rade tomorrow at 10 a.m. A
Memorial Program will be held one
hour later at the recreation park.
Jim Hentz has been named assis-
tant state attorney for Jefferson
County. Hentz, who has been as-
signed to Wakulla and Franklin
counties, will begin work in Jeffer-
son County in February, State Attor-
ney Willie Meggs said.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
January 15, 1976
Nine years of determined effort by
a group of dedicated women was re-


Files
cently rewarded when the Monti-
cello City Council donated $1,000
toward the restoration of Monticello
Old Cemetery.
Members of the Jefferson County
Historical Association Board of
Trustees and their spouses combined
business and pleasure at a supper
meeting.
During the entire month of Janu-
ary the Monticello News and WTBJ
Radio are encouraging every citizen
of Monticello to sign the pledge
cards.
FORTY YEARS AGO
January 14, 1966
William T. Fulford was named
new Chairman of Jefferson County
Commissioners.
Mr. and Mrs. William H. Hughes
Jr., were named co-campaign direc-
tors for the 1966 March of Dimes
Fund Drive.
NFJC Dean's List included Ray E.
Foster, Judith A. Harris, Jo Anne
Flewellen McCown, Rai Christine
Peters, Jane V. Pruitt, Janice M.
Smith, and Elmer G. Boland Jr.
from Lamont.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
January 13, 1956
Lester Lawrence was elected
chairman of Jefferson County Red
Cross.
The Woman's Club held their
birthday luncheon at the attractive
home of Mrs. C.A. Simpson.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
January 11, 1946
Former Governor and Mrs. Spes-
sard Holland were honored with an
outdoor barbecue Tuesday
afternoon.
L.G. Morris was elected as chair-
man of the State Game and Fresh
Water Fish Commission.


Bird Flu Serious Virus


BY DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

Exactly what is the "Bird Flu" and
is it something to get all excited
about? First off, the bird flu is actu-
ally a virus. Viruses are strange little
creatures of nature. They don't ex-
actly fit into any scientific category
of living things, yet they display
several of the unique characteristics
of living organisms.
Basically, they are pieces of de-
oxyribonucleic acid (DNA) wrapped
in a bundle of protein. Their whole
purpose in life is to find a living or-
ganism that they can invade and use
its living cells to multiply their num-
bers.
When such outside viruses invade
our body, our immune system iden-
tifies them as a foreign protein and
goes to work trying to kill it. This is
often evident in the flu type viruses
by the body increasing its internal


temperature to hopefully create an
environment hostile to the virus. We.
call it having a fever.
The bird flu is one such virus. For-
tunately, it is currently adapted to
surviving in the living cells of birds
and not humans. The scientific iden-
tification for this virus is the H5N1
and the fear is that it might mutate
(as some viruses commonly do) to
allow the virus to bind to human
cells. This then would threaten the
world with a potentially deadly pan-
demic.
Few if any of us are old enough to
remember the last great world pan-
demic. It was the Spanish Influenza
Pandemic of 1918-1919. Right in
the middle of WWI, a viral infesta-
tion began in the far east and stead-
ily moved its way into Europe. It
was called the "Influenza," an Italian
word meaning "The Influence." It
easily spread from person to person,
mysteriously striking primarily
young adults and children, often


Changes in Book


Eighty-three percent of Americans
sa they want to write a book, but
.only a small percentage actually
have both the drive and discipline to
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Finishing a manuscript is a huge
accomplishment an achievement
that affords writers the reward of
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Prospective authors can take pride
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poetry, or how-to manual, they have
alternative and effective ways to
publish it affordably and efficiently
in some cases, making it available
to online retailers in fewer than 90
days.
Just as new technology and online
distribution channels have revolu-


tionized the music and film indus-
tries increasing the number of art-
ists and producers working with in-
dependent film and recording com-
panies these advancements are also
changing the book-publishing indus-
try.
Until a few years ago, hopeful
authors had only two options for
getting their work published.
They either sent their manuscripts
to traditional publishing companies
or literary agents, usually only to re-
ceive numerous disappointing rejec-
tion letters, or they chose the option
of true self-publishing.
In true self-publishing, the author
retains all rights to the work, but
must perform all publishing and dis-
tribution tasks including taking re-
sponsibility for obtaining editing


with deadly results.
At one point in 1918, there were
more casualties on both sides of the
battlefields of Europe being inflicted
by the influenza than by the enemy.
It first devastated the German lines,
but captured German prisoners car-
ried the deadly disease over to the
Allies. It made its way to America,
in the living cells of Dough Boys re-
turning through the sea ports of the
northeast and soon spread its deadly
tentacles westward across America.
After killing millions of people, it
mysteriously just died out by 1919,
as though it somehow realized it
was killing off its essential hosts.
Few people realize that while the
battles of WWI caused 10 million
deaths, the Spanish Influenza pan-
demic of 1918 claimed 20 and 40
million lives in one year!
So should we be paying attention
to the bird flu? There is no doubt
that scientists are concerned and we
should be too. Alarmingly, the


and n
ing an
In
require
ment
ber of
No'
suppo
of pu
ety
service
techn
wareh
Co
iUniv
public
fessio
service
and te
Aut
little


World Health Organization just de-4
tected a change in one gene of th&:
bird flu virus. Now it is too early to
know whether this mutation is oft
any genuine significance, but it does?
point out the ability and willingness'
of this virus to mutate.
This could be one small change ind.
an attempt to adapt to other living
cells including human. Scientists
can only wait and see what "moves"'
the virus takes in the future, before-
making any reliable predictions re-
garding its potential ability to infect'
human cells.
There have been numerous re-'
ported cases of bird flu appearing ini
humans. Thus. far, these have all
been discovered in the far east. The
people infected had very close daily
contact with living infected chicken'
flocks, which scientists attribute as,'
the method via which they have,
caught the illness through contact.
with the bird feces.
(See Bird Flu Page 5)


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as $459 and make it available (See Publishing Page 5)


Levine, Here he chats with Bill Tellefsen
planning commissioner. (News File Photo)


Letters to the Editor Welcomed
500 Words or Less

Letters must be signed and include
phone number or writer


I











Letters...


i Citizen Takes


O Comments In
Oear Editor: as "very eager for w
This is in response to Gerald Bus- Greed means "avic
ll's letter in the Jan. 13 edition of or wealth." It is not
e Monticello News. want managed gr
His reference to those with "post- greedy. It is those w
,e stamp size property wanting to philosophy that bett
bntrol everything within their tion.
Hew" is preposterous, insulting, and There are man'
Btally uncalled for. greed in the Bible.
In my opinion, his remarks have to those also.
sulted every person who lives in It seems to me tha
fferson County, whether they have ting confused with o
ore or less land than he has. The Comprehen
People in Jefferson County work Plan was put in place
rd for what they have, and his aged and responsible
Imments are degrading to many of supposed to be a
r fine citizens. The people we sure planned growth
ynow care about the beauty and wel- Some people are
are of their county, regardless of this a property rights
'ow much land they own, or how is not. It is a land us
:ich money they have. Growth is going
) 1'c referred to those who oppose however, it must be
tv comp plan amendments as that will not happen
Areedy. The dictionary defines greed mindset of the mn


Dea. Editor:
have read with interest and enter-
tainment each letter written to you
regarding our County Commission-
ers, land use changes, special excep-
tions, and unfair treatment of resi-
dents who oppose them.
While I respect the comments
from personal friends of Commis-
sioners Joyner and Tuten, they are
irrelevant to their responsibilities to
their constituents.
Also, Mr. Bailar, it seems that
anything Mr. Joyner says, you con-
sider to be "his finest hour." Lord
help us if he has any more!
Points to ponder: Remember the
"special exception application" for
the Go-Cart Track? It was denied
by the Planning Commission, then
approved by the County Commis-


Commissione

Good Job, Cit


Dear Editor:
Almost every time I read my pa-
per, I see some misguided person
complaining about our county com-
missioners.
They are the same people, saying
the same things over and over. I
would like to remind them that they
don't own Jefferson County, al-
though they act like they do.
If they don't like what's taking
place with other people's property,
they need to buy it, and then they
can complain all they want.
It's a shame that a property owner
has to have his neighbor's permis-
sion to do anything with his land,
even when the complainers live 10
miles or more away from that prop-
erty, and don't even know it's there!
Jefferson County is going to grow,
in spite of you.
I think our county commissioners
are doing, a fine job, and hope they
hang in there, in spite of the cry ba-



.Publishing
(Continued From Page 4)
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traditional publishers or, if their
book is selling enough copies to
warrant a large print run, they may
consider a true self-publishing ap-
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To learn more about iUniverse's
publishing program, or to submit a
manuscript, please visit
www.iUniverse.com.


NO U
TURN
This is no time to turn back.
Keep MDA's lifesaving research
moving forward.

Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717


Issue With


Earlier Letter


health. "
d desire for gain
the citizens who
owths that are
'ith Mr. Bussell's
ter fit the defini-

y definitions of
He should refer

at people are get-
ur true concern.
sive Land Use
e to ensure man-
e growth, and is
guideline to en-

trying to make
s issue, which it'
se change issue.
to happen;
e managed and
with the current
majority of the


County Commission.
Before the County Commissioner:
started amending the Comprehen-
sive Land Use Plan, they should
have developed written guidelines
and criteria to follow for anyone
submitting an agricultural rezoning
change, criteria that the public car
review so they will know why
changes are necessary.
Presently, there are no guidelines
used to amend the current land ust
plan. All it takes is a majority vote
of the County Commission; no logi-
cal explanation; no valid reasoning.
Mr. Bussell, I believe you ow<
every citizen in Jefferson County an
apology for your insulting, elitist
belittling, and uncaring remarks
whether they are for or against
changing the Comprehensive Land
Use Plan.
Sincerely
Cheryl Searcy


5


simply a figure they calculated .of
how much he spends on a weekend
of playing.
I. met with Alan Saucier who fi-
nally compromised to, OK, maybe
only halfa million.
Information I received from these
counties was: "very little revenue is
realized from the Go-Cart Tracks."
The nearby landowners pled their
cases of traffic, noise, expense for
road repair, the 100 year flood plain,
contamination of drinking water, the
Aucilla River and disturbing low
lands necessary to wildlife.
As I spoke and presented my in-
formation, zing, my three minutes
were up.
The only response I received from
Mr. Joyner, peering over his glasses,
was: "As the crow flies, how far do
you live from this site?"
DUH! End of discussion. Anyone
interested in 'a video of this
meeting? Call me, 1 have a copy.
See how one sided this circus was.
It appeared they had their minds
made up BEFORE hearing both
sides.
Did this vote open the can of
worms for spot changes we're facing
now? And how can the cart track be
near completing with a law suit
pending? Are they above the law?
Point: If I want to do anything in
Jefferson County that is illegal, im-
moral or fattening, I'll be sure to call
Mr. Saucier. It appears he's the only
one that has the ear of commission-
ers, planners, attorneys, and anyone
with the power to change zoning.
Open your eyes, commissioners.
He could lead you down the road of
unemployment.


Mr. Tuten didn't even
vote in the last election.
knew my feelings, which
by many of his constituen


BETH PARRAMORE


sion, despite the reasons given
them.
Each commissioner I spoke to said
he would listen to both sides before
making a decision. Ha! They arrived
at the meeting with photos in hand,
and volumes of information on the
Hamilton County track.
Reminder: The county was prom-
ised millions of dollars would pour
in "as it does in Hamilton and Duval
Counties."
Mr. Phipps told me personally,
and I quote: "I have a very expen-
sive hobby, and the funds to build
my own track."
He wanted cheap land for his
playground, that would be closer for
him to travel to, and play.
About the $$$$$$, he said it was


r "Doing

izen Says
bies.
Using their type of thinking, the
door should have been shut on them
before they got here.
Bernard Peters


Bird Flu
(Continued From Page 4)
On the positive side, it is impor-
te rL to note that at the present time,
the virus can not be transmitted
from human to human. It would ap-
pear, therefore, that we are currently
a long way from any threat of a Bird
Flu pandemic, if at all. Additionally,
we are better educated and equipped
to handle a pandemic outbreak in
America than we were in 1918.
We can't drop our guard, but
hopefully this will help to "clear the
air" about this Bird Flu thing.


Ic

Winter (a



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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 25, 2006 PAGE 5

FMB Honors Employees

At Awards Banquet


At an awards banquet held Jan.
7, officers and staff of Farmers &
Merchants Bank, honored several
employees.
L. Gary Wright, president and
CEO of FMB conducted the cere-
monies.
Beth Parramore, assistant branch
manager of the Killearn office re-
ceived the FMB Blue Award for
Outstanding Performance.
Joe Anderson, Loan Compliance
Officer, received the FMB Gold
Award for his contribution to profit
enhancement.


College Sunday To Help

Apply For Financial Aid


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

College Goal Sunday (CGS) takes-
place 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 19, at
Jefferson County High School.
Coordinator is Nancy McClellan,
who can be reached at 850-973-
1661.
CGS is a volunteer, charitable ef-
fort to assist low income families
and those who have no college go-
ing tradition, by helping to complete
the free Application for Federal Stu-
dent Assistance, required to qualify
for the college financial aid nation-
wide.
This is the first year that Florida is
participating in College Goal Sun-
day. Jefferson, and 18 other counties
are taking part in the event.
CSG is offered free to families of
prospective college students who
need financial aid and assistance in
completing the paperwork.
On College Goal Sunday, finan-
cial aid experts, primarily from the
state's colleges and universities, vol-
unteer their time.
Families attending the event re-
ceive the help of these experts in
completing the Free Application for


Federal
(FAFSA)


Student Assistance.


By completing and submitting the
FAFSA form accurately and on
time, college bound students in-
crease their chances of receiving fi-
nancial aid.


Lynn Johnson, assistant branch
manager of the North Monroe
office, received the FMB Star
Award for many contributions to
various community programs sup-
ported by the bank.
Sonja Walker, vice-president, was
recognized with the FMB Eagle
Award.
In addition, Ely Parke, switch-
board operator of the Monticello Of-
fice was awarded the Employee of
the Year plaque.
FMB operates branch offices in
Monticello, Tallahassee, Greenville,
_and Thomasville. GA.


The First Step

To Any Buying
S' Decision


Monticello News
Classifieds


Call J.G.'Wentworth's W
Annuity Purchase-Program J.G.WENTWORTH.
866-FUND-549. ANNUITY PURCHASE PROGRAM


* .4'" l: i"l "^ "' \ ;"

RELAY
FOR LIFE






AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY'S
2006 RELAY FOR LIFE JEFFERSON COUNTY
APRIL 21 AND 22, 2006

Would you like to be involved???
We need all the help we can get....
Here are the ways you can be a part!!


call for my
I guess he :
are shared I in 3 Americans will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. The American Cancer Society Relay
its. For Life gives everyone the opportunity to fight back and to make a difference in the battle against
Judy Ross cancer. Relay always raises awareness of cancer prevention, early detection, treatment, and patient
: support (including transportation to treatment, peer support group programs, and resources for
practical assistance). Relay brings people together from all walks of life with the common goal of
eliminating cancer. Relay honors cancer survivors and their caregivers. There's a place for you at
Relay. Please join us today!!

S : Be a part of the committee! Committee members are now being recruited for Team Recruitment;
Corporate Sponsorships; Logistics/Facility; Entertainment; Survivorship; Public Relations; Onsite
Volunteers; Onsite Survivor Activities, and Food.

Form a Relay For Life team! Gather together 8-15 of your favorite people who love making a
S: difference and having fun.

Volunteer at the event! We need volunteers who will help with the needs at the site itself on the days
of April 21-22, 2006.




YES! I want to participate in Relay.
I Learn more about forming a team
2 Information on survivor activities
3 Volunteer to help with the event
4 Learn more about becoming a sponsor
on 1075!
em, : Name
Address
e! E-Mail
tails:! lPhone
(Please mail to Relay For Life, 710 W. Washington St.,
1 Monticello, Florida 32344)




The American Cancer Society Relay For Life represents the hope that those lost to caa;cer will never
be forgotten, that those who face cancer will be supported, and that one day cancer will be
eliminated.


... .... ......................... **..**************.. ************************................... .


Did Approval Of Go-Cart Track

Precipitate Land Use Changes?


Feeling Handcuffed. by Your Annuity.
77













PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 25, 2006


Lifestyle


Kendall Page Will

Marry Robert Devane


Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth James
Page, of Griffin, announce the en-
gagement and forthcoming marriage
of their daughter Kendall Yvonne
Page, also of Griffin, to Robert
Henry Devane, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Neal Devane of Barnesville.
The bride-elect is the granddaugh-
ter uiA Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Whaley,
Sr. of Griffin, and Mr. and Mrs.
R' rt Page, of Williamson.
She is a 2005 graduate of Griffin
High School and is attending Gor-
don College.
She is employed by Goody's Fam-
ily Clothing.
The groom-elect is the grandson
of Mr. and Mrs. Bobby C. Gordon,
of Ranger, and Jeanette Devane, of


Monticello, and the late Bobby T.
Devane.
He is a 2001 graduate of Lamar
County Comprehensive High
School and a 2003 graduate of Gor-
don College with an Associate's De-
gree in Business Administration.
He is a 2005 graduate of Georgia
State University J. Mack Robinson
College of Business with a Bache-
lor's Degree in Risk Management
and Real Estate.
He is employed with Paragon At-
lantic in Charlotte, NC. and First
Nations Mortgage in Peachtree City.
The wedding is planned for 3 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 4 at Milner United
Methodist Church.
All family and friends are invited
to attend.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

A "Hearts & Souls" event takes
place 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday,
Jan. 28 at the Howard Middle
School
Guest speakers include local min-
isters. Rev. Barnhart. Rev. Houston,
Rev. Love, and Rev. Tisdale.
There will be free blood pressure
checks, free diabetes risk tests, and
door prize drawings every half hour.
Also a Kids Comer will be avail-
able for ages 3 and up.
Music and entertainment will be
provided by MAD, Monticello Afri-
can Drummers and Hip Hop Danc-


ers.
There will be Healthy Heart Cook-
ing demonstrations at 10:30 a.m.
and 11:30 a.m. by Chef Mattrell
Hawkins.
A "Just Move For Your Heart"
demonstration will be performed at
11:15 a.m. and 12:15 p.m. by Te-
quila Hagan.
Amy Mullins will give talks on
Heart Healthy Nutrition at 10:30
a.m. and 11:30 a.m.
Information and consultations on
diabetes, heart disease, and organ
donation will be made available.
The event will be broadcast live
by Faith Radio 105.7 FM.
For more information call 342-
0170 ext. 207.


Homes Of Mourning


Betty Cooksey Fewell
Mrs. Betty Cooksey Fewell, age
76 died Saturday, January 21, 2006.
Services will be 11a.m., Wednes-
day, January 25, 2006 at Clark Fu-
neral Home Chapel, Cairo, GA.
Interment will follow at Greenwood
Cemetery, Cario, GA. Officiating is
Reverend Curtis Morgan. Visitation
will be Wednesday at the Funeral
Home from 9:30 until the time of
service at 11:00a.m.
Betty Fewell was born a resident
of Lloyd June 3, 1929-to the late
Howard (Sr.) and Leila Kidd Cook-
sey. She is the widow of the late
John Richard Fewell, Jr. who pre-
ceded her in death May 16, 1968.
She was currently a resident of Tal-
lahassee. She was a retail Shoe Store
Manager and a member of Method-
ist Church.
Mrs. Fewell is survived by sons
and daughters-in-law: John Richard
(Rick) Fewell, III, and wife Susan,
Tallahassee, David Lee Fewell, Tal-
lahassee, Robert (Bobby) Butler
Fewell and wife Robin, Colorado
Springs, Colo., Thomas Barry Few-
- ell and wife Lori, Perry; sisters:
- Margaret Reid, Meigs, Ga., Lillian
Morgan, Monticello: grandchildren:
Jennifer Fewell, Kristin Fewell,
Danielle Fewell, Heidi Torres Few-
ell, Aaron John Fewell and Sally Ur-
ban: great-grandchild Taylor Fewell.

Maude Boland Snyder
Maude Boland Snyder, age 79,
died Thursday, January 19 2006, in
Tallahassee, Florida.
Visitation (viewing) was from
6:00 8:00 p.m. on Friday, January
20, 2006 at Beggs Funeral Home -
Apalachee Chapel, in Tallahassee,
Florida.
The service was held at 10:00 a.m.,
Saturday, January 21, 2006 at Beggs
Funeral Home Apalachee Chapel,
in Tallahassee, Florida. Interment
followed at Beth Page Cemetery in.
Jefferson County, Florida.
She was bom in Limestone, Flor-
ida, and lived most of her life in
Capitola. She was a homemaker and
a member of the Capitola Baptist
Church.
She is survived by: 2 sons, Rudy
Snyder and wife, Sharon of Talla-
hassee and G. Burton Snyder and
wife, Martha of Capitola; 2 brothers,


Pete Boland and wife, Ann of
Woodville and Lester Boland and
wife, Aleene of Capitola; 5 grand-
children, Shiela Snyder, Clint Sny-
der, Randee Hammar, Dana Finuff
and George Burton Snyder, II; 6
great-grandchildren. She was pre-
ceded in death by her husband,
George W. Snyder and a grand-
daughter, Tonya Lynn Forbes.

All memorial contributions can be
sent to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Ma-
han Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL
32308.


~CU


Nancy Shiver Reseaches Lineage
The Florida Pioneer Descendants certificates were awarded recent
Certification Program announces the annual banquet held in Par
[l ^ that Calvin Cary Canada has proven City Beach.
lineage to Francis Marion Canada,
f 'as a resident of the Territory of Flor-


ida, prior to statehood in 1845.
Researcher for this lineage was
Nancy L. Shiver, of Monticello.
The Florida State Genealogical
Society sponsors this program, and


.~ I
4
*1


KENDALL PAGE AND ROBERT DEVANE


Gi LLYAR




GILLYARD


First Birthday
Bre'zaria Gillyard will celebrate
her first birthday 2 p.m. Saturday,
Jan. 28 at Chase Street Park with her
family and friends.
She was born Jan. 23, 2005 to
Shanterria Crumity and Brezon Gil-
lyard, and has a brother, Brezon Gil-
- lyard, Jr.
Her maternal grandmother is De-
. lores Shuiler, and grandfather is
Terry Crumity.
Her great grandmother is Princetta
Shuler.
Her paternal grandmother is Mar-
garet Lewis and her grandfather is
George Gillyard.


Fire Safety Tips
I Cnntinnpd Frnm Pao2 ng


place, or in a charcoal broiler or hi-
bachi unit inside. Burning charcoal
gives off deadly amounts of m.,.-..I
monoxide.
Be sure no flammable materials
decorate your mantel. A spark hit-
ting them from your fireplace could
ignite these materials and cause a
fire.
*When you go to bed, be sure the
fire in your fireplace is out. Never
close your damper with hot ashes in
your fireplace. A closed damper
can cause hot ashes to build up heat
to the point where a fire could flare
up and ignite the room while your
are asleep.
*If your fireplace hasn't been used
for some time, have it and the chim-


ney checked before using.
*Follow the directions on the
package if you use man-made logs.
N r:'i break a man-made log apart
''Io quicken a fire.
*It's important that you have your
furnace checked out and cleaned
regularly, and that it be in good
working condition.
Furnace safety tips need to be ob-
served all year round.
Be sure all furnace automatic
controls and emergency shutoffs are
in good condition.
Leave furnace work to experts.
Don't attempt repairs unless you are
qualified.


... ".'" '-' i;'.

, ACongratulations Are

In Order To The

New


Mr. & Mrs.


~Th. ~ ~
.4-
ii




\~ I\.


Donald Gillyard


Donald Gillvard & Nlatesha Williams
Tied the knot on
Saturday, January 14, 2006
A Reception is set to follow \ for
friends and family.


Monticello News
Keeps You
Informed!!


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 25, 2006 PAGE 7


Consumer Agent Notes Law


Will Help Choose Foods Wisely


FR'AN HUNT
Staff Writer

Family and Consumer Sciences
Agent Heidi Copeland relates that
beginning the first of this month,
nutrition labels on packaged foods
will bring changes designed to help
shoppers make informed decisions
about foods they buy.
The new Food and Drug Admin-
istration (FDA) rule requires nutri-
tion labels to include the trans-fat
content on packaged foods in
which the trans-fat exceeds half a
gram per serving.


"Saturated fat and dietary fiber
have been on the label since 1993,"
said Copeland. "With trans-fat
added to the mandatory nutrition
facts panel, you will know for the
first time, how much of all three
are in the foods you choose."
She added that scientific evidence
shows that consumption of satu-
rated fat, trans-fat, and dietary cho-
lesterol, raises low-density
lipoprotein (LDL) or "Bad" choles-
terol, which increase the risk of
. coronary heart disease, one of the
leading causes of death in the US.
She said that trans-fat is formed
when liquid vegetable oils are so-


lidified by adding hydrogen, a
presses known as Hydrogenation.
"This addition of hydrogen helps
make the fat resistant to rancidity,
it's shelf life increases and so does
the shelf life of the food it is in,"
said Copeland.
She said trans-fats are flavorful,
add to the flaky layering of baked
products, and help keep baked
products moist.
"However, researchers have
known for quite a while that trans-
fats are equally harmful "to our
health, especially the heart," said
Copeland.
"The department of Health and
Human Services estimates that
processed foods and oils account
for 80 percent of the national intake
of trans-fats," she added.
"Small amount of fat are needed
for the daily diet and fat is impor-
tant for proper growth, develop-
ment and maintenance of good
health," Copeland said.
"Fats are a major source of en-
ergy as well as an aid in the absorp-
tion of vitamins A, D, E, and K."
She added that although trans-fats
are found naturally in meat and
dairy products, Americans are eat-
ing too much of their trans-fats
from processed foods like marga-
rines, crackers, chips, cookies and
frozen processed foods.
This in turn helps acquire unwat-
ned pounds which can lead to over-
weight and related health problems.
Restaurant food is especially fond
of trans-fats because of its proper-
ties, she explained.
"How can you avoid them? Pay
attention to nutrition facts on labels
of processed foods," said
Copeland. "Everyone can benefit
by comparing foods by looking at
the Nutrition Facts Panel and
choosing foods with lower amounts
of fats as well as avoiding items
made with partially hydrogenated
oils.
"In addition, cooking homemade
meals will help, because the cook
will know exactly what is naturally
part of the food, and what is added
to it.," she explained.



E--g
Edu'a' tio


JERI GLYNN finds quiet time to get caught helpful to a number of citizens. (News
up on some bookkeeping at the library. Ac- Photo)
cess to computer and. the Internet is also


Refuge House Grant Will


Cover Prevention


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Refuge
House has recently received a grant
from the Department of Health for
community Sexual Violence Pre-
vention programs, presentations,
and works.


Free Meals If

At Lucy's Chi
Lucy's Child Care Center, 855
Goldburg Street, announces its par-
ticipation in the USDA Child Care
Food Program.
Meals will be available at no sepa-
rate charge to enrolled eligible chil-
dren.
Parents/guardians of children eli-
gible for free and reduced priced
meals must complete an application.
Eligibility information includes
the number and names of all house-
hold members, social security num-
ber of adult household member
signing the application, or an indica-
tion that this household member
does not have one, total monthly
household income, or Food Stamp
case number, or Temporary Assis-
tance to Needy Families case num-
ber, and the signature of an adult
household member.
Applications are available at the


Dessie Harvey, outreach coun-
selor for the local Refuge House, is
available to present programs to lo-
cal churches, clubs, organizations,
and other groups upon request. She
can be reached at 342-3518.
Harvey is well versed on a variety
of topics concerning the Refuge
House and its purpose.
Recently the Refuge House spon-


F Eligible

ild Care
center, along with income eligibility
guidelines.
Income eligible families are re-
quired to report increases in house-
hold income of more than $50 per
month, and increase or decrease in
household size.
The policy statement for free and
reduced price meals is on file at the
child care center and may be re-
viewed by any interested party.

S


programs
scored a Christmas party at the Jef-
ferson Senior Center, at which
Harvey presented a program on the
holiday traditions of various nations.
Holiday music and a sing along
took place, and Task Force members
helped to distribute gift bags to the
seniors.
Items for the gift bags and other
gifts were donated by local mer-
chants and Task Force members.
The Refuge House sponsors an
annual Adopt-A-Family program.
Before the Christmas holiday
'Wish Lists' were made up for each
of the five families in the program.
The lists were than given to the
Lloyd Lions Club which saw to it
that the lists were filled.
The families were thrilled to re-
ceive the packages along with a few
added extras like food baskets, ac-
cording to Harvey.

Ready... Set... Shop...
Monticello News
Classifieds


Thanks to wildlife management
involving sportsmen, creatures
great and small are flourishing.
Embrace our effort to protect
natural treasures.


~. ,,1*


4a U GOSPEL SING 7

J -7 featuring
J7 7

Cavaliers From Perry & Greenville J,
* January 28, Saturday at 7:00 p.m. ,



a Lamont United ;

J7 Methodist Church

Lamont, Florida
J7 Join us for refreshments after the sing ;
4 43J3J3J3J9J3J3^J3J3J3JyJ3J3J3J3J3J3JJ


.4'


1.
4-


~. ~.x .sv'


"A' ~x


Sal'ri lubIntrnaionl Fundtio
800377539 1Tw.Saa lbo.dto~r


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Boys and
Girls Clubs eagerly welcome James
Mercado to their team as PEP Coor-
dinator in their Physical Education
Program.
Originally from Northern Virginia,
he moved to the area from Virginia
Beach.
Mercado, 28, graduated from
*Radford University in 2001 with a
*,Bachelor of Science in Public Rela-
Stions.
His position is to promote, advo-
cate, and plan various health related
physical/recreational activities for
'--the Boys and Girls Club members,
-,:and to promote a healthier lifestyle
- within the Club and in daily life.
"My goal," he said, "is for Jeffer-
son County to know that great
,,things are happening at the Boys
and Girls Club and to know we are
-'The Positive Place For Kids." '
His plan is to keep the community
'aware of the goings-on within the
"'county clubs by keeping the media
up to date with the activities of the
members, and photos of the kids
having fun.
He would also like to see ap, in-
crease in the number of kids attend.-
ing the after school .programs
provided at the Clubs.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Greater MB Church will sponsor A-
Dynamic Fashion Show Extrava-
ganza 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 28 at
',.Howard Middle School.
o A Baby Contest will follow at
'-2:30 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 29, after the
Our Family and Friends Day cele-
brations.
The celebrations begin at 10 a.m.
with Sunday School and 11 a.m.
Morning Worship at the church lo-
cation 690 East Cypress Street.


MERCADO


In order do this he'd like to get
more teachers working over to the
Clubs; a mentoring blend with com-
munity volunteers; sports leagues;
an NFL Youth Grant; an FSU and
FAMU partnership; a more full cal-
endar of events; a youth of the
month; and a Keystone Club within
the Clubs.
Mqrcado.,can be reached at 519-
1200 for additional information
about local Clubs.


Guest minister Rev. Norman Clary
will offer the message.
The celebrations will conclude
with the congregation of Casa Bi-
anca Missionary Baptist Church and
their Pastor, Rev. Toby Berrian III,
delivering the message at 3 p.m.
Rev. Dr. Melvin Roberts, Pastor,
welcomes the community to attend.
"In these days of sustained world
turbulence, we are indeed fortunate
to yet have an opportunity to gather
together in the name of Jesus and
fellowship one with the -other in
Christian love and support," he
notes.


Retired Educators

-Meet At Diane's Place


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


She encouraged all retired educa-
tors to attend the meeting.


Approximately 25 Jefferson
County Retired Educators gathered
recently, to dine at Diane's Place.
Spokesperson Mai- Madison,
said that the group not only en-
joyed the meal meal, but also the-
, fellowship and watching the "Wild
: Card Play-off game"
Retired former Howard Academy
Principal George W. Pittman asked
the blessing.
The meal included homemade
corn bread, fresh string beans with
potatoes, collard greens, rice and
roast beef, homemade macaroni
and cheese, sliced honey ham with
. pineapple chunks, southern' fried
, and baked chicken, shrimp pasta,
;,salad bar and homemade desserts
-including sweet syrup bread, peach
"cobbler, blueberry upside down
cake, and plain pound cake.
Beverages were iced tea, lemon-
ade or soft drinks.
Spokesperson Mary Madison said
the next monthly meeting of the
Retired Educators will be held 10
a.m. Feb. 14, in the annex room of
the Greater Fellowship Church.


WE DELIVER. CALL FOR DELIVERY CHARGE

11025 EAST MAHAN
a1 fy f.4 55 O^ f^montucello *Border 1
877 4550- Border ,-10
MAHAN /


Steel's Jewelry

Ja von Longieliere Photography

S Executive Travel

January 28, 2006
10:00am-5:00pm
James H. Rainwater Conference Center

Come out and meet with over 50 of this areas
top merchants specializing in wedding preparation.

GRAND PRIZES
Jewelry valued at $1500 from Steel's Jewvell\,
a $1500 Photography package from Javon Longielier Photography, and
a $1500+ Sandal's Honeymoon Package from Executive Travel. Door Prizes
awarded throughout the day. For more information call (229) 241-7590.
$5.00 Admission


James Mercado Named

Club PEP Coordinator


,-Greater MB Church

Plans Fashion Show


.,* ",





PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 25, 2006


Se


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ports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 25, 2006 PAGE 9


Warrior Casey Gunnels


Shines On Basketball Court


RAN HUNT
!aff Writer


Coach Dan Nennstie
Gunnels is an excellent
can change him from c
nn the court to anoth


SCasey Gunnels is an 8 year old plays his heart out, w
senior at Aucilla Christian Acad- plaint."
tny, and one of the key players on Gunnels believes that
tie Warriors' basketball teram. on the court is in d
He is the son of Kay and Bill steals.
(Gunnels. "Before going in
" Gunnels has been playing basket- against a tough competil
a11 for the Warriors since he was best not to get nervous,
in the seventh grade and played on nels. "Getting nervor
t6e middle school team. game is what kills you,



Middle School Girls

Split Last 4 Games


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy-
middle school girl's basketball
team wrapped up 5-5 on the
season, winning two and losing two
of the final games.
Coach Mac Finlayson said that
though he had only three eighth
grade girls on the team this year
who will more than likely move up
to JV next year, most of the girls on
the team were sixth graders and
seventh graders with no basketball
playing experience, so a 5-5 season
wvas a very good showing.
In a close game against Brook-
wood, the Lady Warriors lost, 17-
f3.
"Brookwood's girl's were a lot
bigger than we were," said Finlay-
son.
Tiffany Brasington led the charge
for ACA with eight points. She
also shot eight for 12 from the free-
throw line.
'Dana Jane Watt, four points; and
Sydney Plummer, one point.
'In yet another close game against
Maclay, the Lady Warriors fell for
a 22-18 loss.
"We missed the basket a lot with
uhder-the-basket lay-ups," said
Finlayson. "With young players, it
is important to focus, which im-
proves as they continue to play the
sport."
" Brasington led the Aucilla score
with seven points.


el said that
t athlete. "I
ne position
her, and he
without com-

his strength
defense and

to a game
tor, I try my
" said Gun-
is before a
and I'm go-


Nikki Hammrick, four [points;
Plummer, three points; and Watt
and Sarah Sorensen each scored
two points.
The Lady Warriors defeated Ste-
inhatchee 21-1 in the third game.
"All together, I played the eighth
graders for only about a total of
five minutes, and maybe just about
one minute in the second half," said
Finlayson. "It got to the point, we
were wanting them to score."
Brasington lead the charge for the
Lady Warriors with ten points,
seven of which were acquired
within the first three minutes of the
game. She also dropped in a three-
point bucket.
Watt and Caroline Mueller each
scored four points; and Anna Fin-
layson and Kaitlin Jackson, each
scored two points.
In the final game of the season,
the Lady Warriors downed Stein-
hatchee 29-2.
Finlayson said the Lady Warriors
led 15-0 at the half. "I only played
the eighth graders for about four
minutes .in the .first: quarter and
pulled theii out."
He added that the seventh grader
and sixth grade girls did score a lot
of their points in the fourth quarter.
Jackson led the score with seven
points; Brasington, six points;
Watt, six points; Taylor Baez-
Pridgeon, four points; Elizabeth
Riley and Sorensen each scored
two points; and Lisa Kisamore
dropped in the final .two point
-bucket as the buzzer sounded.


JCHS Boys Win Three;

Climb To 6-6 Season


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School varsity boy's basketball
team won its last three games and
climbed to 6-6 on the season.
The Tigers played three games in
the Reebok-CNS Holiday Hoopfest
in Thomasville, winning two and
finishing in fifth place in the tour-
nament.
In the first game, the Tigers faced
off against Thomasville. High and
lost 83-50.
Leading the score for JCHS was
Demario Rivers with 28 points.
Lamarkus Bennett, five points;
Tim Crumity, two points; James
Skipworth, three points; Jitavin
Bennett, six points; Jordan Blair;
two points, Marco Kapor three
points; and Paul Huggins, one
point.
The Tigers came back hard during
the second game, defeating Valdo-
sta High 63-54.


Rivers again led the score for the
Tigers with 23 points.
Lamarkus Bennett, four points;
Crumity, two points; Skipworth,
ten points; Jitavin Bennett, eight
points; Kapor, four points; and
Huggins, 12 points.
The Tigers squeaked by Pelham
in the third game 61-60.
Rivers led the score with 24
points. He was also named to the
first team "Team All Tournament".
Lamhrkus Bennett, 15 points;
Crumity, nine points; Skipworth,
six points; and Jitavin Bennett,
eight points.
The Tigers downed Florida High
68-61.
Rivers again led the scoring charge
with 26 points, eight -assists, five
steals and six rebounds.
Lamarkus Bennett, 12 points;
Crumity, 15 points, five assists,
three steals; Skipworth, two points,
nine rebounds; and Jitavin Bennett,
six points.
Kapor and Huggins each scored
two points.


Tigers Rout Lafayette Mayo
59-23 In District Action


Tiger boys stand 11-6 on the sea-
son and are undefeated in district
play after routing Lafayette Mayo
last week, 59-23.
"The Tigers started out strong
and the game was never in doubt,"
said Coach Omari Forts.
Leading the charge for the Tigers
was Demario Rivers, pouring in 24
points, pulling down seven re-
bounds, four assists, and three
steals.
Tim Crumity, 12 points, three re-


bounds, four assists, three steals; Ji-
tavin Bennett, three points, seven
rebounds, 10 assists; and James
Skipworth, two points,, five re-
bounds, two steals.
Lamarkus Bennett, nine points,
four rebounds, three assists, four
steals, Lucius Wade, two rebounds,
two steals, Marko Kapor, five
points; Paul Huggins, four points,
one rebound, one steal; and Quan-
tez Burke, one steal and one assist.


ing to do all that I can to help my
team win."
He has been injured on several
occasions, having his playing time.,
in a game cut short, or not being
able to play at all.
"If I'm out of a game for one rea-
son or another, I feel terrible," said
Gunnels. "It really blows your
mind if you can't be out there on
the floor."
He enjoys the competition of the, ,
game, and being able to hang out
with his friends.
"My philosophy for playing in ;
any sport is to never quit, play your
hardest, and always give it 110 per-
cent," Gunnels said.
He also plays football and base-
ball for the Warriors.
"I have never dreamed of playing
basketball professionally," he said.
but it's my dream to play profes-
sional baseball."
He added that he has been playing
baseball since he began playing T-
ball at the Recreation Park when he
was five years old.
In all sports and aspects of life,
Gunnels has a winning philosophy,
"Even if you have no talent for
whatever it is you wish to accom-
plish, if you work hard, put in a lot
of time and give it a lot of practice,


GUNNELS


one rebound, one steal; Westwood,
11 points, two rebounds, two assist,
five steals; and FAMU, six points,
one rebound, two steals.

Bell: six points, six assists, six
steals; Apalachicola: four points,
two assists, two steals; Villages:
seven points, one rebound, three
steals; Atlantis, playing on the se-
,verely sprained ankle, two assists,
one rebound.

John Paul, still in pain from his
injury: two assists, two steals; Apa-
lachicola, he had the play of the
day when he was able to outrun an


you can be good at it," he< opponent and prevent a slam-dunk,
believes. .three assists; FAMU: one point and
Of the 16 games he played this" eight rebounds, his highest number
year, Gunnels has demonstrated the of rebounds this season; and Carra-
true heart and spirit of a Warrior, belle: four points, four assists,
missing only one game due to holi- ',seven rebounds, and four steals.
day vacation with his family, and Gunnels has also been named
missing most of another game, be- four weeks straight as a Big Bend
cause of a severely sprained ankle. Leaders.
on which he did play the first one The first week he was number
and a half to two minutes on a two in steals with 17
tightly bandaged ankle before he
was pulled out of the game. The second week he was number
His statistics against Carrabelle five in steals with 17. During the
are: 11 points, two assists, two re- third week, he was number eight in
bounds, four steals, one blocked assists with 24, and: vwas Inmb..r


Munroe: three points, three as-
sists, two rebounds; Brookwood
(playing as point-guard), one assist,


The fourth week. He6was :-umbL I
three in steals with 31, and was
number 16 in assists with 24.


ACA Girls Stand


11-10 On Season


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

' Lady Warriors basketball team
stands 11-10 on the season, after
losing two of their last three games.
The girls lost to FAMU 51-20.
Leading the score for ACA was
Mallory Plaines with eight points,
four rebounds and two assists.
Bethany Saunders, three- points,
two steals, one assist; Brittany
Hobbs, two points, two rebounds,
two assists, one assist; and Caitlin
Murphy, three points, five re-
bounds.
Corie Smith, four points, three re-
bounds, one steal, one assist; Lind-
sey Day, five rebounds, one assist;
Rikki Roccanti, three rebounds,
one steal and Stephanie Dobson,
one steal.
ACA defeated Carrabelle 54-27.
Day led the charge for ACA with
17 points, 22 rebounds for a
double-double, three steals and one
assist.


Plaines followed close behind
with 16 points and ten rebounds for
a double-double, three assists, two
steals and two drawn charges.
Saunders, 11 points, two
rebounds, five assists; Hobbs,
seven points, six rebounds, five as-
sists, two steals; and Murphy, two
points, four rebounds, one steal.
Smith, Roccanti and Dobson each
had one rebound.
John Paul beat the ladies 32-29
Hobbs scored eight points, five re-
bounds, one assist, four steals; and
Day, eight points, two rebounds,
one steal and two blocked shots.
Saunders, four points, two re-
bounds, one steal; Roccanti, three
points, one rebound, one assist;
Murphy, two points, three
rebounds, one assist, one steal; and
Dobson, two points.
Plaines had two points, 12 re-
bounds, one assist and three steals.
Coach Daryl Adams attributed
Plaines' game to John Paul boxing
iher into a corner, keeping her away
from the ball and the hoop.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy fell to-
John Paul 59-20 in basketball ac-
tion, Tuesday night.
Coach Dan Nennstiel said that
Warriors did not play well. "As a
matter of fact, we played poorly. It
was a real off-night for us.
"Fortunately, we don't have to
play them again: this year," he
added.
Nennstiel said, that this was the
first time this season that none of
the Warriors had a score with dou-


ble digits.
He did not have the statistics
available, but recalled that for the
first time this year, Reggie Walker
led the score with six points.
Stephen Griffin and Ben Gran-
tham each scored five points; Ca-
sey Gunnels, three points; and
Wade Scarberry, one point.
"We have a stretch of seven
games coming up," said Nennstiel.
"All of them will be winnable, close
games, I don't foresee any
blowouts.
"Whether we win or loose, all de-
pends on how well we play," he
said.


JCHS Tiger Boys Defeat

Maclay Marauders 40-38


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Tiger boys beat Maclay Marauders
40 38, last week and stand 9 6 on
the season.
Coach Omari Forts called the
game a nail-biter in which the Ti-
gers led the score for the first three
periods.
JCHS scored seven in the first to
Malay's four; 13 in the second to
Maclay's 11; 12 in the third to Ma-
clay's eight; and eight in the fourth


to Maclay's 15.
Forts said that Tiger Demario
Rivers cinched the win with a lay-
up with 1.5 seconds remaining in
the game.
He also led the Tigers in scoring
and rebounds with 15 points, and
five rebounds.
James Skipworth, six points, four
rebounds, one steal; Tim Crumity,
12 points, one rebound, two steals,
two assists; Lamarkus Bennett, five
points, two rebounds, one block
and Marko Kapor, two points.


Howard Middle School Bees

Lose To Suwannee 11-3


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Howard Middle School
boy's basketball team wrapped up
their season 11-3! after falling to
SSIn 'Pie''Middle -, -60-29, last

Hall said the Bees played very
hard, but had to play without the


help of three of their starters.
Scoring for the Bees were De-
vondrick Nealy, six points, five re-
bounds; Demontray Johnson, five
points, five rebounds; Harold In-
gram, one point, eight rebounds;
Teylor Richard, six points, ten re-
bounds; DeAndre Tucker, four
points, 12 rebounds; and Ja'Cari
Johnson, seven points, three re-
bounds.


JCHS JV Basketball Team

Falls TO Mayo 49-42
Leading the score for the Tigers
FRAN HUNT was J. C. Fead with 20 points.
Staff Writer Dantrell Oliver, 12 points, seven
steals; Reggie Watkins, five points;
The Jefferson County High Jamaal Brooks, four points, 16 re-
School JV boy's basketball team bounds; Maricio Scott, five assists.
downed Mayo last week, 49-42, to The next game for the Tiger is 6
stand 10-3 on the season, p.m. Thursday against NFC, here

Lady Bees Hoopsters

Stand 1-5 On The Season


Lady Bees basketball team stand
1-5 on the season after the game
slated against Trinity Catholic was
canceled and won by forfeit, and
the 22-2 loss against Madison Cen-
tral, Tuesday night.
Scoring for the Lady Bees in the
fourth quarter was La'Ashle


Norton.
Since the final two games of the
season against Shanks Middle have
been canceled, only two games re-
main for the Lady Bees.
Suwannee Middle is scheduled
for Thursday here and Havana
Middle is slated for Tuesday, there.


t 4


ACA Warriors Fall To

John Paul 59-20







PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 25, 2006


LEGALS
NOTICE OF SALE: Notice is hereby
given that the School Board of Jefferson
County, Florida, Desmond M. Bishop
Administration Building, 1490 W. Wash-
ington Street, Monticello,. Florida will
receive sealed bids on or before January
30, 2006 at 2:00 p.m. for the purchase of
the following described real property
owned by the School Board of Jefferson
County, Florida. One acre of land in SW
1/4 of SW 1/4 of NW '1 DB "YY" Page
193. The Parcel Number is Section 20-2n-
7E-0000-0110-0000. This property is being
sold in its "As Is Conidition" and no repre-
sentations are made as to zoning, access,
or its suitability for specific uses. The land
is situated in Jefferson County, Florida.
Bids received will be opened publicly at



Lady Tigers

Fall To NFC


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lady Tigers fell to North Florida
Christian 64-28, last week.
It was a District 5-2A game and
the Lady Tigers now stand 10-4 on
the season.
Coach Bill Brumfield attributed
the loss to the girls having to play
without three of their starters.
"Keandra Seabrooks, Deidra Ar-
nold and Donnas Ransom were all
out, and they usually score about
25 points combined," said Brum-
field.
"The next games should be much
better, we're back up to full-throttle
again."
Shaumese Massey led the score
for the Lady Warriors with 12
points, four rebounds, three assists,
two steals and two blocked shots.
.Candice Griffin, seven points,
eight rebounds, one steal; Shanise
Brooks, four points, one rebound,
three steals; and Latoya Footman,
two points, one rebound.
The Lady Tigers will play their
final home game of the season 6
p.m., Wednesday.
Brumfield said the Lady Tigers
are readying for the game against
Maclay at NFC, Jan. 31. "We beat
Maclay by 25 points earlier in the
season and by nine points, the last
time we played them," said Brum-
field. "If we win this one, we'll be
in the playoffs."



Lady Bees Lose
TO Suwannee

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Howard Middle School girl's
basketball team stand' 1-6 on the
season 'after falling to Suwannee
Middle last week for a 26-5 loss,
All five points for the Lady Bees
were scored by LaAshle Norton.



KidCare
Free or Low
Cost Health ^Jr
Insurance
for Kids
W :: ilwmJ i


LECALS. *'


2:00 p.m. in the Board Room of the dis-
trict office located at 1490 W. Washington
Street, Monticello, FL 32344. No bid will
be .opened if received after 2:00 p.m.
Please mark on envelope, "Surplus Real
Property Bid Opening 2:00 p.m. on .Janu-
ary 30, 2006." Anyone desiring informa-
tion on the procedure for submitting bids
should contact HIal Wilson at (850) 342-
(0100. It is anticipated that the highest bid
will be presented to the School Board for
approval on Monday, February 13, 2006.
The School Board of Jefferson County
reserves the right to reject any or all bids.
Fred Shofner, Chairman, Jefferson
County School Board, Phil Barker, Super-
intendent, Jeffersmn County School Board.
1/13, 1/18, 1/20, /25 1/27, c
The Jefferson County Planning
Commission will hold a workshop on
January 26, 2006 at 7:00 p.m. The
workshop will be to discuss subdivisions,
lot clustering, and procedures. The
meeting will be held in the Courthouse of
the Jefferson County Courthouse located
at the intersection of US Highway 19 and
US Highway 90 in Monticello,, FL. The
meeting may be continued as necessary.
From the Florida "Government in the
Sunshine Manual", page 36, paragraph c:
Each board, commission or agency of this
state or of any political subdivision thereof
shall include in the notice of any meeting
or hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing
is required, of such board, commission, or
agency, conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to appeal
any decision made by the board, agency or
commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, lie
or she will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such purpose he
or she may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made which
record includes the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is to be
based.
1/25, c
Notice of Public Hearing The Jefferson
County Commission will review and make
its decision regarding a revised
preliminary plat for a proposed residential
subdivisionon approximately 372 acres.
The proposed Mill Creek Ridge
subdivision is to be located approximately
2 '/2 miles southeast of Lloyd and about '
mile east of Lloyd Creek Road. Interested
parties may present their concerns at the
Jefferson County Commission meeting on
February 16, 2006 at 6:00 p.m., or as soon
thereafter as such matter may be heard, in
the courtroom of the Jefferson County
Courthouse located at the intersection of
U.S. Highway 19 and U.S. Highway 90 in
Monticello, Florida 32344. The meeting
may be continued as necessary. From the
Florida "Government in the Sunshine
Manual", page 36, paragraph c: Each
board. commission, or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision thereof shall
include in the notice of any meeting or
hearing, if notice of meeting or hearing is
required, of such board, commission or
agency conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to appeal
any decision made by the board, agency or
commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing he
or she will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such purpose,
he or she may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings, is
made which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based. Prior to the meeting interested
persons may contact the Jefferson County
Planning and Building Department at
850-342-0223 or review the proposal
-during business hours at the Department
office located at 445 West Palmer Mill
Road, Monticello, FL 32345. Written
comments may be mailed to the same
address.
1/::5, c
STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT,
OF COMMUNITY AFFAIRS NOTICE
OF INTENT TO FIND THE CITY OF
MONTICELLO COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN AMENDMENTS(S) IN
COMPLIANCE DOCKET NO.
05-I-NOI-3302-(A)-(I) The Department
gives notice of its intent to find the
Amendment(s) to the Comprehensive Plan
for the City of Monticello, adopted by
Ordinance No(s) 2005-06 on December 6,
2005, IN COMPLIANCE, pursuant to
Sections 163.3184, 163.3187 and 163.3189,
F.S. The adopted City of Monticello
Comprehensive Plan Amendment(s) and


the Department's Objections,
Recommendations and Comments Report,
(if any) are available for public inspection
Monday through Friday, except for legal
holidays, (luring normal business hours, at
the Monticello City Hall, 245 South
Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida
32344. Any affected person, as defined in
Section 163.3184 F.S. has a right to
petition for an administrative hearing to
challenge the proposed agency
determination that the Amnendment(s) to
the City of Monticello Comprehensive
Plan are In Compliance as defined in
Subsection 163.3184(1) F.S. The petition
must be filed within twenty-one (21) days
after publication of this notice and must
include all of the information and contents
described in Uniform Rule 28-106.201,
F.A.C. The petition must be filed with the
Agency Clerk, Department of Community
Affairs, 2555 Shumard Oak Boulevard,
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2100, and a
copy mailed or delivered to the local
government. Failure to timely file a
petition shall constitute a waiver of any
right to request an administrative
proceeding as a petitioner under Sections
120.569 and 120.57, F.S. If a petition is
filed, the purpose of the administration
hearing will be to present evidence and
testimony and forward a recommended
order to the Department. If no petition is
filed, this Notice of Intent shall become
final agency action. If a petition is filed,
other affected persons miay petition for
leave to intervene in the proceeding. A
petition for intervention must be filed at
least twenty (20) days before the final
hearing and must include all of the
information and contents described in
Uniform Rule 28-106.205, F.A.C. A
petition for leave to intervene shall be filed
at the Division of Administrative Hearings
Department of Management Services,
1230 Apalachee Parkway, Tallahassee,
Florida 32399-3060. Failure to petition to
intervene within the allowed time frame
constitutes a waiver of any right such a
person has to request a hearing under
Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S. or to
participate in the administrative hearing.
After an administrative hearing petition is
timely filed, mediation is available
pursuant to Subsection 163.3189(3)(a),
F/S/ to any affected person who is made a
party to the proceeding by filing that
request with the administrative law judge
assigned by the Division of Administrative
Hearings. The choice, of mediation shall
not affect a party's right to an
administrative hearing. -s- K. Marlene
Conaway Chief of Comprehensive
Planning, Division of Community
Planning, Department of Community
Affairs 2555 Shunmard Oak Boulevard,
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2100

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND
JUDICIAl CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 05-320-CA NATIONAL CITY
MORTGAGE CO., PLAINTIFF, vs
KENNETH J. MCCOY, ET Al..,
DEFENDANTS) NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO:
KENNETH J. MCCOY; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF KENNETH J. MCCOY
whose residence is unknown if he/she/they
be living: and if he/she/they be dead, the
unknown defendants who may be spouses,
heirs, devisees. grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming
an interest by, through under or against
the Defendants, who are not known to be
dead or alive, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title or interest
in the property described in the mortgage
being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE


HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to
foreclose a mortgage on the following
property: LOT BLOCK "A" OF LLOYD
ACRES UNIT 117, AN UNRECORDED
SUBDIVISION LOCATED IN
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS. COMMENCE AT THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT I I
BLOCK "B" OF LLOYD ACRES UNIT
NO 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK "8", PAGE 31 OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH
00 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 09
SECONDS WEST ALONG THE
EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID
BLOCK "B" A DISTANCE OF 1701.73
FEET, THENCE RUN EAST 156.76
FEET TO THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY
OF THE 60.0 FOOT RIGHT-OF-WAY
OF HERON ROAD, THENCE RUN
THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 16
MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 65.27
FEET, THENCE RUN EAST 467.63
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING,
FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING
CONTINUE EAST 150.00 FEET
THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 53
MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST 299.72
FEET TO A POINT ON A 50 FOOT
RADIUS CUL-DE-SAC, THENCE RUN
NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID
CUL-DE-SAC 157.12 FEET (CHORD
BEARS SOUTH 24 DEGREES 14
MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST 100.0
FEET) THENCE RUN
SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG A CURVE
TO THE RIGHT HAVING RADIUS OF0
245.52 FEET FOR AN ARC DISTANCE
OF 140.47 FEET (CHORD BEARS
SOUTH 00 DEGREES 16 SECONDS
WEST 42.96 FEET, THENCE RUN
NORTH 65 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 18
SECONDS WEST 261.07 FEET,
THENCE RUN NORTH 30 DEGREES 57
MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 241.20
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
TOGETHER WITH A DOUBLEWIDE
MOBILE HOME SERIAL NUMBER
GAFL375A74567CY2I AND
GAFL375B74567CY21 has been filed
against you and you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses, if any to it
on DAVID J. STERN ESQ. Plaintiffs
attorney, whose address is 801 S.
University Drive #500, Plantation, FL.
33324 on or before January 25. 2006 (no
later than 30 days from the date of the
first publication of this notice of action)
and file the original with the clerk of this
court either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be.entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition filed herein.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court
at JEFFERSON County, Florida this 19
day of January 2006. CLERK OF THE
CIRCUITY COURT. LAW OFFICES OF
DAVID ,J. STERN ATTORNEY FOR
PLAINTIFF 801 S. UNIVERSITY DRIVE
SUITE 500 PLANTATION, Fl. 33324; IN
ACCORDANCE WITH I TIHE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, persons with disabilities needing a
special accommodation should contact
COURT ADMINISTRATION, at the
JEFFERSON County Courthouse at
850-997-3595, 1-800-955-8770 (TDD) or
, O00-955-8770 via Florida Relay Services.
:/25. 2/1, c
IN THE CIRCUIIIT COURT FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 05-60-CA
UNC:332005CA000060XXXXXX
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC
REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS


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850-997-5132

90 DAY WARRANTY ON ALL APPLIANCES

CHRISTOPHER CUMMINGS OWNER


LEGALS E-EG


LEGALS '.

NOMINEE FOR FIRST CIIOICE
FUNDING, INC. MIN NO.
1002805-2003121911-2, Plaintiff vs.
CHARLES LIVINGSTON, et al,
Defendants RE NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE
IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order, or Summary Final Judgment of
foreclosure dated June 16, 2005 and an
Order Resetting Sale dated January 10,
2006, and entered in Case No 05-60 CA
UNC: 332005CA000060XXXXXX of the
Circuit Court of the Second Judicial
Circuit in and for Jefferson County,
Florida wherein Mortgage Electronic
Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for
First Choice Funding, Inc. d/b/a First is
Plaintiff and CHARLES LIVINGSTON;
ELOISE 11. LIVINGSTON A/K/A
ELOUISE LIVINGSTON; JEFFERSON
COUNTY, BY AND THROUGH THE
JEFFERSON COUNTY SHIPl
PROGRAM; JAMES BLACKWELL;
ANN BLACKWELL; TMH FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION; WILLIE MAE
INGRAM F/K/A/ INTERESTS BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A
NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS
ACTION, OR IIAVING OR CLAIMING
TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR
INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY
HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants I
will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the North Front Door of the
Jefferson County Courthouse, Monticello,
FL 32345 in Jefferson County, Florida at
I 1:00a.m. on the February 09, 2006 the
following described property as set forth
in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit:
PARCEL 1: A PARCEL OF LAND
LOCATED IN SOUTHWEST QUARTER
OF TIlE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF
SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP I NORTH,
RANGE 6 EAST, J.IEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA, BEING A PORTION OF THE
PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL
RECORD BOOK 142, PAGE 63, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA SAID PARCEL OF LAND
BEING MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE
MONUMENT MARKING TIlE
SOUTIIEAST CORNER OF THE
SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE
SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION
7, TOWNSHIP I NORTH, RANGE 6
EAST, JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH (10
DEGREES, 17 MINUTES 58 SECONDS
WEST, ALONG THE EAST LINE OF
THIE SOUTHIIWEST QUARTER OF THIE
SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAIDl
SECTION 7,210.00 FEET TO AN IRON
ROD MARKING THE NORTHEAST
CORNER OF lTHE MAYS PROPERTY
AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL.
RECORDS BOOK 338, PAGE 60,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA, FOR A POINT OF
BEGINNING THENCE FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH
89 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 32
SECONDS WEST, ALONG TIE NORTHl


"0


.226-2077,


1 0


LEGALS

BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID MAYS
PROPERTY, 103.76 FEET TO AN IRON
RO ON THE EASTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF
STATE ROAD 257, THENCE NORTH 01
DEGREES 23 MINUTES 15 SECONDS
WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY, 604.870 FEET TO AN
IRON ROD MARKING THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE
LIVINGSTON PROPERTY AS-
DESCRIBEDI) IN OFFICIAL RECORDS.-.
BOOK 80, PAGE 759, PUBLIC: '
RECORDS OF JEFFERSON COUNTY,b.,
FLORIDA. THENCE NORTH 89,,
DEGREES 30 MINUTES 50 SECONDS..,
EAST ALONG THE SOUTH,".
BOUNDARY OF SAID LIVINGSTON-,,
PROPERTY 115.24 FEET TO AN IRON
PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF SAID LIVINGSTON/',
PROPERTY SAID POINT BEING ON'.,.
THE WEST BOUNDARY OF THE'. *
TERRELL PROPERTY AS DESCRIBED,.: 5
IN DEED BOOK UU, PAGE 427, *,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF JEFFERSON'.,
COUNTY, FLORIDA THENCE SOUTH-;!:
00 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 58, 'i
SECONDS EAST, ALONG THE WEST-?,*
LINE OF SAID TERRELL PROPERTY",,'
THE WEST BOUNDARY LINE OF THE..".
DOWLING PROPERTY AS DESCRIBED i
IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 147,- :-
PAGE 63, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND '-
THE WEST BOUNDARY LINE OF THE
MCCLEOD PROPERTY AS SHOWN ON .'
THE JEFFERSON COUNTY
PROPERTY APPRAISERS MAPS OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
606.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF '
BEGINNING. PARCEL 2: A PART OF ,
THE SW ', OF THE SE 'A OF SECTION .
7. TOWNSHIP I NORTH. RANGE 6 '
EAST. WHICH IS ENCLOSED WITH '
THE FOLLOWING BOUNDARY LINES, "
TO-WIT. COMMENCE AT A POINT 420 -
FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTHEAST
CORNER OF THE SW 'A OF SE ,..
SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP I NORTH, ..-
RANGE 6 EAST, THENCE RUNNING ,-.
SOUTH ALONG THE EAST-~
BOUNDARY OF SAID FORTY 105 ,
FEET, THENCE RUNNING WEST 210.
FEET AND TO THE CENTER OF.:
STATE ROAD S-257, THENCE
RUNNING NORTHERLY ALONG THE .,.
CENTER OF SAID HIGHWAY A,;
DISTANCE OF 105 FEET, THENCE--
RUNNING EAST 217.5 FEET TO THE' :
POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE LAND ,
IIEREIN CONVEYED, LESS AND
EXCEPT THAT PORTION
CONTAINED IN THE RIGHT OF WAY -,:
SAID HIGHWAY. If you are a person
with a disability who needs any
accommodation in order to participate in:
this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost "M,
to you, to the provision of certain ,-,
assistance. Please contact the Court at \
850-342-0218 with in two (2) working days
of your receipt of this Notice, if you are .,,
hearing or voice impaired, call Florida .,,
Relay Service (800) 955-8770. Dated at






ients OVER TIME
it? Get More Cash.

th the Leaders.3

* 1-800-337-6409 ,
*f-,r









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 25, 2006 PAGE 11


To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED

Your Community Shopping Center
1


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGALS
Monticello, Florida on January I Ith, 2006.
Carl D. Boatwright, As Clerk, Circuit
Court.
1/18, 1/25.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION: WELLS FARGO
BANK, NA SUCCESSOR BY MERGER
TO WELLS FARGO HOME
MORTGAGE, INC. F/K/A NORWEST
MORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff vs.
WALTER B. LAVALLEY, et al,
Defendant(s) CASE NO.: 05-297-CA
Division NOTICE OF ACTION TO:
WALTER B. LAVALLEY LAST
KNOWN ADDRESS: 161 SNEADS
DRIVE GREENVILLE, FL 32331
CURRENT ADDRESS UNKNOWN LAST
KNOWN ADDRESS CHARLES E.
LAVALLEY 161 SNEADS DRIVE
GREENVILLE, FL 32331 CURRENT
ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANY AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAl.
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN
ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT
ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE
NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following property in
JEFFERSON County, Florida: LOT 5
BLOCK C, JEFFERSON LANDING
SUBDIVISION AS PER THE PLAT
THERE OF FILED IN PLAT BOOK B,
PAGE 39 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH A 1999 DOUBLE
MOBILE HOME WITH VIN NUMBERS
11990313687A AND 11990313687B
LOCATED THEREON AS A FIXTURE
AND APPURTENANCE THERETO. has
been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses within 30 days after the first
publication, if any, on Echevarria, Codilis
& Stawiarski, Plaintiffs attorney, whose
address is 9119 Corporate Lake Drive,
Suite 300, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file
the original with this Court either before
service on Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint or
petition. This notice shall be published
once each week for two consecutive weeKs-
in the The MonticelloNews, WITNESS my
hand and the seal of this Court on this 9th
day of January, 2006. Dale Boatwright,
Clerk of Court
1/18, 1/25, c
NOTICE OF PROPOSED ZONING: The
City Council of the City of Monticello
proposes to adopt the following ordinance:
ORDINANCE 2006-01 AN ORDINANCE
AMENDING THE ZONING MAP OF
THE CITY OF MONTICELLO,
FLORIDA BY DESIGNATING A
PARCEL OF LAND COMPRISING 12.84
ACRES ON ROCKY BRANCH ROAD AS
R-I RESIDENTIAL-SINGLE FAMILY;
PROVIDING FOR PURPOSE;
PROVIDING FOR ADOPTION OF THE
SPECIFIED AMENDMENT TO THE
CITY OF MONTICELLO ZONING
MAP; PROVIDING FOR LEGAL
EFFECT; PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILITY, CODIFICATION,
SCRIVENER'S ERRORS, AND AN
EFFECTIVE DATE. The entire text of the
ordinance may be inspected at City Hall,
245 S. Mulberry Street, Monticello,
Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Public
hearing on the ordinance will be held on
Tuesday, February 7, 2006 at 7:00 p.m. at
Monticello City Hall. Interested persons
may appear at the meeting and be heard
with respect to the proposed ordinance.
1/2.; c
HELP WANTED
Leading national propane marketer
Southeast Propane has immediate
opening for an energetic route sales
driver for their Monticello based
operation. Candidates must possess
strong customer service skills, team
player attitude along with a Class B
CDL license with an air brake
endorsement and have the ability to
obtain a hazmat & tanker
endorsement.. Clean driving record a
must. Excellent starting salary with
competitive benefit program for the
qualified candidate. EOE. Apply by
Fax 850-997-2808 or in person @ 500
South Jefferson St. Monticello, Fl.
1/18, tfn
Cashier, available to work shift work
and weekends @ Capital City Travel
Center. Call Sharon @ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, fn, c
Office Assistant wanted at North
Florida Community College. Monday
- Friday 8:00 to 4:30 Partial Duties
include: Thorough knowledge and
experience in Microsoft Office
including Outlook, Word, Excel, and
Access (must be able to create and
maintain spreadsheets and
databases); Updating and
maintaining computerized Board
Policy Manual and Procedures


Manual; Coordinating
schedules/meetings; Maintain budget
information; Record/transcribe
minutes (The ability to take
Shorthand dictation a plus). Full job
description on website. Qualifications:
AA/AS degree (Preferred) plus two


HELP WANTED '
(2) years related experience. Send
application & resume to NFCC,
Human Resources, 325 NW Turner
Davis Drive, Madison, FL 32340.
Application must be received by
1/31/2006 Application can be
downloaded at www.nfcc.edu. EOE
1/25, 27, c
Servers: must be 18 years old. Call Brian
for interview 284-7899.
i/25, 27, 2/1, 3, c
Registered Nurse Home Health $1500 -
$3000 Recruitment Incentive Archbold
Home Health Services is currently seeking
qualified applicants for the above full time
position to serve Leon, Jefferson, Madison
Counties. One year of home health
experience preferred. We offer
competitive compensation and an excellent
benefit package. CONTACT: Nurse
Recruiter, Archbold Medical Center.
Phone: 229-228-2713, FAX: 229-551-8733.
Email: rtaylor@archbold.org Visit our
website: www.archbold.org EOE
1/25, 27, c


Masters Level Therapist #2266:
Masters Degree from an accredited
University or College with a major in
the field of counseling, social work,
psychology, or a related human
services field and two years of
professional experience in providing
services to persons with behavioral
illness. Prior experience working with
children who have emotional issues
required. Some local travel required.
License preferred. Shift 8am 5 pm
M-F.
Licensed Therapist #2266c: Masters
Degree from an accredited University
or College with a major in the field of
counseling social work, psychology,
or a related human services field and
two years of professional. Experience
in providing services to persons with
behavioral illness. Prior experience
working with children who have
emotional issues required. Some local
travel required. License required.
Shift: Monday-Friday / Variable
hours. Some late afternoon work
required.
Masters Level Therapist #2267:
Masters Degree from an accredited
University or College with a major in
the field of counseling, social work,
'i'sychology, "bor~"-a' rated hunfi"
services field and two years 6f
professional experience in providing
services to persons with behavioral
illness. Substances abuse knowledge
preferred. Some local travel required.
License preferred shift: 8am 5pm
M-F.
Licensed Therapist #2267a: Masters
Degree from an accredited University
or College with a major in the fields
of counseling, social work,
psychology, or a related human
services field and two years of
professional experience in providing
services to persons with behavioral
illness. License required. Some local
travel required. Substance abuse
knowledge preferred. Shift: Variable
hours. Some late afternoon work
required.
For more information and a complete
listing of available positions:
www.apalacheecenter.org (850)
523-3217 or (800)226-2931 Human
Resources 2634-J Capital Circle NE,
Tallahassee, FI Pre-Hire Drug Screen
& FDLE background check An Equal
Opp'ortunity/Affirmative Action
Employer Drug-Free Workplace.
1/25, c
The Jefferson County Road Dept. will
be accepting applications for the
following position' "Truck driver with
CDL class A Florida license. Must
have excellent driving record, high
school diploma, 2 years experience
driving trucks, and experience using
backhoe. For application stop by the
Road Dept. office week days 7:30 a.m.
to 4:00p.m. Jefferson County is an
equal opportunity employer and a
drug free workplace. Phone number
997-2036. Closing date will be
February 1, 2006.
'/25, 27, c
SERVICES
Health Care Equipment Jackson's
Drug Store. We bill Medicare Call
for a assessment of your needs.
997-3553. UPS available
1/19, tfn
Christian girl will clean your home.
New in town. Call Tori 997-1437.
1/18, 20, 25, 27, pd
Peters Satellite -- Your Dish Satellite
dealer. We offer equipment,
installation, repair, parts, and prompt
service. We also offer Go-Karts,
utility trailers and lawn mowers.
Located at: 1150 Old Lloyd Road,
Monticello, Fla. 850-997-3377.
tfn, 1/25
Ours is a seeker friendly church. We
believe that God will meet us
wherever we are on our spiritual
journey. Christ Episcopal Church,
three blocks N of the courthouse.
Sunday service at 10:00am./997-4116.
1/18, c
Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,


SERVICES
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116,
933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drugs, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn fat
and increase energy levels resulting in
considerable weight loss over time.
Hoodiacol consist of 3 key ingredients
incorporated into rice bran oil with,
natural flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss, you
may see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in rice bran oil. Hoodia
gordonii is a cactus found in the
Kalahari Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd, 997-5648.
Leave Message.
2/11, tfn


Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
WANTED
Dog Owner Needs Home: Responsible
51 year old male looking for small
home to rent with outside space for
dogs. Will provide nonrefundable pet
deposit. Local references available.
William @ 850-212-8337.
1/25. 27, 2/1, pd
FOR SALE


Rhode Island Red Roosters $10
each. Purebred Limousin bull, 15
months old. Call 997-0901 leave'
message or 997-3.68, ask for Debbie.
1/11, 13, 18, 20, 25. 27, pd
Pillow Plush Double Sided Pillow Top
Mattress/Box Set 4 inch pillow top,
List $989.00 sell for $248.
850-528-1422.
1/25 27, 2/1, 3, pd


"Bunk Bed, Full size'6ofi bottomni, tw'inf '
on top,excellent condition,$300 obo.,
997-6164.
1/20, 15, pd
Left over Merchandise from Big Chief
Pawnbrokers: electronics, handtools,
DVD's, VHS, jewelry, Reasonably
priced 342-2105
1/6, 11, 13, 18, 20, 25, 27, pd
4' (Like New) Gondolas, $45/each,
shelves eachc, Heavy Duty circular
garment rack (approx. 58" Diameter)
$75. Call (850) 997-2519.
FREE
Redbone/Walker mix 1 year old free
to a caring hunter. Trained for deer
Call 229-794-3628.


AUTOMOTIVE
No Credit Checks Just Low Down
Payments on Good Cars & Trucks
2 and 4 Door Model As Low As $750
down 850-536-9111
www.JumpinJims.con Ask For Mr.
Deal.
11/2, tfn
'87 Mercury Sabel,$500 Firm, Runs.
Contact Kim at (904 497-7093
l!1/4,tfn
1977 Olds Cutlass 89,252 miles,$3500
CASH. Clean, New tires. Call
997-2646. M-Th 9-5.
tfn,c

FOR RENT
2 or 3 bedroom $450 $650 per
month near JCKC or 1-10 421-3911.
12/2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28, 30, pd
Country Living-1 bed, 1I bath, $500,
997-6653
1/25, 27, 2/1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24, pd
Prime downtown office space now
available in Cherry Street Commons.
.Jack Carswell, 997-1980.
11/30, tfn, c
One bedroom, on one acre. Partially
furnished, no pets, $600 per month,
credit check. 997-6991.
1/25, 27, pd


REAL ESTATE
In town LOT $22,00U SE of Square
88' x 79' 345-7116, 222-5658
Samn:er's Realty of Tallahassee, Inc.
1/25, 27, 2/J, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, pd
Nice 3 Bedroom, 2 bath. brick home,
approx. acres, living room, Florida
-'room, fireplace, hard wood floors,
country setting, Jefferson County
997-2387, 933-0904 $249, 900
1/20. 25, 27, c


*,"Fixer Upper" $22,000 4 bedroom,1+
baths,2nd St. 345-7116
,/2S, 27, 2/1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, pd


HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT

S.--,
_--_- '

Bulldozers, Backhoes,
Loaders, Dump Trucks,
Graders, Scrapers,
Excavators
Train in Florida
-National Certification
-Financial Assistance
-Job Placement Assistance
800-383-7364
Associated Training Services
www.ats-schools.com


Housing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615- 3/2 $715- 4/2 $895 -$50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571








Trucks, vehicles, equipment, misc.
From LEON COUNTY, TALQUIN
ELEC., LEON SHERIFF, & (10)
OTHER AREA COtUNTIES & CITIES
SATURDAY, JANUARY 21: 10AM
North Florida Fairgrounds
ITEMS INCLUDED:
*Late model Cat D3C dozer *Late model Ford & Intl.
Dump trucks *Late model (2000-2003) Utility trucks *
work vans *Cat D6 *Deere 41 B backhoe
*Numerous late model cars and SUV's *Misc.
Equipment & accessories *MUCH MORE!
THESE ARE FLEET MAINTAINED UNITS!
Preview: Friday, January 20: 9am-4pm
terms: *All units sell AS IS *5% Buyer Prem.
*Cash or cashier check OK. Other checks must be
accompanied By a current Bank Letter of Guarantee
FIRST COAST AUCTION AB150 AU286
P.O. Box 7878 JACKSONVILLE, FL 32238
800-519-6402 or
www.firstcoastauction.com


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES
215 N. Jefferson
lonticello, Fl 32344
/of5 0 m c0-'-l5


Check us out on
the web
wwW.cbkkcom


* Affordable 3Br/2Ba mobile home in good
condition on one acre $S 55,700
" Roomy 4Br/3Ba on 1 acre. Property is zoned
mixed bus/res. With huge garage/workshop,
blueberry trees and grapes. $ 99,999
* Great Starter Home Brick 3Br/2Ba home on
1.19 acres with screen porch and carport. Back
yard fenced for animals. $S 124,900
* Piece of History Historic home built in 1832.
Original trim, woodwork & mantels, restoration
work needed. S 163,000
* New Construction 3Br/2Ba home. Marble &
tile throughout home, carpet in living room,
color to be chosen by buyer $ 165,000
* Great Golf Course Views 4Br/2Ba in great
neighborhood. Lg. deck off family room faces
woods and creek. $ 249,900


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Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only $16,500 per acre

Very Reasonable! 2 bedroom 1 bath home
with small fenced yard, nice family room
$87,500

Choice Buildinq Lots in Cooper's Pond
Area cleared and ready to build on, nice
trees, paved rpad $27,500 each

Look at This! Comfortable 4 bedroom 3 bath
home on five fenced acres w/guest house/
playhouse w/ bath, big shop, 2 car garage,
pasture, 100 pecan trees and a nice pool a
real dream for a growing family $400,000

Hard to Find 5 choice acres on hillside with
planted pines on quiet graded county road
Asking $12,000/acre

Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom home
in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane off Rocky Branch Road and Sunset Street
100'x220' in the City $15,500 each

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Look at the Price Contract Pending 5
wooded acres on Blue Lake Road only
$22,500

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

terrific Land Investment 10 acres on the
ast side of town high and dry in quiet loca-
ion with lots of game, 9 year old planted
pines, profitfrom both appreciating land and
rowing pine $12,000 /acre.


Home Site-Under Contract close to town
on West Grooverville Road only $14,500
Rentals Available
2/1.5 mobile home on 2 ac $450
3/2 mobile home Xmas Ac $650
3/2 mobile home Lloyd Ac $650
2/1 home on Dogwood St $850
Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
We have qualified buyers!
Are you interested in selling?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!


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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 25, 2006


He then returned to Ft. Benning to
attend Air Borne Jump School and
then he was assigned to the Army's
173rd Air Borne Brigade in Viet
Nam as a member of the Combat
Air Borne Infantry, known to mili-
tary personnel as "The Hunters."
Hill said they worked on search
and destroy missions for one year,
before he moved to serve Air
Borne in the Central Highlands.
He recalled the many stresses
during his time in the service.
"We'd walk from sunup to sun-
down, always carrying enough
food, water and ammunition to last
for about three or four days," said
Hill. "If we made contact with the
enemy, we would wait until after
dark and dig the fox holes and we'd
cut down small trees to make a roof


Poster Contest


Deadline Looms

Category two is for teachers
FRAN HUNT whose student posters are ranked
Staff Writer first, second and third from posters
throughout Florida along with re-
The ongoing Hazardous Weather- gional runner-up of the seven State
Awareness Poster Contest for Emergency Management Areas.
fourth and fifth graders concludes The student first place winner will
Feb. 6. receive a $1,000 Office Depot gift
The contest is for any Florida stu- certificate, an all expense paid trip
dent enrolled in fourth and fifth to the State Capitol to mark the be-
grades during the 2005-06 school ginnifig of the 2006 Hazardous
year. Weather awareness Week for the
Posters must be packed, wrapped winner and his/her parents, a $100
flat and mailed to the: American US Savings Bond and one NOAA
Red Cross, 187 Office Plaza Drive, weather radio.
Tallahassee, FL, 32301 and post- The second place student winner
marked on or before Monday, Feb. receives a $500 Office Depot gift
6, 2006 to arrive at the American certificate, a $50 US Savings Bond
Red Cross no later than Andean NOAA weather radio.
Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2006. The student third place winner
Posters must be submitted on will receive a $250 Office Depot
poster or illustration board, ap- gift certificate, a $25 US Savings
proximately 15 inches by 20 Bond and an NOAA weather radio,
inches. __ and the regional runner-up will re-
All artwork must be original and ceive a $100 Office Depot gift car-
may be any media desired with the tificate and an' NOAA weather
exception of pencil, chalk, charcoal radio.
or glitter. Teachers of the winners each will
Stenciled, traced, computer- receive an Office Depot gift certifi-
generated or commercially manu- cate and an NOAA weather radio.
factored stick-on lettering or Values of the gift certificates are"
graphics are not acceptable. first place, $1,000; second place,
$500; third place $250; and the re-
All posters will become the prop- gional runner-up, $100.
erty of the American Red Cross. First, second, third and regional
Posters will be judged of both the runner-up posters will be displayed
clarity of the preparedness message in the Rotunda of the State Capitol
and the quality of the art. Posters during Florida's Hazardous
with misspelled words will be dis- Weather Awareness Week, Feb.
qualified. 12-18.
The Hazardous Weather Aware- On the back of the posters should
ness Poster Contest has two winner be the artist's name, age, grade,
categories, home address, telephone number
Category one is for students and names of parents. As well as
whose posters are ranked first, sec- the school's name, address, tele-
ond and third from posters through- phone numbers along with the
out Florida along with a regional name of the art instructor class-
runner-up within each of the seven room teacher, if any.
State Emergency Management Ar- Winners will be notified by tele-
eas. phone.


Subscribe


Today


To Receive


The


Monticello News



In State


$45.00


Out Of State


$52.00


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County native Ned Hill
has been serving in the capacity of
Acting Commander for Veterans of
Foreign Wars Post 251, as second
in command, when former Com-
mander Raymond Henry stepped
down from the position back in late
November.
He graduated from Howard Acad-
emy in 1964, and attended Suwan-
nee River Junior College studying
Agriculture when he was drafted
into the service.
Hill went to Ft. Benning, GA. for
basic training, after which he went
to Ft. McClellan, AL.for Advanced
Infantry Training.


Hospice Training

Benefits Caregivers

that with interventions, caregiver
DEBBIE SNAPP quality of life increased while the
Staff Writer burden from caregiving, and care-
giver distress were significantly re-
Catherine Arnold, Big Bend comrn- duced.
munity relations coordinator for Family caregivers are central to
ffJii.ifU (~U CUiitv t JnJUt Ant a h -


for our bunker. We did this every
day.
"Then at night, we'd serve guard
duty on rotation, depending how
many soldiers were in the unit,"
said Hill. "If we were attacked at
night, we'd fight all night.
"Then in the morning, we'd tear
the bunkers down and any of the
containers of the C-rations we ate,
we had to bury them, otherwise the
enemy would use them against us"
said Hill.
On Nov. 6, 1968, Hill was
wounded, a time he recalls with
great clarity.
"It was a head wound and seeing
all the blood is what scares you,"
he said. "We had just rotated and
the soldier that took the position
that I had just been moved from,
took a direct hit and was killed and
a few others were injured," said
Hill.
He added that his wound was not
that severe. "It was shrapnel from
an artillery round that struck me in,
the head."
He was out of service for a few
days and then returned to the field.
He was later promoted to SGT.
and was awarded several medals.
Hill's medals included the Air
Borne Wings, the Rifleman, two
Viet Nam Service Medals, the
Bronze Star, the Traveling Air
Medal and the Purple Heart.
Overall, Hill served the Army for
two years, one of which was in
Viet Nam. "I wanted to stay
longer, but I was afraid that they
would send me back to the Air
Borne Infantry again," said Hill.
"At night, the sky was your roof. It
was monsoon season and always


je iierson tUUIILnJy, IreporUs t iat a ire-
cent study by the University of
South Florida shows that caregivers
of cancer patients dying at home
significantly benefited from suppor-
tive educational sessions.
In these sessions, Hospice nurses
taught the caregivers how to cope
with distressing patient symptoms.
The study was published online
Dec. 2 in "Cancer," the journal of
the American Cancer Society, and
will appear in January's printed is-
sue.
"It was rewarding to read that the
patient and caregiver education and
support provided by Big Bend Hos-
pice nurses and counselors has been
found to be significantly beneficial
for caregivers of patients with can-
cer," said Jefferson County team
manager Jan Lee, RN.
Earlier studies have shown highly
stressed family caregivers are at
high risk for depression, health
problems and increased death rates.
Susan McMillan, PhD, RN. lead
author for the latest study, found


end-of-life care because they offer
emotional support, help with activi-
ties of daily living and medications,
and communicate with health care
professionals about the patient's
condition.
Yet, caregivers, many of whom
are elderly spouses with their own
health problems, may experience
significant strain and anxiety, from
taking care of seriously ill patients,
Dr. Millan said.
"In today's healthcare system, pa-
tients simply don't have the option
of being hospitalized for long peri-
ods, including at the end of life,"
she said.
"And, most patients tell you they
want to be able to die comfortably at
home in their own beds.
"But, that can only happen if we
adequately prepare family members
to provide extensive care for their
loved ones at home," she concluded.
Arnold is available locally to answer
any questions residents may have
about this and other issues related to
Hospice and the services offered.
She can be reached at 566-7491.



Advertising

With The

Monticello News

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For You.!!


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ATTENTION

To better serve our valued customers,
Madison Employment Connections will have a new address
effective Monday, January 30, 2006. You may visit us at
200 West Base Street, Madison 2nd Floor (Wachovia Bank Bldg.)

For ll*f yor eployentneesvsitMaiso Eplyen Cnncions


Job Seeker Service
Career counseling skill & skill level assessment
Job search & placement assistance
Use of computers with. internet access/faxes, resource
room, copiers, phones
Workshop for interviewing & resume writing
Veterans services and benefits
Information on unemployment programs, claims fil-
ing, job openings, insurance, labor market, job open-
ings

Youth Services
Objectives assessment
Individual service strategies and planning
Paid/unpaid work experience
Comprehensive guidance and counseling
Occupational skills training
Follow-up services for 12 months


'W
-Works


Employer Services
* Easy posting of job openings on Employ Florida
Marketplace
* Access to worker profiles, resumes
* Recruitment assistance
* Job fairs
* Information on employer prevailing wages, unem-
ployment
* OJT, skills upgrading and retraining
* HR consulting services (skills assessment for employ-
ees, job description preparation)
* Rapid response service to avoid dislocation


O'\.


} EmlovCment
CCONiECTIONS
solutions for you


Addtioalservice*S S S .smy eaaiSl o toeautsadyuhSh ulfy o oeinformtion plese
cal 85) 73965 TY(80)97-95


Ned Hill Serves As VFW


Post 251 Commander


HILL

raining," he said. "You'd sleep in
the rain and wake up soaked. When
we'd stop in the evenings, we'd
wring out our socks, and treat or
feet because they were raw.
"All that I've seen over there, and.
all I had to endure, that's when you
know that there is a God and you
know that you have survived.
Hill has been a charter member of
the VFW Post 251 since it first be-
gan a few years ago and he will
serve as acting commander of the
post until the elections in May.
"I work seven days a week and
between my job and the church ac-
tivities, I'd really have to rework
my schedule to be the
commander," said Hill. "There's a
lot of work involved there, a lot of
deadlines to be met, and a lot to do,
so at this point, I don't know if I
could accept the post, were I
elected.


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