Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00162
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: January 13, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00162
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text







Holiday Honors
Civil Rights
Leader

Editorial, Page 4


LtAY OF FLORIDA 1: ID'%1

i"j ''c-:z'TTY "F 7' 7 "'.
GAINESVILLE, FL. 3><11



John Lilly
Helps Youth
Achieve Potent

Story, Page 9


Youth Soccer
At Park Off
To Good Start

Story, Photo, Page 11


Rep. Will Kendrick
To Speak At
Democratic Event

Story, Page 14


Friday Morning D





Montic


Publi:


oI


Wednesday & Fridays


ews

FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 2006


Representative Loranne Ausley and State
Senators Nancy Argenziano and Al Lawson.
(News Photo)


SHARING A LAUGH at Monday night's legis-
lative delegation hearing are Commissioner
Junior Tuten, left, and State Representative


Will Kendrick. Kendrick is a regular visitor
to the community. (News Photo)


Lawmakers Make Annual Trek Here


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Unlike the rambling, freewheel-
ing affairs of old, legislative delega-
tion hearings have become orches-
trated and sedate events, thanks in
great part to the Jefferson Legisla-
tive Committee.
The committee ensures that the
city and county's joint list of re-
-quests is presented by a designated
-speaker -- yes, city and county offi-
-cials actually cooperate on common
-goals nowadays. And speakers who
address the legislators outside the
-designated speakers are few and
-generally pursuing independent
agendas.


So it was Monday night when
.State Senators Al Lawson and
Nancy Argenziano and State Repre-
sentatives Will Kendrick and Lo-
ranne Ausley made their annual trek
here to gather citizens and officials'
input for the coming legislative ses-
sion.
Other than to enumerate the.dif-
ferent committees they serve on, the
legislators said nothing about the is-
sues they expect to dominate the
coming session, as they were wont
to do in the past.
The only remark on the subject
came from Kendrick, who told the
local audience to capitalize on their
requests this year. The next sound
they would hear, Kendrick said,
would be a great sucking sound as


South Florida absorbed power in the
Legislature.
Dick Bailar, spokesperson for the
Jefferson Legislative Committee,
presented the community's formal
request list, consisting of six offi-
cially identified priority projects.
These priorities, in order of impor-
tance, called for: support of the
measure formerly called the Rural
Initiative, which would assure this
county of $577,000 annually from
the state for the next 10 years; fund-
ing for establishment of a central
emergency operations center at the


industrial park; funding for estab-
lishment of an agriculture center at
the former University of Florida
property on US 90 West; funding
for the replacement of the bridge on
CR-142, commonly known as the
West Lake Road; funding for the
completion of sewer and water in-
frastructure at the industrial park;
and support for funding being
sought from the federal government
for the upgrade of the Senior Citi-
zens Center.
Outside the committee's request,
Sheriff David Hobbs asked for im-


plementation of a system that would
allow law-enforcement officers to
readily identify sexual predators.
"I want an indicator put on every
Florida driver's license or identifica-
tion card for law enforcement use
only," Hobbs said. "We would then
know immediately who were deal-
ing with."
Two other issues that came up had
to do with the disenfranchised: chil-
dren and jobless people.
George Hinchliffe, director of the
Healthy Start Program, presented
legislators with what he called star-
tling statistics regarding the county's
infant mortality and economically
deprived children.
According to Hinchliffe, Florida
ranks in the bottom third of the


country in infant mortality and Jef-
ferson County ranks in the bottom
third of the state.
Indeed, the infant death rate here is
10 time the rate in Cuba, Hinchliffe
said.
As for other statistics, he pointed
out that 87 households here no
longer received food stamps because
of cutbacks by the Department of
Children and Families (DCF).
Meaning that 272 children went to
school and to bed hungry each day,
he said.
His modest request, which pro-
duced self-derisive laughter among
the legislators, was that they "exert
control over the executive branch".
(See Lawmakers Page 2)


School Board Denies Lease


Of CDC Building To YMCA


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

At Monday's School Board meet-
ing, an agenda item by the YMCA
Steering committee requesting the
School Board to lease them space
was denied by a 3-1 vote.
Voting nay were Chairman Fred
Shofner, Members Charles Boland
and Franklin Highto'wer.
Voting in favor of the motion was
Member Ed Vollertsen.
Member Beverly Sloan was not
present.
To backtrack: at a recent work-
shop the YMCA Steering Commit-
tee met with the School Board to
discuss the option of leasing space


for a YMCA facility here that would
be a branch of the Tallahassee facil-
ity.

Building For
NFCC Classes
At that time, the committee pre-
sented a proposal to the School
Board for exclusive use of the Ca-
reer Development Center (CDC) at
the former JCHS location on Water
Street.
It was this leasing that was denied
at Monday's meeting.
. It should be made crystal clear
that the vote merely denied the
YMCA the use of the CDC
building.
It did not deny the option of leas-


ing any other property the Board
owned, including the former JCHS
gym, cafeteria, Home Economics
area, nor the Howard Middle School
facilities, which will be vacated in
May when the school year closes.
Howard Middle School will be
accommodated on the campus of the
new Jefferson County High School
campus, beginning in the fall of
2006.
Prior to the vote, citizens ad-
dressed the Board expressing their
view of a YMCA facility here.
Angela Gray representing the
YMCA spoke of the advantages to
residents of having a facility here.
County Commissioner Gene Hall
said he believed a facility here
would provide more opportunities
for residents, given the activities
usually provided.
Health Department Director Kim
Barnhill spoke of the advantages of
the YMCA in promoting physical
fitness and. encouraged the Board to
consider all options.
From all indications, it appears
that the YMCA Steering Committee
has no interest in any other facility,
other than the former CDC building.
This building is not available be-
cause the Board plans to make it
available to North Florida Commu-
nity College for a Building Con-
struction Tech Program to be taught
here, involving some 12-15
students.
See sidebar for more information.


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

North Florida Community College
has received a grant of S165,000 to
establish a Building Construction
Tech Program here, Dean Cathy
Simcox reported to the School
Board Monday
The monies are designed as start
up funds to refurbish the Career De-
velopment Center (CDC building,)
formerly used by ESE students
when JCHS was located on Water


Street, to help them learn a means of
supporting themselves.
Simcox explained that unlike a
similar earlier grant application, this
one was approved with the funds in
hand.
Plans call for the infrastructure in-
stallation to begin in iMay, and the
space ready for classes to begin in
Fall, 2006.
"As long as the student load con-
tinues, we expect to be eligible for
additional funding," Simpcox ex-
plained.
(See NFCC Page 2)


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THOUGH it has been more than one year
since this sign was erected, motorists con-
tinue to ignore it and similar signs around


town. Police alert residents to expect tick-
ets for ignoring traffic signs. (News Photo)


Police Chief Says Motorists Need

To Heed Monticello's Traffic Signs


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Back in October of 2004, no left
turn signs were erected on both cast
and west Cherokee Streets, how-
ever, many drivers continue to dis-
regard these signs as well as others
placed throughout the city.
Police Chief David Frisby states
that officers have been issuing cita-
tions for the infractions, causing a
slight decrease in the number of of-
fenders, but the signs are often ig-


nored all the same.
Frisby advised that his officers
will also begin issuing citations to
those drivers who continue driving
on the section of West Dogwood
Street, now one way, in the wrong
direction.

Citations
TO Be Issued
"There is still speeding through
town, people running stop signs,
making those left turns, and going
the wrong way down one way


streets," said Frisby.
"People need to be aware that
Monticello is growing, and that's
going to affect many areas.
"Some good examples are the an-
nexes planned for west 90 and
north of town," he said. "They will
affect many present traffic laws and
people need to pay attention to
these changes.
"Changes in the traffic laws are
made for a reason, and people are
either seeing them and not paying
(See Motorists Page 2)


138TH YEAR NO.04, 50 CENTS


Affair Low KeY And

Well Orchestrated


NFC TO Use CDC Building

For Tech Program Classes


SA








PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 13, 2006
% 1 "r' m ,^ R s,. I


old house was moved to the backyard of the
Avera-Clarke, on West Washington Street.
(News Photo)


Town's Oldest House Gives


Way For Multi-Use Building


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

What is supposedly the county's
oldest house was relocated Monday,
making way for Gadsden Square, a
multiple-use building that is slated
to soon occupy the site on W. Wal-
nut Street.
The Local Planning Agency
(LPA), in fact, reviewed the site
plan for the Gadsden Square project
on Tuesday night and recommended
approval.
As contractor Riley Palmer de-
scribed the project to the planners,
Gadsden Square will consist of three'
downstairs retail spaces and two up-
stairs residential units. He said the
building will reflect the architectural
style of the Wirick Simpson House,
in keeping with the historical char-
acter of the area.
"Hopefully, it will set a precedent
for the downtown area," Palmer
said.
The planners briefly explored
whether the 10-parking spaces
slated for the facility were
sufficient. County officials have ex-
pressed concern that patrons and
residents of the new building could
overwhelm the capacity of the al-
ready overtaxed courthouse parking
lot.
But the city planners determined
that the parking situation didn't war-
rant addressing at the present. They
decided that issue would be better
addressed if and when parking be-
came a problem.
The planners' only request to the
developer was that the project in-
clude a sidewalk and hardiboard in-
stead of vinyl siding if at all possi-
ble.
"This is a pretty bold statement to
make in a small community like
this," Palmer said, referring to the
$700,000 cost of the project.
The old green house that formerly
occupied the site, meanwhile, is
now safely situated in the backyard
of the historic Avera-Clarke House
on W. Washington St.
Historians and preservationists


applauded the saving of the house,
which most agree is the oldest
structure in the county, likely dating
from the early 1800s.
"This is all supposition, pieced
together from bits and pieces," says
Dee Counts, author of the book
Familiar Faces and Quiet Places, a
pictorial and narrative history of
Jefferson County. "We don't have
documents per se. But it's believed
to be the oldest house in
Monticello."
Certainly, it's older than the
Wirick Simpson House, which was
built in 1831, Counts says.
She points out that the house in
referenced in the little green book
about the county writteinin 1835. It's
also identified in the 1885
lithograph giving a bird's eye view
of the city, she says.
Property Appraiser David Ward,
also a history buff, agrees. There's
no facts to substantiate the belief,
Ward says, but the popular notion is
that the. structure dates from the
early 1800s.
"I can't put my finger on anything
definitive," Ward says. "But I've
always heard that it's the oldest
house in town. It's one of the
legends that one heard growing up."
He cites a hand-drawn map he
keeps in his office. The map,
depicting Monticello in the early
1900s, was drawn from memory a
few years back by L.W. Jones, a
county native now in his 90s.
Ward says the map clearly
identifies the green house as the
Robert residence.
He notes that the original structure
is believed to have been a log cabin,
which was modified by subsequent
owners.
Possibly also, according to Ward,
the site of the house was also the
site of the county's first courthouse,
a log structure that was subse-
quently replaced by a more becom-
ing edifice and ultimately by the
present courthouse.
As for the future of the green
house, it's reportedly the plan of


NFCC Tech Program


(Continued From Page 1)
She said some 12-15 students
were necessary to keep the facility
operational.
"Keep in mind, these students in-
clude dual enrollment students, and
adults in the county," Simpcox
added.

The CDC building was the avail-
able space most suitable for the
NFCC course, which is why its
lease to the YMCA was denied.

For the School Board's point of
view it's a win-win situation, be-
cause even in the worst case sce-
nario, should the grant funds not be
renewed, the county will still own


the up to date CDC building for
whatever it may choose to use it.
In a subsequent conversation,
Jim Norton, director of community
and adult education said that indica-
tions were that more emphasis on
votech education will be forthcom-
ing from the Department of Educa-
tion.
The intention of such directives is
to provide high school students who
don't go on to higher education, a
means of developing a career.

Thus should the NFCC program
fall by the wayside in the future, the
county will still own a building suit-
able for Votech.


NOTICE OF MONTICELLO
CITY COUNCIL WORKSHOP

The Monticello City Council will meet in a special
workshop session on Wednesday, January 18, 2006 at
3:00 p.m. at City Hall to discuss pending and proposed
city water and sewer projects.


Gretchen and Troy Avera to restore
the structure and make it an addition
to their bed and breakfast establish-
ment.


Lawmakers Make Annual Trek
(Continued From Page 1) apprentices their trade. But she another grant for th
Notwithstanding their initial reac- thought the effort would be better toration of Buildin
tion, Argenziano and Ausley noted served if it was community based, brick schoolhouse i
that many of the DCF's decisions rather than government initiated.
were policy changes, which right- She promised to put the petitioners
fully should involve the Legislature. in touch with similar programs that g
They promised to look into the mat- were proving successful in other | Choose
ter. fh i,


Another request involved an ap-
peal for the establishment of some
kind of program that would provide
vocational training for the unem-
ployed, along with incentives to pro-
mote participation in the program.
Such a program, according to its
proponents, would utilize vacated
school buildings here and take ad-
vantage of the knowledge of skilled
workers in the community.
Argenziano applauded the notion.
She said it reminded her of bygone
days when skilled individuals taught




Motorists
(Continued From Page 1)
attention, or they're just ignoring
them," he added.
SFrisby said that for safety's sake,
drivers need to adhere to the new
signs before someone ends up get-
ting killed.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

THE DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY ANNOUNCES A
WORKSHOP TO WHICH THE
PUBLIC IS INVITED

Date: January 19, 2006
Time: 3:00 P.M.
Place: 1490 W. Washington Street
Monticello, FL 32344


Subject: Update Report of Clemons, Rutherford &
Associates Regarding Site Planning for Middle
School Relocation :


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Thn.6 -8b-7'
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paJs UI L e country.
Finally, Bill McRae, formerly a
school superintendent, asked the
legislators for their help in securing




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WORKERS prepare to move the historic
green house just south of the courthouse
parking lot to make way for construction of
the Gadsden Square Heritage Project. The


Farmers

&

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Will Be Closed

Monday,

January 16th

In Observance Of

Martin Luther King, Jr.

Holiday


Regular Banking Hours

Tuesday, January 17,-
Member F.D.I.C. ... -An FMB Bank












S35.000


Q U ~


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... *~t~ e~....JA ~
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'.1 *'*
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UNITED WAY lifesaver indicates progress towards $35,000
goal for the country. As the campaign winds down, offi-
cials 'see additional donations to help reach the goal..
(News Photo)


Former Resident Threatens

Suicide, Confesses To Five

Tallahassee Armed Robberies


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

After threatening suicide, a for-
mer county resident has confessed
to, and been charged with five
counts of armed robbery in Leon
County.
John Stewart, 22, is also charged
with two misdemeanor firearms of-
fenses in connection with an inci-
dent that began about 2:10 a.m.,
Jan. 1 at the Texaco truck stop near
1-10.
Stewart called the Jefferson
County Sheriffs Office, threatening
suicide, he requested that Investi-
gator Chris Smith respond because
they knew each other.
Smith said he responded to the
scene and found Stewart holding a
.25 caliber pistol..
Smith said that Stewart told him
that the pistol held only one bullet.
"'He began telling me about his
problems and- I was able to calm
him down," said Smith. "He fired
the pistol at a nearby brick wall,
endangering no one, before lower-
ing the gun.
,"I don't know what drove him to
threaten suicide," Smith said. He
vould only say it was related to
five robberies in Tallahassee."
Deputies took Stewart to the
County jail and charged him with
displaying a weapon and discharg-
iig a firearm in public.
: While at the jail, Stewart told
Smith to call the Leon County
Sheriffs Office because he wanted
to confess.
Smith contacted Detective Kathi
IKline with the Robbery Task




Local woman
Killed In One
Car Crash Here

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

A 69 year old Monticello woman,
Ruth Leatta Brown was fatally in-
jured Wednesday afternoon in a
single-vehicle crash.

At approximately 4:20 p.m.,
Brown was driving her 2002 Jeep
SUV with passenger Anthony Jer-
ome Brown, 48, on South 19,
across from the Apron Factory, in
the outside lane, heading toward
Monticello.

FHP said Brown lost control of
the vehicle for unknown reasons,
and traveled off the roadway onto
the east shoulder, overturned and
came to a final rest in a wooded
area at the bottom of the embank-
ment.

Ruth Leatta Brown was pro-
n6unced .dead at the scene and
transported to Tallahassee Memo-
ridl.

Jerome Brown sustained minor
injuries and was not transported.
iNeither was wearing seat belts.
'The cause of the crash is still un-
der investigation.


Force, and she talked with Stewart,
who confessed to five robberies
committed last month in Tallahas-
see.
"The five robberies included the
Circle-K, Petro, Citgo and Capital
Inn on North Monroe and the Stop
& Save on Capital Circle," said
Kline.
She added that between the five
locations, Stewart had taken under
$400..
"The convenience stores here do
drop their money regularly, so you
can do the crime, do the time, but
you're not going to get much for
it," she said.
"I asked him why he committed
the robberies and he said that he
was about to be evicted and he
needed the money," said Kline.
Stewart presently resides at the
Jefferson County Jail, where he is
being held on five.counts of aremd
robbery, and awaits extradition to
Leon County.


United Way Campaign

Seeks More Donations


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

As the end of the County United
Way Campaign draws near, Co-
Chair Nan Baughman states: "I
would like to ask each citizen of the
county to dig deep in his/her pocket,
and try to contribute a little.
"Please remember, it does not
have to be a large sum, everything
adds up."
The Senior Center is but one re-
cipient of United Way Funds in the
County. "It truly is amazing what is
being accomplished at our local
Center due to your financial help
through United Way.
"I wish everyone in the county
could visit our 18 local agencies and
see first hand how donating through
United Way is helping," Baughman
said.
Remember that the monies raised
in Jefferson County stays in Jeffer-
son County, Baughman notes.
United Way is also shifting focus,
giving those in need not only a
handout but also a hand-up, says


Big Bend President Ken Armstrong.
That means helping prevent
greater need on down the road,
through programs such as the new
B.E.S.T. Believe, Earn, Save,
Thrive.-
It helps low-income individuals
with everything from free tax prepa-
ration to counselingthat will help
them save and spend wisely and be-
come more self-sufficient.
Whole Child is another new pro-
gram supported in part by the
United Way, and its audience is the
child from birth to 5 years old who
is already improvised.
Some 40 percent of the children in
this range in Jefferson. and the sur-
rounding seven counties live at the
poverty level, the program is not
coming too soon.
Jefferson County's 18 United Way
agencies can be supported either by
direct donation or through employee
payroll deduction, where available.
Tax deductible donations can be
mailed to: Nan Baughman, P. 0.
Box 853, Monticello, FL. 32345, or
speak to your employer about pay-
roll deduction.


City police are investigating an
incident that caused the lock-down
of classrooms at Jefferson Elemen-
tary School for a little while on
Monday.
According to Monticello Police
Department spokesman Roger Mur-
phy, some unknown individual
knocked the windows of a teacher's
car in the parking lot.
"We have reason to believe that it
'was an ex-boyfriend," Murphy said.
He said for security reasons and to
ensure the safety of the children, of-
ficers asked teachers to lock their
classrooms while the officers made
a check of the school. He said the
lock-down lasted about 45 minutes.
:; Officers did not find the individual
on the school premises.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 13, 2006 PAGE 3


JEFFERSON COUNT TY

Citizens for a Sustainable Future


Good Neighbor.
GREAT RATES.


SAVINGS ACCOUNTS
$0 $24,999 1.60% APY*
$25,000 $49,999 2.10% APY*
$50,000- $99.999 3.10% APY*
$100,000+ 3.25% APY*

Ple.se talk to'your State
Farm agent today for
more information.


James T Surles
State Farm Agent
Monticello, F 32344
Bus 850 997 8282
loninv sirles bw9i@statefarm.comn


MONEY MARKFT ACCOUNTS


$0- $99
$100 $9,999
$10,000 $24,999
$25,000- $49,999
$50,000- $99,999
$100,000 +


0.00% APY*
1.50% APY*
1.60% APY*
2.55% APY*
3.45% APY*
3.95% APY*


('FRTIFICATES OF DFPOSIT
90 Day 4.00% APY*
180 Day 4.25% APY*
I Year 4.25% APY*
2 Years 4.35%APY*
3 Years 4.35% APY*
4 Years 4.35% APY*
5 Years 4.35% APY*




A Bank.
LIKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR,
STATE FARM IS THERE.


L OC U, -I71'ent f Me-U-,. -


To Preserve our Community, our Resources and Plan for Sustainable Growth!



When: January 17, 2006 (Tuesday evening).

We start at 7:00 p.m. SHARP!


Where: Niki Little's House 71 Tall Oaks



Directions: West side of Waukeenah Highway (CR 259)
6 miles south of U.S. 19 ... or 3 miles north of U.S. 27



Look for the "Save Jefferson County" sign


If you care about
> real community values,
> the importance of integrity and service in government,
> good responsible planning for growth,
> preserving a high quality of life for all citizens & future generations, &
> the protection of ftatural and cultural resources,
then this is your opportunity to make a real difference for Jefferson County.
Join us in developing strategies and address issues that affect us all!





For information, contact:
Brent Hoadley at 997-4829
Don Lee at 997-6002
Wayne Searcy at 997-3463
Susan Anderson at 997-1001


Brian Hayes
Attorney City Councilman


Whvly I am a


Republican
It used to be that working and voting in Florida
meant being a "registered" Democrat. Only then
could you participate in all of the local and state-wide
elections, runoffs and primaries. The Democratic
primary, as many of us recall, was the real election.
There simply were no two-party final elections for
State or County offices in most Counties back then.
This started changing in the mid-nineties. I began to
take note when, in January of 1995, Newt Gingrich
announced the "Contract with America". It made a
lot of sense to me and, as it turned out, it marked the
start of the "big switch" in North Florida as well as
the rest of the South and Southwest. It wasn't long
before every North Florida County from Pensacola to
Gainesville (except Leon, Alachua, Gadsden and, of
course, Jefferson) were voting Republican in all of
the national elections.
I finally determined by 1997 that the national
Democratic Party and their overall priorities simply
didn't speak for me or represent my values.
That's when I decided to join the hundreds of other
Jefferson County voters who were realizing that the
Republican Party, although not perfect, stood for the
values and ideals that more closely represented our
beliefs. I've been a Republican ever since. ,
,,- .-" ., -

/. Brian Hayes


Are you sure You're

Snot a Republican P
Why not make it official?
Just call us at 228-4400 and...
Srn We'll do the rest!
Switc 0now0
It's Easy!
Paid foi by the Jefferson County Republican Party
Not autllorzed by any candidate or candidate committee www JeffersonGOPl corn


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 13, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

_. RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

i041 ~ LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Holiday Honors


1-~


From Our Photo File

























MEMBERS of the Triple L Club, of First Bap- for a luncheon and program. (Nev
tist Church, traveled to Six Flags Over Geor- Photo)
gia, in June, 1990. The Club meets monthly


r
t



- ,


ws File


Civil Rights Leader __ pinion & Comment


This year marks the 20th, anniver-
sary of the Martin Luther King na-
tional holiday.
For many Americans, the occasion
isn't just a day off it's also a day on
- a day of service to honor Dr.
King's legacy.
On January 16, citizens in every
state will spend the day tutoring
children, building homes, cleaning
parks, painting classrooms, deliver-
ing meals, and performing countless
other acts of service.
In 1994, Congress passed the King
Holiday and Service Act to encour-
age Americans to volunteer as an
appropriate way to honor the mem-
ory of Dr. King.
At the time of its passage, Coretta
Scott King said, "The greatest birth-
day gift my husband could receive is
if people of all racial and ethnic
backgrounds celebrated the holiday
by performing individual acts of
kindness through service to others."
And each year since then, hun-
dreds of thousands of people across
the United States have honored Dr.
King's life and legacy through com-
munity service.
This year the holiday will be made
even more meaningful as many re-
member the late civil rights hero
Rosa Parks. In 1955, during the
height of segregation in America.
Rosa Parks refused to give up her


seat on a public bus.
Her single act of civil disobedi-
ence helped fuel an entire civil
rights movement and a new way of
thinking and behaving in the United
States.
' The King Holiday will also be a
time for millions to reflect on the ra-
cial and social divides made more
apparent by Hurricane Katrina. The
storm exposed levels of abject pov-
erty that many did no know still ex-
isted in America.
"SerVice ifs a way to bridge some
of those differences and build com-
mon bonds," said David Eisner,
CEO of the Corporation for National
and Community Service, which has
led the effort to transform the holi-
day into a day of service.
"It doesn't matter if you're rich or
poor, young or old, fully abled or
not. As Dr. King once said, 'Every-
body can be great, because every-
body can serve.' Everyone should
take advantage of the opportunity
this January 16 to demonstrate their
greatness."
The Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
of Service is sponsored by the Cor-
poration for National and Commu-
nity Service, a federal agency that
administers Senior Corps, Ameri-
Corps, and Learn and Serve Amer-
ica, and The King Center.


Drinking Games Boost

Alcohol Consumption


BY REX M. ROGERS
Columnist

Beer companies are now promot-
ing drinking games for university
students. The most popular games
are called "beer pong," in which stu-
dents at each end of a table throw
ping pong balls at cups of beer at the
other end. If the ball goes in, stu-
dents on that team drink the beer.
The team that first runs out of cups
loses the game.
In January, 2006, the first World
Series of Beer Pong is scheduled in
Las Vegas. Anheuser-Busch is mar-
keting a game called Bud Pong. Of-
ficial rules state that water, not beer,
should be used. Miller is also pro-
moting beer pong events.
It is, of course, ludicrous to be-
lieve that beer companies are genu-
inely interested in marketing games
that encourage water drinking. This,
new foray by beer companies into
university age binge drinking also
calls into question their purported
concern for promoting "responsible
drinking."
Meanwhile, for students who like
binge drinking, what's to lose? So-


called losers drink more than win-
ners. But more mature adults know
that binge drinking greatly increases
the risk of student traffic accidents,
injury, and fatalities, reduces student
inhibitions toward unhealthy sexual
activity, and degrades students' abil-
ity to perform well academically.
Beer companies and others in the
industry who indirectly promote
binge drinking while maintaining a
legally parsed self-protection in
their advertising materials are disin-
genuous at best. They know that the
point of drinking games is to "get
lit," to get a buzz to sell more beer.
Binge drinking and university stu-
dents are not a healthy mix. Beer
companies who ignore this reality
are more interested in the mighty
dollar than responsible drinking.
Universities and parents should
lobby the beer companies to adopt a
higher standard. No one, is saying
they should not market their
product, just that they need to de-
velop socially "responsible market-
ing."
(Rex M. Rogers, Ph.D., a syndi-
cated newspaper columnist and
president of Cornerstone University,
Grand Rapids, Mich.)


Letters to the Editor Welcombed

500 Words or Les's

Letters must be signed i

and include

phone number of writer
S I ,


I


ik*P
>- V.


Short Takes & Other Notions


BY MERRY ANN FRISBY '


They are seen sleeping on the
courthouse lawn and all over town
on the weekends. But they are


The animal shelter people tell us scarce and hidden from 8-5 Monday.
that our local adoptable animals are through Friday. I believe that they
cute and nice. I think there is a big- know the city workers' schedules. I
ger story. I have decided that the lo- can't figure out how dogs could'
cal animal population can also tell know this, but they do.
time and days of the week. Dogs Buzzards know time too. We live
and buzzards have convinced me. near the downtown water tower. It is
Years ago, Monticello had a full the primo buzzard roost downtown.
time dog catcher. When she left, her Most days numerous buzzards sit
salary was divided among certain there figuring out the air currents or
City workers who began to perform testing the air for the latest road kill.


her "animal control" duties. Let me
be one to compliment them. They
have trapped animals in our yard,
and done .a great job of it. However,
they work 8-5.
There is roving packs of stray
dogs that I believe wear wrist
watches. They walk about town all
in a row. One pack sashays down
my own driveway like a rhumba'
line.


At 4 p.m. almost every day, there
is an arial buzzard convention. They
soar and whirl in an area bordered
by the Opera House and the Gerry
Medical Clinic. They seem to be rid-
ing thermal currents although I can
not figure why that particular area
would have air any hotter than an-
other place.
Now when they soar over the
Capitol in Tallahassee I know where


that hot air comes from!
There are from ten to fourteen
buzzards that play or hunt each day.,
See if you can spot them if you are
downtown. They are really good and
graceful flyers. Happily, when they
are so high in the air you can not see
their pitifully ugly faces. They al-
ways look scalded to me.
There are several transformers on
the block surrounding our house.
For an unexplained reason squirrels-'
regularly throw themselves across"
the lines at these transformers. They
make bright filaments and arc with a
great booming flash.
The buzzards are familiar with the
noise. The resulting charred squirrel
carcass is appealing to them. When
the transformers blow, the buzzards
convene over our yard searching for
their toasted meal. Once identified,
one or more swoop down and airlift
the poor squirrel to some table in the


Prepare For Financial W


Financial counselors routinely
ad uise clients to sock away between:
three and six months salary in the
event an emergency strikes.
However, a new survey by HSBC -
North America reveals most,
consumers' savings funds are pretty i
lean, if they have one at all. In fact,
if faced with a life crisis, four in 10
surveyed said they would not have
enough savings to cover more than'
one month of living expenses.
The survey also found that while
80 percent of consumers worry
about their level of financial
savings, one out of four consumers


admits to having no savings at all.
HSBC offers these four tips for
building your nest egg:
Estallish a budget and long-term
plan The survey indicates only one
in four consumers actually sticks to
a budget. But without a monthly
budget or long-term plan in place, it
is difficult to track your results and
make your financial goals a reality.
Pay yourself first Think of
your savings as an expense and
include it in your budget like,
groceries or car payments. If you're
among the consumers with no
savings at all, as identified by the


HSBC survey, paying yourself is
especially important.
Set a savings target Aim for 10
percent of your income, but always
save at least some portion of your
earnings. Make the act of saving, if
not the amount, a habit.
Review your credit report Your
credit standing directly affects the
interest rate you pay when borrow-
ing money, so monitor your credit
report regularly for errors and signs
of fraud.
Of consumers who recently
checked their credit reports, one in
three uncovered errors.


sky. .
One of the most memorable in-;,i
stances of Squirrel arc light waso'
once when my friend and neighbor-,
Diddy Brown was taking her after-;g
noon walk. The buzzards were soar-:.:
ing in their afternoon exercises. A i:
squirrel stepped from one line to an ,.
other on a transformer by the Gerry, a
Medical Clinic and arced just asU:
Diddy walked by.
A continuous thundering BOOM,'
resonated in- time with the gieaf I
orange-white ball of fire and sparksK"'4
Smoke and electrical buzzing also\'
accompanied this even. I had no7'
idea that Diddy could move that"
fast! As she scrambled away, all-"
over Monticello, the buzzards were,,
altered and flew toward the fricassee,,
that awaited them.
So at least in dog world and buz-,,,
zardom, our local Monticello crea-
tures appear to be smarter than
average!
t'l


oes
To learn more about budgeting y,
planning, saving money and manag-,p
ing credit, visit HSBC's comprehen-;. ,
sive financial education Web site,
www.yourmoneyaccounts.com.
"Without some savings, you may A
have to incur debt when an emer-,
gency strikes," says Loretta Abrams,
vice president of community devely-
opment and consumer advocacy,-
HSBC North America. "ArmedG,
with a good financial plan, most
people find ways to put aside a por-,,
tion of their income for future emer-",
gency needs and to meet long-term-),
goals."


King Dream Never Realized


BY DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

I don't know why it is that
throughout history, extraordinary
figures appear at precisely the right
moment in time to make profound
and lasting changes in the world.
Sometimes they are simply oppor-
tunists having acquired political
power to force their will on others.
They represent the personification
of pure evil as in the case of Hitler
and the Holocaust, Idi Amin and
ruthless slaughter or Milosevic and
ethnic cleansing.


Albert Schweitzer immediately
come to mind. Like wise, Martin
Luther King, Jr. came on the scene
precisely when someone was needed
to guide the social changes essential
to eliminate human injustices and
unite a divided society in America.
He used Scripture and a profound
belief in the inherent goodness of
man as his tools to organize and suc-
cessfully carry out nonviolent civil
disobedience to bring about change.
In doing so, he was instrumental in
the creation and passage of both the
Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights
Act in the United States Congress.
His successful nonviolent approach


Thankfully, we have also been to correct injustices was also recog-
blessed with others even larger than nized in the world arena when he
life, who without any power to was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.
wield, still brought about remark- Most of us are old enough to re-
able changes through their simple member the March on Washington
desire to serve their fellow man. and Martin Luther King Jr's
Remarkable figures such as Ma- moving, pointed and now famous "I
hatma Gandhi, Mother Teresa and have a dream" speech. Unfortu-


nately, his assassination and prema-
ture death in 1968 not only ended
his life, but stopped his "dream"
short of realization.
By 1968, the war in Vietnam was
taking the light off of the civil rights
movement. Indeed essential dona-
tions to keep the movement 'afloat
were being diverted to efforts tar-
geted as opposing the war.
Additionally, some impatient sec-
tors of the black community were
dissatisfied with King's nonviolent
approach and believed white Amer-
ica would be completed to respond
more quickly to implementing
equality, if threatened with various
aggressive acts to violence.
According, black power militants
including the Black Panthers were
gaining in popularity.
King planned on regarding the
momentum in the civil rights move-
ment by creating a multiracial and
multi cultural cartel to directly at-


tack the issue of poverty in America.c.i
This brilliant plan, called "The Poor
People's Campaign" was intended
to serve as the foundation for mov-'
ing the entire black community into'-
full partnership in America's econ-'"'
omy.
Unfortunately, King's death left a
void that could not be filled. There',
was no one willing or able to pick""'
up the torch and bring the final and&'
most important stage of his dream to
fruition.
Rev. Ruth Abernathy was good'w
man, but lacked the persona of the-"'
Reverend King. Jesse Jackson, who':'
had been directly criticized by King
for using the organization to pro-"
mote himself, found fame in capital-
izing on racial situations to improve'-
his bank account.
Black Americans armed only with"
the Civil Rights and Voting Rights
Acts struggled to find their leader-',
(See Dream Page 14)













Letters...



Commonality Exists Between


Political Parties, Writer Says


Dpar Editor:
4s a lifelong Democrat, I read with
irnerest the Republican Party ad
highlighting Rev. Carl Hanks.
It was tastefully done and I found
nmself agreeing with every point he
mrde.
*Why would a lifelong Democrat
atree with a Republican ad? Should
I change parties?
Well, I got to thinking about
hi'/my points. You see Rev. Carl
e .ressed the views of any middle
o$the road moderate which is where
most of us live in this country...in
thi middle.
We all agree: while there are in-
stances when some people need a
helping hand, we don't want to stifle
individual initiative.
tWe don't need government to get
arty bigger. We are watching the Re-
pilblicans control our national gov-
ernment, while tremendously


increasing our national debt, and we
watch while their political scandals
hit the news.
So what's a voter like me to do?
I find there are no great differ-
ences in the parties anymore. Most
of us live, work, go to church, take
care of our families, and give some-
thing to charities.
We are called moderates and share-
most of Rev. Carl's views. So why is
it that if I say I am a Democrat, I am
labeled a liberal, and why would
Rev. Carl feel like he has to say that
he is a conservative, when most of
us live in the middle'?
My own opinion is that at a na-
tional level the far right wing Re-
publican Party and the far left wing
of the Democratic Party have shang-
haied our parties and turned to mean
spirited political rhetoric.
I also think that we send good
people to Washington, but over time


the system of money mingling with
politics corrupts some in both par-
ties.
We are fortunate to have Demo-
cratic Representative Allen Boyd to
represent us ethically in Congress.
On a local note, our city/county
races have nothing to do with Re-
publican or Democratic issues.
We have Jefferson County issues.
Both our local parties should recruit
good local candidates and keep the
rhetoric out of local campaigns.
In fact, the local Democratic and
Republican parties ought to sit down
together to discuss how we all can
make this a letter place to live.
About a year ago, a group ot local
citizens completed a document envi-
sioning the best future we could
foresee for our county.
This took more than two years
with as many as 50 people working
on the committee. We surveyed


hundreds of people and at no time-
'during the two years did I ever hear
.,anyone declare they were Democrat
or Republican.
The document represents the best
ideas from all citizens.
So what's a voter like me to do?
I'll do my best to support any candi-
date that I think has integrity and
who will govern with a moderate
philosophy.
I'll respect Rev. Carl and his views
and know that most all of us want
peace, prosperity, and good neigh-.
bors of both parties.
I will just remain a Democrat and
hope our national parties tone down
their divisive approach to politics.
Nick Prine


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 13, 2006 PAGE 5

Commissioners Stand

For What They Believe


Dear Editor:
It is time that someone spoke up in
support of our county commission-
ers.
There are a few vocal individuals
who claim to speak for the majority
of landowning and taxpaying citi-
zens against the "greedy developers
supported by the equally greedy
county commission."
It is possible that our county com-
missioners are considering the will
of the majority, and therefore we
don't have to attend these meetings
and can take care of our property or
businesses knowing that we are rep-
resented.

As for greed, I believe the truly'
greedy person is one who wants to
control property without buying it,
or paying the taxes on it.
If you don't want a particular piece
of property developed, buy it.
I believe the owner has the right to


use his property in his best eco-
nomic interests.
Revenues (taxes) for the county
are paid by 40 percent of the people
in the county. The services used by
many of this 40 percent are limited
to roads, police, and waste disposal.
The cry from those who are wor-
ried that their services may
decrease, or worse yet, that they
may have to pay for some of them,
is unrelenting.
There are those with postage
stamp size property that want to
control everything within their view.
Greedy is a person who expects
someone else to pay for his/her
wants and desires.
My thanks to the county commis-
sioners who have to listen to threats
and character assassinations daily,
and still are men enough to stand up
-and do the right thing.
Gerald Bussell


' *


Writer Responds To Citizens'


Letters About Rezoning


Dear Editor:
I would like to respond to the let-
ters that were in the paper from Wil-
liam Leskanic and Dick Bailar, on
Jan. 4.
Mr. Leskanic said that we should
heed the words of John Kennedy:
"ask not what your country can do
for you, but ask what you can do
for your country."
.He said he was tired of the jabs
and barbs directed at our County
Commissioners, and considered
them a slap in the face.
Many people have constructively
voiced their concerns at public
meetings in a peaceful professional
manner. They have worked within
the established process to try and
prQtect the county from rampant un-
managed growth, such as,has. hap-,
pened in surrounding localities, like.
Wakulla, Leon and Gadsden Coun-
ties, Thomasville and most of the
State of Florida.
.This is their mission and goal in
an attempt to serve their county. It
seems he (Leskanic) wants us to
support Commissioners' decisions,
even if we disagree with them.
Every reasonable plea to the Com-
mission has fallen on deaf ears.
I consider his letter disparaging to
those who believe in free speech.
Many people have worked hard to
try and preserve the beauty and tran-
quility of Jefferson County, and
continue to try and be a voice for
reasonable and managed growth, by
protecting the provisions of the
Land Use Comprehensive Plan.


Dear Editor:
Recently I was informed that my
old middle school (Howard Middle
School) will be closing the doors for
good. This was very disturbing to
me, because all of the students there
will be transferred over to the new
high school.
What's even sadder, is that the
community refused to come to-
gether and save something so valu-
able to us.
Howard Academy is the place
where our parents and grandparents
were educated. Some went on to be-
come doctors and lawyers and some
were satisfied just calling the school
they have grown to love, home.
Through the years, Howard has
become an historical site to a com-
munity better known as Rooster
Town.
To some people the school was
more than a place to learn. Some
used the school to have other activi-
ties like wedding receptions, talent
shows, and so on.
The school was recently remod-
eled and is in better shape than the
new high school. The new high
school was built in a high risk flood
area and is no way big enough to ac-
commodate all the students.
I recently toured the new school
and found that there is no way pos-
sible for it to hold our middle school.
children and separate them from our


I urge him (Leskanic) to follow
his own advice to help our county
by attending some County and Plan-
ning Commission meetings to ex-
press his input, and ideason how to
best plan for reasonable growth.
Mr. Bailar said there were com-
pelling reasons to approve the Wau-
keenah rezoriing. The proposal
approved by the Planning .Commis-
sion, and adopted by the County
Commission, 'as to development
density through rezoning, gave up
all commercial zoning.
I thought that economic develop-
ment was mostly about jobs. No
commercial zoning for business
equals no long term jobs.
I invite the writer to respond and
tellthe.public what the compelling
reasons were, for approval of the US
Highway 19 rezoning for the devel-
opment proposed by Mr. Andris-
He (Bailar) went on to say that op-
ponents of the rezoning were cruelly
uncivil and mean spirited and in the
old days would be invited behind
the barn for a meeting.
He expressed his views at the
meetings and in the paper, and I've
heard none of the cruelly uncivil
barbarians suggest he be taken "be-
hind the barn."
Mr. Bailar suggested that the
County Commissioners might have
voted to approve the rezoning re-,
quests, just because of the attitude
displayed by the opposition.
Mr. Bailar appears to accuse the
Commission of possible deception
and lack of integrity by saying that
they might have voted for the zon-


high school children.
Do we think that our middle
school children are ready for what
goes on in high school?
Our community already has a
problem with our babies having ba-
bies. If we sit'down and let this hap-
pen, this problem will double.
I also went to a School Board
meeting just to find out that we as
parents are not standing behind our
children's education.
Our voice has been taken away
from us. The School Board office
should be full of parents asking


NETWORK BetterT


ing changes just because the opposi-
tion criticized them.
Maybe he knows something about
the voting rationale of the County
Commission that the rest of us don't,
since he sits on several local govern-
ment committees.
Mr. Bailar contradicts his own ad-
vice to the public to show civility,
by saying that people who oppose
the rezoning requests are "cruelly
uncivil," and "mean spirited," and
he intimates that we should be taken
to the woodshed for some old fash-
ioned attitude adjustment.
I find his comments to be uncivil
and demeaning. Not only demean-
ing to others, but demeaning to him-
self.
Now that I know he coordinates
legislative funding and other matters
for the county, I consider his letter
to be nothing more than political
spin and grandiose exaggeration, in
an attempt to impress local govern-
ment officials, and discredit those
who oppose the agricultural
rezonings.
Others and I have witnessed citi-
zens treated with extreme disrespect
by some Commissioners at public
meetings.
We have seen several Commis-
sioners act uncivilly and appear
mean spirited at public meetings.
Maybe that's one of the reasons
some of them get criticized. To both
of you, this reminder from Edward
'R. Murrow: "We must not confuse
dissent with disloyalty."
Sincerely,
Wayne Searcy


questions and being involved.
I was not asked if I wanted my
children to be transferred to the high
school. I was told.
I remember when this community
boycotted when -we were not satis-'
fled.
It's important that we ask our-
selves if we are satisfied now.
Let's get involved with our chil-
dren's education and save our his-
tory.
If we do.,'t stand for something,
we will l 4for anything.
Shawn Ross


V fnr all,
ol-Fee:1863413
Ore nin twwanya0o


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The Jefferson County Recycling Program accepts

the following items for recycling:


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water'bottles,
--laundry detergent bottles, etc..

'All type cans Tin cans food cans, dogfoodcans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.


Newspapers, Magazines, etc.


All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
Laundry detergent boxes, shipping b6oxes', et.'

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the.life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping'fees. How could you go wrong?


Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

:"Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
,,dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
.paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers--clearly marked to identify
contents)

"*The Recycle Center-Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.


Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the

collection site for the proper disposal of above items.




The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


Howard Middle School Historical

Site In Rooster Town Community






PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 13, 2006



Honoring A Leader


Who


Justice


For


For




'All


People


Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.


IN MEMORY OF DR. KING KEEPING THE DREAM ALIVE
L&E Seafood & BBQ'4
Specializing In All Seafood & Seasonings
| (850) 997-8211
145 Chestnut St. Open Mon.-Sat.
Monticello, FL 8:30 a.m. 8:30 p.m.
Leverne and Elvira Wilson, Owners

Phil Barker
School Superintendent
& School Board Staff
'Remember the Past, Celebrate the Present
andcStrive for a Brighter future.
Keep 'The Dream .Ative!


AutoPartsIa
WftreadyinAda=.
Frank Spanarelli
Store Manager
1321 S. Jefferson
Monticello, FL 32344
S ., 850-997-4444

"Our Blessings"

S VPK Program
Open Enrollment
"A PLACE HELPING TO KEEP THE DREAM ALIVE!"


COUNTRY MILE COMPUTERS

"Honoring Dr. Martin L. King., Jr.
997-6500
Richard & Ashley Hotz.


*I have a dream today!
I have a dream that one day down in Alabama with its vicious racists, with its Governor ha.-i,, his lips; dripping right
there in Alabama, little black boys and girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and
brothers.
*I have a dream today!
I have a dream that one day "every valley shall be exalted and every hill and mountain shall be made low. The rough places
will be made plain and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall
see it together."
This is our hope. This is the faith that I go back to the South with. With this faith we shall be able to transform the jangling
discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray
together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together; knowing that we will be free one day. And
this will be the day. This will be the day when all of God's children will be able to sing with new meaning. "My Country 'tis of thee,
sweet land of libery, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim's pride, from every mountain side, let
freedom ring." And if America is to be a great nation, this must come true.
So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire; let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of
Colorado; let freedom ring from the curvaceous slops of California. But not only that. Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of
Georgia; let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee; let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi.
From every mountainside, let freedom ring.


Keaton Tire Repair
"Service Is Our Business on and off the Road"


EDD KEATON
TRAVIS KEATON
54 Capps Hwy
Lamont, FL 32336


850-997-0903 Shop
850-264-'6871 Cell
850-997-0937 Fax
850-997-5443 Home


GERROLD A usTIN
City Councilmen


L -


Robert R. Plaines
County Judge


HILLTOP GROCERY
Great Subs and So Much More,
906-0752
Donna, Bill, Wild Wyatt
and the Hilltop Crew


,'(li -A.L JarfTuera/'Director, Inc.
Tambvnav Fuv aea Y cnom-
620 York Street, Monticello, Fl. 32345
997-5553
The Dream Lives On....Let Freedom Ring!!


Keep The Dream Alive!
Thompson's Amoco
997-5655




In Memory of Dr. King Keep The Dream Alive

Jefferson County High
School Faculty & Staff


Badcock&more
HOME FU R N ITUE R1
405 S. Jefferson St US Hwy. 19 South
Monticello, FL Joe and Linda Roberts, Owner
Remembering Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.


"Let's make the dream come true."
Dr. Artis Johnson & Staff
Jefferson County Adult Center
342-0140
--


Farmers
& Merchants
Bank


200 E. Washington St. Monticello, FL
Member F.D.I.C. An FMB Bank
997-2626


Wendy's Exxon
Travel Center


Spoke


E(ON


S. Highway 19 (Just past I-10)
997-9628


wm
mwm


Emmmd
MEN"


m






MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 13, 2006 PAGE 7


Ogg






A My,~


DRUNK DRIVING DOESN'T JUST KILL DRUNK DRIVERS.


Andrea Harris, killed Autg. 26, 1991 at 6:00pm on El Camino Real, Atascadero, Califobrnia.
Next time your friend insists on driving drunk, do whatever it takes to stdop him. Because if he kills innocent people, how will you live with yourself?

FIENDS DON~ I T LET] FRI ~IENDS DR ~I VE DR~ ~. ~ I UNK


LI S Ovpai Wittrit ()I or js I, ,


-.14 14


irk*


Al


Q--














PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 13, 2006


Lifestyle


NJ>~
~ .r~ -. -


.~;,
.' .&~. 'am ~.' .

* ~ .


Iva






GRL SCOUT Troop 187 met area.celebrities
Ahn and Rob Nucatola, back, of WCTV News
at a Cookie Rally in Tallahassee, recently.
I


Front, L-R: Taylor Champion, Anna Bowling,
Abby Starling, Marisa Thomas, and Sarah
James.


JCHS Senior Brinson

Named Florida Scholar


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
/


ida .Thursda
ville, to b
Regional S
vie in Mar


Jefferson County High school- -wide Suns
graduating senior Crystal N. Brin- Mathematic
soh, has been designated the Jeffer- 2006".
son District Sunshine State Scholar The Suns]
in Mathematics and Science for the gram was
cutrent year. recognize th
She will compete with 74 other ida's gradual
district scholars from around Flor- demonstrate



Sorority Program


ay, Jan. 19, in Jackson-
ecome one of the six
scholars, who will then
ch for the title, "State-
hine State Scholar in
s and Science for

hine State Scholars Pro-
established in 1977 to
ie achievement of Flor-
ating seniors who have
d excellence in both


Features Organization


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


The X; Limbda UpsilontChapter
of Beta Sigma Phi met at the home
of Carolyn Wright at 7:30 p.m. on
Tuesday, to hear the program "Or-
ganize Your Life in 2006."
The program, given by hostess
Wright, suggests that you clean up
the clutter and save the memories of
your life. She presented each mem-
ber with a pocket calenda-, and sue-
gested that they put birthdays,
anniversaries, and appointments, in
it.
Those in attendance for this meet-
ing were: Connie Boland, Cindy
Chancy, Carolyn Cheshire, Peggy
Day, Jean Folsom, Carolyn Hayse,
Betty Messer, Lynn Rhymes, Alice
Sander, Mary Ann Van Kleunen,


Emily Walker, and Wright.
After President Boland called the
meeting to order, reports were heard
from the committees of Service, So-
cial, Membership, and Sunshine.
Sander then read the minutes of
the previous meeting.

Van Kleunen'won the raffle held
to raise funds for Hospice.
Folsom is making plans for an
auction to be held in February to
raise funds for the Relay For Life
event.
Members were asked to share reci-
pes for the upcoming cookbook
"What's Cookin' In Monticello."
Funds from the sale of this cook-
book will go towards projects at the
Jefferson Senior Citizen Center.


VFW Auxiliary Shares Holiday


Post 251 Ladies Auxiliary, VFW
were in attendance at the Jefferson
Nursing Center in December for the
Annual Christmas Dinner and Party.
They helped the residents cele-
brate the Christmas holiday with


their song, laughter, and presented
Christmas gifts.
Those sharing this event include:
District President Shirley Washing-
ton, Sara Griffin, Alberta Barnhart,
Willie Ann Dickey, and Mary Blair.


Homes Of Mourning


Elnora Keaton-Armstead
Elnora Keaton-Armstead, 89, of
Drifton, Florida died Sunday, Janu-
ary 8, 2006 at home.
Armstead was a native of Mari-
anna and lived in the Jefferson
County area for most of her life. ,
She was a volunteer with RSVP at
the Jefferson Elementary School for
several years, an Avon Rep for 37
years, and later- became a home-
maker.
She is survived by Ida Mae Wil-
cox, Eliza Mae (Sam) Jones, a step-
son, Burnice Johnson. A host of
grandchildren, great grandchildren,
and sorrowing family and friends.
She was preceded in death by a son;
Lawrence Keaton Jr.
Funeral service will be Sunday,
January 15, 2006 at Mt. Morilla at
2:00 p.m., Rev. James Thompson,
Officiating. Interment will follow at
Byrd Cemetery. Funeral arrange-
ments by Branch Street Funeral
Home.
Jimmy F. Sloan, Sr.
Jimmy F. Sloan, Sr., a retired cor-
rectional officer, died Friday, Janu-
ary 6, 2006. Fie is survived by his


wife, Minister Joretha N. Sloan.
The service will be at 11 a.m. EST
Saturday at Memorial Missionary
Baptist Church with burial at Pall-
bearers Cemetery. Moderator J.B.
Duval will officiate. Family will re-
ceive friends from 6 to 7 p.m., Fri-
day at Branch Street Funeral Home
in Monticello. (850-997-2024)

He was a member of Memorial
Missionary Baptist Church and a
member of American Legion Post
234.

Other survivors include two sons,
Minister Orenthya Sloan (and wife
LaShonda) of Monticello, and
Jimmy F. Sloan, Jr. of Gainesville;
three daughters, Cassandra Kiser
(Emanual) of Lawtey, Katavia Sloan
of Gainesville and Stephanie John-
son of Monticello; his parents, Bai-
ley F. Sloan and Beatrice G. Sloan
of Monticello, a sister Beverly A.
Sloan of Monticello; two uncles,
Willie Sloan and Theodore Gamble
of Monticello; six grandchildren;
and two great grandchildren; and a
host of nieces, nephews, other rela-
tives and friends.


mathematics and science.
All scholars receive district recog-
nition and individual awards from
the program.
The six Regional Scholars and
their teachers will receive addi-
tional recognition from the Gover-
nor and Cabinet, the Florida
legislature, the Department of Edu-
cation, and private businesses.
The Sunshine State Scholars Pro-
gram is coordinated through the
Florida Institute of education at the
University of North Florida, and re-
ceives its major financial support
from the Florida Department of
Education, the Florida Lottery, and
the Technological Research and
Development Foundation.
Information on the Florida Sun-
shine State Scholars Program can
be found on the web site at
http://www.unf.edu/dept/sunshine/.


Sewing Classes

Planned For

4-H Members

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Clothing Construction classes for
4-H members will be held 3-5 p.m.
on Tuesday and Wednesdays be-
ginning Jan. 17 at the Extension Of-
fice.
Senior Advance classes will be
held on Thursdays.
Anyone interested in learning to
sew or improving their sewing skills
may contact Heidi Copeland or Gla-
dys Neely at-342-0187.
There will be a limited number of
classes so sign-up will be on a first
come first serve basis.
There is room for five students
each day.
You must be age nine and older to
participate.



Church News

Mount Ararat AME Church in
Waukeenah, will present a reflection
of women int he Bible titled
"Women of the World," 11 a.m.
Sunday. The program captures high-
lights of Old and New Testament
women.


New Bethel AME Chruch will ob-
servie its annual Men and Women's
Day worship service, 11 a.m. Sun-
day. Speaker is Rev. Henry R. Grif-
fin of Tallahssee. Music will be
provided by the Holy Ghost Revival
Center. Dinner will be served after
the service.


Recently, New Bethel AME
Church held its annual King and
Queen Contest. Contestants raised
money and included: Kenijah Smith,
Jordan Clark, Justin Peck, Dylan
Moye and Porche Guy. Moye was
crowned king and Smith was
crowned queen.


Rev. Joseph Francis, pastor of
Philadelphia MB Church of Monti-
cello, will be the guest speaker at a
revival, 7:30 p.m. nightly Jan 16-20,
at St. Thomas AME Church,
Madison.


Girl Scout Troop 187 Attends


Cookie College In Tallahassee


cookie sale preparation.
DEBBIE SNAPP She was dressed as a scientist with
Staff Writer a white coat and goggles as she in-
structed the girls. She explains that
Local Girl Scout Troop 187 met-the goal of the Council is to make
celebrities Ann and Rob Nucatola of learning fun.
WCTV News recently, during the The girls were given 20 minutes at'
Girl Scout Cookie Rally, in Talla- each of the eight stations. At the sta-
hassee, at the Camp for all Seasons, tions they learned about static elec-
which kicked off this year's sale. tricity and how it works by rubbing
The theme this year is "Be Bril- a balloon against wool; they tested
liant" and "Experiment in Fun." their sense of smell by closing their
Some 200 girls came together to eyes and sniffing the aromas of
learn lessons on goal setting and lemon, peppermint, coconut, and
selling tips. other sweet flavors; they got to feel
Attending from Jefferson County the warming effects of soap on their
were: Anna Bowling, Taylor Cham- hands by rubbing vigorously;
pion, Sarah James, Abby Starling, They were given an opportunity to
and Marisa Thomas. experiment with cookies. They
Each was given a journal upon ar- decorated the sweet treats, creating
rival to log what they would learn at their own designs.
this cookie college. The cookie eating contest that
Brenda Gibbs, director of mem- took place during the event seemed
bership marketing for the Girl Scout to be enjoyed by all, judging by the
Council of the Apalachee Bend, re- cheers from the group.
ported that this was the first year The girls heard guest speakers, lo-
science was incorporated in the cal female professionals, who en-



Aelaide E. Hatcher Will

Celebrate 90th Birthday


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Monticello resident, Adelaide E.-
Hatcher, will celebrate her 90th
birthday Friday.
She was born in Knoxville, TN. to
Amelia and Ellis Elkins.
She spent most of her young life
in Saint Petersburg, FL.
She married Dennis Hatcher on


June 18, 1932.
Hatcher gives the Lord credit for-
her longevity, and her nephew Wil-
liam Billy Hays, who she has lived
with for the last 20 years, for taking
such good care of her.
She has been bedridden for the
last six years, since breaking her
hip. She says other than a few aches
and pains here and there, her health
is good.
She proudly announces that she
takes no prescription drugs, just her
vitamins.
Hatcher is especially grateful for
her caregivers Rosa, Elizabeth, and
Pauline .for their exceptional care
and attentiveness.


courage them to stay involved
because through involvement they
could do and be anything they
wanted.
Lois McFarland, director of fund-
ing activities and communications
said this year's goal for the girls is
to beat last year's cookie sales of
$600,000.
She stated: "There were real life
lessons mixed in with the activities
at this event. The girls learned how
to make opportunities, be creative
and set goals."


Improve Your Health
New Taoist Tai Chi Class in Monticello
Tuesday, 7:00 to 8:30 p.m. Starts January 17
To be held at Christ Episcopal Church, 425 N
Cherry For information, contact
L4Taoist Tai Chi Society
224-5438


HATCHER


School Menu

Monday
Martin Luther King Holiday!
Tuesday
Corn Dog, Baked Beans, Cookie
Bar, Fruit, and Milk.
Wednesday
Rib Bar B Q On Bun, Oven Fries,
Brownie, Fruit, and Milk.
Thursday
Fish, Cole Slaw, Cheese Grits, Fruit,
Hushpuppies, and Milk.
Friday
Chicken Tettrazinni, Broccoli, Fruit,
Hot Rolls, and Milk.


Ready... Set... Shop...
Monticello News
Classifieds


Evangelism Conference
Jan. 23-24 (Monday/Tuesday)
Dauphin Way Baptist Church, Mobile, Ala. (exit #4,1-65)
THEME: "More Than Ever Before"; from 1 p.m. Monday to 8 p.m. Tuesday
MUSIC: Choirs from Cottage Hill Baptist Church & Dauphin Way Baptist
Church; "Paid in Full" quartet; "Voices," from the University of Mobile
ADMISSION: Free to all, thanks to Cooperative Program; everyone welcome.




Ooug Steve Johnny David Dusty Bob
Chappelle Gaines Hunt Joyner McLemore Pitman



Darrenl Perry Mike Robeirt Ted Robert
Robinson Sanders Satterfield Smith Traytor White
Also.
Great Commission OTHER DETAILS:
Ministries Thaining www.ALSBOM. rg
Opportunities! Call or
Don go on-line for details. 1.800.264.1225, ext. 245
Wilton


.ORAL DESIGNS
SINCE 1934


Just living is not enough ...
One must have sunshine, A
freedom, and a little flower. 4
- Hans Clintian Andeirson


11 11.gellin sOflowers.com


'. ., .
190 E .D .qoo'ci Street
Monticello, 8506997.2015
,


- --------- ------ ---- ---- ------------ -- -- -- -- -- - -


Central

Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166
Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
6 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study


Noah did
everything, just
as God had
commanded
him.
Genesis 6:22

Come and hear...
Wayne Warren, Minister







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 13, 2006 PAGE 9


I ,. ... . :...








"*A- .*4
S... v









"at '- ZV ."-





JOHN LILLY, 4-H Coordinator works at the
library Wednesday, when computers were
down at the Extension Office. With his lab


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

John G. Lilly Sr. is the 4-H Coor--
dinator for the Jefferson County
Extension/IFAS Clubs, and has
spent 19 years working with 4-H
members.
Programs under his direction in-
clude: summer day camps, teen
leadership, environmental education
and 4-H Community Clubs.
Lilly's primary function is to teach
youth the fundamentals of agricul-
ture, engaging them in "hands on"
educational sessions that focus on
forestry, wildlife,' shooting sports,
and natural resources, and to teach
the youth how to become environ-
mental stewards.
He always knew that he wanted to
work with children, and now,Tral-
izes, that they take a lot of patience
at times, too.
Lilly says of his position "Besides
working extremely hard for the kids
and with the kids, I am honest and
sincere with them and their parents.
It's important to them and to me.
"I work above'and beyond the'iall
of'duty. If they come to me with a
question, I don't just send them to a
website for the answer...I find the
answer for them.
"I work with them and help
them face to face in their endeavors,
even when it means extra hours or
on holidays."
Lilly says the only frustrating part
of his job is the paperwork and re-


top and the computer lab at the library, Lilly
was able to finish his reports.. (News Photo)


ports that are required and must be
submitted.
"This takes valuable time that
could be spent with the kids," he ex-
plained.
His objective, as 4-H coordinator,
is to motivate kids to do better and,
to make changes in their lives for
the better.
He especially likes the Public
Speaking part of 4-Hj and enjoys
watching the children blossom right
in front of his .eyes. He thrills at'
their behavioral changes, for the bet-_
ter, and in their leadership and life
skill changes, as they excel in the
programs offered by 4-H,
"It's such a delight to have one of
our kids come back to us years later
and after experiencing the "real
iWorld" and enlighten us' with their
,testimonies," he adds.
Prior to acceptingihis position,
Lilly was a football coa i.i at a high
school in Jasper, the town where he
was born and raised.
He was encouraged to take on this
4-H position by one of his mentors,
now retired 4-H Agent Issac Chan-
dler, of Hamilton County.
-Lily- received ,his -MS DegrIee iif
the field of Agricultural Educatiodio
*from Florida A&M University and
his BS Degree in the field of Agri-
cultural Education from the Tuske-
gee University.
He created the first website for
FAE4-HA. .
Lilly was recently recognized for
,his hard work and dedication to the
4-H Clubs.


. .
'4 ^'v

in ra-^"


'3'
.. -,',/


., 4


ARTIST MELINDA COPPER


Local Author TO Sign Her

Books At Library January 18


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Melinda Copper, author and illus-
trator of "Snow White," will be pre-
sent at the Jefferson County Public
Library 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday,
Jan. 18.
Her friend Maru the bunny will be
joining her and she will be selling
and signing books.
The books will be of particular in-
terest to children and their parents,
and that is her reason for choosing
the time slotduring story time.
Her new book "Snow White" can
also be purchased online through
Amazon.comand left at the Library
for her to sign.
To dedicate the book to a specific
individual, leave that specific infor-
mation for Copper to use in signing.
Any further information can be
obtained by calling Debbie Craig at
the Library 342-0205.


'Smar/ Moaey by K'mber/y oss
LOANS: Direct lender
loosens its requirements for
homeowners who need
money now.
Have you been turned down
for a loan? Do you need more
than $10,000 for any' reason?
Are you paying more than
10% interest on any other
loans or credit cards?
If you are a homeowner and
'answered "yes" to any of
these questions, they can
tell you over the phone and
w//ihou/ ob//'ga/don if you
qualify.
High credit card debt? Less-
than-perfect credit? Self em-


The Florida Association of Exten--
sion 4-H Agents recognized him
with the Meritorious Award at the
Florida Association of Extension
Professionals Conference in Sara-
sota.
Other recognition he has received
include a Certificate of Appreciation
from the Jefferson County High
School Science Club for helping to
.train youth for the State Ecology
Marine Judging Contest; a Certifi-
cate of Appreciation from the North
Florida Fair Association for chairing
the NFF Dairy Show; and a Recog-
nition Award in the form of a plaque
from the Jefferson County School
District for providing presenters for
all the second grade classrooms,
each month.
As a NAE4-HA member he has
served on the Camping and Envi-
ronmental Education Task Force.
He received the Outstanding
Young Americans Award in 1998,
and he received Honors of Great-
ness from the P.K. Young Labora-
tory School, a Service Award from
the Jefferson County High
School/Community Based Industry
Program, iand from the Science
Club.
He received a trophy from the Pin-
ney 4-H Club for his accomplish-
ments.
Through his leadership and guid-
ance 4-H enrollment in the Jefferson
County Clubs continue to increase
two to three percent each year, with
more than 52 percent of the county
youth between the ages of 5-18 en-
rolled in 4-H Clubs.
Lilly also implemented the first
4-H listening project along with the
4-H Teen Council.
The project was conducted by teen
4-H members who were concerned
about pressing issues in their com-
munity.
He established a 4-H Gardening
Project with students with learning
disabilities.
He and his team work with the lo-
cal high school on improving youth
employable skills.
In addition, he is a members of
the Monticello Rotary Club, the Jef-
ferson County Literacy Board,
Chairman of the Jefferson Making
the Grade Committe:, ,;d Chair-
man of the Father's Day Planning
Committee, and a member of Epsi-
lon Sigma Phi.
He's a member of the Jefferson
County Tobacco Control Project,
Vice President of Students Working
Against Tobacco (SWAT,) and a
members of the Boys and Girls Club
Gardening Project.


played? Late house pay-
ments?Financial Problems?
Medical bills? IRS liens?/
a'oesa l matter./
If you are a homeowner
with sufficient equity, there's an
excellent chance you will qual-
ify for a loan- usua//i wi'/ii'
24'our. A
You can find out over the
phone-and free of charge-
if you qualify. Honey Mae
Home Loans is licensed by
the Florida Department of
Financial Services. Open 7 days
a week to serve you.
1-800-700-1242 ext. 263


Wacissa VFD
Plans Fish Fry,
Cake Walk
Wacissa Volunteer Fire Rescue
held their monthly meeting and
made plans for a fish fry and cake-
walk, 5 p.m., Feb. 18 at the Wa-
cissa Fire Station.
Other topics of discussion in-
cluded recruitment, workdays and
fundraisers, as well as updates on
training.
Secretary Lou Giles said that
great improvements have been
made on the building used by the
Wacissa Volunteers..
"The volunteers have really
worked hard to put the new ceiling
in the bay area, painting inside and
out, and plan to put nice letters on
the front of the building in the near
future," said Giles.

"We are an active volunteer fire
rescue department and we appreci-
ate all the support that keeps us go-
ing and urge more volunteers to
join us."
Wacissa Volunteer Fire Rescue
hold their regular monthly meet-
ings on the second Tuesday of each
month at the fire station in
Wacissa.


IN APPRECIATION
Willie Mae Wooten Woodson
We, the family, express our most
sincere appreciation to each of you
for your many acts of kindness
shown and your prayers expressed
during our time of sorrow.
Your caring and your love have
helped us immensely in making our
burden easier to bear.
Special thanks is extended to the
staff and physicians at Tallahassee
Memorial Regional Hospital, the
Reverend Willie Edd Brown and the
congregation of New Bethel AME
Church, and to Mr. Al Hall and his
staff at Tillman Funeral Home for
their outstanding services provided
to our loved one.
We pray God's richest blessings
upon each of you.
The Woodson and
Wooten Families


Tuesday, January 17th
6:30-8:30 pm
Perry Women's Club
502 N. Jefferson Street
Perry, Florida 32347


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 13, 2006

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Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 13, 2006 PAGE 11


YOUTH SOCCER Coach Phil Barker instructs, reviews old material and presents new tech-
youth in the rules and technique of the niques. (News Photo)
game. Each week before the games, Barker



Youth Soccer Opener At Park


Draws Good Turnout Saturday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Coordinator for the Youth Soccer
Program Phil Barker, said that de-
spite the colder weather over the
weekend, the turnout of both play-


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Howard Middle School
boy's basketball team began the
2006 portion of the season by de-
feating the Taylor County
Bulldogs, 30-29.
Coach Steve Hall said the Bees
led the Bulldogs by nine at the half,
19-10.
Taylor scored three points in the
third period.The Bees came back
strong in the fourth to seal the win.
The weaker side of the Bees, ac-
cording to Hall, they went to the


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

ACA and JCHS athletes appeared
on the Big Bend Leaders List this
weekl
Ben Grantham (ACA) was named
the Big Bend Player of the Week.
In the boy's scoring, Demario
Rivers (JCHS) remains at number
one with 317 points /
Grantham was added to the list
and stands at number 14 with 131
points/
In rebounds, Grantham remains
at number five with 99; Stephen
Griffin (ACA) stands at number
ten, down from six, with 81.
Rivers stands at number 12,
down from seven, with 75/
James Skipworth was added to
the list and stands at number 14
with 60.
In Steals, ACA and JCHS take
the first five places with Rivers in
first with 52; Casey Gunnels stands
at number two with 31.
Tim Crumity (JCHS) stands at
number three with 35; Griffin,
stands at number four with 32, and
Grantham stands at number five
with 31,
Lamarkus Bennett (JCHS) stands
at number seven with 27, he aver-


ers and fans during their first
games of the season, was very
high.
"All but three or four of the play-
ers came out," said Barker. "And
they were ready to go."
He added that there were about
200 family members present during


free-throw line 11 times, only suc-
ceeding with one bucket.
Scoring for the Bees were De-
vondrick Nealy, 15 points; Deonte
Jones with four points, six re-
bounds; DeAndre Tucker, two
points, 12 rebounds, one blocked
shot; Marquice Dobson, t' opointN,;
Demontray Johnson, five points,
five rebounds; and Richard Teylor,
two points, 14 rebounds.
"Howard will work hard on
shooting free-throws and being
more aggressive, said Hall.
The Bees are slated to face Madi-
son Central, 4 p.m., Tuesday, there.


ages 2.2 per game; and Lucius
Wade stands at number eight with
18,,
In assists, Tim Crumity (JCHS)
remains at number two with 57, he
averages 4.7 per game; and Rivers
stands at number three, up from
eight, with 47.
Griffin was added and stands at
number six with 32, he averages
2.9 per game; and Bennett stands at
number eight, up from nine, with
35, he averages 2.9 per game; and
Grantham was added and stands at
number nine with 25,.
In girl's scoring, only one athlete
from the schools was named,
freshman Mallory Plaines (ACA)
was added to the list and stands at
number 12, though the number of
points was not available.
In rebounds, Plaines again is the
only athlete from the two schools.
She stands at number five, averag-
ing 10.5 per game.
In assists, Keandra Seabrooks
(JCHS) is the only athlete from the
,two schools mentioned. She re-
mains at number five with 42/
In steals, Seabrooks is again the
only county representative. She
stands at number 13, down from
six, with 40.
The Lady Tigers, as a team, are
also ranked at number nine in the
State.


the different games, rooting for
their children or grandchildren.
"The younger players tend to
draw a larger number of parents
and family members at the games,"
he added.
Barker :said that because of the
taking of photos before scheduled
games, clinic times had to be short-
ened, because he didn't want to cut

into the playing time of the chil-
dren.
The clinic consisted of agility'
warm-ups, dodging, weaving, leap-
ing and ball handling drills includ-
ing dribbling and trapping.
"I also demonstrated proper
throw-in technique," said Barker.
The players in each game were
rotated every four minutes at which
time, additional team members
would be placed on the field in the
positions in the front-line, halfback
and ftll bac', and then restarting
the match.
"We had some beautiful scoring
opportunities and a lot of goals
were made," said Barker. "I was
very pleased, amazed and im-
pressed that many of the older kids
remembered a lot from last year.
Barker said that scores are not
kept during the games, that they are
mainly for having fun and having
the opportunity to learn to play soc-
cer.
"It's a wholesome activity and
they have a great time," said
Barker.
Saturday, soccer action continues
when teams three and four play at 9
a.m., teams five and six, 10 a.m.,
teams seven and eight, oI a.m. and
teams one and two at noon.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy
varsity girl's basketball team now
stand 10-8 on the season after win-
ning the past two games.
When the Lady Warriors faced
off against John Paul, ACA won
38-32.
In the first half, the Lady Warri-
ors scored 11 points in each period
to John Paul's eight in each.
In the third period, ACA out-
scored John Paul 8-6 and in the
fourth, the Lady Warriors were out-
scored 10-8.
Leading the charge for ACA was
Mallory Plaines with 12 points and
11 rebounds for a double-double,
six steals and one blocked shot; and
Bethany Saunders, 12 points, two
rebounds, three assists and two
steals.
Brittany Hobbs, two points, three


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy
JV boy's basketball team climbed
to 3-5 on the season after the game
they had slated against John Paul
last week, was canceled and they
won by forfeit.
The Warriors are working to im-
prove their technique on the game
they will play against Carrabelle, 4
p.m., here, Friday.
Coach Jeremy Tuckey said this
was the Warriors' second game


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Howard Middle School
boy's basketball team defeated
Gadsden County's Crossroads
Academy, 57-26.
Leading the score for the Bees
was Devondrick Nealy with 14
points, four rebounds.
Deontae Jones, 13 points, nine
rebounds; Gregory Dotson, 10
points, six rebounds; DeAndre
Tucker, eight points, 14 rebounds,
and two blocked shots; Harold In-
gram and Demontray Johnson each
scored six points. Ingram also had
nine rebounds and Johnson had


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rebounds, three assists; Caitlyn
Murphy, four points, four
rebounds, two assists; Lindsey
Day, two points, two assists, one
blocked shot; and Corie Smith, 'six
points, six rebounds and two steals.
When the Lady Warriors squared
off with Apalachicola, ACA, the
won 29-16.
Coach Daryl Adams said that
during the game, he did a lot of ro-
tation, so individual. scoring was
not at the ACA highest.
Saunders, four points, one assist,
one steal; Hobbs, four poirits, four
rebounds, three assists, four steals,
Plaines, four points, six rebounds,
one assist, four steals and one
blocked shot; and Murphy, four
points, one assist, and two steals.
Day, eight points, seven
rebounds, two assists, one steal;
Smith, three points, four rebounds;
and Rikki Roccanti, three
rebounds, two steals.
FAMU is slatted Thursday, and


against Carrabelle and in the first
game, the Warriors won.
"We know they're probably gun-
ning for us, a so we're preparing
for Carrabelle's best game," said
Tuckey. "We'll be ready for
them."
He said the Warriors are working
on their defensive moves this week
and especially concentrating on
their free throw shooting.
"We're looking to have a real
good game," he added.
He urges all parents and fans to
attend the game and cheer the War-
riors on to victory.


four rebounds.
D. Whitfield had two rebounds.
The Bees stand 7-2 on the season.


You Can Count
On The

Monticello

News


& RecUNeption Center
& Reception Center


Carrabelle, Friday. Both games are
here at 6 p.m.
ACA has faced each of these'
teams earlier in the season, losing -
to FAMU and winning over Carra-..
belle.


LEGALS


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE-.,--
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND- -
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 05-120-,.
PR IN RE: The Estate of: JOSH SIMP-'"
KINS Deceased. NOTICE OF ACTION'
TO: PEARLIE MAE SIMPKINS MILLS,,
JESSIE L. BROWN, PAULINE BROWN; .'-* ,
JIMMY LEONARD, WILLIE T. LEON-
ARD; GEORGIA MAE L. GREEN,
WYNELL GALLON, GRIFFIN L:':'
MACK, MARION J. ANDERSON, JER--
OME SIMPKINS, PATRICIA S. MAR-
SHALL, TERRANCE SIMPKINS, ".- ..
JESSIE SIMPKINS, SHARON SIMP-" "
KINS, WILLIAM SIMPKINS, WILLIE
MAE SIMPKINS, CREOLA SIMPKINS," ..
BROWN, LEE, ROBIN L. MITCHELL,:
DAVID MITCHELL, and any unknown
heirs at law, assigns, devisees, grantees,."".,
and any other parties claiming any inter-..
est by or through aforesaid parties, YOU
ARE NOTIFIED that a Petition For De- -
termination of Heirs and Beneficiaries hag ,--
been filed in the above entitled estate rela-
tive to your interest in the following de .
scribed real property located in Jeffersond'- ', -,
County, Florida: The North Half of the "
North half of the Southwest Quarter (NI/2
of NI/2 of the SW1/4) of Section One (1-)"
Township One (1) North, Range Four (4)
East. containing Forty (40) acres, more or
less, and being a portion of the lands conga w~'
veyed to said parties of the first part by
Preston B. Bird, Sr. by deed dated July
Ilth 1929 and of record in the Office of,'..
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Jefferson -. :
County, Florida in Deed Book "UU," page
457 and to which reference is hereby
made. You are required to serve a copy of.
your written defenses, if any on the Peti-
tioner's attorney, Harold M. Knowles, Es- -., .
quire, whose address is 3065 Highland'," "
Terrace, Tallahassee, Florida 32301 on or
before the 28th day of February 2006, and
file the, original with the clerk of this court. .
either before ser'iice on the Petitioner's at- -
torney or immediately) thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered against you ,..
for the relief demanded in the Petition.
1/13. 1/20, 1/27, 2/3, c


NOTICE OF SALE: Notice is hereby
given that the School Board of Jefferson
County, Florida, Desmond M. Bishop -
Administration Building, 1490 W."'
Washington Street, Monticello, Florida tl
will receive sealed bids on or before
January 30, 2006 at 2:00 p.m. for the'. -
purchase of the following described real
property owned by the School Board of
Jefferson County, Florida. One acre of
land in SW 1/4 of SW 1/4 of NW % DB
"YY" Page 193. The Parcel Number is
Section 20-2n-7E-0000-0110-0000. This '
property is being sold in its "As Is
Condition" and no representations are
made as t6 zoning, access, or its suitabilityW "
for specific uses. The land is situated in,
Jefferson County, Florida. Bids received
will be opened publicly at 2:00 p.m. in the.
Board Room of the district office located,
at 1490 W. Washington Street, Monticello,
FL 32344. No bid will be opened if,.-

9^- 925-7882
_AtThe Villages
r Of St. Marks


Lady Warriors Now


10-8 On The Season


HMS Bees Down


Taylor Bulldogs


JV Warrior Boys Ready

To Face John Paul


HMS Defeats Gadsden 57-26


JCHS, ACA Athletes

Named Big Bend Leaders


DGIner
* Reservations
\ Requested


Mon., Wed., Thurs. & Fri. 11 a.m. 9 p.m. Closed Tuesday
Saturday 8 a.m. 10 p.m. *- Sunday 8 a.m. 9 p.m.


I,-.


*l .1


i. TRITCHJING

The Waggoners Trucking-Established 1951
Now Recruiting drivers for our SE Auto Transport Division.
Drivers must have a valid Class A CDL,
1 year and 100K verifiable OTR miles.
Stable work history and clean MVR is a must.
Great Pay, Great Benefits,_Matching 401K.
Contact Susan or John at (866) 413-3074 EOE


* *- *<".


t






PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRL, JANUARY 13, 2006


LEGALS
received after 2:00 p.m. Please mark on
envelope, "Surplus Real Property Bid
Opening 2:00 p.m. on January 30, 2006."
Anyone desiring information on the
procedure for submitting bids should
contact Hal Wilson at (850) 342-0100. It is
anticipated that the highest bid will be
presented to the School Board for
approval on Monday, February 13, 2006.
The School Board of Jefferson County
reserves the right to reject any or all bids.
Fred Shofner, Chairman, Jefferson
County School Board, Phil Barker,
Superintendent, Jefferson County School
B"-rd.
,13. 1/18, 1/20, 1/25, 1/27, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA


LEGALS,


PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO:
05-134-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHN
THOMAS SCHLEIFER, Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION: The
, administration of the estate of JOHN
THOMAS SCHLEIFER deceased, File
Number 05-134-PR is pending in the
Circuit Court for Jefferson County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is Jefferson County Courthouse,
Room 10, Monticello, FL 32344. The
names and address of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below. All interested persons are required
to file with this Court, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE: (1)
all claims against the estate and (2) any


.-LEGALS


objection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the Will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdiction of
the Court. ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED. Publication of this
Notice has begun on January 6, 2006;
JOAN HEYSER SCHLEIFER Petitioner;
MICHAEL A. REICHMAN Post Office
Box 41 Monticello FL 32345, (850)
997-5100 FL BAR NO: 183518
1/6, '13, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 05-315 CA. In the Matter of
Adoption of CARLEY MARIE DUPREE,


MMMWAIM


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cigarettes or cigars.


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HEATING & COOLING INC.

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Office: (850) 342-3294
CELL: (850) 509-2903


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877-7222
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Sales Manager All trade-ins are welcome
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LEGALS
a minor. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: The
unknown father of CARLEY MARIE
DUPREE Address Unknown YOU ARE
NOTIFIED that a Petition for Adoption
has been filed and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it, on MICHAEL A. REICHMAN,
petitioner's attorney, whose address is
P.O. Box 41, Monticello, FL 32345, on or
before February 20, 2006, and file the
original with the clerk of this court either
service on petitioner's attorney or
immediately thereafter, otherwise a
default will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint or
petition. DATED on December 28, 2005.
CARL D. BOATWRIGHT as Clerk of the
Court.
1/6, 113, 1/20, 1/27, c


LEGALS.
IN CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE NO.
05-CA-2678 CARIE MCNEAL Plaintiff
vs. BRAIN KEITH WOODY individually,
Defendant. SUMMONS: PERSONAL
SERVICE ON A NATURAL PERSON
STATE OF FLORIDA: TO: Brian Keith
Woody, 913 N. Mitchell Street,
Thomasville, Georgia 31792.
IMPORTANT: A lawsuit has been filed
against you. You have twenty (20)
calendar days after this summons is served
on you to file a written response to the
attached Complaint with the Clerk of this
Court. A phone call will not protect you.
Your written response, including the case
number given above and the names of the
parties must be filed if you want the Court


LEGALS
to hear )our side olf lie case. If ou do not
file your response on time, you may lose
the case, and your wages, money and
property may thereafter be taken without
further warning from the Court. There
are other legal requirements. You may
want to call an attorney right away. If you
do not know an attorney, you may call an
attorney referral service or a legal aid
office (listed in the phone book). If you
choose to file a written response yourself,
at the same time you file your written
response to the Court you must also mail
or taken a copy of your written response
to the "Plaintiff/ Plaintiff's Attorney"
named below: CLIFFORD L. DAVIS,
ESQUIRE: Attorney for Plaintiff Post
Office Box 1057, Monticello, Florida
32345 (850) 997-0113, (850) 997-0131
Facsimile THE STATE OF FLORIDA TO


i


II











To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED

Your Community Shopping Center


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 13, 2006 PAGE 13

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monda3 Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGAL NOTICE
EACH SHERIFF OF THE STATE: You
are commanded to serve this Summons
and a copy of the Complaint in this lawsuit
on the above-named Defendant. DATED
ON 11/3/2005. BOB INZER, CLERK OF
THF CIRCUIT COURT.
1/6, 13, c
HELP WANTED
Experienced upholsterer, part-time.
Call Minnie at 997-0826.
01/6,11, 13, 18, pd
Accounting Office needs full or part
time clerical/bookkeeping help.
References required. Send Resume to
280 S. Cherry St. or Fax 342-9899.
I'13, 18, 20, c
Heavy Equipment Operator.
Experienced Operator, needed to run
different types of heavy equipment in
limerock mine. Some mechanical
ability needed to perform job
function. Serious inquiries only. Must
be dependable. Full benefit package
included. Drug test, physical and
background check required. EOE
apply in person Martin Mariettla
Material. 23 miles west of Perry on
Hwy 98. 850-584-6461.
1/11, i3, 18, 20, c
Cypress Truck Lines, INC Driver
Designed Dispatch. FLA ONLY/Flat
Bed students welcome. Home every
Weekend,most nights (800) 545-1351
www.cypresstruck.com
Come join our growing team. If you
want to be challenged in a busy
newspaper office and want above
average earnings and have the drive
to be a positive team player, we'd like
to talk to you. No slackers,
dunderheads, dopers, drama queens,
please. Call Ron Cichon @ 997-3568.
Taking Applications. Our business is
striping, seal coating, asphalt repair,
etc. Ideal candidate can take on
anything and do it right without
supervision. EOE. Druggies need not
apply. 545-1776.
9/23, tfn
SERVICES
- -
Backhoe Service: Driveways, roads,
ditches, tree and shrub removal, urn,
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @ 997-
3116, 933-3458.
tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and op-
erated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648.
Leave message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-85-O, quick responses.
6/22, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drug, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn
fat and increase energy levels
resulting in considerable weight loss
over time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key
ingredients incorporated into rice
bran oil with natural flavorings to
give it a palpable taste. In addition to
weight loss, you may see benefits for
the hair, skin and nails from the
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in rice
bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is a cactus
found in the Kalahari Desert of South
Africa. Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
s/d 5/18, tfn
Do you want to be just a Christian,
with no denominational names, creeds
,or practices? Jesus established His
church called the church of Christ
and you can be a merhiber of it. We
are ready to help if you are ready to
learn. Call: 997-3466.
1/29 tfn (10/3)
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for assessment of
your needs. 997-3553. UPS NOW
AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn
FOR RENT
Prime downtown office space now
available in Cherry Street Commons.
Jack Carswell, 997-1980.
11/30, tfn, c
Mobile Home on Ashville Hwy. 2 bed
rooms, 1 bath $350 monthly, $350
deposit. 850-997-5434
1/11, 13, pd
Country Living-1 bed, I bath, $500,
997-6653.
01/4,6,11. 13, pd
Spacious 3 bedroom, 2 bath with den,
sun room, garage, large yard. Lovely
neighborhood. $900 plus security.
251-0760.
1/13, c


FOUND
Pit Bull type dog, found 12/22 in
Monticello on East Pearl
Street/Ashville Highway. Call
342-1486.
1/13, 18 pd


LOST
ALERT- BOLO ATI MENTION Four
Peacocks- females, dark brown and
buff colors. Pineywoods/Casa Bianca
area. 649-1179, 997-4627. REWARD.
01/4, 6, 11, 13, pd

REAL ESTATE
NEW HOME 1370 square foot. 4
bedroom, 2 bath for under $475/
month payments. University Homes -
850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
Lovely 3 bedroom, 2 bath home in
great area. 2000 sq. ft. on 1/3 acre
close to downtown. $154,900.
251-0760.
1/13, c
5 Bedrooms! 3 Baths! Plenty of room!
Buy for under $550 a month.
850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
FIRST TIME home buyers. If you
have enough money for a deposit on
an apartment you can probably own
your own home. Call 850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
DISCOUNTED MODELS Only 2
homes left, must go! Save $$$$ Call
today! 850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn

CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots, Land!
We Make Mortgage Loans,
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc.
Lic. Mortgage LENDER
878-3957

DELTA HEALTH GROUP

,- *
BRYNWOOD CENTER
A 97 BED SKILLED NURSING
-"" '. FACILITY LOCATED IN
MONTICELLO, FL
IS IN SEARCH OF:
DIRECTOR OF NURSING
This is an excellent
opportunity for a licensed
RN with strong leadership
& previous DON/Risk
Mgt. experience but not
required. We offer a very
competitive salary and
benefits package.
Interested candidates should
contact Charmion Holmes at
(850) 997-1800
Experience The Delta
Difference!

Brynwood Center
1656 South Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL. 32344

PHONE: 850-997-1800
FAX: 850-997-7269
www. deltahealthgroup. corn
Drug Free Workplace
EOE/m/f/d/v


SetYour

SSights High

SithDRS!


.


FOR SALE
Rhode Island Red Roosters $10
each. Beautiful Purebred Limousin
bull, 15 months old. Call 997-0901,
leave message or 997-3568 ask for
Debbie.
01/4, 6, 11, 13, 18, 20, 25, 27, pd
Two Cockatiels with large cage $35.
Call 342-1486
1/13, 18, 20, pd
LEFT OVER- Merchandise from Big
Chief Pawnbrokers, Electronics,
Handtools, DVD's, VHS, Jewelry,
Reasonably Priced 342-2105.
01/6, 11, 13, 18, 20, 25, 27, pd
Lab Puppies Parents are OFA
Certified; Therapy dog, obedience,
and hunters titled. Bred for health
and calm disposition. 997-3379.
/13, 18, pd
Pit Bulls $150 call 997-1705.
01/6, 11, 13, pd
METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ By
Direct From Manufacturer. 20 colors
in stock with all Accessories. Quick
turn around! Delivery Available Toll
Free (888)393-0335.


AUTOMOTIVE
1995 Ford Crown Vic. New Tires,
Looks & Drives Like New. $3,800
997-6806
10/21, tfn, c
1978 GMC Pickup/Camper Shell.
Long wheel base, good motor, tires.
Runs good $3,000. 997-5701 Leave
Message.
01/4, 6, 11, 13, pd
1977 Olds Cutlass 89,252 miles $3500
CASH. Clean, new tires. Call
997-2646 M-Th 9-5.
tfn, c
87' Mercury Sabel $500 firm. runs.
Contact Kim at (904) 497-7093
01/4. tfn


93 Ford F250 New tires, brakes, tune
up $4,500
89 Accura Legend SR 6 cylinder,
NADA Book is $2,400 Selling Price
$1,295
96 Ford Mustang Convertible- Red, A
New Top, new tires, 6 cyl. $4,200;
997-6066, 997-6806 Wilson Auto,
LLC.
tfn, c


01/13, fcan

Housing Vouchers
We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571



L D0 .A NOW HIRING

WE ARE SEEKING FULL TIME CASHIER AND
FULL TIME MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL.
*Must be available for any shift
*Must be able to work 30-40 hrs. or more each week
*Experience is a plus
*COMPETITIVE PAY! (Based on experience back ground quali-
fications, and certain specialties and acquired skills) ..
**ALl. FULL TIME NON-MINOR APPLICANTS ARE REQUIRE TO TAKE A
DRUG TEST AND SUCCESSFULLY PASS A BACKGROUND CHECK!
DO NOT APPLY IF: You ARE NOT ENTHUSIASTIC
ABOUT DOING THE BEST YOU CAN, NOT WORK ORIENTED,
AND IF YOU'RE NOT A TEAM PLAYER!
r ------------ -
Please see Patti (Store Manager) or Tommy (Assistant Store
Manager), for application, possibility for interview, and
more information. 1



















D. ,, :R Rk; a e u.l
Ma sh ff He lt


Due to our EXPLODING GROWTH,
Digital Reception Services has openings for
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for our TALLAHASSEE location We offer set schedules, good pay, exceptional benefits, advancement potential and more! Experience preferred but NOT
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We invite interested candidates to our
OPEN HOUSE
Wednesday, January 18th
9:00am 11:00am


1:00pm 7:00pm
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Tallohossee, FL
Phone: 850-562-3244
Interested in working for a world loader but unable lo ollend??? Apply online ol
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DIGITAL
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KELLY & &KI[ I Y
PROPERTIES
Barry Kelly Broker
(850) 510-4220
Pam Kelly Broker
(850) 510-8359
Katrina Walton
(850) 510-9512
Sarah Hofmeister
(850) 212-8167


Land, Homes, or Investments
Buying or Selling
For more information on how we can help you c
one of our qualified agents.


Molly Jenkins
(850) 528-1707
John Hawkins
(850) 509-0195
Caldwell McCord
(850) 528-1079
Virginia Blow
(850) 509-1844


Christi Beshea
(850) 251-439


i .4 ii..'nrdr."I
OPPORTLIUNIrY
Check us out
on the web!
www.cbkd.cc


Simply the Best!


Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only $16,500 per acre

New Listinq!, 2 bedroom 1-bath home with
small fenced yard, nice family room $87,500

Choice Buildinq Lots in Cooper's Pond
Area cleared and ready to build on, nice
trees, paved road $27,500 each

Look at This! Comfortable 4 bedroom 3 bath
home on five fenced acres w/guest house/
playhouse w/ bath, big shop, 2 car garage,
a asu'ture" 100 pecan trees and a nice poot a
real dream for a growing family $400,000

Hard to Find 5 choice acres on hillside with-
planted pines on quiet graded county road
Asking $12,000/acre

Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom home
in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round'pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $295,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent'lots on Partridge
Lane off Rocky Branch Road and Sunset Street
100'x220 in the City $15,500 each

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Look at the Price-5 wooded acres on Blue
Lake Road only $22,500

Check Out This One! Under Contract 8
acres with big doublewide and small house on a
pretty old hillside close to Leon County off Julia
Road $160,000
Prime Commercial Property US 19 South


near Pizza Hut Mart $650,000

Nice Hillside Location 10 acres on the east
side of town high and dry in quiet location
with lots of game $12,000 /acre.

Home Site close to town on West Grooverville
Road only $14,500

Rentals Available
2/1.5 mobile home on 2 ac $450
3/2 mobile home Lloyd Ac $650
3/2 mobile home Christmas Ac $650
2/1 home on Dogwood St $850
Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
We have qualified buyers!
Are you interested in selling?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


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PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 13, 2006

Rep. Will Kendrick Will


,Speak At Democratic Event


The Jefferson County Democratic
Executive Committee is making its
mark in the county.
The Committee's new office is lo-
cated at 290 W. Washington, and
the phone number is 997-3113.
In addition, the Party has a web-
site address to help local Democrats
find information regarding the party,
a listing of current committee mem-
bers, as well as a list of current local
party activities.
The email address is:
jcdems@earthlink.net. A soon to be
launched website is located at:
www.jeffersondemocrats.net
A precinct party for Precincts
11,12, and 13 will be held 6:30
p.m., Thursday, Jan. 19, at the Wau-
keenah United Methodist Church
Fellowship Hall.
A free spaghetti dinner, salad, gar-
fic bread, and dessert will be served,
and all family members are wel-
come.
Guest speaker is Rep. Will Ken-
drick. Local Democrats are invited
to come and listen to hear Rep. Ken-
dirck speak about important local
and state issues coming tip in the
2006 Legislature.
For information or reservations,
call Eleanor Hawkins at 997-2863,
Beth Davis at 997-0259, or the Party
Office at 997-3113.
Another upcoming event for the
Jefferson County Democratic Ex-
ecutive Committee is the St. Pat-
rick's Day dinner and fundraiser.
The March event includes a tradi-
tional Irish meal that last year was a
huge hit. Attendees will be asked to
bring a book for the Party Book Sale
to benefit the County Library.
Donations for the Democratic
Party will also be collected. The
event is a major fundraiser for the
committee, and all Democrats are
asked to come and contribute to
their party's efforts. Watch for an-
nouncement of date and location.
The Jefferson. County Democratic
Executive Council meets bimonthly
at the County School Board Office,


KENDRICK


on West Washington.
The next meeting is scheduled 7
p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 14.
Senator "Skip" Campbell! State


Democratic Candidate for Attorney
General has been invited to speak at
the meeting.
The public is invited and refresh-
ments will be served.
The committee has really come
alive over the year. Speakers that
have attended Party events include:
Secretary Betty Castor, Senator Al
Lawson, Senator Rod Smith, Rep.
Loranne Ausley, Party Chair Karen
Thurman, Congressman Jim Davis,
and Congressman Allen Boyd.
Events the Party has participated
in and contributed to include: the St.
Patrick's Day Dinner, a book sale to
benefit the county library, a booth at
the Watermelon Festival, the
County July 4th Fireworks display,
Monticello Trade Fair, hosting a
holiday dinner at the Senior Center,
and attending the State Democratic
Convention in Orlando.
All Democrats are invited to get
active in their local party activities
and help the Democratic Party take
its place in the County.


Fire Rescue Responds

To 2 Car Fires Here


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County Fire Rescue
was called ,-it Thursday to respond
to two unrelated car fires.
Chief Mark Matthews said Fire
Rescue got the first call at 7:45
a.m. reporting a vehicle fire on
Lloyd Creek Road. The Lloyd
Volunteer Fire Department also re-
sponded.
Matthews said that upon. arrival, a
19,87 Volvo driven by Josephine
Bellamy, was totally engulfed. The
driver was unhurt, and the vehicle
was a total loss.
Matthews said that the fire was
not suspicious and that it was more


than likely caused by an electric or
mechanical malfunction.
The second call came in at 7:11
p.m. when a call reported a vehicle
fire at mile marker 226 on I-10.
Matthews said that upon arrival
that vehicle too, was also fully in-
volved.
He said that driver Deketia Jack-
son of Tampa, reported that she lost
control of the 2001 Chevy, over-
compensated and ended up in the
grass along side the highway.
"First the grass caught fire then
the car caught fire," said Matthews.
"It was probably the catalytic con-
verter.
The driver escaped injury, and the
vehicle was a total loss.


'FOXY' was named canine Pet
of the Week by the Humane
Society. She is a German
Shepherd/lab mix. 'Foxy' is
good with children, playful,
and enjoys other animals.

Health Depar

Diabetes Scrn


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Health De-
partment (JCHD) will host a diabe-
tes screening event 9-11 a.m.,
Tuesday, Jan. 24.
"What do you do to reduce your
risk of developing diabetes or dia-
betes related complications, will be
just some of what is covered," said
spokesperson Bonnie Mathis.
The JCHD staff will be providing
this free service open to all citizens
of the county. "Everyone is wel-
come, those that are trying to pre-
vent diabetes and people that have
diabetes," said Mathis.
The diabetes screening event will
include; diabetes risk screening,
height, weight, blood pressure,
blood glucose check, body mass in-


D re acally independent citizens. What he
D ream got was a people void of ambition
(Continued From Page 4) and a generation of people content
to scrape by on government welfare
less way. Ultimately, the absolute and food stamps. This didn't end
worst of all circumstance was left to poverty, it just helped sustain it.
develop. White legislators having The major obstacle that King was
been partially brought to their senses to face and the one that we contin-
by King's movement and his tragic ued to face today, is the complete
death, did what all politicians do, assimilation of African Americans
they began to throw mon.y at the into America's economic society.
problem. Centuries of slavery and poverty can
Fueled by President Lyndon John--not be corrected with the Emancipa-
son's" Great Society" initiative, bil- tion Proclamation, dollars or any
lions upon billion of dollars were other government magic wand ini-
allocated for endless "programs" in- tiatives.
tended to end poverty and "create" After years of being treated as
equality for black Americans. (and accepting) second class citizen-
The result was the creation of ship, it is difficult for individuals to
large sectors of the black commu- envision themselves participating
nity totally dependent upon the gov- equally in our economy.
eminent. How can we except a young per-
Exactly the opposite of what Mar- son to visualize and realistically
tin Luther King Jr. was trying to es- strive for economic success, when
tablish. He wanted to work with all their point of reference and whole
facets of American society to create development experience has been
economic opportunities and equal one of government dependence and
advancement and education for all welfare?
African Americans. The numbers of welfare expectant
He saw a color blind nation of self and unwed mothers with multiple
dependent, hard working economi- children by different fathers, is typi-
cal of the attitude and lack of self-
tm ent Sets esteem we witness in many young
black women.
ning Young punks and gang members
eeBn willing to impregnate girls and cre-
dex, foot exam, medications ate more fatherless government de-
review, nutrition, diabetes case pendence children and families,
management, exercise, and constitute the other half of the equa-
assessment/recommendations. tion. This vicious cycle can not be
Dr. Robert Assantes, optometrist, broken without education.
and Ken Methvin with Eye Savers, Until young African Americans
Monticello, will be handling vision begin to believe in themselves, no
screening. matter what their personal family
situation, and realize that they can
Locawith diabetes products to view on hand share in the dream, we are destined
with diabetes products to view and t nv e ti p a
lea more about. to never eliminate this poor and de-
learn more about.
pendent sector of our society.
Participants will receive free dia-pendent sector of our society.
The situation is not helped by
betes educational literature to take
home with them. prominent African American leaders
Swill bea drawing held (including politicians) who continu-
There wi a rawg ally seize any opportunity to fuel the
every half hour for four door prizes fire of racism and hammer away a
to be awarded to participants. peo- redundant message to young black
pie do not have to be present during people that they don't have a chance
the actual name drawings to win. in white's world. We all need to re-
For further information about the visit Martin Luther King Jr's
diabetes screening event, contact "dream" and conduct ourselves ac-
Mathis at the JCHD, 342-0170, ex. cordingly.


1301t.


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Big Bend Hospice











Heartfelt thanks to anyone who contributed to the Big Bend Hospice Tree of Remembrance.
Your gifts will allow Big Bend Hospice to provide care, comfort and hope to over 300'
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MAKING THE GIFT
Edith G. Adams & Family
Sammie & Jackie Rutherford and Joann Andrews
Phyllis Applegate
Jennifer Kinard
Carolyn S. Bentley
Lottie Berry
Farmers & Merchants Bank staff
Frances Black
William & Jane French
Polly C. Brown
Bea & Beverly Sloan
Doris Burdett
Annie Charron
Carolyn S. Bentley
George E. & Patty Shannon
Hilda Cobb
Barbara C. Culbreath
Barbara C. Culbreath
Marilyn Nations
Barbara C. Culbreath
Barbara C. Culbreath
Barbara C. Culbreath
Barbara C. Culbreath
Robert Curtis
Ruth DiBiase
Bud & Helen Gleasman
Bud & Helen Gleasman
Lois Piper
Harold D. & Mary Ellen Given
Dalila G., Monica B., Eva B.
Bruce Sparks
Roy Gray
Jewell L. Hagan
Juanice M. Hagan
Beth Burch
Ely and Elaine Parke
Herbert G. & Linda Demott
Hazel Hood
Ray Hughes
Tasha, Taniah and Family
Susan Kempton Floyd.
Carolyn L. Kempton
Dan & Margie Peel
Jerome & Ann Peel
Carolyn L. Kempton
Angie Larson
Mozelle Lee
Dorothy P. Lewis


IN MEMORY OR HONOR OF
Paul Adams
Tommy Andrews
Albert V. Applegate
Lucille Bagg
Walter Wallace 'Wally' Bentley, Jr.
Bill Berry
Rena Bevis
C.A. Black
Pamela Bowen
Forrest D. Brown
Sallie Broxsie
Samuel Jesse Burdett
A.C. "Buddy" Charron
Peggy A. Cheshire
Peggy A. Cheshire
Jimmy H. Cobb
J.C. Council
Thelma Council
Richard Cowing
Betty Crowder
Daphne Culbreath
Hugh Culbreath
H.L. Culbreath, Jr.
Marie C. Curtis
John DiBiase
Eva Irene Eck
George Eck
Ruth E. Gamer
Mr. and Mrs. R.C. Given
John Dudley Gramling
Hallie Gratham
Jimmy Gray
William Emory Hagan
William Emory Hagan
Eunice Hamilton
Cary Harden
Evelyn Harris
Raymond Hood
Mary Duke Hughes
Mattie Lee Johnson
Capt. Louis "Tom" Kempton
Capt. Louis "Tom" Kempton
Judith Peel Kennedy
Judith Peel Kennedy
Rufus Kirkland
Jodi Larson
Clayton E. Lee
Mark E. Lewis


MAKING THE GIFT
Dorothy P. Lewis
Glenda Akers
Glenda Akers
Ramona Mackenzie
Genetha McGee
Robert W. & Barbara Moody
Robert W. & Barbara Moody
Robert W. & Barbara Moody
Richard & Friedel Bailar
Ely and Elaine Parke
Erin Grace
Ruth B. Newcomb
Susan Estes
David T. Potter
Herbert G. & Linda Demott
George Miller
Joe & Nancy Bono
Cindy Roe Littlejohn
Mr. & Mrs. Buddy L. Clarke
Patricia Sauer
Bea & Beverly Sloan
Harold D. & Mary Ellen Given
Lottie Berry
Glenda Thomas
Sally Thompson
Denise Thompson
Costello Ward
Susan Waters
Shirley Williams
Shirley Williams
Jack & Eleanor McCutcheon.
Jack & Eleanor McCutcheon
Maggie Shofner


IN MEMORY OR HONOR OF
Paul R. Lewis
Elsie Lipsey
Oliver T. Lipsey
Harry Mackenzie
Brother and Sister McGee
Grace Morris
Mack Morris
Malcolm & Ruby Morris
Mutti & Uncle Fred
Lucy Natale
Ray H. Neal
Joseph A. Newcomb
Alice V. Pickle
Margaret H. "Peggy" Potter
Sue G. Reed
Sue G. Reed
Mary Ruth "Poppy" Revell
William T. "Geechie" Roe
Dick Sauer
Dick Sauer
Sam Simpkins
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Sparks
Randy Stephens
Lillie Mae Thomas
Edgar R. Thompson, Sr.
Edgar R. Thompson, Sr.
Myrtice Ward
Richard Lee Waters
Charlie Williams
Hazel Williams
Mom & Dad
Mother & Dad


Thank You To Our Sponsors:






pital City


Monticello News
"YOU Can't Be Without It'


205 N. Mulberry St.
Monticello, FL 32344
(850) 566-7491
www.bigbendhospice.org


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