Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00163
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: January 18, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00163
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text
LIBRARY OF FLORIDA
404 LIBRARY WEsTr
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE. FL. 32611l


.Crime Message
Notes
25 Years

Editorial, Page 4


Pat Pearson
Speaks At
Woman's Club

Story, Photo, Page 6


Scenes
From Annual
MLK Parade

Photos, Page 7


Rivers Top
Basketball Player
For JCHS

Story, Page 9
Now


Wednesday Morning


Montic


II


138TH YEAR NO.05, 50 CENTS Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18, 2006


50


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The annual Martin Luther King,
Jr. Memorial Parade and Festival
saw some 50 entries, and drew a
good crowd of spectators.
The crowd along South Jefferson
Street where the parade began was
slim, but thickened as the parade
drew nearer the Recreation Park.
Marchers kept the spirit of King
alive, carrying banners quoting, "I
Have A Dream" and singing, "We
Shall Overcome."
Keeping the beat with drums and
trumpnit, along with their colorful
costumes and dance, were the
Rhythm Rushers.
Participants in the parade tossed
hard candy to the children which
lined the street, all waving as they
passed by spectators.
Grand Marshall Charles Parrish
rode in a long white limousine pro-
vided by Mike's Limousine of Tal-
lahassee.
Units in the parade included:
FHP, JROTC Color Guard and
ROTC, VFW District Commander
John Nelson, Greater Fellowship
Missionary Baptist Church youth
group, John White Chapter #65
OES, Jefferson County Tax Collec-
tor Lois Hunter, Jefferson Correc-
tional Institution's Confrontation
Team, JCHS cheerleaders and mas-
cot, House to House Prayer Band,
Jefferson Senior Citizen's Center,
and Memorial MB Church Youth
Department.
Martha's Home Day Care, Mt.
Morilla MB youth group, Earth Im-
pressions by Phyllis, MLK Com-
munity Center, Mt. Ararat AME
Church, two units from AKA
FAMU, Union Hill AME, Mt. Zion


Entries In MLK


AME, Welonne Baptist Church,
JES Choir, Tallahassee Chapter of
the Buddhist Peace Fellowship,
Monticello, St. Phillips & JCHS


Club, Fred Alexander Grand State
Assembly, and JCTEA (a retired
organization).
Mt. Morrillan MB Church, Rays


Stage events opened with 0. Syl-
via Lamar-Jones presiding, recit-
ing "MLK, A Preacher, A Leader,
A Servant", the JROTC Color
A .- J


Parade


Plaines, and County Sheriff David
Hobbs.
Selections were performed by the
Male Chorus of Memorial MB
a? .'-. / .* -


/
It


THIS trumpeter, and drummers behind him, part of the
Rhythm Rushers, provided the music for the 26th Anniver-


Boys and Girls Club, and Dr.
Montgomery.
Bethel AME, VFW Post 251
Women's Auxillary, Jefferson
County Retired Educators, Piney
Woods Community, Madison
County Eastern Star, Carrie White
Boone #331 Order of the Golden
Circle, Prince Hall Affiliated, Lit-
tler Angels in Training, two units
of the 300 Club, Hickory Hill 4-H


Solid Waste Depai


Weathers Anothe
Beth Thorne was happy to report
LAZARO ALEMAN last week that garbage pickup serv-
Senior Staff Writer ice was almost back to normal, fol-
lowing the repair of one of the
Solid Waste Department Director -department's two garbage trucks and


GARBAGE accumulated at the different dumping sites
across the county during the holidays as a result of the
Solid Waste Department's two garbage trucks breaking
down. Crews had to work 10-hour days to catch up with the
collei-tions. (News Photo)


Odd Jobs, Go Carts, Rhythm Rush-.
ers, 96.1 radio van, 102.3 radio
van, MLK Marchers, 5.0 Mustang
Club and the Ebony Riders.
All of Maimie Scott Drive and
many of the side streets were
jammed, with automobiles parked
on both sides of the road and any
traffic in the area was
slow-moving.



rtment


r Crisis
the soon-expected delivery of a new
third truck.
The return of the repaired truck.
represented a major improvement
from the previous week, when both
of the department's garbage trucks
were down.
According to Thorne, one truck
went down the week before Christ-
mas and the second went down on
Jan. 3.
On Jan. 5, county commissioners
authorized Thorne to spend $12,030
on the emergency repair of one of
the trucks. She has yet to receive an
estimate for the repair of the second
truck.
Commissioners also authorized
Thome to enter an agreement with
the city of Waycross, GA, for the
rental of a garbage truck in the in-
terim. As it worked out, the com-
pany selling the county the new
garbage truck volunteered to pick up
the $75 daily rental fee for the Way-
cross truck.
Thorne said Solid Waste Depart-
ment crews have been working 10-
hour days since Jan. 5 to catch up
with the backlog of accumulated
garbage.
"I'm proud of them," Thorne said.
"When both trucks went down, eve-
rybody came together and brain-
stormed to solve the problem.
Nobody threw their hands up in the
air. I'm really proud of everyone."
(See Garbage Page 2)


sary Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parade, sponsored by the
Jefferson County Branch of NAACP. (News Photo)


Guard presented the colors, and
Glyndell B. Presley, President of
the Jefferson County NAACP, wel-
comed the crowds to the celebra-
tion and festivities.
The invocation was offered by
Rev. Queen Miller, and "Lift Your
Voice and Sing" was performed by
Min. Harriett Cuyler.
Greetings were given by Mayor
Julie Conley, County Judge Bobby


Church, "A Charge" performed by
Min. Terry L. Presley, Associate
Minister of Memorial MB Church,
"Precious Lord"performed by Rev.
Matthew Williams, Associate Min-
ister of Memorial MB Church, and
"Faith in the Struggle" performed
by Rev. Bobby Duval, Moderator,
First Bethlehem Association, 'and
guitar selections were played by
Billy Simmons.


HANDLERS and their scouts prepare to release dogs for
the start of the Continental Field Trials, which Dixie Plan-
tation has been hosting since 1937. (News Photo)

111th Continental Field Trials

Underway At Dixie Plantation


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The 111th Continental Field Trials
at Dixie Plantation officially got un-
derway Monday morning.
Dottie Taylor, secretary at Dixie
Plantation, reports a total of 53 dogs
in the derby category (dogs under
two years of age) and 109 in the all-
age. That's slightly down from last
year's record of 174 entries, with 60
of those comnleting in the derby and


114 in the all-age.
Expectations are that the derby
part of the competition will con-
clude midday Thursday, with a brief
noon ceremony planned outside the
lunch house to honor the winners.
The all-age competition is expected
to begin first thing Friday and con-
clude sometime near the end of the
month, weather permitting.
Taylor explained that the dogs are
not run in heavy fog, when visibility
is poor. Nor are they run in thunder-
(See Dixie Page 2) ,


"How Civil Is Your Rights" was
recited by Rev. Al Bivens, Sr., pas-
tor, Bethel AME Church, Jennings,
FL, "It is Well" performed by Don-
ald Blount, "We Shall Not Be
Moved" by Rev. Helen Johnson-
Robinson, Pastor Bethel AME
Church of Monticello, and selec-
tions were performed by Chantell
Mullins and Denaysha Mullins.
"Faith and Hope" was performed
by Min. Lori Bouie, Pastor Shiloh
AME Church of Miccosukee, se-
lections performed by Febe, the
Boys and Girls Step Club per-
formed, LaRhonda Washington
performed selections and John Nel-
son Sr. played some selections on
the saxophone.
Selections were performed by the
memorial MB Church Male Chorus
and Rev. Issac Manning, Pastor of
Beth Page MB Church of Wacissa.
"We Shall Overcome" was ren-
dered by Min. Gene Hall, Associate
Minister of Spring Hill MB Church
of Tallahassee, Cherise Graham
performed a selection, and the 500
Degrees Dance Troupe performed.
Also performing were the Monti-
cello African Drummers, selections
sung by Min. Georgianna
Williams, Associate Minister
Greater Fellowship MB Church, "A
Charge To Keep" performed by
Rev. John Jones, Associate Minis-
ter of St. Tabernacle Church of
God in Unity and selections per-
formed by Min. Walter Davis and
William Crumitie and Rev. Carl Jo-
seph and the Spiritual Trutones of
Madison performed.
The Celebration at the Park was
festive and hundreds of people
paronized the many booths and ac-
tivities.
Aromas wafting through the air
(See MLK Parade Page 2)


Chats Aim

To improve

FCAT Scores

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

As part of its Continuous Im-
provement Model, Jefferson County
High School conducted "FCAT
Chats," January 9-11.
Joining JCHS teachers and admin-
istrators in conducting the chats,
were District Office personnel, in-
cluding: Superintendent Phil Barker,
Sherry Heyen, Kelvin Norton, Jim
Norton, and Kathy Joyner.
The purpose of the "chats" was to
help students examine their per-
formance on the recent FCAT, not-
ing where they did well and where
they need help.
Every student in the ninth and
tenth grade spent some 15 minutes
with a chatter who discussed his/her
FCAT Reading and Math scores
from last year.
Students were informed what
score they needed to make in order
to show a year's growth, or the score
they needed in order to pass the
tenth grade test.
Chatters helped students review
their strengths and weaknesses, and
offered suggestions for improving
the scores.
Students discussed what they can
do to improve their scores and how
the school may be able to best assist
them in achieving this improvement.
Students and chatters both said
they believed the chats were a posi-
(See Goal To Page 2)


CO









PAGE 1, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 18, 2006


Goal To Improve FCAT Scores
(Continued From Page 1)


tive experience.
JCHS plans to continue these con-
ferences in the future, in addition to
other grade level conferences.

Under the Continuous Improve-
ment Model, students are placed in
tutorial or enrichment classes, based
on their scores.
Scores are reviewed weekly and
students reassigned as they progress.


Practice materials and instruction


are provided in tutorial classes.
Enrichment classes offer educa-
tional activities.

In math students take weekly as-
sessments, based on preselected
FCAT skills and benchmarks.
Data from these assessments are_
collected.
Comprehensive remediation is
provided daily with weekly assign-
ments.


In classes, English teachers pro-
vide instructions on the focus skills.
Skills assessments are given regu-
larly and teachers incorporated
FCAT benchmarks throughout the
curriculum.

The Continuous Improvement
Model Plan used at JCHS by the
team is an eight step process de-
signed to improve student achieve-
ment.


CHARLES PARRISH, Grand Marshal of the
Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Parade, rides


ACA'S John Steph(

Wins Spelling Con


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

John Stephens, a grade seven stu-
dent at ACA, won the annual Jef-
ferson County Spelling Bee, last
week, held at Aucilla Christian
Academy.

Locations alternate between
Howard Middle School and
Aucilla, each year.


Kent Jones, A
first runner up
Schofield, ACA g
second runner up.
There were 1
the contest.
"The crowd wa
than last year, bu
said Co-coordinato
With two con
ing, Jones missp
"aquanaut", givin
victory.


Building Inspecto

Help Out In Madis


LAZARO ALEMAN
:Senior Staff Writer

Building Inspector Wallace Bul-
lock will be spending time in Madi-
son County during the next few
weeks, and possibly the next few
months, helping out with the build-
'ing inspections there.
Madison County officials ap-
proached commissioners here last
week to request the help. The offi-
cials explained that their building
inspector had left office to accept
another job and the county was
without a person to fill the position.
Absent Bullock's help, the offi-
cials said Madison County would be
unable to issue any permits or do in-
spections. They reminded commis-
sioner that when this county had


lacked a building
Madison County 1
had helped out her
"We want Wa
Madison County
the operation there
iio le c t"3i t I t w ill1


in white stretch Limousine rby Mike's Limou-
sines of Tallahassee. (News Photo)


eL S Awards and trophies were pre-
m sented to the winners.
Love said coordinators express
test their appreciation to Capital City
Bank- for providing the trophies,
CA grade 7, was and Farmers and Merchants Bank
p and Ashley for providing awards for the chaim-
grade 5, was the pion and runners utip.
Pronouncer was Linda
17 participants in Hamedani.
Judges were Bobby Plaines and
as a little smaller' Phil Barker.
ut it was good," Participants in the Spelling Bee.
Dr Debbie Love. from.ACA included: fourth grade,
itestansts remain- Aimee Love, Christiana Reams and
.elled the word, Annie'Yang. .
.g Stephens the' Fifth grade, Ashli Cline, Ashley"
Schofield, and Audrey Wynn.
Seventh grade, Kent Jones and
eighth grade, John Stephens.
r ,FromP JES,. fourth grade, Haley
r T Wark, and fifth grade, Jana Barber
and Sue Wood.
o n From HMS, sixth grade, Raheem
Allen and Emanuel Finn, seventh
g inspector, the grade, Bria Heard and Raven Mos-
building inspector ley, and eighth grade, Jasmine
e. Francis.
llace' to work in The Winners will parlicipate ip
part-tiine to keep the Big Bend Regional Spelling
e going, -the-offi- Bee, 1 p.m., Feb. 25,' :ai rle FSU-
Srhhl,, h f +,,,. TV studio in Tallahassee.


c .SO Oa l. ILt LIIi J FJLJUlUIJ l.a .Jpt A
hours, two days a week, until we
can hire someone.
"Being an interlocal agreement, it
will also allow us to reciprocate in
future, when Bullock goes on vaca-
tion or if he becomes ill."
Bullock assured the commission-
ers that his going to Madison
County shouldn't interfere with the
local operation. As it was, he said,
his office was experiencing a slump
in building permits at the moment.
Commissioners approved the re-
quest without much discussion.


Dixie Plantation Field Trials
(Continued From Page 1) The object of the trials is to test Dixie Plantation is considered the
storms, although they will run in a the dogs' performance in the pursuit premier wild-game field trial in the
light rain. of feathered quarry, quails in this country, a recognition that the C. M.
Typically, the plantation runs instance. Judges score the dogs on Livingston Foundation takes seri-
seven braces a day, with a brace their class, style, endurance and the ously and strives to maintain. The
consisting of two dogs and their number of coveys that they flush, foundation manages the 8,000-plus
handlers, or trainers, among other things. acre plantation and seek, among
other things, to preserve and per-
Garbage The bird dogs are trained to point petuate the sport of field trials.
out the quarry, freeze in position, Dixie Plantation has been hosting
(Continued From Page 1) and await the trainer's command be- the Continental Field Trials since
* The department typically picks up fore moving again. Dogs that move 1937. It annually attracts trainers
,00 tons of garage each week in the too soon, that fail to find quail, .or and champion dogs from around the
county, excluding the city. that intrude on another dog's point country.
. The department transported lose points. If enough negative The plantation is located about 10
795.33 tons of garbage to the land- points accumulate, a dog will be dis- miles northeast of Monticello on
fill in December, according to qualified. CR-146, also known as the Ashville
Thorne. Highway.


With the new garbage truck in
service, the department will have
three garbage trucks, the most it has
ever had, Thorne said.


MLK Parade
(Continued From Page 1)
varied from fried fish, to fried
chicken, baby back ribs, pop corn,
hot dogs, hamburgers, French Fries
and the like.
Youngsters enjoyed snow cones
as they moved from vendor to ven-
dor or watched the stage events,
while others ate chicken, barbecue
ribs and other foods.
The chairperson for the MLK
Festival was Diane Hall, the Chair
for the booths and vendors was
Barbara Lamar.

Activities 'and games for the chil-
dren Were plentiful, with the two
bubble bounces drawing crowds,
waiting their turn.


Evangelism Conference
Jan. 23-24 (Monday/Tuesday)
Dauphin Way Baptist Church, Mobile, Ala. (exit #4,1-65)
THEME: "More Than Ever Before"; from 1 p.m. Monday to 8 p.m. Tuesday
MUSIC: Choirs from Cottage Hill Baptist Church & Dauphin Way Baptist
Church; "Paid in Full" quartet; "Voices," from the University of Mobile
ADMISSION: Free to all, thanks to Cooperative Program; everyone welcome.


Project HOPE Seeks

Hurricane Evacuees


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Apalachee Center is coordinating
Project HOPE, designed to locate
individuals and families in the area
who were relocated as evacuees
from Hurricane Katrina, and cannot
return to their communities, for
whatever reason.
The project is" designed to help
reintegrate Hurricane Katrina fami-


lies into their new community.
Project HOPE is the result of a
grant which makes it possible to
identify and provide services for
mental health related needs for
evacuees.
Project HOPE is also accepting
donations for household goods.
To request services or for further
information, call (850) 523-3337 or
(800) 500-9611.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 18, 2006 PAGE 3


Mardis Gras Th

Of Downtown


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Mardi Gras is the theme of Feb-
ruary's Home Town Get Down,
planned 5-9 p.m Friday, Feb. 24.


Volunteers a
prizes are current
Spokesperson
said the event v
ana cuisine a
music, with Dog
-cal shops, dec


Library Book Signii

Feature Local Auth


LEIGH GRAHAM DALZELL became an and is co-own
American Citizen, Jan 12, 2006, In Jackson- Cooling, Inc.
ville. She immigrated from Canada in 1976


County's Rainfall Above

Average For December


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Rainfall in the county for Decem-
ber was well above the average for
the time of year, but lower than in
,other parts of the Suwanne River
Water Management District
(SRWMD).
The latest statistics from the
SRWMD show that the county re-
ceived 4.99 inches of rain in De-
cember, versus the 4.86 inches it re-
ceived in December of last year.


The average rainfall for the county
in December is 3.44 inches.
Other counties in the district,
which extends from Alachua to Jef-
ferson, received up to 7.28 inches of
rain in December, with Baker, Dixie
and Union counties receiving well
above 7 inches on average.
District-wide, the average rainfall
for December was 6.47 inches, com-
pared with the average rainfall of
2.79 inches for December of last
year. The district's average rainfall
for December for all years on record
is 3.13 inches.


HMS Announces Third

Six Weeks Honor Roll


Howard middle School Principal
Juliet Jackson reports the academic
honor roll for the third six weeks
grading period.
In the sixth grade, on the A
Honor Roll was Emily Howell.
On the A/B Honor Roll were;
Shataviih Anderson, Haylee Bell,
Franklin Cavallier, Alexus Cham-
bers, Emanuel Finn, Branden Hill,
Brionna Jones, and Lanesiyah Mas-
sey.
Ka'Desjah Norton, Celeste Rob-
inson, Drucilla Shaw, Terez Wash-
ington, Denzel Whitfield, Simone
Williams, Tre'Von Youman and
Shanice Young.
In the seventh grade, on the A
Honor Roll was Brandon Whitfield.
On the A/B Honor Roll were;
Adia Alexander, Gerrold Austin,
Lakaya Brown, Gregory Doston,
Aranthza Fenimore, and Issac Gil-
ley.
Jasmine Graham, Zeleka Houston,
Chasity James, Sara McDonald,
Denita Miller, Lavondra Parris,
Cardrecia Walker, and Misty Wat-
son.
In the eighth grade, on the A, B
Honor Roll were; Janelle Bassa,


Breyon Crumity, Harold Ingram,
Paris Little John, Lena Odom,
Lakaydria Parris and Amber Wein-
rich.


er of Stewart Heating and


"Cumulative rainfall for the past 12
months is 58.87 inches, compared to
the long-term average annual district
rainfall of 55.2 inches, resulting in a
surplus for the calendar year of
about seven percent," the report
states.
Groundwater levels in the Flori-
dan aquifer, meanwhile, declined an
average of two inches during De-
cember, according to the report.
"The aquifer has not yet had time
to respond to the large rain events
that began the week before Christ-
mas,"-the report states. "The largest
individual,well increases of one foot
or more occurred primarily along
the coast, while the greatest declines
manifested along the northern tier of
the district."
Lakes across the district gained
about 7 inches on average by the
end of December. River levels
across the district likewise increased
during December, with the sharpest
rises occurring after the heavy rain
of Dec. 18th.
The district continues to recom-
mend that water conservation be an
ongoing activity for all water users.


When was


the last


time you


made an


investment


that saved


lives?


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Local authors Dee Counts and
Arnold Burkart will sign copies of
their respective books 3 p.m. Sun-
day, Jan 22, at the library.
A reception, sponsored by the
Friends of the Library will provide
light refreshments.
Counts recently wrote an updated
edition of the history of Jefferson
County titled 'Familiar Faces and
Quiet Places'.
It includes more than 200 photo-
graphs that depict life through the
years and 144 pages of informa-
tive text.
Counts had worked over a period
of a year compiling pictures and sto-
ries of local history.
Copies of the book may also be
purchased at the Chamber of Com-
merce and any Farmers & Mer-
chants Bank.


^, The First Step

To Any Buying
Decision


Monticello News
Classifieds


When you invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
enormous-healthier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. It's a dividend that builds a
strong community.


307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL 32303 (904) 41 4-0844


Burkart has
'Songs and Tun
Enlightenment'.
This publicat:
of the best of po
sical music that
and danced by t
from 1780-1820.
Many people
some Scottish h
enjoy the afternm
tory and music
Burkart's and the


S the theme.
ie m e "It hasn't been set in stone yet,
but we're going to try to get a jazz
Ev e n t band," said Imbrunone.
Ev e n b A stationary float is planned in
the middle of Dogwood Street,
.nd the donation of from which traditional Mardi Gras
itly sought. beads will be thrown into the
Ericka Imbrunone crowd.
will feature Louisi- A Mardis Gras Mask Contest will
nd New Orleans be held and the winners will re-
gwood street and lo- ceive prizes.
,orated to illustrate "Just for the fun of it, we're
thinking about fortune tellers, too,"
said Imbrunone. "Nothing real se-
Sng TO rious, just for fun."
A raffle will take place for a prize
o trs as yet undetermined.
As usual, the festivities will fea-
authored the book ture vendors of everything from
es for the Scottish food to collectibles, art, clothing
and jewelry, along with the sale of
ion embraces some beer and wine.
pular folk and clas-
was sung, played, Also on hand, will be members of
the Scottish people the Humane Society with an adop-
tion booth.
e of this area have Members will sell Humane Soci-
heritage and would ety T-shirts and note cards.
oon of Scottish his- To donate prizes or to volunteer
performed by the to help with the event, call Imbru-
eir guests, none at 997-2015


A.L. Hall Funeral Directors, Inc.


Vl


dba


4 I v620 York St., P.O. Box 425,
SMonticello, FL. 32344
850-997-5553
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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 18, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

_ RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Crime Message


Notes 25 Years


It began as a simple idea. An ani-
mated dog in a rumpled trench coat,
uttering the words. "You don't know
me yet. But you will."
Twenty-five years and three gen-
erations later, people still recognize
McGruff the Crime Dog as an
American icon that is "taking a bite
out of crime."
In the early 1970s, most people
thought it was strictly up to law en-
forcement to prevent crime. How-
ever. a group of concerned private
citizens and government leaders be-
lieved that working individually and
collectively, in tandem with the po-
lice, could aid in crime prevention.
Fast-foward to 1980, when an ad
campaign created by advertising
agency Saatchi & Saatchi and dis-
tributed by The Advertising Council
Inc. introduced McGruff the Crime
Dog to the American public.
Originally, the National Crime
Prevention Council's iconic brand
targeted adults with commonsense
messages about everything from
home security to neighborhood
safety.
Over the years, he extended his
reach to teens and children, teaching


them how to protect themselves
against the dangers of drug abuse
and gun violence, and more
recently, how to handle bullies and
surf the Internet safely.
Since his debut. McGruff has been
instrumental in showing adults and
youth alike how their involvement
can reduce crime. Today more than
three out of four Americans believe
they can personally do something to
prevent crimes from occurring.
While crime in e-.cral has been
reduced from Lc highs seen in
the 1910", it remains a reality in
communities across the nation every
day. To this end, it is clear that even
with a more diverse, older, technol-
ogy savvy nation, McGruff the
Crime Dog still has a job to do.
In the past quarter-century,
McGruff has become more than just
a familiar face. He is a true piece of
Americana, even appearing in trivia
questions on "Jeopardy" and "Wheel
of Fortune," 'in movies such as
."Mystic River," and on VHl's "I
Love the 80s Strikes Back."
More than $1 billion has been do-
nated to help spread McGruffs mes-
sage that together, we can all "Take
A Bite Out of Crime."


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
January 10, 1996
Residents of several streets slated
for paving and other improvements
in the southeast quadrant of the city
as part of a $505,025 CDBC neigh-
borhood Revitalization Grant may
soon be seeing progress on the pro-
ject, which is behind schedule.
The Grants office was notified Fri-
day that shipments of food for distri-
bution to the needy and elderly in
the county will resume Jan. 17.
City residents with historic houses
outside the current historic district
may want to take note: The city is
looking to expand the district.
The Jefferson County Branch
NAACP will observe its annual Dr.
Martin Luther King Memorial
Church Program 3 p.m. Sunday,
Jan. 14.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
January 10, 1986
Four sites in Jefferson County are
being considered for a coal-fired
generating plant. If the plant is built
in Jefferson County it would be six
to 14 miles away from the city of
Monticello.
Monticello voters will decide
Monday whether to extend the time
of office from two years to four
years for elected city positions. Vot-
ers will also decide whether to allow
the City Council to appoint a new
member if one should die, resign, or
be removed from office or otherwise
become unable to fulfill the terms of
office.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
January 8, 1976
At a meeting of the Monticello
Jefferson County Chamber of Com-


,merce held on Tuesday, January 6,
the Chamber approved a motion to
continue to support the Downtown
Improvement Committee on a tem-
porary basis.
At a meeting of the Watermelon
Festival committee held on Tuesday,
January 6, a children's parade in
conjunction with the regular festival
parade was discussed.
The Monticello Garden Club is
joining with all clubs of the National
Federation of Garden Clubs of
America in planting a "Liberty" tree
in their communities.
FORTY YEARS AGO
January 7, 1965
Bill Anderson elected in Novem-
ber as new president of the Monti-
cello Jefferson County Chamber of
Commerce took office the first of
the year.
Mrs. J.I. Folsom Sr., and Henry
Folsom entertained with a family
birthday luncheon New Year's Day
at their home on North Water Street.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
January 6, 1956
Mr. and Mrs. A.P. Hartsfield of
Aucilla celebrated their fifty-ninth
wedding anniversary with a family
dinner at the Elks Club in Live Oak.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
January 4, 1946
Monticello Order of the Eastern
Star and Greenville chapter of East-
ern Star held a joint installation in
Greenville.
Mrs. Kathleen Bowden and sons
left for their former home in Clewis-
ton for a visit.
Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Morris
and Mrs. William Bailey visited
Jacksonville.


Letters to the Editor Welcomed
500 Words or Less

Letters must be signed and include
phone number or writer


Opinion & Comment


Who's Paying Bills, Anyway?


With the holiday season behind us
and the New Year before us, it's
time to start thinking about gather-
ing income tax information.
From now to April 15, we'll play
games like "Find the Canceled
Check," and "I Thought I Filed That
Receipt."
One has to be a Philadelphia law-
yer to figure out the tax rules and an
expert bookkeeper to comply with
documentation required for deduc-
tions.
It can be downright depressing!
Take heart though, a slight attitude
adjustment might make the whole
process a little less painful.
Consider that you are one of the
government's financiers. Savor the
notion that the government couldn't,
function without your money! The
next time you see the President on
the tube, remember you are paying
his salary!
Having this new approach fixed
firmly in your mind, give some
thought to what changes you might
wish to make. Yes, you can make
changes. After all, you are paying
the bill!


Publisher's

Notebook |


'~s ..~-.


R97n Cidion


Stumped for ideas'? Let me,make a
few suggestions.
For openers let's rent space in the
White House to those folks who
want 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue as
their address.
Those House and Senate dining
rooms could be replaced with a cou-
ple of delis: Most working people
can get by with a ham sandwich or
two for lunch, so why not Congress?
The limos used by high govern-
ment officials could be replaced
with a shuttle bus.
Seats on Air Force One could be


sold to people who want to fly with
the President. That might make the
perfect gift for the "hard to buy for"
person on your Christmas gift list.
Camp David could be operated as
a resort. Think of the hefty fees that
would bring in to the government
coffers.
Since Ambassadorships are often
political plums, salaries for those
posts should be $1 per year.
Are you getting the hang of this?
By now your juices should be flow-
ing and you are thinking of several
areas where government expenses


can be cut.
Well, for heaven's sake, sound offI
Dash off a note to your Congress-
man and Senators right now!
Try to include the idea about do-
ing away with the House and Senate
dining rooms so you'll be sure to get
their attention.
Heck, if we're paying the bills for
this bloated monster known as the
federal government, it's high time'
we called the shots!
Who knows what brilliant idea,
may surface from someone right
here in Jefferson County?
Now, please understand, I'm not
absolutely certain your cost-cutting
idea will be accepted by the Wash-
ington power structure. Good ideas
have been known to languish on the
Hill.
What I do know is that getting
your cost-cutting ideas down on pa-
per and sent off to Congress will be
good therapy.
Instead of dreading preparation of
your income tax, this new attitude
may help you relish the job.
After all, who's in charge here
anyway?


'Pork' Parade Marches On


BY DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist


Actually it is "tax time" all the
time. According to the National
Taxpayers Union, 40 cents of every
dollar you earn is taken from you by
different government agencies.
The price of every gallon of gaso-
line in Florida, for example, in-
cludes 48 cents in taxes, the ninth
highest in the nation.
Your telephone bill, cell phone
bill, electric bill and cable TV bill
(to mention a few) all have various
taxes, sometimes disguised as
"fees," and don't forget those Jeffer-
son County taxes, vehicle registra-
tion "fees" and that state tax you pay
on everything from clothing to gro-
ceries.
At the federal level, every cent
taken (including Social
Security/MEDICARE
"contributions") are all dumped into


the United Stated Treasury to fuel
the insatiable appetite of our elected
officials to spend it all. The truth is
that our elected officials are spend-
-ing so much money in so many
ways that it is virtually impossible to
keep track.
All presidents including President
Bush campaign on stopping the
fleecing of taxpayers by eliminating
the needless "pork" in the .congres-
sional budget proposals: Bush's offi-
cial 2003 budget was touted as a war
against boondoggles and pet pro-
jects he said he would no longer tol-
erate.
Ultimately he surrendered in the
"pork" war by signing into law a
$286 billion transportation bill that
contained a record 6,371 pet pro-
jects inserted by members .of Con-
gress from both parties.
Now you Bush haters, don't get
too excited, Clinton was party to the
same Congressional "pork barrel"
spending for his eight years in


office, not to mention the $1 billion
dollars he sent to Haiti for which no
one can make an accounting.
The Congressional code word for
such "pork" is "earmarks." It is
nothing more than a golden opportu-
nity to spend your hard earned tax
dollars by tacking special interest
pet projects on to important legisla-
tion. When the major bill is passed,
bingo!, so are all the "earmarks."
When you are doing your federal
income tax, remember that those
precious dollars are going for such
"needed" projects as 6.3 million for
wood utilization research, 1.7 mil-
lion for the International Fertilizer
Development Association, 1 million
for the Paper Industry Hall of Fame,
4 million for the Packard Museum
in Ohio and the Henry Ford Mu-
seum in Michigan and of course the
essential 1.2 million for the installa-
tion of lighting on the Blue Ridge
Music Center. Believe me, the ugly
list goes on and on and on!!


What -about closer to home and
our congressional representation? I
just received Congressman F. Allen
Boyd, Jr.'s "2005 Washington Up-
date." It begins with encouraging
statements about getting control of
government spending and reducing
the out of control national debt.
It also has a special "Holding
Government Accountable" section
bemoaning reckless government
spending. But just when I am about
to shout with joy over having a rep-
resentative eager to attack govern-
ment waste, I note the section enti-
tled "Working for North Florida,"
that proudly lists some of Congress-
man Boyd's own share of the
"pork."
If the national debt is such a high
priority for Congressman Boyd's at-
tention and actions, then someone
please explain the urgency of spend-
ing taxpayer dollars for such things
as $450,000 to dredge the McGriff
(See Parade Page 5)





than intended.
Unsuccessful attempts to cut
down on alcohol use.
Use despite physical or psycho-
logical consequences.
Excessive time related to drink-
ing or its effects.
Impaired social or work activi-
ties due to alcohol.
Andy S. was prescribed a new
medicine called Campral (acampro-
sate calcium) Delayed-Release Tab-
lets, the first treatment for alcohol-
ism in almost a decade.
Now available to help maintain
abstinence from alcohol in patients
with alcohol dependence, Campral
is used as part of a comprehensive
(See Alcoholics Page 5)


Andy S. was 39 before he finally
did something about the self-
destructive life he was living.
Andy is a fourth generation alco-
holic who finally checked himself
into rehab to treat his chronic dis-
ease, 28 years after trying his first
drink.
A self-described alcoholic by age
20, Andy wishes he had had tools to
stop drinking years ago. Unfortu-
nately, despite repeated attempts to
quit, he could never find the right
treatment plan to help him until
now.
Although there are ongoing efforts
to raise awareness of alcohol de-
pendence in the United States, this
disease continues to be misunder..


stood.
Many people do not know that al-
coholism is a disease of the brain.
not a lack of will power. It is a dis-
ease that can be effectively treated.
Andy has been sober for over five
months now. He knows firsthand
that alcoholism is not just a matter
of.willpower.
"Alcoholism has been in my fam-
ily for generations. I knew it was in
my genes, but I thought I was strong
enough to overcome the desire to
drink on my own. But it's a disease
that controls how you think you
want alcohol all the time. I have
tried to stop several times before,
but have never been successful until
now, when I took a new approach to


treatment by combining behavioral
therapy with medication."
There are many Americans out
there like Andy who need to seek
treatment for their disease. The first
step in the treatment process is diag-
nosis of the medical illness. Alco-
holism, or alcohol dependence,
relates to an imbalance in a person's
brain chemistry and has distinct
symptoms:
Tolerance: the need to consume
even greater amounts of alcohol to
get "high".
Physical dependence: with-
drawal symptoms, such as nausea,
shakiness and anxiety, when a per-
son stops drinking.
Loss of control: drinking more


Alcoholics Have Options







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 18, 2006 PAGE 5


Letters...


Dear Editor:
There seems to be a lot of un-
known on the part of those that are
writing in favor of the view of re-
zoning and development.
These three or four people that
have written in the favor of the
Commissioners are either close
neighbors, business associates, or sit
on committees that deal with them
That is the only excuse they have,
unless they are from another planet.
If you truly believe the Commis-
sioners are looking out for your best
interest, I know you haven't at-
tended a public meeting. I guess
you think the mistrust placed on
Capital Hill is OK and I know you
don't criticize our President.
The Comprehensive Plan, Land
Development Code, Future Land
Use Map, and State Statute, don't
have any meaning in your eyes.
Just whatever you are told by your
elected officials will serve your
needs, now and in the future. I'm
sure you'll be one of the firsts to
complain when the infrastructure is-
n't in place for you and your family.
The people who are speaking out
against the Commissioners and the
rezonings have facts and knowledge
in hand. They are not speaking out
against just more density.
They are speaking out against the
negative effects of density when a
county is not -prepared for the
growth that is being allowed in a re-
zoning.
Growth is inevitable, but growth
has to be planned for, and managed
Growth that Jefferson County is not
prepared for at this time. Unfortu-
nately, this does not seem to be a
priority when the Commissioners
vote in favor of a higher density re-
zoning.
Each category of our present land
use map has more than enough zon-



Parade
(Continued From Page 4)
Channel, $400,000 for a feed effi-
ci-ncy in cattle study, or 3.6 million
for the Florida Climate Research
Consortium and one million for
poultry and dairy waste treatment?
As taxpaying voters, I think we
are well overdue in reminding our-
selves of the old adage, "Actions do
speak louder than words."
P.S. According to several national
polls, Americans rank terrorism and
illegal immigration as their main
government priorities. I missed any
mention of these critically important
major issues in Congressman Boyd's
annual "2005 Washington Update."
(Dennis Foggy is a retired U.S.
Army Lt. Colonel, a former teacher,
and current resident of Jefferson
County.)



Alcoholics
(Continued From Page 4)
program that includes psychosocial
support.
"Because of the behavioral and
physiological components involved
in this disease, the importance of
having a twofold treatment option
cannot be stressed enough," explains
Henry Kranzler, M.D., Professor of
Psychiatry, University of Connecti-
cut School of Medicine.
"While Campral can help address
the brain chemistry behind alcohol-
related problems, only psychologi-
cal counseling can get to the emo-
tional issues that may have driven
the patient to the bottle in the first
place."
In clinical trials, Campral has been
proven to not only help alcohol-
dependent patients maintain absti-
nence, but also significantly prolong
the time to first drink.
If you or someone you know may
have a problem with alcohol, it is
important to speak to your doctor.
-Once diagnosed, alcoholism can
be treated with a combination of
pharmacotherapy and psychosocial
support programs.
There. are many pathways to re-
covery from this chronic disease,
and patients should explore as many


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Three Jefferson County residents
are among the 150 cast members in
the Brookwood School's production
of Disney's Beauty and the Beast.
Abby Lewis appears as the Milk-
maid in the opening scene. Austin
Malloy portrays a knife; and Kaitlin
Thompson is a napkin in the huge
production number, "Be Our
Guest."
Disney's Beauty and the Beast
will be presented at 8 p.m. on
Friday, Feb. 3; 2 and 8 p.m. on Sat-
urday, Feb. 4; and 2 p.m. on
Sunday, Feb. 5 at the Thomasville
Municipal Auditorium.
Musical numbers include: "Belle,"
"Gaston," "Be Our Guest," and the
title song "Beauty and the Beast."
Disney's Beauty and the Beast
presents the story of Belle, a lovely


and supported by the wor
club, through various fund
Expenses such a: mainte
taxes and insurance are
by their efforts.
The Club has quite
Many a class party, wedd
tion, or family reunion
held there.
The club is in need of n
bers, more participation
support.
It is one of the institi
makes Jefferson County
derful.c. .ing community i
We can't let these wonder
down. I encourage more
join our club.
If you would like to
member, contact Amanda
997-4553.


young girl who lives with
a dotty inventor.
When her father does
from a trip to the local
rushes off to find him.
To her dismay, she disco
being held captive in an
by a horrible beast.
She trades her freedom f
the tale, as old as time, beg
The story presents the a
Belle to tame the unfortu
and his ultimate transform
a handsome prince.
For additional informa
the production, or to reser
call Brookwood at 229-22
Tickets are also avail
door.


men of the'
raisers.
enance and
supported

a history.
ling recep-
has been

nore mem-
and monre


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


City and county residents requir-
utions that ing large quantities of ice for boat-
the won-ing and other outdoor activities may
t is today soon be able to satisfy their need
rful ladies right in town.
iomen to s George Koller, owner of a vacant
Women to on 845 E. Washington St., is pro-

become a posing to install a coin-operated,
a Ouzts at drive-through, freestanding ice
vending machine on the site.
The industrial-size machine, 24
Sincerely, ...
Toni Lan, feet long by 8 feet wide by 8 feet
tall, falls under the category of a
building in the city's development
code.
S"It's something that the code never
contemplated," said City Clerk
Emily Anderson, adding that the
a 1 typical vending machine is portable
c and goes inside a building.
her father, She compares the proposed ice
vending machine to an automated
not return car wash, more appropriately suited
fair, Belle for coastal communities.
And in fact, such machines re-
overs he is portedly already exist in Madison,
old castle Carrabelle, St. George, Perry and
Thomasville.
for his and City officials began dealing with
gins. the issue earlier this month, when
attempts of Koller approached the council and
nate Beast asked for temporary permission to
nation into place the machine on the site while
he went through the permitting
tion about process.
rve tickets, The council ultimately denied the
6-8070. request, with Mayor Julie Conley
able at.the the lead opponent.
"I have concerns about its appear-
ance," Conley said of the machine.


Monticello News
Keeps You
Informed!!


WE DELIVER. CALL FOR DELIVERY CHARGE

11025 EAST MAHAN
5 onticllo. *Border
Lm, 2 Border y-I
MAHAN


ing to meet our needs. People are
moving and buying land here today
as it is currently zoned, trying to es-
cape the problems of the so-called
city life. We do not need to rezone
for developers to get people to no-
tice and relocate to Jefferson
County.
I recently had to make a trip to the
Orlando and Tampa Bay areas. I
wish the people who are pro-
development had been with me.
Everywhere there are buildings and
subdivisions. There isn't space for
all of it, so they tear down and re-
build in the same spot.
The traffic was horrendous. I saw
more cars in one day than I saw all
year here. Certainly no "home town"
atmosphere.
I suppose the citizens in those
counties put their faith and trust in


'I frankly don't want to see it
On Tuesday night, the Loco
ning Agency reviewed Kolle
plan and recommended ap
with conditions.
Among the conditions,
must install a six-foot buffe
on the southern portion of th
erty and a hedge on the east s
must also. place the machine
paved portion of the property
Proponents describe the r
as state-of-the-art equipment
$100,000-plus price range. T
chine is fully automated anc
ers ice in bags or in bulk. V
will be able to access the n
from Washington or Marvin s


Flu Shots

Available

Here Now


Residents Need To Look


Beyond What Officials Say


Dear Editor:
I recently attended the first meet-
ing of the New Year, at the
Woman's Club.
Having been a member since we
moved to Jefferson County 13 years
ago, I was saddened by the dwin-
dling attendance at our meetings.
When I joined, 1 was so proud to
be associated with a service-oriented
club, whose impact on the commu-
nity was admirable.
The ladies were so involved in
many community and charitable
projects.
Just recently, the Holiday Cake
Sale was very successful.
Four cornerstones of the club, no-
tably President Amanda Ouzts, Lou-
sie Chitwood, Lottie Berry and
Emily Taylor should be
commended.
The Woman's Club is:self owned


treatment options as possible until
they find one that works and help
them maintain abstinence and
change lifestyle patterns.


their Commissioners and the flood-
gates were opened.
They never imagined what the fu-
ture had in store for them and the
problems that they now face.
Don't think it can't happen here, it
is just getting started.
It appears that the Commissioners
are only concerned for the property
rights of the person asking for the
rezoning.
When this is allowed to happen,
they take away the rights of the rest
of the County, all due to lack of vi-
sioning and greed on the part of de-
velopers and commissioners.
So as long as I own a postage size
piece of property, am one of the 40
percent who pay taxes in the county,
and vote, I'll continue to fight for
my rights.
Cindy Lee'


/. '" ., f
S .


/ .*;


1.



nh

4t.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Though the Jefferson County
Health Department ran out of the
flu vaccines about two months ago,
,... another supply has arrived and the
'' vaccinations are now available.
Spokesperson Donna Melgaard
urges residents who have not ac-
quired the vaccine yet, to do so.
"January and February are the
peak months of flu season and any-
one acquiring a flu shot in January
will be carried out for the rest of
the winter," she said.
The shots are being given to both
S- the high risk and low risk residents.
The inoculations are $15 and they
are covered by Medicare.
Those in the high risk category
include;
65 years or older, with or with-
out chronic medical conditions.
.,t Persons ages 2-64 with chronic
medical conditions.
Pregnant women.
Health care personnel who pro- *
rs- vide direct patient care.
nt. Household contacts and out of
home caregivers.
Residents are encouraged to call
the Health Department at 342-0170
for an appointment.
Practical steps to follow to stop
the spread of flu include;
Clean hands often with soap
and water or an alcohol-based hand
there." cleanser.
al Plan- Avoid touching your eyes, nose
her's site and mouth.
iproval, Stay home when you are sick
and keep sick.children home.
Koller Avoid close contact with peo-
r fence ple who are ill, if possible.


e prop-
;ide. He
on the

machine
in the
Fhe ma-
d deliv-
'ehicles
machine
streets.


Help us fight amyotrophic
lateral sclerosis, better known
as Lou Gehrig's disease.

Muscular Dystrophy Association
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Women Encouraged

To Join Woman's Club


DENTAL ASSISTANT Angie Barr gets a flu shot from Nu
ing Director Donna Melgaard, at the Health Departme
(News Photo)



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Local Residents II


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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 18, 2006


Lifestyle


~h.
.:~:"~

I,.
.1-I-
t' .14


PAT PEARSON speaks to the Woman's Club
about the history of Lloyd, and the restora-
tion of the Laffitte Store built around 1912,


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Members of the Monticello
Woman's Club met for their January
meeting to hear a program about the
Lloyd Comlun-nity Preservation
Trust, presented by longtime Lloyd
resident Pat Fearson.
She brought pictures, information,
and history about Lloyd, and talked
briefly about the Laffitte Store built
around 1912 and discussed its res-
toration currently ongoing.
Walter L loyd. a cot-
ton picker by trade, arrived in the
area in 1853 at a time when planters
had to carry their cotton to St.
Marks by mule wagons.
In 1858 Lloyd donated 3.5 acres
for the building of the Lloyd Depot.
The village center of commerce
consisted of two cotton gins; a tur-
pentine operation, two sawmills, a


'1 1 ;


made possible through a historical preser-
vation grant. (News Photo)


doctors office, the Grange Hall,
schools, a post office, grist mill, and
seven general stores.
The Laffitte Store building is the
only one remaining.
The Whitfield Hotel was desig-
nated as the dinner stop by the rail-
road. When the train would stop, as
many as 150 people could be fed in
a 20 minute time span. "The original
'fast food' restaurant," quips Pear-
son.
In 1990, a descendent of Lloyd,
Rhea Miller, along with her husband
Bill, retired from teaching careers to
restore and live in the old Lloyd
family home.
And there began the renaissance
of Lloyd.
The Millers and others who lived
there, and were interested in the his-
tory of the town established the
Lloyd National Register Historic
District.


In other business discussed, Lottie
Berry reported that the Christmas
Auction receipt totalled $297.
The Holiday Cake Sale totals were
not available at the time of this
meeting but pecans left over from
the baking of the cakes were sold
out.
President Amanda Ouzts men-
tioned that the Senior Citizen Center
is in need of a few good recipes for
their cookbook.
They have requested that the
Woman's Club consider contribut-
ing to this endeavor.
Members wishing to attend the
Feb. 18 Arts and Crafts Festival in
Perry should reserve by Feb. 8.
Door prizes were awarded after
a luncheon served 1.i .pmucd for
the group by hostesses Joy Nedeau
and Lilly Mae Brumbley.


Doers Club Plans Monthly


Meeting At Library


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Doers Club Diabetes Support
Group will meet 10:30 a.m.
Thursday, in the conference room
at the library.
"Make 2006 the year you achieve
improved control over your
diabetes," said Facilitator Bonnie
Mathis.
The group will meet at the
Library on the third Thursday of
every month from 10:30-11 a.m.
Educational materials will be
provided free of charge and all
participants will receive a daily
planner and schedule, and a
three-ring binder of information
from the Big Bend Rural Health
Network.
* Each month a different diabetes
topic will be presented at the meet-
ing and additional literature such as
recipes, pamphlets, and other free
items will be made available by the
Health Department.
Every meeting will include time
for participants to discuss and ex-
change self-care ideas and tips, and
some meetings may also include a
guest speaker.
"Learn all you can about
diabetes," said Mathis. "The more
knowledge you have regardirig dia-
betes, the more empowered and
prepared you will be to better man-
age your diabetes.
"Help yourself minimize fears
and frustrations of diabetes by par-
ticipating in the DOers Club Diabe-
tes Support Group.
Mathis notes that if transportation
is needed, residents should consider
using the shuttle.
"The shuttle bus will arrive near
the vicinity of the library about
10:15 a.m., in plenty of time to
make it to the start of the meeting,"


Homes Of Mourning


Annie Ruth Wheeler
Maynard
Annie Ruth Wheeler Maynard,
age 87, died January 12, 2006.
The family received friends
Saturday, January 14, 2006 from
5:00pm to 7:00pm.
Upon request from the family in
lieu of flowers, contributions should
be made to Big Bend Hospice 1723
Mahan Center Blvd. Tallahassee,
Florida 32308-5428, 850-878-5310.
Services were held 2pm Sunday,
January 15, 2005 at First Baptist
Church in Monticello Florida.
Mrs. Maynard was a life long resi-
dent of Monticello Florida and a
faithful member of the First Baptist
Church of Monticello.
She is survived by three sons,
James E. Wheeler (and wife Linda
Lou) of Tallahassee, T. Cary
Wheeler (and wife Linda Lee) of
Monticello and John M. Wheeler
(and wife Belinda) of Tallahassee;
six grandchildren, Susan Wheeler
Nordin, Michael Wheeler, Tommy
Wheeler, Elizabeth Wheeler Walker,
Lee Wheeler, Amy Wheeler, Brit-
tany Wheeler and six great grand
children.

Thurmon T. Lee
Thurmon T. "Hank" Lee, 85, of
Monticello, died January 15, 2006,
in Thomasville, Ga.
Services will be on Thursday,
January 19, at 3:00 PM, at Monti-
cello Presbyterian Church, with bur-
ial at Roseland Cemetery. The
family will receive friends from
6:00-8:00 PM at Beggs Funeral
Home on Wednesday evening, Janu-
ary 18.
In lieu of flowers, the family re-
quests that contributions be made to
Monticello Presbyterian Church or
Hospice of Southwest Georgia.
Hank was born September 3,
1920, in Ozark, Al., and moved to
Monticello in 1941, after serving in
the US Army in the South Pacific in
WWII. He was owner/manager of
L.G. Morris Motors, Inc. until retire-
ment in 1971. He was a past mem-


ber of the Monticello Kiwanis Club,
Treasurer of the Jefferson County
Historical Society for 26 years, and
a faithful member and Elder of the
Monticello Presbyterian Church.
Hank was a lover of nature and con-
servationist, and was awarded Out-
standing Tree Farmer of the year in
1990.
Survivors include his wife of 65
years, Josephine Morris Lee; one
daughter, Linda Lee Wheeler, of
Monticello, (and husband Cary);
one son, Dr. Louis G. Lee (and wife
Barbara), of Thomasville, Ga.; five
grandchildren: Liz Wheeler Walker,
Lee Cary Wheeler, Robert Sloan
Lee, Josephine Rebecca Lee, and
William Bowman Lee; three great-
grandchildren: Lily Elise Walker,
Luke Thomas Walker, and James
Henry Wheeler; sister-in-law Mari-
anne Morris Miller (and husband
Ulmer) and one niece, Joy Johnson
(and husband Dozier)


Ready... Set... Shop...
Monticello News
Classifieds


said Mathis.
The bus will be back around
11:15 for those planning to depart
on the shuttle;
Call Big Bend Transit Inc. at 997-
1323 for more information regard-
ing the shuttle's scheduled
pick-up/drop-off locations and
times.
"If the time of this new diabetes
support group does not work for
you, feel free to attend the JCHD


DOers Club meetings, which are
open to all county residents," said
Mathis.
Those meetings are held at the
Health Department on the second
Thursday of each month from
12:15-12:45 p.m. Members are in-
vited to bring their own lunch.
For further information about the
Doers Club support groups, con-
tact Mathis at 342-0170, ex. 205 or
ex. 1301.


Improve Your Health
New Taoist Tai Chi Class in Monticello
Tuesday, 7:00 to 8:30 p.m. Starts January 17
To be held at Christ Episcopal Church, 425 N
Cherry For information, contact
Taoist Tai Chi Society
}).t 224-5438


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woman's Club Hears About


Lloyd Preservation Trust


'1wr






MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 18, 2006 PAGE 7


Scenes From Annual MLK Parade


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t~&'it ,E&*,t~,, ~fl C
-A -N!.. (tJ4


COLOR. GUARD of Jefferson County High
School JROTC lead the annual Martin Luther


King, Jr. parade down city streets to the
Recreation Park.


THIS Confrontation Team from Jefferson
Correctional Institution was one of the 50


entries in the annual MLK Parade Monday
morning.


AM I ,. .
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I..- ,'ks


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.1


MARCHERS representing the Buddhist
Peace Fellowship Tallahassee Chapter were

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among the units marching in the MLK An-
nual Parade.


RIDING in this shiny convertible in the ML
Parade are Mt. Morilla Missionary Bapti


.K Church King and Queen. Kerijah
st king; Jalexia Sloan is queen.


Campbell is


.4 '- ^ *'{- ; -^ 'r~ ." -- -y.^* ^ S
^ . -.es- .T,.. .. -.i p * -~ "^ ^-^-i f-''.^ TfV
't Ch. &-T61 ,1..-J^ .-:A.L*T


CHEERLEADERS from Jefferson County High
School and their Tiger mascot were among
.0fitk1=


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,lyn


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JEFFERSON .WT!
,.,. ./,JH .((.#7
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CARRYING banner of the 26th Dr. Martin Lu-
ther King anniversary parade, sponsored by


participants in the annual MLK Parade Mon-
day morning.


the Jefferson County Branch of the NAACP
are Emma Nelson and Eddie Green.


LOIS HUNTER, our friendly Tax Collector,
smiles and waves to the crowd. Hunter can


:.-,,* ., ; ''j jft... .. *' ,
4
S^*'^r' !*&


THIS Boys and Girls Club delegation in-
cluded representatives from Moticello Boys


be seen often in parades around town riding
her mean machine.


V.
V.


and Girls Club, JCHS Boys and Girls Club,
and St. Phillips Club.


Ad


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YOUTH GROUP from New Bethel African
Methodist Episcopal Church were among the


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'fl-A-.-'.


participants in the 26th
their King Parade.


annual Martin Lu-


is ,
JOHN WHITE Chapter 65, Order of the East- Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. celebration Mon-
ern Star sit on their colorful float during the day morning. (News Photos)


.... .........


4*

4$


S,., GIRLS CLUB
OF
.Ir-FERSON COUW





PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 18, 2006



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Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 18, 2006 PAGE 9


Demario Rivers Top Scorer


For JCHS Basketball Team


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Demario Rivers is the highest
scorer for the Jefferson County
High School basketball team.
He is the 17 year-old son of Tam-
mie Harris and Clifford Rivers, and
a senior at JCHS.
He has been playing basketball
since he was in the eighth grade,
where he was one of, if not the
highest, scorers for the Howard
Middle School Bees.
Rivers attended the Five Star
Basketball Camp and feels that it
was an enlightening and educa-
tional experience. "I would like to
go again," he said.
Rivers loves the game and does
what he can to assist his team
mates to improve their skills.
His major strength in basketball
is the accuracy of his three-point
shots. "That's what I believe I do
best," said Rivers.
His favorite aspect of the game,
is the competition involved."
Rivers' philosophy of basketball
is simple, yet powerful. "I've got
to play harder than the person in
front of me," he said.
To get in the mood to win before
a big game against a tough com-
petitor, Rivers listens to rapper Lil'
Wayne. "It really gets me going
and ready to play hard," he said.
He has always dreamed of play-
ing basketball professionally for
the NBA. His ultimate dream
would be to one day play for the
Cleveland Cavaliers.
Thus far, Rivers has had an im-
pressive season with (as of last Fri-
day morning) 340 points, 82 re-


Tiger Boys

Beat Wakulla

61-56

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School varsity boy's basketball
team defeated Wakulla 61-56, last
week, standing 8-6 on the season.
Leading the charge for the Tigers
was Demario Rivers with 23
points, seven rebounds
Lamarkus Bennett, 11 points, two
rebounds, five steals, one assist; Ji-
tavin Bennett, eight points, two re-
bounds, two assists, two steals; and
Timothy Crumity, seven points,
three rebounds, two steals, four as-
sists.
James Skipworth, four points,
seven rebounds, one steal; Lucius
Wade, four rebounds, one assist;
Paul Huggins, six points, two re-
bounds; and Quantez Burke and
Marko Kapor each added two
points.
The Tigers are preparing to play
Maclay, who they beat earlier in
the season, and who they play
Tuesday, here.
The Tigers beat Mayo Lafayette
earlier in the season and face them
again Thursday, here.
Both games are at 6 p.m.


JCHS Girls
Defeat Chiles

The Jefferson County High
School varsity girl's basketball
team now stand 9-3 on the season,
after beating Chiles, 31-28, last
week.
Coach Bill Brumfield said the
Lady Tigers had to play without
two of their starters, Donna Ran-
som and Keandra Seabrooks.
Shaumese Massey led the charge
for JCHS with 17 points and ten re-
bounds for a double-double, one
steal, one assist and two blocked
shots.
Nikidra Thompson, eight points,
ten rebounds, one assist, and two
blocked shots; and Deidra Arnold,
five points, one rebound, three
steals, and four assists.
Shanise brooks, one point, three


rebounds, three steals, one assist;
and Candice Griffin, two steals,
five assists.


RIVERS


In the first game against NRC,
Rivers suffered a severe sprain and
ended up scoring seven points be-
fore he was removed early form the
game.
In the second game against NFC,
still in pain from his injury, Rivers
score 16 points.
L During the Holiday Hoop-Fest,
l Rivers scored 28 points against
S Thomasville High; 23 points
against Valdosta; 24 points against
Pelham; and was named to the
Team All Tournament.
Against Florida High, he scored
26 points, six rebounds, eight as-
sists, and five steals; against NFC,
16 points, four steals; and against
Wakulla 23 points, seven rebounds.
Rivers has been named to the list
of Bend Leaders for the past three
wY weeks, in points, rebounds, steals
and assists.
He began at number one in points
with 174, averaging 29.0 per game;
number eight in assists with 22, av-


WARRIOR LUKE SADLER works his way around an oppo-
nent trying to keep the ball away from him, during a game
with Branford, early in the season.



FAMU Beats ACA Boys

79-38 In Tough Game


bounds, 52 steals and 47 assists. eraging 3.7 per game; number two FRAN HUNT
However, all stats from Holiday in steals with 22, averaging 3.7 per Staff Writer
Hoop-Fest were not available at game; and number seven in re-
press time. bounds with 45, averaging 7.5 per The Auilla Christian Academy's
In the game with Lincoln, Riv- game. loss to FAMU 79-38 stands team
ers had 22 points, 11 rebounds, and 8-7 on the season.
five assists. The second week, he was number "it wasn't an easy game," said
Against Mayo, he had 30 points, one in points with 317, averaging Coach Dan Nennstiel. "They're a
seven rebounds, six steals. Against 26.4 per game; number one in very good team, it got frustrating as
Maclay, 34 points, six rebounds, steals with 52, averaging 4.3 per a really good team will expose all
four steals. game; number two in assists with of your weaknesses and use them
Against Wakulla, he broke the 47, averaging 3.9 per game: and against you."
JCHS scoring record in a single number 12 in rebounds with 75. av- He added that FAMU is ranked in
game of 44 points, with 45 points, raging 6.2 per game. the top ten in the state.
nine rebounds, six assists, and In the third listing, he was num- "Last time we played them, we
seven steals. He also went 17 for ber two in points with 317, averag- lost by 43 points. It was 41 this
17 from the free-throw line in that ing 26.4 per game; number 14 in time," he said.
game. rebounds with 75, averaging 6.2 Key player Ben Grantham sus-
In the first game against Suwan- per game; number one in steals tained an injury in the first quarter,
nee, he had 19 points, five re- with 52, averaging 4.3 per game; spraining his ankle. In the time he
bounds and shot seven for 14 from and number six in assists with 47, was in the game, he got five re-
the free-throw line. averaging 3.9 per game. bounds and one assist.
............................ ........ ...... .......... .............0..... ...........





(R RELAY
FOR LIFE






AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY'S
2006 RELAY FOR LIFE JEFFERSON COUNTY
APRIL 21 AND 22, 2006

Would you like to be involved???
We need all the help we can get....
Here are the ways you can be a part!!



I in 3 Americans will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. The American Cancer Society Relay
For Life gives everyone the opportunity to fight back and to make a difference in the battle against
cancer. Relay always raises awareness of cancer prevention, early detection, treatment, and-patient
support (including transportation to treatment, peer support group programs, and resources for
practical assistance). Relay brings people together from all walks of life with the common goal of
eliminating cancer. Relay honors cancer survivors and their caregivers. There's a place for you at
Relay. Please join us today!!

Be a part of the committee! Committee members are now being recruited for Team Recruitment;
Corporate Sponsorships; Logistics/Facility; Entertainment; Survivorship; Public Relations; Onsite
Volunteers; Onsite Survivor Activities, and Food.

Form a Relay For Life team! Gather together 8-15 of your favorite people who love making a
difference and having fun.

Volunteer at the event! We need volunteers who will help with the needs at the site itself on the days
of April 21-22, 2006.




YES! I want to participate in Relay.
1 Learn more about forming a team
2 Information on survivor activities
3 Volunteer to help with the event
4 Learn more about becoming a sponsor

Name
Address
E-Mail
Phone
(Please mail to Relay For Life, 710 W. Washington St.,
Monticello, Florida 32344)




The American Cancer Society Relay For Life represents the hope that those lost to cancer will never
be forgotten, that those who face cancer will be supported, and that one day cancer will be
eliminated.

......................................................................- .... .................e.e.......\


LIMITED TIME
OFFER


Lady Tigers

TO Play Chiles

Madison

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

After suffering a major loss to
North Florida Christian last week,
the Lady Tigers varsity basketball
team have worked hard to knock
off the "holiday rust" preparing for
the two games this week.
"Both teams are really good
teams," said Coach Bill Brumfield.
He added that Thursday's game
against Chiles, 4:30 p.m., here, will
be a hard game but the Lady Tigers
have already beaten them once this
season.
"They're a 5-A school with about
3.000 students," said Brumfield.
"They have a lot of players, a big
bench and a lot of bench strength,
but we have a pretty good bench
too. We're back up to ten players."
He predicts that Friday's game
against Madison will be a close
one. "Madison is a 3-A school,
they always give us a good game
and it's always close," said Brum-
field.
He said that last year against
Madison, the Lady Tigers won both
games, and the year prior, the two
team split their games.
"The Lady Tigers have been
working to get back into- shape,
we've been doing a lot of running
and practicing our fast shots.
"So whoever plays better during
the.game, will win," he said.
Brumfield said that the Lady Ti-
gers are now rated at number eight
in the state and number nine in the
Big Bend.


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Stephen Griffin played very well,
leading the score for the Warriors
with 20 points and 11 rebounds for
a double-double, four assists, one
steal and two blocked shots.
Wade Sc-arberry, seven points,
five rebounds, two assists and one
steal; Reggie Walker, five points,
four rebounds; and Stewart Wil-
liams, three points, four rebounds,
two assists.
Luke Sadler, two points, two re-
bounds, one blocked shot; Casey
Gunnels, one points, eight re-
bounds, his highest rebound total
this year in a single game, and one
assist; and Jim Stephens, one re-
bound.







PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 18, 2006


Warriors 8-6 On Season

After 2 Recent Losses


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Aucilla Christian Academy
varsity boy's basketball! team stand
8-6 on the season after suffering
two losses in the two consecutive
games.
When the Warriors faced off
against John Paul, they lost 67-26.
"John Paul is a good team," said
Coach Dan Nennstiel. "They're
ranked number nine in the state.
They have good perimeter
shooting, and they have height.

"John Paul has two guys that are
over six feet, eight inches tall and
that makes it much more difficult
to score," he added.

ACA scored four to John Paul's
25 in the first period; seven to John
Paul's 14 in the second; 12 to John
Paul's 18 in the third; and three to
John Paul's ten in the fourth.

Stephen Griffin led the score for
the Warriors with 12 points, two
buckets were three-pointers; Wade
Scarberry, seven points; Ben Gran-
tham, five points, five rebounds, ;
and Stewart Williams, two points.

Casey Gunnels has two assists
and two steals.


When the Warriors faced off
against Apalachicola, ACA was de-
feated, 78-36.

"Apalachicola is the fifth ranked
team in the state," said Nennstiel.
"But we played OK at times, and
not so well, at others."

He said there were two warriors
highlights during the game. "We
were down by 19, had a nice run
and got it to ten," said Nennstiel.

"The play of the day was made
by Casey Gunnels," he added. "On
the Apalachicola team, they have a
player who flies and their fans
cheer for him to slam-dunk all the
time.

"Casey was able to run fast
enough to prevent the dunk," said
Nennstiel.
ACA was 11 in the first to Apala-
chicola's 25, 12 to Apalachicola's
25 m the second; seven to Apala-
chicola's 17 in the third; and six to
Apalachicola's ten in the fourth.

Leading the score for the Warri-
ors was Griffin with 11 points and
two blocked shots.
Grantham, ten points, six re-
bounds; Scarberry, ten points; Reg-
gie Walker, three points; Williams,
two points, three steals; and Gun-
nels, three assists.


ACA Middle School Boys

Split Two Recent Games


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Aucilla Christian Academy
middle school boy's basketball
team now stand 7-2 on the season,
after splitting the past two games.
In the first game, the Warriors
fell to Maclay, 25-14.
"We've had two losses this year



Legion Post 251

Compiles Vets

Documentary

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The American Legion Post 251
along with The Learning Center
continue to call upon WWII and
Korean War veterans in the Jeffer-
son County area for input and infor-
mation for a documentary they are
'compiling.
County participation in needed to
complete this project. Volunteers
are available to help in the collec-
tion of information.
Center Director Byron Barnhart
can be contacted at 251-0386 to
make arrangements.
Information from family members
of veterans is also welcomed.
Plans for a documentary on local
veterans of the Vietnam War and
more recent wars will be scheduled
-in the near future.


and both of them were to Maclay,"
said Coach Ray Hughes.
Brandon Dunbar led the score
with seven points, eight rebounds
and two steals.
Wilson Lewis, four points; Alex
Dunkle, two points, 11 rebounds,
two steals; Clark Christy, one
point, three rebounds and Ryan
Pritcher, three rebounds.
When the Warriors squared off
against Steinhatchee, ACA downed
them for a 26-12 win.
"We were 14-0 at the end of the
first quarter," said Hughes. "The
starters only played about one quar-
ter for the entire game."
Dunbar led the Warriors with
eight points, two rebounds, and
three steals.

Christy, six points, two rebounds;
Scholte, two points, six rebounds,
two steals; G. H. Lifford, two
points, five rebounds; Daniel Ward,
two points; five rebounds, two
steals; Jacob Newberry, two points,
three rebounds; Dunkle, two points,
two rebounds, three steals; and
Wilson Lewis, two points, two
steals.

LEGALS
NOTICE OF SALE The District School
Board of Jefferson County will receive
sealed bids on a surplus relocatable in the
office of the school superintendent,
Desmond M. Bishop Administration
Building, 1490 W. Washington Street,
Monticello, FL 32344 until 3:00 p.m.
Tuesday, January 25, 2006 at 2:00 p.m.
The bids will be opened publicly at that


LEGAL NOTICE

time. No bid will be received after that
time. Please mark on envelope "Surplus
Relocatable Sale." Bids will be presented
to the School Board at tl.e regular board
meeting on February 13, 2006 at 6:00
p.m. The bid will be awarded to the
highest bidder at that time. The Board
reserves the right to reject any or all bids.
Please call Donald Johnson, Maintenance
Director at 850.342.0142 to set up an
appointment to inspect the relocatable.
Relocatable must be removed from the
school board premises within thirty (30)
days after bids are awarded. Room:
99-004, Sq. Ft. 864, Description: 24 x 36,
Yr. Constructed: 1971, Bldg. 00017.
NOTE: The Relocatable will be sold "AS
IS". The relocatable includes a "wall
hung" A.C. Heat Pump System. NOTE:
Minimum Bid for the 24 x 36 relocatables
is $3,000.00.
12/28, 12/30, 01/04, 01/06, 01/11, 01/13,
01/18, 01/20, c
NOTICE OF SALE: Notice is hereby
given that the School Board of Jefferson
County, Florida, Desmond M. Bishop
Administration Building, 1490 W. Wash-
ington Street, Monticello. Florida will
receive sealed bids on or before January
30, 2006 at 2:00 p.m. for the purchase of
the following described real property
owned by the School Board of Jefferson
County, Florida. One acre of land in SW
1/4 of SW 1/4 of NW '/ DB "YY" Page
193. The Parcel Number is Section 20-2n-
7E-0000-0 10-0000. This property is being
sold in its "As Is Condition" and no repre-
sentations are made as to zoning, access,
or its suitability for specific uses. The land
is situated in Jefferson County, Florida.
Bids received will be opened publicly at
2:00 p.m. in the Board Room of the dis-
trict office located at 1490 W. Washington
Street, Monticello, FL 32344. No bid will
be opened if received after 2:00 p.m.
Please mark on envelope, "Surplus Real
Property Bid Opening 2:00 p.m. on Janu-
ary 30, 2006." Anyone desiring informa-
tion on the procedure for submitting bids
should contact Hal Wilson at (850) 342-
0100. It is anticipated that the highest bid
will be presented to the School Board for
approval on Monday, February 13, 2006.
The School Board of Jefferson County
reserves the right to reject any or all bids.
Fred Shofner, Chairman, Jefferson
County School Board, Phil Barker, Super-
intendent, Jefferson County School Board.
1/13. 1/18, 1/20, 1/25, 1/27, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY. FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 05-60-CA
UNC:332005CA000060XXXXXX
MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC
REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS
NOMINEE FOR FIRST CHOICE
FUNDING, INC. MIN NO.
1002805-2003121911-2, Plaintiff vs.
CHARLES LIVINGSTON, et al,
Defendants RE NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE
IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an
Order or Summary Final Judgment of


LEGALS

foreclosure dated June 16, 2005 and an
Order Resetting Sale dated January 10,
2006, and entered in Case No 05-60 CA
UNC: 332005CA000060XXXXXX of the
Circuit Court of the Second Judicial
Circuit in and for Jefferson County,
Florida wherein Mortgage Electronic
Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for
First Choice Funding, Inc. d/b/a First is
Plaintiff and CHARLES LIVINGSTON;
ELOISE H. LIVINGSTON A/K/A
ELOUISE LIVINGSTON; JEFFERSON
COUNTY, BY AND THROUGH THE
JEFFERSON COUNTY SHIP
PROGRAM; JAMES BLACKWELL;
ANN BLACKWELL; TMH FEDERAL
CREDIT UNION; WILLIE MAE
INGRAM F/K/A/ INTERESTS BY,
THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A
NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS
ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING
TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR
INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY
HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants I
will sell to the highest and best bidder for
cash at the North Front Door of the
Jefferson County Courthouse, Monticello,
FL 32345 in Jefferson County, Florida at
11:00a.m. on the February 09. 2006 the
following described property as set forth
in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit:
PARCEL 1: A PARCEL OF LAND
LOCATED IN SOUTHWEST QUARTER
OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF
SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP I NORTH,
RANGE 6 EAST, JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA, BEING A PORTION OF THE
PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL
RECORD BOOK 142, PAGE 63, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA SAID PARCEL OF LAND
BEING MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE
MONUMENT MARKING THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE
SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE
SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION
7, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH. RANGE 6
EAST, JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 00
DEGREES, 17 MINUTES 58 SECONDS
WEST, ALONG THE EAST LINE OF
THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE
SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID
SECTION 7,210.00 FEET TO AN IRON
ROD MARKING THE NORTHEAST
CORNER OF THE MAYS PROPERTY
AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS BOOK 338, PAGE 60,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA, FOR A POINT OF
BEGINNING THENCE FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH
89 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 32
SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE NORTH
BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID MAYS
PROPERTY, 103.76 FEET TO AN IRON
ROD ON THE EASTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF
STATE ROAD 257, THENCE NORTH 01
DEGREES 23 MINUTES 15 SECONDS
WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY


LEGALS

BOUNDARY, 604.870A FEET TO AN
IRON ROD MARKING THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE
LIVINGSTON PROPERTY AS
DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS
BOOK 80, PAGE 759, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA. THENCE NORTH 89
DEGREES 30 MINUTES 50 SECONDS
EAST ALONG THE SOUTH
BOUNDARY OF SAID LIVINGSTON
PROPERTY 115.24 FEET TO AN IRON
PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF SAID LIVINGSTON
PROPERTY SAID POINT BEING ON
THE WEST BOUNDARY OF THE
TERRELL PROPERTY AS DESCRIBED
IN DEED BOOK UU, PAGE 427,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA THENCE SOUTH
00 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 58
SECONDS EAST, ALONG THE WEST
LINE OF SAID TERRELL PROPERTY
THE WEST BOUNDARY LINE OF THE
DOWLING PROPERTY AS DESCRIBED
IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 147,
PAGE 63, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA AND
THE WEST BOUNDARY LINE OF THE
MCCLEOD PROPERTY AS SHOWN ON
THE JEFFERSON COUNTY
PROPERTY APPRAISERS MAPS OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA.
606.40 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING. PARCEL 2: A PART OF
THE SW / OF THE SE OF SECTION
7. TOWNSHIP I NORTH. RANGE '6
EAST. WHICH IS ENCLOSED WITH
THE FOLLOWING BOUNDARY LINES,
TO-WIT. COMMENCE AT A POINT 420
FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTHEAST
CORNER OF THE SW 'A OF SE A,
SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 1 NORTH,
RANGE 6 EAST, THENCE RUNNING
SOUTH ALONG THE EAST
BOUNDARY OF SAID FORTY 105
FEET, THENCE RUNNING WEST 210
FEET AND TO THE CENTER OF
STATE ROAD S-257, THENCE
RUNNING NORTHERLY ALONG THE
CENTER OF SAID HIGHWAY A
DISTANCE OF 105 FEET, THENCE
RUNNING EAST 217.5 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE LAND
HEREIN CONVEYED, LESS AND
EXCEPT THAT PORTION
CONTAINED IN THE RIGHT OF WAY
SAID HIGHWAY. If you are a person
with a disability who needs any
accommodation in order to participate in
this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost
to you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the Court at
850-342-0218 with in two (2) working days
of your receipt of this Notice, if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call Florida
Relay Service (800) 955-8770. Dated at
Monticello, Florida on January llth, 2006.
Carl D./ Boatwright, As Clerk, Circuit
Court.
1/18, 1/25, c

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE


LEGALS


SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION: WELLS FARGO
BANK, NA SUCCESSOR BY MERGER
TO WELLS FARGO HOME
MORTGAGE, INC. F/K/A NORWEST
MORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff vs.
WALTER B. LAVALLEY, et al,
Defendant(s) CASE NO.: 05-297-CA
Division NOTICE OF ACTION TO:
WALTER B. LAVALLEY LAST
KNOWN ADDRESS: 161 SNEADS
DRIVE GREENVILLE, FL 32331.
CURRENT ADDRESS UNKNOWN LAST
KNOWN ADDRESS CHARLES E.
LAVALLEY 161 SNEADS DRIVE
GREENVILLE, FL 32331 CURRENT
ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANY AND ALL"
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY,
THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL,
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT '
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN
ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT
ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE
NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following property in
JEFFERSON County, Florida: LOT 5
BLOCK C, JEFFERSON LANDING.
SUBDIVISION AS PER THE PLAT
THERE OF FILED IN PLAT BOOK B,
PAGE 39 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS;
OF JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA..
TOGETHER WITH A 1999 DOUBLE
MOBILE HOME WITH VIN NUMBERS
11990313687A AND 11990313687B.
LOCATED THEREON AS A FIXTURE
AND APPURTENANCE THERETO. has
been filed against you and you are,
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses within 30 days after the first
publication, if any, on Echevarria, Codilis .
& Stawiarski, Plaintiff's attorney, whose
address is 9119 Corporate Lake Drive,
Suite 300, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file
the original with this Court either before
service, on Plaintiff's attorney. or
immediately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint ors
petition. This notice shall be published
once each week for two consecutive weeks,
in the The Monticello News, WITNESS my ,
hand and the seal of this Court on this 9th.,
day of January, 2006. Dale Boatwright,.
Clerk of Court
1/18, 1/25; c
NOTICE OF SALE The District School-e
Board of Jefferson County will receive.
sealed bids on surplus vehicles in the office. I
of the school superintendent, Desmond M. i
Bishop administration Building, 1490 W.
Washington Street, Monticello, FL 32344,
until 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 25,'s
2006. No bid will be received after that
time. Please mark on envelope, "Surplus -
Vehicle Bid." Bids will be tabulated at.'
3:00 p.m. and presented to the School'


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BUSINESSCa9



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_ __DIRECTORY __ _


BURNETTE PLUMBING &1

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Family Owned Since 1902
Plumbing Repairs -- Wells Drilled ~ Fixtures-Faucets ~ Pumps
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STEWART
HEATING & COOLING INC.

Sales ~ Service ~ Installation -, Change Outs
Residential Commercial


Family Owned Office: (850) 342-3294
Lic. # RA0067121 CELL: (850) 509-2903


Northside Mower and

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For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
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Pickup & Delivery Service Available

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"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"





Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.

(on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717


1 I


Register's

Mini-Storage
315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South

997-2535


CUMMING 's APPLIANCES


850-997-7468

850-997-5132

90 DAY WARRANTY ONALL APPLIANCES

CHRISTOPHER CUMMINGS OWNER


I N


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I 226-2077 I











To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED

Your Community Shopping Center


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 18, 2006 PAGE 11

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:'
997-3568


LEGALS
Board at the regular board meeting
Monday, February 13, 2006 at 6:00 p.m.
Please call Willie Carr, Transportation
Supervisor at 850-342-0136 to set up an
appointment to inspect the vehicles. The
Board reserves the right to reject any or
all bids. Vehicles must be removed from
the school board premises within ten (10)
days after bids are awarded 1993 INH/TH
1HVBBPLN3PH524316 DT-360 AT-545
65 Pass. As is Bus #93-36; 1982
GMC/CARGO Van 2GTDG25H8C453263
As Is Vehicle #01. Obsolete bus a $2,000
minimum.
12/28, 12/30, 01/04, 01/06, 01/11, 01/13,
01/18, 01/20, c
NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given
that the School Board of Jefferson County.
Florida, located 1490 W. Washington
Street, Monticello, Florida 32344 will
receive bids on or before 2:00 p.m. on
Tuesday, January 31, 2006 for the sale of
the following described property owned by
the School. Board of Jefferson County,
Florida: OLD ADULT EDUCATION
SCHOOL 700 EAST DOGWOOD
STREET LOCATED ON THE CORNER
OF DOGWOOD AND EAST
WASHINGTON STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA. PROPERTY
APPRAISER PARCEL ID NUMBER
00-00-00-0370-0000-0101 This property is
being sold "as is" and no representations
are made or implied as to zoning, access,
or its suitability for any intended or
specific purpose. The parcel is situated in
the City of Monticello in Jefferson County,
Florida. MINIMUM ACCEPTABLE BID
- $325,000.00 Bids will be publicly opened
at 2:00 p.m. In the board room of the
district office located at 1490 West
Washington Street, Monticello, Florida.
No bid will be opened if received after 2:00
p.m. Please mark on the envelope,
"Surplus Property Sale Bid Opening 2:00
p.m. January 31. 2006." Anyone desiring
information on the procedure for
submitting bids should contact Hal Wilson
at (850) 342-0100. It is anticipated that the
highest bid will be presented to the School
Board for approval on Monday. February
13, 2006. The School Board of Jefferson
County reserves the right to reject any or
all bids. By Fed Shofner, Chairman
Jefferson County School Board. Phil
Barker, Superintendent Jefferson County
School Board.
12/28, 12/30, 01/04, 01/06, 01/11. 01/13.
01/18, 01/20,c .
HELP WANTED
Experienced upholsterer, part-time.
Call Minnie at 997-0826.
01/6, 11, 13, 18, pd.
Retail Help: Need to work with
computers, military service helpful.
General store work in Tallahassee.
Send resume to P.O. Box 2126,
Tallahassee, FL 32316 or call
544-3900.
1/18, 20, c
Leading national propane marketer
Southeast Propane has immediate
opening for an energetic route sales
driver for their Monticello based
operation. Candidates must possess
strong customer service skills, team
player attitude along with a Class B
CDL license with an air brake
endorsement and have the ability to
obtain a hazmat & tanker
endorsement. Clean driving record a
must. Excellent starting salary with
competitive benefit program for the
qualified candidate. EOE. Apply by
Fax 850-997-2808 or in person @ 500
South Jefferson St. Monticello, Fl.
1/18, tfn
Masters Level Therapist #2266:
Masters Degree from an accredited
University or College with a major in
the field of counseling, social work,
psychology, or a related human
services field and two years of
professional experience in providing
services to persons with behavioral
illness. Prior experience working with
children who have emotional issues
required. Some local travel required.
License preferred. Shift 8am 5 pm
M-F.
Licensed Therapist #2266c: Masters
Degree from an accredited University
or College with a major in the field of
counseling social work, psychology,
or a related human services field and
two years of professional. Experience
in providing services to persons with
behavioral illness. Prior experience
working with children who have
emotional issues required. Some local
travel required. License required.
Shift: Monday-Friday / Variable
hours. Some late afternoon work
required.
Masters Level Therapist #2267:
Masters Degree from an accredited
University or College with a major in
the field of counseling, social work,
psychology, or a related human
services field and two years of
professional experience in providing
services to persons with behavioral
illness. Substances abuse knowledge
preferred. Some local travel required.
License preferred shift: 8am 5pm


M-F.
Licensed Therapist #2267a: Masters
Degree from an accredited University
or College with a major in the fields
of counseling, social work,
psychology, or a related human
services fiqld and two years of


HELP WANTED
professional experience in providing
services to persons with behavioral
illness. License required. Some local
travel required. Substance abuse
knowledge preferred. Shift: Variable
hours. Some late afternoon work
required.
For more information and a complete
listing of available positions:
www.apalacheeccnter.org (850)
523-3217 or (800)226-2931 Human
Resources 2634-J Capital Circle NE,
Tallahassee, FI Pre-Hire Drug Screen
& FDLE background check.An Equal
Opportunity/Affirmative Action
Employer Drug-Free Workplace.
1/18, c
Accounting Office needs full/part time
clerical/bookkeeping help. References
required send resume to 280 S.
Cherry St. or fax to 342-9899.
1/13, 18, 20, c
Heavy Equipment Operator:
experienced operator, needed to run
different types of heavy equipment in
Limerock Mine. Some mechanical
ability needed to perform job
function. Serious inquiries only. Must
be dependable. Full benefit package
included. Drug test, physical and back
ground check required. E.O.E. apply
in person Martin Mariettla Material.
23 miles west of Perry on Hwy. 98.
850-584-6461.
1/11, 13, 18, 20, c
SERVICES
Health Care Equipment Jackson's
Drug Store. We bill Medicare Call
for a assessment of your needs.
997-3553. UPS available
1/19, tfn
Christian girl will clean your home.
New in town. Call Tori 997-1437.
1/18, 20, 25, 27, pd
Ours is a seeker friendly church. We
believe that God will meet us
wherever we are on our spiritual
journey. Christ Episcopal Church,
three blocks N of the courthouse.
Sunday service at 10:00am. 997-4116.
1/18, c
Backhoe Service: driveways, roads.
ditthes;, tree & shlibui renioval,'burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116,
933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drugs, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn fat
and increase energy levels resulting in
considerable weight loss over time.
Hoodiacol consist of 3 key ingredients
incorporated into rice bran oil with
natural flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss, you
may see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in rice bran oil. Hoodia
gordonii is a cactus found in the
Kalahari Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd, 997-5648.
Leave Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
FOUND
Quarter collection Describe and
claim. Call 997-2028.
1/18, 20, nc
Pit Bull type dog, found 12/22 in
Morntkeiio on east Pearl St./Ashville
Hwy. Call 342-1486


Set Your

Sights High

.With DRS!


FOR SALE
Rhode Island Red Roosters $10
each. Purebred Limousin bull, 15
months old. Call 997-0901 leave
message or 997-3568, ask for Debbie.
1/11, 13, 18, 20, 25, 27, pd
Lab Puppies: Parents are OFA
Certified; therapy dog, obedience and
hunter titled. Bred for health and
calm disposition 997-3379.
1/1'3, 18, pd
Two cockatiel with large cage $35.
Call 342-1486
1/13, 18, 20, pd
Left over Merchandise from Big Chief
Pawnbrokers: electronics, handtools,
DVD's, VHS, jewelry, Reasonably
priced 342-2105
1/6, 11, 13, 18, 20, 25, 27, pd
4' (Like New) Gondolas, $45/each,
shelves $7each, Heavy Duty circular
garment rack (approx. 58" Diameter)
$75. Call (850) 997-2519.


AUTOMOTIVE
No Credit Checks Just Low Down
Payments on Good Cars & Trucks
2 and 4 Door Model As Low As $750
down 850-536-9111
www.JumpinJims.con Ask For Mr.
Deal.
11/2, tfn
'87 Mercury Sabel $500 Firm. Runs
Contact Kim at (904 497-7093
1/4,tfn
1977 Olds Cutlass 89,252 miles $3500
CASH. Clean New tires. Call
997-2646. M-Th 9-5.
tfn,c
FREE
Redbone/Walker mix 1 year old free
to a caring hunter. Trained for deer.
Call 229-794-3628.
FOR RENT
2 or 3 bedroom $450 $650 per
month near JCKC or 1-10),421-3911.
12/2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28, 30, pd
Prime downtown office space now
available in Cherry Street Commons.
Jack Carswell, 997-1980.


The Waggoners Trucking-Established 1951
Now Recruiting drivers for our SE Auto Transport Division.
Drivers must have a valid Class A CDL,
1 year and 100K verifiable OTR miles.
Stable work history and clean MVR is a must.
Great Pay, Great Benefits, Matching 401K.
Contact Susan or John at (866) 413-3074 EOE


Housing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 3/2 $715,- 4/2 $895 $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571


A I




Trucks, vehicles, equipment, misc.
From LEON COUNTY, TALQUIN
ELEC., LEON SHERIFF, & (10)
OTHER AREA COUNTIES & CITIES
SATURDAY, JANUARY 21: 10AM
North Florida Fairgrounds
ITEMS INCLUDED:
*Late model Cat D3C dozer *Late model Ford & Intl.
Dump trucks *Late model (2000-2003) Utility trucks *
work vans *Cat D6 *Deere 410B backhoe
*Numerous late model cars and SUV's *Misc.
Equipment & accessories *MUCH MORE!
THESE ARE FLEET MAINTAINED UNITS!
Preview: Friday, January 20: 9am-4pm
terms: *All units sell AS IS *5% Buyer Prem.
*Cash or cashier check OK. Other checks must be
accompanied By a current Bank Letter of Guarantee
FIRST COAST AUCTION AB150 AU286
P.O. Box 7878 JACKSONVILLE, FL 32238
800-519-6402 or
www. firstcoastauction. corn


r .~




'I.
C.,..


Due to our EXPLODING GROWTH,
Digital Reception Services has openings for
SATELLITE INSTALLATION TECHNICIANS
for our TALLAHASSEE location. We offer set schedules, good pay, exceptional benefits, advancement potential and more! Experience preferred but NOT
REQUIRED. WE OFFER PAID TRAINING! For more detailed information, please visit: www.hrmcacclaim.com/aRply/drscareers
We invite interested candidates to our
OPEN HOUSE
Wednesday, January 18th
9:00am 11:00am
1:00pm 7:00pmr


4825-110 Woodlane Circle
Tallahassee, FL
Phone: 850-562-3244
Inleresled in working for a world leader bul unable to attend??? Apply online ol
www.hrmcacclaim.com/aPPlv/drscareers or call: 1-877-351-4473.


DIGITAL
RECEPTION
SERVICES, INC.


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTY ES
Barry Kelly Broker
(850) 510-4220

Pam Kelly Broker
(850) 510-8359

Katrina Walton
(850) 510-9512

Sarah Hofmeister
(850) 212-8167


Land, Homes, or Investments
Buying or Selling
For more information on how we can help you call
one of our qualified agents.


Molly Jenkins
(850) 528-1707

John Hawkins
(850) 509-0195

Caldwell McCord
(850) 528-1079

Virginia Blow
(850) 509-1844


Christi Beshears
(850) 251-4392


Check us out
on the web!
www.cbkk.com


A Simply the Best!



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Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only $16,500 per acre

New Listinq! 2 bedroom 1 bath home with
small fenced yard, nice family room $87,500

Choice Buildinq Lots in Cooper's Pond


Area cleared and ready to build on, nice
trees, paved road $27,500 each

Look at This! Comfortable 4 bedroom 3 bath
home on five fenced acres w/guest house/
playhouse .w/bath, big shop, 2 car garage,
pasture, 100 pecan trees and a nice pool a
real dream for a growing family $400,000

Hard to Find 5 choice acres on hillside with-
planted pines on quiet graded county road
Asking $12,000/acre

Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom home
in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $295,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane off Rocky Branch Road and Sunset Street
100'x220 in the City $15,500 each

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Look at the Price-5 wooded acres on Blue
Lake Road only $22,500

Check Out This One! Under Contract 8
acres with big doublewide and small house on a
pretty old hillside close to Leon County off Julia
Road $160,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South


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near Pizza Hut Mart $650,000

Nice Hillside Location 10 acres on the east
side of town high and dry in quiet location
with lots of game $12,000 /acre.

Home Site close to town on West Grooverville
Road only $14,500

Rentals Available
2/1.5 mobile home on 2 ac $450
3/2 mobile home Lloyd Ac $650
3/2 mobile home Christmas Ac $650
2/1 home on Dogwood St $850
Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
We have qualified buyers!
Are you interested in selling?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


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12








PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 18, 2006


Lloyd Lions Club Update


Latest Coming Events


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Members of the Lloyd Lions Club
received some updated Lion's News
during this month's meeting through
a DVD presentation given by acting
president Kevin Campbell.
The documentary depicted the on-
going works of members of Lions
Clubs all over the world.
Recently the Lloyd Club provided
eye glasses for a young couple in
the Lloyd area.
Over the Christmas holiday, mem-
bers enjoyed a Club Christmas Party
with a Chinese Auction, and helped
with the decorating of the Hospice
Tree of Remembrance.
They assembled Thanksgiving
and Christmas gift and food baskets
for five local families, and 5 Christ-
mas Wish Lists given to them from
the Jefferson County Refuge House
were filled.


Member Jerry Andrews will do-
nate a bike, from the Lion's, to a
county resident who has been walk-
ing a great distance to get to and
from his job.
Member Arun Kundra spoke
briefly about his upcoming trip to
Bombay and eventually to the areas
hit by the tsunami last year. He re-
quested the Club sponsor an or-
phaned child of the tsunami at the
cost of $160.
The Lions have been instrumental
in the building of orphanages near
the devastated area.
He encouraged the members to
spread the word about the $160 per
child sponsorship to other clubs,
churches, and organizations. Any-
one can help to sponsor a child.
Monthly dues were collected from
the membership.
Members turned in funds to the
treasurer collected from the sale of
raffle tickets for the five bottled
Wine and Picnic Basket. The raffle


will be held on Valentine's Day,
Tuesday, Feb. 14. The funds will be
used for county charities decided on
by the members.
Members raised $177, in their
poinsettia sale, and some monies
remain outstanding.
Other fund raising events were
discussed and decisions will be
made at the next few meetings.
It was also mentioned that the


Club is now a member of the
Monticello/Jefferson Chamber of
Commerce.
Ann Davis, past district governor
for District 35-F, was in attendance
to update the membership on Dis-
trict news and happenings.
Before closing the meeting June
Campbell encouraged each member
to bring a friend and possibly a new
member to the next meeting.
This Lion Club needs help and
more active members are needed
now.
They meet 7 p.m. on the first and
third Wednesday of each month.
Contact Campbell at 997-1754 for
more information.


.... .. i. '



LLOYD LIONS CLUB members, Arun Kundra, left, and June
Campbell, discuss possible fundraising events. (News
Photo)


ATTENTION

To better serve our valued customers,
Madison Employment Connections will have a new address
effective Monday, January 30, 2006. You may visit us at
200 West Base Street, Madison ~ 2nd Floor (Wachovia Bank Bldg.)

For all f ou eplymntneds vsitMaisn mpoyen Cnncton


10 Trees For Arbor Day

Foundation Donation


Ten free flowering trees will be
given to each person who joins the
National Arbor Day Foundation
during January 2006.
The free trees are part of the non-
profit Foundation's Trees For
America campaign.
The ten trees include two white
flowering Dogwoods, two flower-
ing Crabapples, two Washington
Hawthorns, and two Kousa Dog-
woods.


. "These compact trees are selected
for planting in large or small
spaces," said Foundation President
John Rosenow.
To become a member of the
Foundation and to receive the free
trees, send a $10 contribution to
Ten Free Flowering Trees, National
Arbor Day Foundation, 100 Arbor
Avenue, Nebraska City, NE, 68410
by January 31, 2006. Or go online
to arborday.org.


Job Seeker Service
* Career counseling skill & skill level assessment
* Job search & placement assistance
* Use of computers with internet access/faxes, resource
room, copiers, phones
* Workshop for interviewing & resume writing
* Veterans services and benefits
* Information on unemployment programs. claims fil-
ing, job openings, insurance, labor market, job open-
ings

Youth Services
* Objectives assessment


Employer Services
* Easy posting of job openings on Employ Florida
Marketplace
* Access to worker profiles, resumes
* Recruitment assistance
* Job fairs
* Information on employer prevailing wages, unem-
ployment
* OJT. skills upgrading and retraining
* HR consulting services (skills assessment for employ-
ees, job description preparation)
* Rapid response service to avoid dislocation


Individual service strategies and planning
Paid/unpaid work experience
Comprehensive guidance and counseling
Occupational skills training
Follow-up services for 12 months


Florida


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' &CONNECTIONS
Work solutions for you


Adiionalseriesmy eaa..ial o hs dls andyouh wo qaliy.5or oreinformat ion les
cal (50 93-67 TT (50193-75


PEE WEE AND DEE DEE need good homes...they are really
good kitties. "Our fur is so soft, and we purr in stereo,"
they say. (News Photo)


Feline Pair

Pets Of Week


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Pee-Wee and Dee-Dee have been
chosen as the adoptable felines Pet
of the Week.
Pee-Wee is a male and Dee-Dee
is a female. They are black and
white longhair, fluffy cats, and re-
semble Sylvester on the old Bugs
Bunny cartoons.
Pee-Wee has a little more white
around his neck than Dee-Dee.
He has not been neutered, but she
has been spayed. They are eight to
ten weeks old.
All of their vaccinations are cur-
rent.
Since they are long hair animals,
they will require frequent brushing.
Shelter Caretaker Cheryl Bautista
describes them as being high-
spirited.
"They're on the go all the time
playing," she added. "They are
lovable and they enjoy being
petted."
To adopt any of the other many
animals at the shelter call
342-0244.


The First Step







To Any

Buying

Decision


Monticello

News

Classifieds



997-3568


Advertising

With The

SI Monticello News

Opens Door

For You!!


Today, a healthier, more vital community.

The next level of care has arrived.









SiiII I ji.









Join us for the grand opening of the new East Tower

Sunday, January 22, 2006

1:00 PM

Refreshments and Tour Please enter from Mimosa Drive
Archbold Medical Center invites you to tour our state-of-the art East Tower. This
beautiful, spacious facility includes the R. Charles Loudermilk Sr. Heart and Vascular
Center and the Thomas Lyle Williams Jr. Education Center.
For patient convenience, we have relocated and expanded other service areas
including the Cardiopulmonary Rehab Program, Cardiac Critical Care Unit with private
family waiting areas; and the Nephrology and Acute Renal Unit.

Years of planning are now a reality. Please join us for a tour.

*EDI JOHN D. ARCHBOLD MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

( ARCHBOLD MEDICAL CENTER
EC" Quality healthcare- in the comfort of your own hometown.


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'ME




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