Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00164
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: January 20, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00164
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text

LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
- -- _-I -f _* orl. 1


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Published Wednesdays & Fridays


:SVILLE, FL,. .37"htl

Organ Donation
Campaign
Set At HMS

Story,, Page 7


ews


FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 2006


Safety Team Gets



$614,000 For Road



Widening Project


.





MEMBERS of the Community Traffic Safety the $1.5 million project. The team was in-
Team gather at the Drifton-Aucilla Road on strumental in securing the $614,000 for the
Tuesday to celebrate the near completion of widening of the roads. (News Photo)


Humane Society Fundraiser

Needs Volunteers, Donations


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Humane Society is seeking -
volunteers and donations for its
"Bless the Beast," fundraiser 6
p.m., Feb. 18, at the Opera House.
In the past, the event was held
every two years. Because of its
popularity, the Society decided to
hold the event annually.
While formally known as the
"Bless the" Beast Feast," Society
President Caroline Carswell ex-
plained that this year heavy hors d'
oeuvres will be served rather than a
complete meal.
"This way, we can accommodate
some 250 people, as opposed to the
158 accommodated at the feast,"
she said.


A cash bar will be available, as
well as entertainment, live auction
and silent auction raffles and
door prizes.
Donations for both auctions and
door prizes continue to be sought.

Ticket Cost
is $25 Each

In addition, "We're going to need
volunteers for food preparations,
set up, clean up, and accumulating
both door prizes anid auction
items," Carswell explained.
Entertainers and an auctioneer
are also needed for the event.
Tickets are now being sold for
the event, set for 6 p.m., Feb. 18,
at the Opera House.


The live auction will begin at
7:30 p.m., at which time, the silent
auction will cease.
There are 250 tickets available
and the cost is $25 each. Also
available are tickets for two horses
to be raffled.
The horses include Bella, a Chest-
nut 15-hand Quarter horse mare
and Bo, a Chestnut 17-hand Quar-
ter horse gelding, which were do-
nated by Mercer and Katie
Farington.
The tickets for the horse raffles
are $5 each, 5 for $20 or 30 for
$100, and will be sold at the event.
The proposed menu for the event
includes; pork or beef tenderloin on
a roll, shrimp and artichoke mari-
nade, grouper and oysters, cheese
rings and crackers, brochette, spin-
(See Fundraiser Page 12)


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Lt. Governor Toni Jennings will
be the guest speaker at a press con-
ference, 10 a.m. Wednesday at Jef-
ferson Elementary School, focusing
on the mentoring effort.
Mayor Julie Conley explains that a
partnership between the Florida
League of Cities and the Florida
Mentoring Program has been
formed as part of the Focus on
Achievement and Program for
Struggling Schools.
Conley said eight counties were
involved in the program with May-
ors requested by Gov. Bush to round
up 50 volunteer mentors.
This program is designed to pick
up the slack which took place when
the grant funding for the Mentoring
Program recently ran out.
Conley said that she expects a
number of former mentors to con-
tinue in the process, and has re-
ceived a number of additional
volunteers.
Among these: Jefferson County
Ministerial Conference has offered
18 mentors; Department of Highway
Safety in Tallahassee, 6 mentors,
Kiwanians and Rotarians will offer
an undetermined number of mentors
as well as a group of Jefferson


County High School students.
Conley said she planned to request
City employees to help support the
effort as well.
Edna Henry, is the Mentor Coor-


dinator at JES whose function is to
be sure that students are ready for
mentors and that the mentors know
in which area the student, needs
help.


Two Men Charged

In Shooting Incident


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

City police on Monday arrested
two county men who allegedly were
involved in a shooting incident in
the southeast part of town.
Arrested on charges of carrying
concealed firearms were Nathan
Williams, 21, and Michael Crumitie,
24.
According to Sgt. Roger Murphy
of the Monticello Police Department
(MPD), officers were dispatched to
King and First streets Monday eve-
ning following a report that groups
of people were fighting in the area.
Murphy said gunshots rang out
just as Sgt. Tim Hightower arrived
on the scene.
"There were approximately be-
tween 200 and 300 pedestrians *in
the immediate area and several peo-
ple were involved in altercations,"


Murphy said. "Vehicular traffic in
the immediate area was also heavy.
Sergeant Hightower radioed for as-
sistance and began disbursing peo-
ple."
Murphy said several off-duty city
police responded to the call, as did
three Sheriffs deputies. He said the
officers eventually restored order
and in the process got a partial de-
scription of the vehicle driven by the
individuals believed involved in the
firing of the weapons.
Officers subsequently traveled to
the RAJ convenience store on East
Washington Street in response to a
report that a large crowd was con-
gregating there and trouble was
brewing.
Arriving on the scene, Lt. Fred
Mosley spotted a vehicle that
matched the earlier description
quickly driving off.
(See Shooting Incident Page 2)


Total Cost is

$1.5 Million

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Score another success for the
Community Traffic Safety Team
(CTST) -- a group dedicated to the
improvement of traffic safety prob-
lems in the community.
On Tuesday afternoon, members
of the group met briefly near the en-
trance of the Drifton-Aucilla High-
way at US 19 South to celebrate
their latest accomplishment.
This was the $614,000 the CTST
got the Department of Transporta-
tion (DOT) to allocate for the wid-
ening of the Drifton-Aucilla
Highway, considered one of the sev-
eral dangerous roads in the county
because of its narrowness.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Local American Cancer Society
volunteers have scheduled an
"Around the World in 18 Hours"
Relay For Life 2006 Kickoff 6:15
p.m. Thursday, Jan. 26, at the Opera
House.
Citizens are encouraged to'arrive at
5:30 p.m. for a fundraiser dinner
sponsored by the Elizabeth Baptist
Church Relay Team to benefit the
Relay For Life.
Dinners will be available for $7
each.
Attendees are invited to learn
more about becoming involved in
the overnight team fundraising
event, honor local cancer survivors,
meet the Relay Steering Committee,
enjoy home cooked food, and regis-
ter to win special prizes.


The CTST project widened the
road from 18 to 22 feet, allowing for
extra margin of safety when vehi-
cles -- particularly school buses --
passed each other on the road.
Added to the $972,000 that the
Department of Transportation
(DOT) gave the county for the re-
surfacing of the road, the CTST pro-
ject brought the total cost of
Drifton-Aucilla Highway improve-
ments to $1.5 million.
On Tuesday, CTST Chairman
Ken Sasser lauded the group's latest
accomplishment and urged contin-
ued commitment to the group's goal
of eliminating traffic safety hazards.
He also praised former Commis-
sioner Gene Cooksey, a founding
member of the CTST and its long-
time chairman.
Started by the DOT in the mid
1990s, traffic safety teams provided
communities with a means of identi-
fying and addressing local traffic
safety problems without having to


Teams are encouraged to bring
their $100 registration fee to the
event.
"We're calling on all cancer survi-
vors, community leaders, Relay
teams, sponsors, and hard workers
to participate in the Kickoff," says
Event Co-Chair Juanice Hagan.

Kickoff To
Be Jan. 26

"Teams commit to raising a mini-
mum of $1,000 and to have one per-
son walking the track at all times,
recognizing the fact that cancer
never sleeps."
This year the Relay theme is
"Around the World in 18 Hours,"
and each team will be asked to rep-
resent a different country. The 21
teams that have already signed up
for the event will have the first


COUNTY OFFICIALS and others involved in tails of
the restructuring of the former Grants De- morning.
apartment prepare to work out the last de-


go through the usual bureaucratic
rigmarole.
Safety teams, in other words,
functioned as tools that communities
could utilize to expedite the im-
provement of roads, the construction
of pedestrian overpasses, or the in-
stallation of sidewalks, among other
things.
The one stipulation, per the DOT,
was that the selected projects be do-
able, short-term and not unduly
costly.
The local group was established in
early 1998, thanks in great part to
Cooksey. Ironically, the impetus for
the formation of the group was the
community's desire to press the
DOT to construct a bypass around
the city -- an effort still being pur-
sued by other groups in the commu-
nity.
It quickly became evident to the
CTST, however, that the pursuit of a
bypass -was outside its specific pa-
(See Road Widening Page 12)


choice of country and campsite.
This will be Jefferson County's
seventh event.
The Relay is an 18 hour team
event where participants walk
around the track relay style and
camp out overnight.
Teams of cancer-fighting enthusi-
asts will gather at the Jefferson
County High School track on April
21 and 22 to show their support in
fighting this disease.
All are encouraged to attend the
opening, Luminaria, and awards
ceremonies, as well as play the
games, eat the food, and enjoy the
entertainment.
The event this year should prove
to be the grandest Relay yet.
Across the country the American
Cancer Society seeks to fulfill its
mission to save lives and diminish
suffering from cancer through
(See Relay For Life Page 12)


I M*M


the reorganization on Tuesday
See Story, page 12. (News Photo)


Retirement
Plan Needs
Attention

Editorial, Page 4


C


FFriday Morning





Montic


138TH YEAR NO.06, 50 CENTS


County Relay For Life


Scheduled April 21-22


Lt. Gov. Jennings To Speak

At JES Press Conference


0% a VoLge


ACA, JCHS
Athletes Named
Big Bend Leaders

Story, Page 10
I--M M


Grants Office
Restructuring
Details Completed

Story, Page 12







PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 20, 2006































KELANI KING enjoys a king size dill pickle during the MLK
Celebration at the Recreation Park. (News Photo)


Road Widening Project
.:..,:-










Road Widening Project


(Continued From Page 1)
rameters, giving the long-term and
costly nature of a bypass.
With that initial setback, the CTST
learned to curtail its expectations
and to work within the confines of
its limitation. As a consequence, the
group has been able to identify and
correct several traffic safety prob-
lems through the years.

Among its more notable accom-
plishments, the CTST got the DOT
to contribute $500,000 for the strip-
ing of county roads a few years
back.
More recently, the group was re-
sponsible for the DOT allocating
more than $200,000 for the side-
walk extension project on W. Wash-
ington Street.
Other less costly but no less sig-
nificant accomplishment include the
reconfiguration of parking spaces


around the downtown district, the
acquisition of numerous radar units
for the city and county law enforce-
ment agencies, and the purchase of a
speed-monitoring trailer to raise mo-
torist awareness of speed limits:

The group also routinely holds
public awareness campaigns to edu-
cate the drivers of the importance of
wearing seat belts and of using
child-restraints seats.

Members of the group include
Mayor Julie Conley, City Clerk
Emily Anderson, Police Chief
David Frisby and County Commis-
sioner Junior Tuten.

Quinton Williams, with the DOT,
has now replaced Fred Buchanan as
CTST coordinator. Meaning Wil-
liams is the go-between in all trans-
actions between the team 'and the
state agency.


Amnesty Annexation

is Allowed To Expire


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The city's amnesty annexation
program quietly expired last Friday.
It happened because the City
Council decided not to extend the
program another six months.
During its more than year of exis-
tence, the program annexed 100.08
acres into the city. But its failure to
attract the targeted subdivisions,
combined with cost considerations,
prompted city officials to let it lapse.
It was always the expressed hope
of city officials -- including Coun-
cilman Brian Hayes, the program's
author -- that the program would
draw in areas such as Montivilla and
Holly Hills.
Even so, the program attracted a
fair number of voluntary annexa-
tions. But last week, City Clerk
Emily Anderson pointed out that the
program was also costing the city in
increased newspaper advertise-
ments.


It was the council's consensus that
the program had more or less ac-
complished what it had set out to do
and that it was time to let it rest.
Implemented Oct. 15, 2004, the
program offered charge-free an-
nexations to willing property owners
for an initial six-month period.
Meaning that the city would
waive all applicant fees for filing,
legal advertisements and recording.
All that the applicant was required
to produce was proof of ownership
or proof of authority to sign the an-
nexation petition.
Applicants also had to provide a
metes and bounds description of the
property. And on occasions, a sur-
vey might be required, if the proper-
ties boundaries weren't readily
determined.
The property being volunteered
for annexation also had to be con-
tiguous with the city's boundaries.
The program was extended at least
twice before being allowed to
expire.


Shooting Incident Ends in Arrest


(Continued From Page .1)
"Lt. Mosley followed the car,
which circled the block," Murphy
said. "The vehicle then turned onto
the bicycle trail being constructed
and began traveling on the bike
trail."
When officers stopped the vehicle


and conducted a search of it and its
four occupants, they found "a 9 mm
semiautomatic handgun and a .38
revolver, fully loaded ... along with
several boxes of ammunition," Mur-
phy said.
He said Williams and Crumitie
likely will face additional charges.


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Why I Switched


to Republican
I consider myself a political moderate. I do not
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There are many beliefs and positions in the
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however, get to disagree. The Republicans in
Jefferson County are willing and happy to argue
any position you like. They are not hobbled by a
rigid ideology, you do not have to believe the
entire party line in order to be accepted. I switched
to the Republican party in part, to be able to
express my views on any issue.
I am pleased to be part of a local party that can
come together to try to make this community a
better place. There is a atmosphere of cooperation
and good will and compromise. This is the best
and most effective political process. I have
confidence in this party.
I lost confidence in the Democratic party during
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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON
COMCAST CABLE TELEVISION
The Monticello City Council will hold a public hearing
on Comcast Cable rates and services. The public hearing
will be held at the regular City Council meeting
scheduled for February 7, 2006 at 7:00 p.m. at City Hall,
245 S. Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida. For more
information, please contact City Clerk Emily Anderson at
342-0153.











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-5


JUDGE BOBBY PLANES left, Maythe
McCloud, and Sheriff David Hobbs pause a


moment during activities Monday, at I
Recreation Park, to pose for our camera.






..... .1


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0.. J


LEVERNNE WILSON, JR. mans the barbecue
grill as he sprays a slab of ribs with his spe-



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: :+ :"4,


cial sauce, at the Recreation Park events
Monday afternoon.


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FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The first of the recently planned
monthly haunted tours and ghost
hunts offered by members of the
Big Bend Ghost Trackers (BBGT)
takes place 7 p.m. Saturday, begin-
ning in front of the Chamber of
Commerce.
Space is still available for the
events. The haunted tour and ghost
hunt are offered by reservation
only.
To make a reservation or for fur-
ther information call BBGT Foun-
der Betty Davis at 562-2516.
The tour and hunt will last ap-
proximately 90 minutes each, and
the cost is $10 per person, for each
event.
Members of BBGT will not be in
period dress, but will however lead
the tour around town to the many


a1


haunted destinations by lantern
light.
Immediately following the tour,
the ghost hunt will be conducted in'
the old 1827 Cemetery.
Participants are urged to bring
comfortable walking shoes, plenty
of film, flashlights, and extra bat-
teries.


Please do not encourage
Florida's wildlife to do
things that are not
natural. Help keep
our wildlife safe. 0. 2


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 20, 2006 PAGE 3


Altrusa Accepting Donations


For Junk, Treasure Sale


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


The 4-H County Council Adopt-
A-Road cleanup will get underway
9 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 28, on Lake
Road.
4-H Council members will pick up
trash along the in keeping with the
responsibility of adopting the road
and keeping it free of trash.
Members need to be at the Exten-
sion Office by 8:45 a.m. and will
travel to the site as a group.
Other 4-H members are invited to
participate in the cleanup.


MLK Committee

r Plans Meeting

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


The MLK Center Committee will
meet 7 p.m. on Jan. 30 at the Memo-
rial MB Church in Monticello


D


DESTINY HUGGINS, left, and Jeremiah Nor- tion Park M
ton are shown with their pet at the Recrea- Celebration ever



Wear Red Fridays;


Support Our Troops


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Nan Baughman, local representa-
tive for Red Fridays, believes
strongly in the importance of sup-
porting our military troops.
Towards this end, the idea of
wearing red on Fridays was born.
Americans who support our troops
were formerly called the "silent ma-
jority."
They are no longer silent, but are
voicing their love for God, country,
and home in record breaking num-
bers.
They are not organized, boisterous,
or overbearing.
They get no liberal media cover-
age on TV to reflect their message
or their opinion.
Many Americans simply want to
recognize that the vast majority of
America supports our troops.
Their idea of showing solidarity
and support for our troops with dig-
nity and respect starts with wearing
red every Friday until all the troop
come home, sending a deafening
message that, 'Every red blooded
American who supports our men
and women afar, will wear some-
thing red'.
By word of mouth, and the press,
let's make the United States, on
every Friday, a sea of red, much like
a football game in the bleachers.
If every one of us who loves our
country will share this with acquain-


tances, co-workers, friends, and
family, it will not be long before the
USA is covered in red and it will let
our troops know the once "silent
majority" is on their side more than
ever.
The first thing a soldier, airman,
seaman says when asked "What can
we do to make things better for


onday during the
its. (News Photos)


you?' is "We need your si
your prayers."


a The community is invited to at-
tend and get involved.
I Discussion of the funding of the
MLK Recreation and Community
Center at 1201 First Street will be
one of the topics discussed.
MLK These meetings are held monthly
on the last Monday.
Contact Charles J. Parrish, chair-
man of the board and president of
support and the committee at 997-3760 for ad-
ditional information.


Let's get the word out and lead
with class and dignity, by example;
and wear red every Friday
Contact Baughman at 997-3825
with the names of county military
personnel as she is attempting to
make a local register and encour,
ages the community's help by re-
sponding to this call.
Her oldest son is serving in Iraq
and she is in contact with military
families with kin also in war zone
areas.


tcreawT SAVINGS

New entury av .BONDS
of SSavingm.SOD


Altrusa will hold its annual Junk
and Treasure Sale beginning 8 a.m.,
Saturday, Feb. 4, at the Opera
House.
Donations are coming in daily,
and there is still time to bring items
to the Opera House for the sale.
Donations will be accepted
through Wed, Feb. 1, and items too
large to be dropped off will be
picked up.
To arrange for pickup, call the
Opera House between 10 a.m. and 4
p.m., Monday through Friday at
997-4242.
the The club is looking for clothing,
household goods, furniture, craft
items, videos, CDs and the like.
The sales floor will occupy the en-
tire downstairs reception area of the
Opera House, with merchandise
separated into categories for shop-
peing convenience.
Departments will include a Fash-
ion Boutique featuring adult cloth-
ing and accessories, an Infants and


: 4-H Council

^ To Clean

. Adopted Road

DEBBIE SNAPP
,;2 Staff Writer


Kids department with clothing, toys,
and other items for children.
Furniture and electronics will be
found in the Bed and Bath and
Household Shop.
The Books, Crafts, and Collecti-
bles Shop will abound with Christ-
mas decorations, decorative glass
and -other items such as games,
books and videos.
The Lawn, Garden and Outdoor
Shop will have items ranging from
used hand tools to flower pots and
sporting goods.
Toasters, mixing bowls and table-
ware are among the many items that
will be found in the Kitchen and
Appliance Shop.
An anonymous donor sent sev-
eral cartons of designer clothing, in-
cluding leather jackets, silk
kimonos, evening wear, skirts, jack-
ets, blouses, and casual wear.
All of the above items are size 4
or smaller, but are classic styles,
practically new, and some were
never worn.
Included in the lot is a wedding
gown, valued at more than $3,000,



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The same source will donate an-
other shipment of clothing in sizes
8-10.
Since purses and scarves and ac-
cessories fit all sizes, there is some-
thing for every fashion minded lady.
Altrusa expects a good turnout at
the sale. Treasurer Jan Rickey prom-
ises plenty of cashiers on hand for
speedy checkout.
All proceeds from the sale will
benefit local programs and orgnaiza-
tions, including the Jefferson Senior
Center, County Library, and Opera
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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 20, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

SRAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Retirement Plan


Needs Attention


To most Americans, saving money
for retirement is a challenge equal to
quitting smoking or loosing weight.
A recent survey asked respondents
what one goal is the hardest for peo-
ple to accomplish. "Quitting smok-
ing" narrowly edged out "saving for
retirement" 32 percentversus 31
percent.
"Losing weight" was a strong
third, cited by 25 percent. Regard-
less of demographics, respondents"
chose those three goals as the hard-
est to achieve, although not always
in the same order.
For baby boomers and women,
stopping smoking and saving for re-
tirement tied as their No. 1 chal-
lenges at 31 percent.
For men and members of Genera-
tion X (born from 1965 to 1978),
quitting smoking edged out saving
for retirement as their toughest chal-
lenge.
Respondents living in the West
rated saving for retirement as the
toughest, Southerners said losing
weight was the hardest and those
from the Midwest and Northeast
cited quitting smoking as their No. 1
challenge.
Regardless of which target respon-
dents named, almost half 44 per-
cent said the most effective first
step to achieving success is setting a
goal or having a plan.


And 29 percent said getting advice
from a professional would be the
best first step.
These findings, in the fifth annual
"Retirement Reality Check" survey
by Allstate, suggest that Americans
might want o6 approach managing
their fiscal health just as they would
approach managing their physical
well-being.
For example, effective weight loss
programs often set short-term goals
that are not overwhelming.
Similarly, setting a goal to set aside
a manageable percentage of your in-
come is easier to accomplish than
focusing on a huge long-term sum.
And just as some dieters keep a
written record of what they eat to
better track calories, a "spending di-
ary" can help people track weekly
expenses as a first step toward get-
ting control over finances.
People trying to stop smoking of-
ten keep cigarettes out of the house
or limit the number of cigarettes
they will smoke in one day.
Similarly, people might leave
credit cards at home or use only a
card that requires them to pay off
the total balance each month.
And for those who cannot get or
stay on track by themselves, profes-
sional help can provide the direction
and encouragement to help individu-
als lose the pounds, stop smoking
and set up an effective savings plan.


Moral Reasoning Beats

Emotional Reactions


BY REX M. ROGERS
Columnist


America's War on Terrorism was
rightly initiated as an appropriate
national response to the 9/11
attacks. Not to have responded mili-
tarily to these aggressions would
have been to grant international ter-
rorism a free hand and would have
greatly undermined American credi-
bility and therefore leadership and
security in the world. So we went to
war.
The questions suggested by this
military action include, how often
must one respond? What does the
concept of proportionality seem to
advise regarding the response?
When is enough, enough?
The Taliban has apparently been
destroyed. Afghanistan is trying to
rebuild. Known or suspected terror-
ists have been captured. But terror-
ism continues with bombings in
Spain, England, and Iraq and with
periodic threats against America.
Other countries, like Iran or North
Korea, remain dangerous threats to
world order and American well-
being, whether or not they are actu-


ally harboring future terrorists.
Then there is the War in Ir
where the Iraqi regime has been to
pled, but Americans are still
harm's way and still dying. Wheth
this preemptive war is a justifiab
extension of the War on Terrorist
and if so whether it is being pros
cuted properly, remains an open d
bate.
No biblical chapter provides i
easy answer to the dilemma of ho
to win the War on Terrorism or ho
to get out of Iraq. The guidance or
draws from Scripture on complex
political and international issues lik
this is in the form of principles, the
God leaves it to us to apply them.
That's why it's no, mystery tha
even carefully thinking religious
people express widely divergent
views of the war. Our task is not t
engage in name calling, but to pon
der, to place our lasting value
alongside today's information, to tr
to think God's thoughts after him. I
the end, moral reasoning is always
better than emotional reaction.
(Rex M. Rogers, a syndicate,
newspaper columnist and president
of Cornerstone University, Grana
Rapids, Mich.)


Letters to the Editor Welcomed
500 Words or Less

Letters must be signed
and include
phone number of writer


From Our Photo File


PREPARING'to tour area farms, in honor of
Farm City Week, in Feb., 1990, some 25
citizens gathered in the parking lot of Jef-


person Square. From
Larry Halsey, Clifford
(News Photo)


left, John Murphy,
Brown, Ann Mullis.


Opinion & Comment


Short Takes & Other Notions


BY MERRY ANN FRISBY


I have Sirius satellite radio in my
pick up truck, and I love it. I can
turn to blues, news, or the BBC. The
signal does not fade on my trips to
Jacksonville.
All together it is a technical won-
der, and a source of information and
pleasure. I listen to it the entire time
I drive. John and Eleanor Howkins
got such a radio as a Christmas pre-
sent, and report that they are enjoy,-
ing it too.
As I was listening to a blues sta-
tion, I was reflecting on changing
values. I listened to some stations
that play old music. Walter Trout
sang "Devil In Nylon Hose" and El-
vis Presley "...Devil In A Bluie


Dress."
Today blue dresses and nylon hose
do not rate even a nod. The pre-
sumption is that both nylon hose and
blue dresses sometime in our past,
represented some questionable
moral choices.
When one of our sons was in mid-
dle school, he decided that he
wanted to write on his jeans. We
said "OK" as long as it was with a
permanent marker and not objec-
tionable. -
He did pen the names of football
teams and rock stars on the jeans,
and we were satisfied until one day I
washed the clothes. I noticed in very
small letters, a swearing phrase writ-
ten on one knee.
I was tempted to ignore it, but
knew in my heart that bolder in-


scriptions would follow if I did
nothing. So I took the permanent
marker and wrote "Porko Dorko"
between his back pockets in large
block letters. He missed it and went
to school. His friends at school did
not miss it, and he came home en-
raged and red faced. The jeans dis-
appeared. The profanity was not
repeated.
Last week I read that Howard
Stern was paid millions of dollars to
switch his radio program to Sirius
radio. Supposedly, he has signed up
hundreds of thousands of new lis-
teners. Until last week I had never
watched or heard him. I did both,
much to my dismay. His program-
ming is total auditory and visual
vulgarity. I kept waiting for any re-
deeming value, there was none. We


are way beyond the "Devil In Nylon
Hose."
This all made me appreciate all the
-fine Monticellans who dress and act
as ladies and gentlemen. You know
when you see the finely dressed
David Ward or Davis Revell, that
their dress reflects their mannered
presentations. Not that clothes make
the man, but they do represent the
respect that they bear for their com-
munity and themselves.
I appreciate my finely dressed
lady friends who ignore my faults.
Monticellans know that their fellow
citizens go out of their way to be
helpful and attentive.
So to all the Sadie Paffords and
Barbara Hughes, Gary Wrights and
Laz Alemans; thank you. To you
Howard Stern, Porko Dorko!


One Person Makes Difference


Can the actions of one person campaign
truly make a difference in the A Diffen
world? "We f
According to a recent survey on' viduals
volunteerism sponsored by Kiwanig through
International, 86 percent of Ameri- than jus
cans say any one person can indeed said Ste
aq make a difference. wanis Ir
p- The survey results support Ki- "Whe
wanis International's contention that hour a
le in a year marred by numerous natu- steering
ral disasters, the need for hands-on others."
community service and volunteering When
e-
e- is more essential than ever. nity ser
Kiwanis, a global organization of ference,
volunteers dedicated to changing the surveyed
world one child and one community ties sucl
w at a time, sponsored the survey in unteerin
ne conjunction with the launch of its or partic
x public service announcement (PSA) .nity eve
ke


n Postpone
is
as "Youth is wasted on the young," out sunb
to George Bernard Shaw once said. Mo
True or not, a youthful appearance ages, so
I-
is certainly more cherished among daily ba:
Is
people who are...well, less young, ture wrin
y Though fashion magazines and Don
makeover shows imply that the all the m
Fountain of Youth is actually a sy- to early
d ringe filled with Botox, there are the moul
many ways to defy the aging proc- Dri
d ess without medical intervention, prevents
Signs of aging are not limited to Get
the over-30 set. In fact, it is the hab- people a
its that are established in adoles- a lot. Fr
cence that determine how quickly a Eat
person ages. to be dil
And the sooner good habits are ac- las Perri
quired, the more likely an age reve- expert c
lation down the road will elicit diet and
gasps of admiration. Who man or between
woman wouldn't like to hear some- too man
one say, "Really?! You're 40? You having
must be kidding you can't be more going sk
than 31 !" Here's how to get started. vegetable
Avoid the sun. No one, male or and who
female, should leave the house with-" Eat


;n entitled, "One Can Make
rence."
found that 61 percent of indi-
would, prefer .to give time
volunteer activities rather
t donate money to a cause,"
eve Siemens, president, Ki-
iternational.
ether you can contribute an
week or once a year, volun-
is a great way to help

asked, what type of commu-
vice makes the biggest dif-
over two-thirds of those
d said that hands-on activi-
h as donating supplies, vol-
g with a local service club
ipating in the local commu-
nts have a bigger influence



Signs
block of at least SPF 15.
isturize. Skin dries out as it
moisturizing your face on a,
sis will help prevent prema-
ikles and fine lines.
n't smoke. At all. It leeches
moisture from skin and leads
wrinkling, especially around
th.
nk lots of water. Hydration
the shriveled look.
lots of sleep. Sleep-deprived
re cranky people who frown
owning leads to wrinkles.
sensibly. This doesn't have
fficult. According to Nicho-
icone, M.D., an author and
on the connection between
aging, there's a direct link
eating too much sugar and
.y highly refined foods and
prematurely wrinkled, sag-
in. Stick to lots of fruits,
les, low-fat or lean protein
ole grains.
reasonably. Portion control


than giving money.
The survey also found that nearly
75 percent of respondents are moti-
vated to volunteer time when they
believe it will have a meaningful
impact on their community.
"We believe in the power of the
individual to impact children's lives
and make a difference in the world,"
said Siemens.
"Getting involved in meaningful
service projects makes the world a
better place for children across the
globe."
The "One Can Make A
Difference" campaign inspires indi-
viduals to action by illustrating how
one person's kindness is enough to
make a significant impact on entire



Of Age
is a magic piece of the anti-aging
puzzle, since excess weight can add
years to your face.
Restaurant servings and .oversized
dinner plates have tripled portion
expectations. Fight back by serving
meals on dessert/appetizer plates;
the meat portion should be about the
size of a deck of cards, the pasta or
rice about the size of a tennis ball.
Check the Internet for such nug-
gets of information as portion
equivalents (e.g., a CD-sized bagel
equals a full day's supply of
grains!).

Get moving. The best way to
stave off aging is to keep fit and
flexible. Select a fitness regimen.
that's easy to stick to regardless of
climate.
Home exercise equipment is a
sound investment for those who are
committed to staying fit. Some
equipment is even specifically de-


communities. It focuses on one key
theme: Impacting a child's life today
can change the world tomorrow.
Through guidance and example,
the organization works to develop
future generations of leaders with its
entire family and sponsored organi-
zations, including: Key Club, Circle
K, Aktion Club, Builders Club, K-
Kids, Key Leader and Kiwanis Jun-
ior.
Nearly 600,000 members of the
Kiwanis family help to serve chil-
dren and communities worldwide in
96 countries and geographic areas.
Each year, members dedicate 19
million volunteer hours and invest
over US$100 million to strengthen
communities and make a better
world for children.


signed for the home. The new T-
series treadmills from Life Fitness,
for example, offer user-adjustable
shock absorption to mimic running
on various surfaces, and their design
is as sleek as an Italian leather sofa,
so they can reside in the den without
disturbing the feng shui.

And speaking of feng shui, the fi-
nal key to aging gracefully is a sense
of serenity.
Finding a spiritual center or place
of peace will reduce stress and fill
the half-full glass overflowing.
While yoga, meditation and other
Eastern philosophies are well-
known for their calming benefits, it's
also easy to find peace through sim-
ple actions such as a walk in the
park, a warm bath or just sitting and
staring out the window.
Blood pressure slows, brows un-
furrow and aging becomes some-
thing that happens to other people.


4.4












Transportation Board

"Discusses Funding Cuts
" Jefferson County Disadvantaged ing Medicaid patients to doctors ap-
Transportation Board met Jan 12, at pointments was 15 percent short of
the Emergency Management Office, meeting the need.
and discussed long term plans to To cover the shortfall, the Big
sustain the shuttle service in Monti- Bend Transit Coordinator dipped
, cello, drastically into its own capital re-
A committee was formed to serves to continue to provide the
search and explore ideas to maintain medical transportation.
V the shuttle service, should funding This year AHCA has reduced
from the North Florida Workforce Medicaid transportation for the
,j Development Board (NFWDB) be coming year by an additional 12
cut. percent.
The Board approved an additional This means that on average, six
shuttle stop on Railroad Street, just Medicaid patients each day will not
north of East Washington. be able to attend scheduled doctor's
It was noted that many services in appointments.
the County are impacted by State The Board considers one of its
agency decision making, and budget major accomplishments to be the
cuts contribute to the lack of serv- implementation of the Shuttle Serv-
ices in the community. ice.
Gaps in service are becoming With that in mind, the Board rec-
more evident in the area of transpor- ognized Mike Deming, Executive
station, specifically medical transpor- Director of the North Florida
station. Workforce Development Board
Decisions by the State Agency for with a plaque in recognition of the
Health Care Administration generous support for the project.
(AHCA) have impacted Medicaid The Jefferson County Transporta-
transportation, tion Disadvantaged Board Meets
Examples cited include: Last year, next 10 a.m., April 13 at the Emer-
the monthly allocation for transport- agency Management Office.


4


SKIP


Skip Named

Pet Of Week
'Skip' has been named adoptable
canine Pet of the Week by the Hu-
mane Society.
Skip is a four month-old gold,
brown male Golden Retriever/Ger-
... man Shephard mix.
He is neutered and all vaccina-
tions are up to date.
Shelter Caretaker Cheryl Bautista
describes him as being a very sweet
and loving animal who is also very
playful.
He gets along very well with chil-
dren and adults, other dogs and
cats, once he gets to know them.
Skip loves to play tug of war,
chase a Frisbee, and enjoys nuzzles
* and long belly rubs.
To adopt Skip or any of the other
many loving animals at the shelter
call 342-0244.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 20, 2006 PAGE 5


Junior Leaders Learn

Of Business Careers


DANNY MONROE, chairman of the Jefferson County Trans-
portation Disadvantaged Board presents Mike Deming, left,
with a plaque of recognition of the north Florida Workforce
Development Board's support of the Monticello Shuttle.



Girl Scouts Taking


Cookie Orders


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Local Girl Scout troops are taking
cookie orders for their annual
cookie sale.
The sale is designed to provide
Girl Scouts an opportunity to earn
money for program activities, spe-
cial events and projects, and for pur-
chasing and maintaining equipment
and facilities.
Likewise it teaches the girls the
basics of business and customer re-
lations, since repeat customers equal
more sales.
The cookies sell for $3 a box and
can be purchased from any active
Girl Scout.
Cookies can also be ordered by
contacting Troop leaders Tammy
Bowling at 997-8624 or Lisa Star-
ling at 997-8684.
Plans call for cookie booths to be
set up around town at a few local


businesses Feb. 16 t gh March 5


"This is just an approximate date
line so, keep a watch out for the
girls to be selling," says Cookie Co-
ordinator Kathy Bueschel.
A few new cookies have been
added to this year's selection to in-
clude, Cafe Cookies.
This gourmet style cookie is cara-
melized with brown sugar and is a
crisp cookie. With a hint of cinna-
mon spice, it works well with a
warm beverage.
Reduced fat Lemon Coolers con-
tain bite sized bursts of cool lemon
flavor in crisp, vanilla cookies and
zesty lemon chips with a covering of
powdered sugar.
The wildly popular Tagalongs are
topped with creamy peanut butter
and covered with a chocolate coat-
ing.
Other cookie favorites coming
back again this year are the Samoas,
Trefoils, Thin Mints, Do-si-dos, and
the All Abouts..


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Junior Leadership Group met_
recently and heard presentations
from individuals representing Simp-
son Nursery, Coldwell Banker/Kelly
& Kelly Properties, Capital City
Banks, Farmers & Merchants Bank,
and Radio Shack.
Among the presenters, Fred
Beshears gave a brief history of
Simpson Nursery. He noted that the
Nursery is approaching its 104
birthday.
Most importantly he gave the stu-
dents some valuable leadership and
life skill lessons.
Bill Gunnels, community presi-
dent of Capital City Bank gave an
informative presentation on banking
and the related job market.
Goodie bags, compliments of the
Bank were appreciated by the
group.
Katrina Walton, Realtor for Kelly
& Kelly Properties held the interest
of the class as she gave a presenta-
tion of the pros and cons of a
realtor.


Betsy Gray, human resources di-
rector at Farmers & Merchants Bank
told of FMB's rich history and gave
the class valuable lessons about the
importance of proper dress, and the
interview process.
Frank Blow, owner of the Radio
Shack, presented a snapshot of the
retail business from the point of
view of the small business owner.
The next meeting of the Junior
Leadership will be on Feb. 8 at the
Chamber of Commerce.


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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 20, 2006




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Lifestyle


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 20, 2006 PAGE 7


Organ Donation Campaign


Planned At Howard Middle


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Jefferson Health Disparities
Committee is launching- an organ
donation awareness campaign 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 28 at
the Howard Middle School.
With the list of people waiting for
a lifesaving organ transplant swel-
ling to over 90,000, and 17 people
dying needlessly each day for the
lack of a heart, liver, kidney, or
other organs, the Jefferson County
Health Disparities Committee is
urging residents in the area to make
a positive decision about organ do-
nation.


As part of the Healthy Jefferson,
Healthy Hearts Campaign, Floridi-
ans living in the Big Bend Area will
have the opportunity to learn more
about organ donation during the Jan.
28 Hearts & Souls 2006 Kickoff
Event at the Howard Middle School.
The event is intended to help re-
duce health disparities related to car-
diovascular disease and diabetes
among the African American popu-
lation by increasing community
awareness and providing education
for residents.
The event will include healthy
cooking, physical activity and nutri-
tion demonstrations, and informa-
tion on cardiovascular disease, dia-
betes, and organ donation programs.


In the.African American commu-
nity, the need for organ donation has
reached crisis proportions.
While Blacks comprise 13 percent
of the US population, they represent
27 percent of individuals on the na-
tional transplant waiting list and 35
percent of patients waiting for a kid- I
ney transplant.
"Statistically, African Americans
have the best chance of being
matched for an organ transplant if
the donor is also African American.
Due to a lack of awareness and in-
formation about the necessary steps
to take to donate, the lack of avail-
able organs often means longer
waiting periods on transplant lists,
and years spent on dialysis for local
people," explained Katherine
Jeffers, public education coordinator
for LifeQuest Organ Recovery Serv-
ices in North Florida. .
One of those people is Julius Har-
rison of Monticello, who endured
dialysis for eight years before re-
ceiving a lifesaving kidney.
A tall, robust and soft-spoken
man, Harrison now looks the picture
of health but his road to health has
been long and difficult.
At 35 Harrison almost passed out
while driving. He says he had not
had his blood pressure checked in
several years but there were no
warning symptoms.
"I found out that my blood pres-
sure must have been too high for
quite a while and it almost caused
serious kidney damage.
"I spent eight years receiving kid-
ney dialysis for five hours a day
three times a week.
"My entire life changed. It cost me
my jobs and my home."
Harrison says he fought depres-
sion every day and was losing hope
for the future.
In order to qualify for a transplant
Harrison had to get his blood pres-
sure under control and keep it there.
He was finally able to do that and
after waiting about 14 months he re-
ceived a kidney transplant in 2003.
Harrison didn't experience serious
complications after the transplant
and today he's receiving training for
new employment and again feels
positive about his future.
Harrison came to speak to the Jef-
ferson Health Disparities Committee
because he wants to bring accurate
information about organ donation to
his community.
Without the person who donated
their kidney Harrison would still be
on dialysis.
He doesn't know who the donor
was but said he will always be
grateful for the gift of life that per-,
son gave him.


DREAMS COME

TRUE


With "Damn Yankees"
I made it on Broadway.
, "My kids" have big dreams, too.
Help us cure
neuromuscular diseases.

Muscular Dystrophy Association
S1-800-572-1717 www.mdausa.org


The County Farm Bureau in rural
north Florida is celebrating Jan. 29
to Feb. 4 as Food Check Out Week.
In about five weeks, Americans
will have earned enough disposable
income to pay for their food supply
for the entire year.
To mark the occasion, Jefferson
County Farm Bureau, and nine other
County Farm Bureaus surrounding
Tallahassee will donate more than
$1,000 worth of fresh and frozen
Florida produced food to the Ron-
ald McDonald House Charity in
Tallahassee, Feb. 2.
The Ronald McDonald House pro-
vides a home away from home for
families of seriously ill children re-
ceiving medical treatment in the
Tallahassee area.


The donated food will help fami-
lies staying at the House.
Food includes fruits, vegetables,
dairy products, beef, chicken, pork,
as well as other items the facility
needs in its pantry.
Stephen Monroe, president of the
Jefferson County Farm Bureau,
states that the affordable food we
enjoy is a product of a successful
food production and distribution
system, as well as America's farmers
retaining access to effective and af-
fordable crop production tools.
"We live in a great nation, and
thanks to our agriculture and mar-
keting channels we have the world's
safest and most abundant food sup-
ply," Monroe said.


Homes Of Mourning


Thurmon T. Lee
Thurmon T. "Hank" Lee, 85, of
Monticello, died January 15, 2006,
in Thomasville, Ga.
Services were held on Thursday,
January 19, at 3:00 PM, at
Monticello Presbyterian Church,
with burial at Roseland Cemetery.
The family received friends from
6:00-8:00 PM at Beggs Funeral
Home on Wednesday evening,
January 18.
In lieu of flowers, the family
requests that contributions be made
to Monticello Presbyterian Church
or Hospice of Southwest Georgia.
Hank was born September 3,
1920, in Ozark, Al., and moved to
Monticello in 1941, after serving in
the US Army in the South Pacific in
WWII. He was owner/manager of
L.G. Morris Motors, Inc. until
retirement in 1971. He was a past
member of the Monticello Kiwanis
Club, Treasurer of the Jefferson
County Historical Society for 26

Foundation

Donates $700

TO Local Club

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Monticello Boys and Girls
Club recently received a check for
$700 from the trustees of the Ger-
aldine C. M. Livingston Foundation,
which Club Director Gerrold Aus-
tin said would be used to help fund
the "Coats for Kids" project.
This is the third year the Founda-
tion has made a similar donation to
the Boys and Girls Club.
Austin said that five coats were
purchased for students at the Jeffer-
son High School Club, five for stu-
dents at the St. Phillip Club, and 15
were purchased for students at the
Monticello/Jefferson Club.
The coats are heavy winter coats
purchased from JC Penney's, Austin
added.


Ready... Set... Shop...
Monticello News
Classifieds I


years, and a faithful member and
Elder of the Monticello Presbyterian
Church. Hank was a lover of nature
and conservationist, and was
awarded Outstanding Tree Farmer
of the year in 1990.
Survivors include his wife of 65
years, Josephine Morris Lee; one
daughter, Linda Lee Wheeler, of
Monticello, (and husband Cary);
one son, Dr. Louis G. Lee (and wife
Barbara), of Thomasville, Ga.; five
grandchildren: Liz Wheeler Walker,
Lee Cary Wheeler, Robert Sloan
Lee, Josephine Rebecca Lee, and
William Bowman Lee; three great-
grandchildren: Lily Elise Walker,
Luke Thomas Walker, and James
Henry Wheeler; one sister-in-law,
Marianne Morris Miller (and hus-
band Ulmer), and two nieces, Joy
Johnson (and husband Dozier) and
Elizabeth Miller Smith (and hus-
band Mike); and two nephews: Gib-
bes Miller, Jr. (and wife Maxie) and
Morris Miller (and wife Anita).


Church News
Springfield AME Church will
hold a pew rally 4 p.m. Sunday.
Speaker for the occasion is Rev.
Marque Woodard along with the
Friendship AME Church Family.

Greater Fellowship MB Church
observes the anniversary of its Pas-
tor Rev. Dr. Melvin Roberts, 3 p.m.
Sunday. Guest speaker is Rev. Larry
Campbell of Valdosta, with the
Sweetfield MB Choir.


LIMITED TIME
OFFER |


QFE DIEALER~
FOR DETAILS


COMPLETE GAS SERVICE
O ei.m INCLUDES:
Normal Installation
\ $183+tax 6 Months Free Tank Rental
+t 100 Gallons of Gas
LJ Lu

AmeriGas
US 19 S. at CR 259 Monticello, Florida
997-3331


School Menu


Monday
Grilled Chicken on Bun, Lettuce &
Tomato, Potato Wedges, Fruit,
Cookie, Milk.
Tuesday
Beef-A-Roni, Greens, Combread,
Fruit, Milk.
Wednesday
Roast Turkey, Green Beans, Sweet
Potato Souffle. Hot Roll. Milk.


Thursday
Taco over Chips, Shredd
Tomato & Cheese, Wh
Corn, Fruit, Oatmeal Mu
Milk.
Friday
Ham Carbanaro, Broccol
Rolls, Milk.


IN APPRECIATE
We, the family of the
land "Hank" Thomas, e
sincere appreciation to e
for your many acts o
shown, and your prayers
during out time of sorrow
Your caring and love h
to ease our burdens.
May God bless each of
Thank you.
The
Cleveland "Han'


Evangelism Conference
led Lettuce,
iole Kernel Jan. 23-24 (Monday/Tuesday)
ffin Square, Dauphin Way Baptist Church, Mobile, Ala. (exit #4,1-65)
THEME: "More Than Ever Before"; from 1 p.m. Monday to 8 p.m. Tuesday
MUSIC: Choirs from Cottage Hill Baptist Church & Dauphin Way Baptist
i, Fruit, Hot Church; "Paid in Full" quartet; "Voices," from the University of Mobile
ADMISSION: Free to all, thanks to Cooperative Program; everyone welcome.


ION
late Cleve- Doug Steve Johnny David Dusty Bob
express our Chappelle Gaines Hunt Joyner McLemore Pitman
ach of you
f kindness -aw
s expressed
Dari'I Pe.r, t R,:,t.,-,l TE.J Rooe,'a
ave helped Robinson Sanders Satteerield Smith Traylor White
you. Also:OTHER
Great Commission OTHER DETAILS:
Family Of inistries Traini ng www.ALSBOM.org
Family Of Opportunities! Call or
k" Thomas Don g, o ol-ln b./ r deaA 1.800,264.1225, ext. 245
Wilton


Central

Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166

Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
5 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study


The fear of
the Lord
teaches a man
wisdom.
Proverbs 15:23


Come and hear...
Wayne Warren, Minister


i~i


~MIT
- ,* ,* . . . . . . . . ,- _ . . .-Z-- :- --y .----








FLORAL DESIGNS
SINCE 1934o
"To be overcome by the
fragrance offlowers is a
delectable forn of defeat."
Beverley Nichols HE


190 E Dogwood Street ~ Monticello ~


850.997.2015


Food Check Out Week

Begins January 29


INTRODCTOY PMA


FF F F F F Fl- Fl- Fl- I = Fr---iFr--i Fr--i Fr--i I=- F =- Fr-iF,---i Fr F,---i fr--i F =- Fr---i tr-iFr--i


E&vJ






PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 20, 2006



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2. FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy-
varsity boy's basketball team de-
-' feated Carrabelle 40-27, last week,
standing 9-7 on the season.
,-, Coach Dan Nennstiel said that
though key player and starter for
the Warriors, Ben Grantham, was
. out due to a sprained ankle, all of
the Warriors stepped up and did a
good job.
Leading the score for the Warriors
,was Stephen Griffin with 18 points
and 12 rebounds for a double-


double, two assists and four steals.
Nennstiel said that in ACA's past
two games, Griffin had averaged
19 points in each.
Luke Sadler, six points, four re-
bounds; Stewart Williams, six
points, 11 assists, three rebounds,
one steal and two blocked shots.
Casey Gunnels, four points, four
assists, seven rebounds, four steals;-
Reggie Walker, four points, two as-
sists, six rebounds, four steals;
Wade Scarberry, two points, 10 re-
bounds, two steals, one blocked
shot; and Jim Stewart, two re-
bounds one steal.


Sports


.Lady Tigers Down

.,Madison 55-28


,kFRAN HUNT
i -.Staff Writer
The Jefferson County High
'School varsity girl's basketball
,/1.team now stand 10-3 on the season
I After defeating Madison last week
for the first time in two years, 55-
1:T.28.
"For the past two years, we have-
I '^n't been able to beat Madison, but
t the games have always been close,"
s,,said Coach Bill Brumfield. "The
ri girls played really well. We had a
lot of fast breaks and they played
/ ,7r'really good defense."
Shaumese Massey scored ten
.OHI-points and ten rebounds for a
double-double, four assists, four,
,.' steals and two blocked shots.,
*f A '-


Nakidra Thompson, ten points,
three rebounds, one steal; and
Donna Ransom, ten points and ten
rebounds for a double-double, four
assists, three steals and two
blocked shots.
India Wyche, eight points; Can-
dice Griffin, seven points, eight re-
bounds; and Shanice brooks, four
points and two rebounds.
Keneshia Coates, two points, two
rebounds, two assists; Deidra Ar-
nold, one rebound, two assists, two
steals; and Latoya Footman, three
rebounds.
The Lady Tigers face off against
NFC in district play 6 p.m., here,
Friday, in what Brumfield esti-
mates to be a tough game.
"NFC leads the District and
they're ranked at number two in the
state," Brumfield concluded.


PATTY HARDY, captain, and Cindy Wainright, co-captain of
the A-2 Team of Monticello Mood Swing Ladies Tennis
Team. .


Mood Swings Tennis

Team wins 2 Matches
'. ,..;-; r~i s~ ; *


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Mood Swings-
won two of six matches against the
Split Steps last week at Forest
Meadows Country Club.
Team Number one, Katie Brock
and Lisa Jackson, lost its matches,
4-6 and 2-6.
Team #2, Patty hardy and Cindy
Wainright, lost the matches, 2-6
and 2-6.
Team #3, Lorei Salie and Susan
Goodwin,. lost the first match, 4-6;
won the second, 7-6; and lost a tie-
breaker, 3-6.
Team #4, .Latira Kirchhoff and
Angie Delvecchio, lost the first
match 2-6; won the second, 6-2;
and blanked the Split Steps in the
tiebreaker, 6-0.


ACA Middle School Boys -'r imatces, 3-6
and 2-61
Down Steinhatchee 37-22 Team #6, Maxi Miller and substi-

FRAN HUNT
,,.Staff Writer
Quality Crane and Sign
The Aucilla Christian Academy Service, LLC
7'; middle school boy's basketball Service, LL
team wound up 8-2 on the season
after defeating Steinhatchee 37-22, 735 E. Washington St.
.: last week. Monticello, FL 32344
,j. Coach Ray Hughes said that he M F 3
only played his starters for about (850) 997-8500 '
one and a half quarters and by the
^#j time the fourth quarter rolled qualitycrane05@msn.cm
.: around, her had his third, string on r a
the floor. We lift roof trusses, a/c units etc.
SAt the end ofthe game the War- Bulb replacement for parking lot, stadium lights, etc.
riors had ten players on the team
,. who had scored for the win.
Alex Dunkle had seven points 1.15 .boom length
three rebounds, three steals, two as- John MiN lTis,'OWner
sists; Lane Fraleigh, seven points,
two rebounds; Brian Scholte, six QUALITYSERVICE GUARANTEED
., points, five rebounds; and Brandon
Dunbar, four points, five rebounds,
two steals.
/,AC Wilson Lewis, four points, two
rebounds, three steals, four assists;
Ryan Pricher, two points, six re- ,
"2'bounds, two steals; Clark Christy 4 ,
and Daniel Ward each had two -
/t points, four rebounds; John Ste-
II phens, two points, three rebounds;
.and Joe Mizell, two points, two re-
Sounds. .y mU

SJCHS JVS Fall T e

,TO Wakulla jree -w prk mission
The Jefferson County High ice Skating Toboggan Runs
School JV boy's basketball team Snow Balls & More!
K lost to Wakulla 51-48, last week.
Athletic Director Alfreddie High-
tower said that though the Tigersi p ass-
lost, they put up a valiant fight until
the end.
Leading the score for the Tigers
was J. C. Fead with 20 points. FRN RT
Jamaal Brooks, 10 points, eight FREE mCONCERTS
rebounds; Dontrell Oliver, eight CeCaeWina.ns................Feb4
points, six assists; Torrence Neil. McCoy.............F......eb.. 11
-.Tucker, four points, six assists; Tel- Winter Jam.................F...eb 18
wilh ,Newsboys, Teby Mao, Hmwsong
vin Norton and Reggie Watkins. awkH elson, ZOEgirs Krystallrers
each had two points and three and metercycle stunt team Sphere of Fear
steals; and Reggie Watkins added WiliNelson..................25
,. Traoe Adkins
two points. & Craig Morgan............Mar 1,1
The Tigers now stand 8-3 on the George Thorogood............Mar 18
season. Jo Dee Messina .........Mar 25
The Tigers face off against Mayo
Lafayette, 6 p.m., Thursday, there. .
This is the second time in the sea-
,son that the Tigers have faced
Mayo. The Tigers beat them in the
first game.


tute Roslyn Bass, won the matches,
7-6 and 6-3.
The ladies will face off against the
Killearn Lucky Stars, 9:30 a.m.,
Thursday at Tom Brown Park.


Monticello News
Keeps You
Informed!!


Help us fight amyotrophic
lateral sclerosis, better known
as Lou Gehrig's disease.
mm
Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717 www.mdausa.org


MONTICELLO. (FL). NEWS. FRI.. JANUARY 20, 2006 PAGE 9


Adult School

Meeting Set

Tuesday

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Adult
Center will conduct a community
meeting 6 p.m. Tuesday, at St.
Phillip's Church.
Discussions will include such
topics as education for adults,
GED, basic skills and ABE,
parent/child interaction, homework,
FCAT, personal growth, employ-
ment skills and the like.
For further information contact
Dr. Artis Johnson at 342-0140.


D You are invited to attend
DUCKS
UNLIMITED The Annual Banquet of the
Monticello Chapter of Ducks Unlimited.

The Banquet is being held on Friday, January
20th, 2006, at the Jefferson Country Club.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m. with a steak and/or
chicken dinner being served at 7:30 p.m.

LIVE AND SILENT AUCTIONS WILL TAKE PLACE AMIDST SEVERAL
OTHER ACTIVITIES INCLUDING SEVERAL DIFFERENT TYPES OF RAF-
FLES. TICKET PRICES ARE $45 SINGLE AND $65 COUPLE WITH
EACH INCLUDING A ONE MEMBERSHIP IN DUCK UNLIMITED.
TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT SORENSEN TIRE OR AT THE DOOR.
ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE PRESERVATION OF WE T LANDS AND
THE WILDLIFE THAT INHABIT THOSE AREAS.


RELAY
FOR LIFE .. ..






AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY'S
2006 RELAY FOR LIFE JEFFERSON COUNTY
APRIL 21 AND 22, 2006

Would you like to be involved???
We need all the help we can get....
Here are the ways you can be a part!!


1 in 3 Americans will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. The American Cancer Society Relay
For Life gives everyone the opportunity to fight back and to make a difference in the battle against
cancer. Relay always raises awareness of cancer prevention, early detection, treatment, and patient
support (including transportation to treatment, peer support group programs, and resources for
practical assistance). Relay brings people together from all walks of life with the common goal of
eliminating cancer. Relay honors cancer survivors and their caregivers. There's a place for you at
Relay. Please join us today!!

Be a part of the committee! Committee members are now being recruited for Team Recruitment;
Corporate Sponsorships; Logistics/Facility; Entertainment; Survivorship; Public Relations; Onsite
Volunteers; Onsite Survivor Activities, and Food.

Form a Relay For Life team! Gather together 8-15 of your favorite people who love making a


difference and having fun.


. Volunteer at the event! We need volunteers who will help with the needs at the site itself on the days
of April 21-22, 2006.


YES! I want to participate in Relay.
1 Learn more about forming a team
2 Information on survivor activities
3 Volunteer to help with the event
4 Learn more about becoming a sponsor

Name
Address
E-Mail
Phone
(Please mail to Relay For Life, 710 W. Washington St.,
.. Monticello, Florida 32344)




The American Cancer Society Relay For Life represents the hope that those lost to cancer will never :
be forgotten, that those who face cancer will be supported, and that one day cancer will be
eliminated.

........ ..........
oo**********o*** o e o o*"o*" o"ee e" "" "e"" " ee ""


Aucilla Boys Defeat

-Carrabelle 40-27








PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 20, 2006

With Only 2 Returning Players,

Lady Bees Lose 1st Four Games


FRAN HUNT
' Staff Writer
The Lady Bees basketball team
lost their first four games of the
season.
Kicking off the season was the
game against Madison Central,
which the Lady Bees lost 36-7.
LaAshle Norton scored five
points; and Drucilla Shaw scored
two points.


In the game against Perry, the
Lady Bees were hammered for a
48-4 loss.
Norton scored the four points for
the Lady Bees.
HMS fell for a 31-5 loss to Live
Oak, in the third game of the sea-
son.
Norton scored one points; Shaw
scored one; Shataviah Anderson
scored two points; and Simone
Williams scored one point.
In the game against Cross Roads,


the Lady Bees fell for a 32-14 loss.
Norton scored eight points; Shaw
scored four points; and Anderson
scored two points.
Having lost 12 players from last
year's roster, which included all of
the starters for the Lady Bees.
Coach Corinne Stephens said that
all but two of this year's team are
sixth graders new to the game.
She added that the two Lady Bees
returning have been forced into
starting roles and asked to step up-


their game several notches.
Commenting earlier about losing
the first games of the season, Ste-
phens said, "We are starting com-
pletely over with a team having
little or no experience. We have
come a long way since day one, but
we still have a very long way to go.

She added that both Coach Jor-
dan and she have seen the Lady
Bees make a lot of improvement
that wouldn't be obvious to specta--
tors, "because they ,were not at
practice the first few days," she
said.


LEGALS ::
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 05-120-
PR IN RE: The Estate of: JOSH SIMP-
KINS Deceased. NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: PEARLIE MAE SIMPKINS MILLS,
JESSIE L. BROWN, PAULINE BROWN,
JIMMY LEONARD, WILLIE T. LEON-
ARD, GEORGIA MAE L. GREEN,
WYNELL GALLON, GRIFFIN L.
MACK, MARION J. ANDERSON, JER-
OME SIMPKINS, PATRICIA S. MAR-
SHALL, TERRANCE SIMPKINS,
JESSIE SIMPKINS, SHARON SIMP-
KINS, WILLIAM SIMPKINS, WILLIE
MAE SIMPKINS, CREOLA SIMPKINS
BROWN LEE, ROBIN L. MITCHELL,


LEGALS

DAVID MITCHELL, and any unknown
heirs at law, assigns, devisees, grantees,
and any other parties claiming any intec-
est by or through aforesaid parties, YOU
ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition For De-
termination of Heirs and Beneficiaries h s
been filed in the above entitled estate rela-
tive to your interest in the following de-
scribed real property located in Jefferson
County, Florida: The North Half of tfe
North half of the Southwest Quarter (N12
of NI/2 of the SWI/4) of Section One (1,)
Township One (1) North, Range Four (4)
East, containing Forty (40) acres, more dr
less, and being a portion of the lands corr-
veyed to said parties of the first part by
Preston B. Bird, Sr. by deed dated July


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Regular, Light, or Cherry Flavors

Swisher Sweet Kings
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Black & Mild Cigars
.42 ea. $1.79pk +tax

Prices Good Thriu Jan. 31, 2006
We have another order of leather purses
Free Crystal Lighter with each carton
cigarettes or cigars.


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Cell: (850) 545-2325 Cell: (850) 510-0346
Home: (850) 997-1451 Home: (S50) 997-3091
10534 South Sill Rd. Lamont, FL. 32336


~1


Residential & Commercial Lic.# cgc #1507547

YEAGER CONTRACTING CO. INC.
CUSTOM HOMES

Commercial and Agriculture Buildings

PH: 997-2296 CELL: 508-2383


*Lot Cleaning *Driveways *Dig Ponds *Road
Building *Culvert Installation *Fill Dirt
*Limerock *Gravel
Billy Simmons, Owner
Backhoe and Hauling Septic TanksContractor &
Excavation Contractor
Phone: (850) 997-0877
Cell: (850) 509-1465
Insured D.O.H. Lic #SR0971265
Visa & Mastercard Accepted!


_________ w


DOUG'S TREE & LAWN
SERVICE


Trimming
Mowing
Removal
Maintenance


0 Stump Grinding
0 Aerial Device
0 Bush Hogging


997-0039 Lic. & Insured


Do' o nyOdJh


Call for quality work
45 Years In The Trade
Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
850-997-7467 850-544-2917
*Residential ~ Commercial *Interior Exterior


- 0UlAtimate


877-7 222to

877-7222


'1 i.mne Davis
Sales Manager


-_ __ I__ ^ ^ J - - ^ - -


Portable Toilets
Billy Simmons Septic
850-509-1465 cell
850-997-0877 home
Clean Portables for construction sites,
^ family reunions, parties
Events and Types


LARICHIUTA
Craig
merock Larichiuta
*(lay Lloyd, FL 32337
*Sand 997-6788
Top Soil


CHASE
Jena Fernandez
Senior Mortgage Specialist
17 Years Of Service
850-224-2427


0


FHA/VA/CONV.
Self Employed New Construction/Land
Credit issues OK


ATTENTION
BUSINESS OWNERS
-SHOP KEEPERS-

LOCAL PROFESSIONAL
SALES & SERVICE


NOW AVAILABLE:
SECURITY CAMERA SYSTEMS
ACCESS CONTROLS
ALARM SYSTEMS
TELEPHONE SYSTEMS
DATA NETWORKS
BIG BEND


COMMUNICATIONS Co.

997-4150


A Very large selection to choose from
4 All trade-ins are welcome
A Best rates as low as 4.5%
A Free warranty on every vehicle sold
prag OOD (REDT, AD (REIWT,


CARROLL HILL Au ro EIFC(TRI', INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service



Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


Trade


Keaton Tire Repair
S'it:Iv .oI wII, ( SO I I I1nesSb on a s 'I oIl l )te Roea


EDD KFAFON
TRAVIS KEA10N
54 Capps Hwy
Lamont, FL 32336


8)50-997-0903 Shop
850-264-6871 Cell
850-997-0937 Fax
850-997-5443 Home


Since 1977
*Licensed *Bonded *Insured
Residential & Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES ~ 997-4100







Richbourg Nursery, Inc.
99 Richbourg Road
Monticello, FL 32344
Tel. 850- 997-3764 Fax 850-997-8388


Vehicle
,'..we!


TO[TIATR


Sim-
ply
the J




Best! REALTOR


I -


MR. MERCHANT

THIS SPACE COULD

BE YOUR FOR

$10 PER WEEK


Call Andy Rudd For

Appliance Service

Needs @

997-5648


- I I1


Pam Bowling
Broker Associate

997-4789
1-888-701-2205
www.pamb@nettally.com


AW4~




4/


MONTICELLO'S ONLY LOCAL HEATING & COOLING COMPANY

STEWART
HEATING & COOLING INC.

Sales ~ Service ~ Installation ~ Change Outs
Residential Commercial

Family Owned 0 Office: (850) 342-3294
Lic. # RA0067121 3 CELL: (850) 509-2903


Mr. Merchant

This Space

Could Be

Yours For

Only $20

Per Week


-1"


I










To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 20, 2006 PAGE 11

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....S1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
99"-3568


LEGAL NOTICE
-llth 1929 and of record in the Office of
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Jefferson
.County, Florida in Deed Book "UU," page
457 and to which reference is hereby
made. You are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any on the Peti-
tioner's attorney, Harold M. Knowles, Es-
quire, whose address is 3065 Highland
Terrace, Tallahassee, Florida 32301 on or
before the 28th day of February 2006, and
file the original with the clerk of this court
Either before service on the Petitioner's at-
torney or immediately thereafter; other-
,wise a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the Petition.
: 1/13, 1/20, 1/27, 2/3, c
NOTICE OF SALE: Notice is hereby
given that the School Board of Jefferson
County, Florida, Desmond M. Bishop
Administration Building, 1490 W.
Washington Street, Monticello. Florida
will receive sealed bids on or before
January 30, 2006 at 2:00 p.m. for the
purchase of the following described real
,-_property owned by the School Board of
,Jefferson County., Florida. One acre of
land in SW 1/4 of SW 1/4 of NW 'A DB
";'YY" Page 193. The Parcel Number is
,-Section 20-2n-7E-0000-0110-0000. This
property is being sold in its "As Is
Condition" and no representations are
made as to zoning, access, or its suitability
for specific uses. The land is situated in
Jefferson County, Florida. Bids received
will be opened publicly at 2:00 p.m. in the
Board Room of the district office located
at 1490 W. Washington Street, Monticello,
FL 32344. No bid will be opened if
received after 2:00 p.m. Please mark on
-envelope, "Surplus Real Property Bid
Opening 2:00 p.m. on January 30, 2006."
Anyone desiring information on the
procedure for submitting bids should
contact Hal Wilson at (850) 342-0100. It is
-anticipated that the highest bid will be
presented to the School Board for
approval on Monday, February 13, 2006.
The School Board of Jefferson County)
reserves the right to reject any or all bids.
Fred Shofner, Chairman, Jefferson
County School Board, Phil Barker,
Superintendent, Jefferson County School
-Board.
1/13, 1/18, 1/20, 1/25, 1/27, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
SCASE NO. 05-315 CA. In the Matter of
Adoption of CARLEY MARIE DUPREE,
a minor. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: The
unknown father of CARLEY MARIE
DUPREE Address Unknown YOU'RE.
7 NOTIFIED that a Petition for Adoption
has been filed and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it, on MICHAEL A. REICHMAN,
Z petitioner's attorney, whose address is
P.O. Box 41, Monticello, FL 32345, on or
before February 20, 2006, and file the
original with the clerk of this court either
service on petitioner's attorney or
immediately thereafter, otherwise a
default will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint or
petition. DATED on December 28, 2005.
CARL D. BOATWRIGHT as Clerk of the
Court.
1/6, 1/13 1/20, 1/27, c
In accordance with FL Statue: Public
Auction February 18, 2006 @ 10:00am:
1999 Freightliner
Vin#1FUYDSZBIXPA64343; 1991 Honda
1 Vin#1HGCB7665MA1 67662; 1992 Toyt
--Vin#4T1SK12EINU072631; 1991 Niss
Vin#JNIFU21P7MT321420 March 04,
S2006 @ 10:00 a.m. 2003 Ford
-' Vin#3FAFP11383R110907. To be sold as
is for Towing & Storage charges.
-Conditions & Terms at Auction. Dave's
.,-Towing 7261 East Washington St.
-'Montic!lo, FL 32344 / (850) 342-1480
1/20, c
NOTICE OF SALE The District School
Board of Jefferson County will receive
sealed bids on a surplus relocatable in the
office of the school superintendent,
Desmond M. Bishop Administration
Building, 1490 W. Washington Street,
..Monticello, FL 32344 until 3:00 p.m.
Wednesday, January 25, 2006. The bids
will be opened publicly at that time. No
bid will be received after that time. Please
mark on envelope "Surplus Relocatable
Sale." Bids will be presented to the School
Board at the regular board meeting on
SFebruary 13, 2006 at 6:00 p.m. The bid
*.will be awarded to the highest bidder at
that time. The Board reserves the right to
Reject any or all bids. Please call Donald
Johnson, Maintenance Director at
850.342.0142 to set up an appointment to
inspect the relocatable. Relocatable must
be removed from the school board
-, premises within thirty (30) days after bids
Share awarded. Room: 99-004, Sq. Ft. 864,
SDescription: 24 x 36, Yr. Constructed:
1971, Bldg. 00017. NOTE: The
Relocatable will be sold "AS IS". The
relocatable includes a "wall hung" A.C.
Heat Pump System. NOTE: Minimum Bid
for the 24 x 36 relocatables is $3,000.00.
12/28, 12/30,
01/04, 01/06, 01/11, 01/13, 01/18, 01/20, c

HELP WANTED
Accounting Office needs full or part
Time clerical/bookkeeping help.
References required. Send Resume to
280 S. Cherry St. or Fax 342-9899.
1/13, 18, 20, c
The Jefferson County Road Dept. will
be accepting applications for the


following position: "Truck driver
with CDL class A Florida License.
Must have excellent driving record,
high school dipolma, 2 years
experience driving trucks, and
experience using backhoe. For
- application stop by the Road Dept.


HELP WANTED
office week days 7:30 a.m. to 4:00
p.m. Jefferson County is an equal
opportunity employer and a drug free
workplace. Phone number 997-2036.
Closing date will be February 1,
2006."
1/20, c
Heavy Equipment Operator.
Experienced Operator, needed to run
different types of heavy equipment in
limerock mine. Some mechanical
ability needed to perform job
function. Serious inquiries only. Must
be dependable. Full benefit package
included. Drug test, physical and
background check required. EOE
apply in person Martin Mariett;a
Material. 23 miles west of Perry on
Hwy 98. 850-584-6461.
1/11, 13, 18, 20, r
Cypress Truck Lines, INC Driver
Designed Dispatch. FLA ONLY/Flat
Bed students welcome. Home every
Weekend,most nights (800) 545-1351
www.cypresstruck.com
01/20 fcan
Driver Covenant Transport. Excellent
pay & Benefits for Experienced
Drivers, 0/0, Solos, Teams, &
Graduate Students. Bonuses
Available. Refrigerated Now
Available. (888)695-7279 x19.
01/20, fcan
Taking Applications. Our business is
striping, seal coating, asphalt repair,
etc. Ideal candidate can take on
anything and do it right without
supervision. EOE. Druggies need not
apply. 545-1776.
9/23, tfn
Leading national propane marketeer
Southeast Propane has immediate
opening for an energetic route sales
driver for their Monticello based
operation. Candidatesmust' possess
strong customer service skills, team
player attitude along with a Class B
CDL license with an air brake
endorsement and have the ability to
obtain a hazmat & tanker
endorsement Clean driving record a
must. Excellent starting salary with
competitive benefit program for the
qualified candidate. EOE. Apply by
Fax 850-997-2808 or in person @ 500
..South Jefferson St. Monticello, FL.
1/18, tfn,c
Retail Help: Need to work with
computer, military service helpful.
General store work in Tallahassee.
Send resume to P.O. Box 2126,
Tallahassee, FL., 32316 or call
544-3900
1/18, 20, c
SERVICES
Backhoe Service: Driveways, roads,
ditches, tree. and shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @ 997-
3116, 933-3458.
tfn
Christain Girl will clean your home.
New in town, call Tori 997-1437.
1/18, 20, 25, 27, pd
Are you concerned about the high
cost of college? Would you like to
learn how to pay for college? Attend a
3 hour seminar Saturday, February
4th. Register at
www.earncollegecash.com
1/20, 25, 27, 2/1, c
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and op-
erated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648.
Leave message.
2/1 -tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quick responses.
6/22, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drug, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn
fat and increase energy levels
resulting in considerable weight loss
over time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key
ingredients incorporated into rice
bran oil with natural flavorings to
give it a palpable taste. In addition to
weight, loss, you may see benefits for
the hair, skin and nails from the
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in rice
bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is a cactus
found in the Kalahari Desert of South
SAfrica. Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
s/d 5/18, tfn
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for assessment of
your needs. 997-3553. UPS NOW
AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn
BUSINESS


OPPORTUNITIES
Al L ( \SH C.\ND\ ROUTE. Do)ou
earn $800/day? 30 Machines, Free
Candy All for $9,995. (800)814-6323.
B02000033. Call US: We will not be
undersold!
01/20, fcan


AUTOMOTIVE
1995 Ford Crown Vic. New Tires,
Looks & Drives Like New. $3,800.
997-6806
10/21, tfn, c
1977 Olds Cutlass 89,252 miles $3500
CASH. Clean, new tires. Call
997-2646 M-Th 9-5.
tfn, c
87' Mercury Sabel $500 firm runs.
Contact Kim at (904) 497-7093
01/4, tfn
93 Ford F250 New tires, brakes, tune
up $4,500
89 Accura Legend SR 6 cylinder,
NADA Book is $2,400 Selling Price
$1,295
96 Ford Mustang Convertible- Red,
New tip, new tires, 6 cyl. $4,200;
997-6066, 997-6806 Wilson Auto,
LLC.
tfn, c

FOR SALE
Rhode Island Red Roosters $10
each. Beautiful Purebred Limousin,
bull, 15 months old. Call 997-0901,
leave message or 997-3568 ask for
Debbie.
01/4, 6, 11, 13, 18, 20, 25, 27, pd
Two Cockatiels with large cage $35.
Call 342-1486
1/13, 18, 20, pd
4' (like new) Gondolas, $45 each,
shelves $7 each, heavy duty circular
garment rack (approx 58" diameter)
$75. Call (850) 997-2519.
1/18 20, 25, 27, c
Bunk Bed, Fullsize on bottom, twin on
top. excellent condition. $300 obo.
997-6164
1/20, 25, pd
Mattress/Box bed Set: pillow plush
double sided pillow top mattress/box
set, 4 inch pillow top. List $989.00, sell
for $248. 850-528-1422
1/20, 25, 27, 2/1, 3, pd
LEFT' OVER- Merchandise from Big
Chief Pawnbrokers, Electronics,
Handtools, DVD's, VHS, Jewelry,
Reasonably Priced 342-2105
01/6, 11, 13, 18, 20, 25, 27, pd
METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ By
Direct From Manufacturer. 20 colors
in stock with all Accessories. Quick
turn around! Delivery Available Toll
Free (888)393-0335.
01/20, fcan


FOUND
Quarter Collection. Describe and
Claim Call 997-2028
1/18, 20, nc

FREE
Redbone/Walker Mix 1 year old.
Trained for deer. Free to a caring
hunteW. 229-794-3628 Mike.
/18. 20, nc

FOR RENT
Prime downtown office space now
available in Cherry Street Commons.
Jack Carswell, 997-1980.
11/30, tfn, c
One bedroom, on one acre. Partially'
furnished, no pets, $600 per month,
credit check. 997-6911
1/20, 27, pd
REAL ESTATE
NE\\ HOME 1370 square fool. 4
bedroom, 2 bath for .under $475/
month payments. University Homes -
850-576-2105.
11/1 1,tfn
Nice 3 bedroom, 2 bath brick home,
approx. 2 acres, living room, Florida
room, fireplace, hardwood floors,
country setting, in Jefferson County,
997-2387, 933-0904, $249,900.
1/20, 25, 27, c


5 Bedrooms! 3 Baths! Plenty of room!
Buy for under $550 a month.
850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
FIRST TIME home buyers. If you
have enough money for a deposit on
an apartment you can probably own
your own home. Call 850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
DISCOUNTED MODELS Only 2
homes left, must go! Save $$$$ Call
today! 850-576-2105.

CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots, Land!
We Make Mortgage Loans,
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc.
Lic. Mortgage LENDER
878-3957


THE



The Waggoners Trucking-Established 1951
Now Recruiting drivers for our SE Auto Transport Division.
Drivers must have a valid Class A CDL,
1 year and 100K verifiable OTR miles.
Stable work history and clean MVR is a must.
Great Pay, Great Benefits,_Matching 401 K.
Contact Susan or John at (866) 413-3074 EOE




We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities

E 575-6571
.3u a
.3-


GOENMN


Trucks, vehicles, equipment, misc.
From LEON COUNTY, TALQUIN
ELEC., LEON SHERIFF, & (10)
OTHER AREA COUNTIES & CITIES
SATURDAY, JANUARY 21: 10AM
North Florida Fairgrounds
ITEMS INCLUDED:
*Late model Cat D3C dozer *Late model Ford & Intl.
Dump trucks *Late model (2000-2003) Utility trucks *
work vans *Cat D6 *Deere 410B backhoe
*Numerous late model cars and SUV's *Misc.
Equipment & accessories *MUCH MORE!
THESE ARE FLEET MAINTAINED UNITS!
Preview: Friday, January 20: 9am-4pm
terms: *All units sell AS IS *5% Buyer Prem.
*Cash or cashier check OK. Other checks must be
accompanied By a current Bank Letter of Guarantee
FIRST COAST AUCTION AB150 AU286
P.O. Box 7878 JACKSONVILLE, FL 32238
800-519-6402 or
www.firstcoastauction.com


KELI. & KELLY
PROPERTIES
215 N. Jefferson
Monticello, Fl 32344
(850) 997-5516


Check us out on
the web
www.kcMom


* Affordable 3Br/2Ba mobile home in good
condition on one acre $ 55,700
" Roomy 4Br/3Ba on 1 acre. Property is zoned
mixed bus/res. With huge garage/workshop,
blueberry trees and grapes. $99,999
* Great Starter Home Brick 3Br/2Ba home on
1.19 acres with screen porch and carport. Back
yard fenced for animals. $ 124,900
" Piece of History Historic home built in 1832.
Original trim, woodwork & mantels, restoration
work needed. $ 163,000
* New Construction 3Br/2Ba home. Marble &
tile throughout home, carpet in living room,
color to be chosen by buyer $ 165,000
" Great Golf Course Views 4Br/2Ba in great
neighborhood. Lg. deck off family room faces
woods and creek. $ 249,900


k Simply the Best!


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Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only $16,500 per acre

New Listinq! 2 bedroom 1 bath home with
small fenced yard, nice family room $87,500

Choice Buildinq Lots in Cooper's Pond
Area cleared and ready to build on, nice
trees, paved road $27,500 each

Look at This! Comfortable 4 bedroom 3 bath
home on five fenced acres w/guest house/
playhouse w/ bath, big shop, 2 car garage,
pasture, 100 pecan trees and a nice pool a
real dream for a growing family $400,000

Hard to Find 5 choice acres on hillside with-
planted pines on quiet graded county road
Asking $12,000/acre

Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom home
in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $295,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane off Rocky Branch Road and Sunset Street.
100'x220' in the City $15,500 each

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Look at the Price 5 wooded acres on Blue
Lake Road only $22,500

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 10 acres on the
east side of town high and dry in quiet loca-
tion with lots of game, 9 year old planted
pines, profitfrom both appreciating land and
growing pine $12,000 /acre.


Home Site-Under Contract close to town
on West Grooverville Road only $14,500
Rentals Available
2/1.5 mobile home on 2 ac $450
3/2 mobile home Lloyd Ac $650
2/1 home on Dogwood St $850
Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
We have qualified buyers!
Are you interested in selling?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


i .


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A







PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 20, 2006




*'',^.' ^jasA',. "


SLast Details Worked Out In


Grants Office Restructuring


,,- - -


4'


/1


OWNER of Morgan's Bows-N-Toes, Kerri die, during a routine
Kercher Dowdy, trims long hair between the Photo)
paw pads of Buddy Kinsey, a chocolate poo-


grooming. (News


Dog Groomer Kerri Dowdy

Finds Comfortable Niche Here


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Kerry (Kercher) Dowdy, owner of
Morgan's Bows-N-Toes, has found
her niche here, grooming dogs,
something she has always wanted to
do, but with no opportunity to do it.
Dowdy named her business
"Morgan's" after her own dog.
Over the years, Dowdy has modi-
fied her original plans somewhat.
Initially she planned to eventu-
ally offer day care for dogs as well
as to sell grooming supplies such as
shampoos.
"The shampoos and other items
weren't selling, so I don't offer
those anymore. I do still offer flea
control, such as Advantage and
Front Line," said Dowdy.
"I decided not to offer doggie
day care because there's too much
involved."
Dowdy grooms all breeds of
dogs, big, small, long hair and
short hair, by appointment only.
"If I don't have any appointments,
I don't come in," she explained.
Services provided include, trim-
ming toe nails, hair cuts, and bath-
ing.
She does not groom cats, because
"They're much too dangerous," she
said.
She also polishes toe nails by re-
quest, and all long hair females get
a bow in their hair.
All others leave their appointments
wearing a bandana around their
necks.
Dowdy said that dog grooming is
a seasonal business and the number
of appointments she has varies
greatly.
"It all depends on the time of
year," said Dowdy. "The number
goes way up during the summer
and before the holidays, but it
really slows down after the holi-
days.


She has her regular customers.
and grooms four or five canines per
day and between 20-40 per week..
Dowdy recommends that dogs re-
quiring hair cuts, have their hair cut
every four to six weeks.
They should be bathed no more
than once per week.
Average cost to fully groom a
small to medium dog which re-
quires a hair cut, is $25 to $28.
Dowdy notes she has had a few
mishaps in her work:.
"When I bathe the animals, I get
as wet as they do and go home
wearing wet clothes," she said.
"I have also been vomited on,
peed on, and pooped on, but stuff
happens, you've got to love them
anyway."
Though her specialty is dog
grooming, Dowdy has been asked
to provide care for other animals.
"I have been asked to trim the toe
nails of a ferret and trim the wings
of a bird," she said.
"I don't mind trimming a ferret's
nails, but I don't want to attempt
clipping a bird's wings. I wasn't
trained to do that.
"I'm afraid I could hurt them, and
I'm not here to hurt animals, I'm
here to help them," she added.
Dowdy earned a Bachelor's de-
gree in Kentucky, where she ma-
jored in Sociology and minored in
Psychology and Criminology, and
studied for nine years.
She is also a Special Needs
teacher in North Carolina.
However, ever since she was a
high school student, she has wanted
to groom animals, but there was no
place there to do it where she lived.
Dowdy wished to be closer to her
family, so she relocated here.
"I found the perfect location in
town, decided to do what I've al-
ways wanted to do, and I love it,"
she explained.


To make an appointment for dog
grooming, call Dowdy at 997-
8599.
Morgan's Bows-N-Toes is lo-
cated at 1065 N. Jefferson Street.


Package Deal! $ As oO
Diesel Tracr P1ck9a
*Diesel Tractor
*Rotary Cutter
*Boom Pole
,Drawbar
*-16 ft Dual Axel Trailer
-Includes Warranty e
Other Pkgs Available .
CHECKS*- CREDIT CARDS '
$0 Down $99/mo WAC

STINGER TRACTORS"TPLACE"
Exit 11 off 1-75 1/4 Mile West Then Turn Left on White Water Road
877-249-8885 229-249-8484


Miss Mary 's Family

SRestaurant
(Located at BP Truckstop in Lloyd)
Best Seafood In The Area


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It was the consensus of the group
that a county the size of Jefferson
did not warrant the establishment of
a housing authority per se. Instead,
the County Commission should act
in that capacity.
As for the distribution of the
work, Schleicher said it was shared
by him, the building inspector, and
Meridian.
"Wallace and I have worked this
out," Schleicher said. "Wallace does
the inspections and I take care of the
paper pushing stuff. The logistics of
getting the pieces moved are well in
hand."
Meridian's part, he said, was to ad-
minister the different programs,
such as public housing, weatheriza-
tion and the Community Develop-
ment Block Grant (CDBG).
It was also the consensus that the
county Housing Assistance Plan
should be amended to reflect the


new reality, insofar as the partition
of the different tasks. And that the
SHIP and CDBG citizen advisory
boards be combined into one organi-
zation.
The one remaining issue to re-,
solve, participants agreed, was to
formulate a job description for the
local liaison person and decide
which department would fund the
individual's salary. That's because
the individual performs duties for
both the building inspector and
grants director.
"It's a fuzzy line deciding whom
Lola Hightower should report to,"
Halsey said. "It's a fuzzy line of
authority. It has to be a handshake
kind of arrangement."
It was left up to Bullock and
Schleicher to work out the details of
the arrangement and decide which
department should claim the posi-
tion for purposes of the budget.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

County officials and others in-
volved in the restructuring of the
former Grants Department met
briefly Tuesday morning to work
out the final details of the reorgani-
zation.
Participants in the discussion in-
cluded County Commission Chair-
man Danny Monroe; Grants Office
Director Roy Schleicher; Extension
Office Director Larry Halsey; Build-,
ing Inspector Wallace Bullock; and
Lisa Blair and Harold Eastman of
Meridian Community Service
Group, the contractor administering
the county's various housing pro-
grams.
Issues at hand were whether the
county had a designated housing
authority; what should be the duties
and responsibilities of the different
players now handling the tasks of
the former Grants Department; and
which county official should have
authority over the local liaison per-
son coordinating the various ele-
ments of the housing programs.


Call J.G. Wentworth's
Annuity Purchase Program
866-FUND-549.


We don't let a computer tell us
what to do. We can give you a loan
when others say no even if you
have a "low" credit score.
THREE, there's an excellent
chance your loan will be approved.
We approve 6 out of 7 applicants.
And some of these people have
credit scores below 540. You have
an 86% chance of getting a loan-no
matter your situation.
Why must you call before April
15? Because you don't know what
the IRS may do after April 15. They
may garnish your wages, seize your
car or even foreclose your house.
There's no reason to owe the IRS
if you have equity in your home.
We can tell you-free of charge-
and over the phone if you qualify.
Open 7 days.
Call 1-800-700-1242, ext. 283


J.G.WENTWORTH.
ANNUITY PURCHASE PROGRAM


Fundraiser Needs Volunteers


(Continued From Page 1)
:.ch dip, bread and fresh vegetables,
chicken salad sandwiches, egg
salad sandwiches, artichoke dip and
Greek pastries stuffed with spinach
and fetta cheese.
Also during the event, members
will be selling Humane Society T-
shirts at $10 each, and note cards


featuring the artwork of Jefferson
Elementary School students
The Bless the Beast has always
been the Humane's Society most
successful fundraiser.
To volunteer for. the event, con-
tact Carswell at 997-4000, or 264-
5927.


ATTENTION

To better serve our valued customers,
Madison Employment Connections will have a new address
effective Monday, January 30, 2006. You may visit us at
200 West Base Street, Madison ~ 2nd Floor (Wachovia Bank Bldg.)

Foral o yor mpoymntneds viitMaiso Eplymetonecions


Relay For Life Scheduled


(Continued From Page 1)
community-based programs aimed
at reducing the risk of cancer, de-
tecting cancer as early as possible,
ensuring proper treatment, and em-
powering patients facing cancer, to
cope with the disease and maintain
the highest possible quality of life.
The Relay For Life allows partici-


pants from all backgrounds includ-
ing patients, medical support staff,
corporations, civic organizations,
churches, and community volunteers
to come together for this worthy
cause and fight a deadly disease.
For more information contact
Team Development Chair Ellen
Cline at 997-2798.


Job Seeker Service
Career counseling skill & skill level assessment
Job search & placement assistance
Use of computers with internet access/faxes, resource
room, copiers, phones
Workshop for interviewing & resume writing
Veterans services and benefits
Information on unemployment programs, claims fil-
ing, job openings, insurance, labor market, job open-
ings

Youth Services
Objectives assessment
Individual service strategies and planning
Paid/unpaid work experience
Comprehensive guidance and counseling
Occupational skills training
Follow-up services for 12 months A


'I
-Work s


Employer Services
* Easy posting of job openings on Employ Florida
Marketplace
* Access to worker profiles, resumes
* Recruitment assistance
* Job fairs
* Information on employer prevailing wages, unem-
ployment
* OJT, skills upgrading and retraining
* HR consulting services (skills assessment for employ-
ees, job description preparation)
* Rapid response service to avoid dislocation .....-M


OACqCEs


EiI\


SEm Io ment
C.dNECTIONS
solutions for you


Ad itioal srviesma gbeavilblefo toseadlt an yut6wh qalfy.Fomreinfrmton les
cal 85) 73965 TY(80)97-95


f r.


Advernisment
Homeowners who owe the IRS
must read this before April 15


Honey Mae Home Loans is licensed by the Florida Department of Financial Services.


Feeling___Handcuffed.__ ___-Yot^^^r Annuity?^


[bhOrnci; yule Ijondcaz
I a




wi/Jo whatever


\ *// ifS" [
1-800-771-1144
1610 E.Jackson St. Thoma-ile, Georgia
From T.a.lah...ssee 24 nInurt North on
Thomnasvlle Ro.d .


If you owe $10,000 or more in past
due taxes, there are four solutions:
(1) You can pay it in full. This is,
of course, your best option.
(2) You can pay it off with a cred-
it card. This is not a good solution-
unless you can pay off your credit
card in full quickly. Besides, the
IRS charges you a hefty "conven-
ience" fee.
(3) You can borrow from a friend
or relative. You already know this
is not a good idea.
(4) You can use the equity in your
home to pay off your debts.
This is your best option and we
have the best program.
ONE, we guarantee the lowest rate
in writing. We will beat all offers-
or we'll pay you $250.
TWO, we will not increase your
rate even if you have a low credit
score.


M,




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