Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00161
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: January 11, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00161
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text


LIDRlARY OF FLORj'IDA Hi!SO'g-Y
404 LIBRARY WEST
71717TE- P2Y OF r, T PTDA


GA

Blinded veterans
Obtain
Needed Help

Editorial, Page 4
1111111


INESVTTT ?-', T. '"(J

use caution
in Taking Over
Counter Medicines

Story, Page 7
[]i


Harvey initiates
Grandson
TO Deer Hunting

Story, Page 9


Countywide
Speaking Contest
Winners

Story, PhotosPage 12


Wednesday Morning D





Monti


II


1 3TH VEAR NO.03. 50 CENTS Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2006


Home Builders To


Site Center Here


Camp To Draw Students

From Around State & SE


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

It's far from a done deal -- a point
Florida Home Builders Association
(FHBA) spokesperson Edie Ousley
repeatedly emphasized Monday --
but her organization has plans to lo-
cate a workforce development train-
ing camp here for high school stu-
dents.
Modeled after the Future Farmers
of America program, the relatively
new Future Builders of America
program targets students with an in-
terest in the ever-expanding con-
struction industry.


According to Ousley, Florida's
construction industry currently has
need of 13,000 additional workers,
with the starting salary around
$30,000 in many cases.
She said students participating in
the program learn everything from
hands-on construction to leadership
skills to how to acquire develop-
ment permits and develop a
property.
"We know that not every high
school student will go to college,"
Ousley said. "This program is an op-
portunity for these students to know
who we are and to learn about the
industry. ",
Created in 2003, the Future Build-


ers of America now numbers 37
chapters in high schools across the
state and enrolls more than 800 stu-
dents. No chapter exists in Jefferson
County at present, but Ousley said
it's the hope that the county will de-
velop one in the future.
The chapters are sponsored by the
local building community and work
hand-in-hand with the schools to de-
velop the students' workforce and
leadership skills.
As envisioned, the leadership
training center will be constructed
on a 500-acre tract in the southern
part of the county near the Leon
County line. The property, formerly
owned by St. Joe Land Company,
can be accessed by way of Natural
Bridge and Fanlew roads.
Ousley said the center will consist
of a meeting facility and a yet-to-be
(See Home Builders Page 2)


MLK Parade Set


For January 16


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The NAACP 26th Annual Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
Ceremony, Parade and Festival be-
gins Sunday.
Events begin 3 p.m., Sunday,
with an MLK Memorial service at
Beth Page Missionary Baptist
Church in Wacissa.

,Entries Said To :
Be increasing
Guest speaker is Rev. Issac Man-
ning of Beth Page M.B. Church.
The Beth Page choir will provide
music.
The MLK Parade takes place 10
a.m., Monday, beginning on South
Jefferson Street and on to the rec-
reation park.
Spokesperson Glyndell Presley
says coordinators expect the num-
ber of participants to increase this
year, and likewise to see a greater
number of spectators and partici-
pant at the activities in the park.
"We currently have 35 entries in
the parade and that number is


growing," said Presley. "We ex-
pect to have about 50-60 entrants.
"Most of the units will be march-
ing units because we want to get
back into marching like MLK did,"
she added.
Charles Parrish will be the parade
Grand Marshall because he began
the annual MLK parades.
She said that the Junkanoos have
been invited to participate again
this year. There will be a couple of
floats, including the Cappa Alpha-
sorority and the MLK Jr. Center.
Also committing to be in the pa-
rade are the Shriners and kings and
queens from various area churches.
Scheduled to be in the parade and
also at the platform events in the
recreation park, which will imme-
diately follow the parade, are: the
Jefferson County High School
Band and Rickards High School
Band.
Last year, there were approxi-
mately 50 entries in the parade.
The parade is chaired by Gerrold
Austin.
At the park there will be vendors
booths, food booths and activities
and games for the children. Ven-


(See Parade Page 2)


PHIL BARKER, superintendent explains how the elimina-
tion of the Opportunity Scholarships will affect District
Schools. (News Photo)



Resident Shot In Hand;


SNo vouchers Mean

$120,000 More FTE


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The recent high court ruling
stamping out school vouchers for
opportunity scholarships will affect
some 25 students here, at the
conclusion of the current school
year.
"These students represent approxi-
mately $120,000 in FTE funding
which will return to the School
District, along with the students,"
Superintendent Phil Barker said Fri-
day.
The vouchers were provided for
students in failing schools to attend
better public :schools, or private
schools.
"Because Jefferson Elementary
School received a grade of "F" twice
in a four year period, it met the cri-
teria of a failing school, and stu-
dents were entitled to opportunity
scholarships," Barker explained.
Most of the students who took ad-
vantage of the opportunity scholar-
ships, attended Chaires Elementary
School, in Leon County, he added.
Chief Justice Barbara Pariente
wrote in the 5-2 majority decision,
which eliminated the vouchers:
"The Constitution prohibits the
state from using public monies to
fund a private alternative to the
public school system, which is ex-


Echoing similar sentiments,
Barker said: "I don't think public
monies should be spent on private
schools, which set their own rules
and do not abide by the State De-
partment of Education regulations.
"Those who wish their students to
attend private schools should pay
for it our of their own pockets," he
continued.
25 Students
Affected Here 1
His son attends the private Aucilla
Christian Academy, which did not
accept opportunity scholarship stu-
dents.
"Only one private school in Gads-
den County agreed to accept oppor-
tunity scholarships in this area,"
Barker stated.
To qualify for an opportunity
scholarship, a student had to have
attended a failing school for a full
year.
Applications for the scholarships
were made online directly to the De-
partment of Education, and parents
had no choice as to which school
their child would attend.
Parents were notified where their
student would be schooled if
they accepted the opportunity schol-
arship.
Officials report that statewide
some 733 students participated in
the Onnnrtunitv Scholarshin Pro-


Sa acuny what the oupportunitiiy scholuuiai-
Investigation Ongoing shipdoes." gram.
out to the couple and intervened in
FRAN HUNT the argument, at which point, he Local Woman Killed In One
Staff Writer and the unidentified man got into a
scuffle, and Peterson was shot in Vehicle Crash Wednesday
City Police continue to investi-- the hand.
gate the circumstances of a Monti- Peterson said that the male and vehicle for unknown rex
cello man shot in the hand, New female got back into the vehicle FRAN HUNT drove onto the east should
Year's Day. and drove away, but he could not Staff Writer road, overturned and can
Jan 1, about 8 p.m., MPD Sgt. give any details about the suspects' nal rest in a wooded area
Mack Norton was dispatched to vehicle. A f69 ;ear old Mk,\on,,tI,, .i ll. tom of the embankment.


MLK PARADE 2005 Grand Marshal, Harriett Cuyler, waves
to spectators. Driver is Scottie Ebberbach. (News Photo)


North Railroad Street to the resi-
dence of Timothy Peterson.
Peterson called police to report
that he had been shot in the hand.
Norton and Sgt. Roger Murphy,
interviewed Peterson about the
shooting and Peterson stated that he
saw an unidentified male and fe-
male arguing in the street, near a
car which was left running in the
street.
Peterson stated that he walked


Peterson also stated that he had
seen the male and female around
before, but he did not know any-
thing about them, and could only
give a vague descriptions of both.
Officers interviewed a nearby
resident who told them that he had
heard two gun shots, several sec-
onds apart, however, he did not
hear any argument or hear or see
any vehicle speed away.
The investigation continues


Ruth Leatta Jones, was fatally in-
jured Wednesday afternoon in a
single-vehicle crash, on South 19.
At approximately 4:20 p.m.,
Brown wad driving her 2002 Jeep
SUV with passenger Anthony Jer-
ome Brown, 48, on South 19,
across from the Apron Factory, in
the outside lane, heading toward
Monticello.
FHP Brown lost control of the


sons, and
older of the
ne to a fi-
at the bot-


Ruth was pronounced dead at the
scene and transported to Tallahas-
see Memorial. Jerome sustained
minor injuries and was not trans-
ported.
Neither were wearing seat belts.
The vehicle sustained approxi-
mately $15,000 in damage.
The cause of the crash is still un-
der investigation.


COT


SISTERS Sarah and Tori Kercher enjoy an
outing at the recreation park on Saturday


morning, following their participation in the
soccer program. (News Photo)


100 A Xx A --.1 -.VI, IV








PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 11, 2006


Parade
(Cqntinued From Page 1)
dors will be selling everything from
barbecue chicken and ribs, to cloth-
ing and jewelry, to bric-a-brac and
homemade comforters to pillows.
Activities will include the foot-

ball throw, face painting, and the
bubble bounce, as well as the
VFW Post 251 fried fish dinners,
and board games, such as Taboo.
Performances at the park will in-
clude a couple of modeling groups,
the Elizabeth Missionary Baptist
Church choir and students reciting
the MLK "I Have A Dream"
speech.
"Dr. Angela Massey will be
bringing some of the FAMU phar-
macy students over to handout edu-
cational literature on AIDS and
perform diabetes screenings," said
Presley.
To register for the parade call
Austin at 997-1180 or 997-8817, to
register to set up a booth at the park
for only $30, call Presley at 997-
6712 or Austin.


City Code Book

Available Online

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The city's updated code book is
now available online.
The book contains the city's char-
ter and laws, as well as fee sched-
ules and rules and regulations
pertaining to licensing, animal con-
trol and land development, among
other categories.
City Clerk Emily Anderson said
the document can be viewed at mu-
nicode. corn
Residents can also access the
document via a link on the city's
Web site, at cityofmonticello.us.
A hard-bound copy of the code
book is also available at the public
library on Water St.


Healthy Start Plans Meeting


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Healthy Start Coalition, serv--
ing Jefferson, Madison and Taylor
Counties meets 10:30 a.m.,
Tuesday, Jan. 24, at the library.
Director George Hinchcliffe notes
the objective of the Coalition is to
help women have healthy pregnan-
cies and deliver healthy babies.
There are 31 Healthy Start Coali-
tions in the state.
The Coalition strives to reduce the


CRASH kills 69 year old local woman, and lost control o
her SUV wound up at the bottom of a (News Photo)
wooded area of an embankment, when she



No DUI Citations


Here Over Holidays

about the same as last year," Mur-
FRAN HUNT phy said. .
Staff Writer Major Bill Bullock said that
deputies issued about 30 citations
Both the Jefferson County Sher- between Capps and Wacissa on
iff's Office and Monticello Police US-27 for speeding.
Department report that during the "We had been getting complaints
reePnt holidav s there.w 11 n.


DUI's here, and the number of
traffic citations were no more or
less than usual.

MPD Sgt. Roger Murphy said
that usually there are one or two
DUI citations issued.

"Apparently everybody was be-
ing good this year when it comes to
drinking and driving," he said.
MPD reports that they issued 42
citations for traffic violations and
that approximately 95 percent of
those were for speeding. "That's


American Heart
Associationir'
Fighting Heart D disease
and Stoke

Start to Finish Heart Disease


f the vehicle. Story page one.



of people speeding through there,"
said Bullock. "The speed limit is
45 and we have clocked people at
65 and 75 miles per hour.
"Just because the holidays are
over doesn't mean that we are go-
ing to stop monitoring in that area,"
cautioned Bullock.
No criminal activity was re-
ported in Monticello.
"The convenience stores usually
get it this time of year, but no
armed robbery was reported this
year," he said.


.. .

Manatees live
in Florida's
Coastal areas...
Watch out for manatees when
boating near seagrass beds.
Obey the pasted waterway
markers and help
protect Florida's
,.,, manatees.
myfwc.org/psm


risk of infant mortality, and poor
-birth outcomes.
It works with community agencies
to help identify risk factors that af-
-fect the health of mother and baby.
In addition, the Healthy Start Coa-
lition offers services such as: breast
feeding classes, nutrition
counseling, emotional support, fam-
ily counseling, help to quit smoking,.
and doula services.
For additional information,:
Hinchcliffe can be reached at 948-
2741.
_AW


Homeowners with
money worries
may qualify for
* low-interest loans


'"mar/A money by griNderlv aors
LOANS: Direct lender
loosens its requirements for
homeowners who need
money now.
Have you been turned down
for a loan? Do you need more
than $10,000 for any reason?
Are you paying more than
10% interest on any other
loans or credit cards?
If you are a homeowner and
answered "yes" to any of
these questions, they can
tell you over the phone.and
wl//hou/ ob/iga/ion if you
qualify.
High credit card debt? Less-
than-perfect credit? Self em-


played? Late house pay-
ments?Financial Problems?
Medical bills? IRS liens?A/
doesz '?ma//er/
If you are a homeowner
with sufficient equity, there's an
excellent chance you will qual-
ify for a loan- usua//v w//Aih
24Vous.
You can find out over the
phone-and free of charge-
if you qualify. Honey Mae
Home Loans is licensed by
the Florida Department of
Financial Services. Open 7 days
a week to serve you.
1-800-700-1242 ext. 263


Home Builders


(Continued From Page 1)
determined number of cottages and
pavilions.
"This is really a wonderful coup
for Jefferson County," Ousley said.
"This program will eventually draw
students from across Florida and the
Southeast."
She said realization of the center
was made possible by a $550,000
donation from FHBA past President
Robert Harper and his wife Amy, of
Polk County.
Ousley said FHBA representatives
will be meeting with county offi-
cials in the coming week to discuss
plans for the center.
"This will be beneficial to Jeffer-
son County," Ousley said. "But
don't assume it's a done deal. This is
a partnership opportunity."
She said it's aim of the FHBA to
preserve as much as possible of the


natural beauty of the site, which in-
cludes a large lake and majestic cy-
press trees.
Ousley said students will convene
at the site annually for a week-long
summer camp of training as well as
fun activities. She said the rest of
the year the camp will be available
to the public for a fee.
"The center and surrounding prop-
erty is ideal for church and recrea-
tional retreats, fishing and other
sporting and special events," she
said.
The FHBA is a Tallahassee-based
trade association representing more
than 19,400 corporate members in-
volved in Florida's home-building
and remodeling industry. The or-
ganization reportedly employs
473,000 individuals and contributes
$42 billion annually to the state's
economy.


Y*U HM AN A USE *TW ICE A SMN RENOS E GSES AS A*CAR


4-H Hog, Ham Workshop Set


County 4-Hers are eligible to par-
ticipate in the 4-H Hog and Ham
workshop, 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Mon-
day, at the University of Florida, in
Gainesville.
Participation is open to youths
aged 12 and older, to parents, lead-
ers and agents.
Interested parties' should contact
4-H Coordinator John Lilly at 342-
0187, immediately, for additional-


information or to attend the work-
shop.
CLARIFICATION
Because of miscommunictation,
an article published in the Wednes-
day, Jan. 4 edition of the Monticello
News, and article concerning Bipo-
lar Disorder and Suicide was cred-
ited to an incorrect source.
The information was provided by
the National Center For Health Sta-
tistics.


WE DELIVER. CALL FOR DELIVERY CHARGE

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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 11, 2006 PAGE 3


t



~
1
1q~


," I


CHERYL JOHNSON, and Bruce Holly
the library location on Water Street.


.dw.
V.".




0 1 '..

work on computers at


Debbie Dumais reshelves
brary. (News Photo)


bo


ACA Reports Third 6 Week


Academic Honor Roll


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Principal Richard Finlayson has-
announced the third six week honor
roll at Aucilla Christian Academy.
Students appearing on the roll ,
4nd their grade levels follow:
In K-3/K-4 Multiage, receiving
all A's were: Hunter Cain, Jocelyn
Davis, Alex Haselden, Ayush Patel,
Wyatt Reese, Elizabeth Scheese,
Grayson Sircy and Austin Wheeler.
In K-4, receiving all S+'s were:
Grace Beshears, Kash Connell,
Marissa :.Cooley, Evan Courtney,.
Antonio Cox, Emily Forehand, Ly-
dia Hall, Bethany Hayes, Austin
Hebert, Anna Hillinski, Ryan Jack-
son, Ameer Khodr, Amber
KInowles, Hayley Lewis, Lynelle
Loveless, Chloe Reams, Skylar
,Reams, Megan Schofill, Levi Staf-
ford, Nicolas Swickley, Katherine
Wichel, and Mackenzie Wirick.
In K-5, receiving all S+'s were:
Walker Davis, Timothy Finlayson,
Jessica Giddens, Camryn Grant,
Kenlie Harvey, D. J. Key, Ryals
Lee, Cannon Randle, .Brandon
Slaughter, Quinton Thomas and
Ria Wheeler.
Receiving all S+'s, S, were: Eliza-
beth Hightower, T. J. Hightower,
Noah Hulbert, Haley Jones, Nour
Khodr, Jenna Merschman, Abigail
Morgan, Jake Pridgeon, Abby Rat-
liff, Tedo Wilcox and Daniel Wur-
gler.
In first grade, receiving all A's
were: Traynor Barker, Megan
Beaty, Hannah Compton, Faith De-
mott, Stephanie English, Sarah
Hall, Chaz Hamilton, Joe Hannon,
Tyler Hutchenson, Jenny Jackson,
Emily Knowles, Lindsey Lawson,
Hannah Lewis, Gatlin Nennstiel,
Kirsten Reagan, Ramsey Sullivan,
Kirsten Whiddon and Kate Whid-
don.
Receiving all A's ahd B's were:


When was


the last


time you


made an


investment


that saved


lives?


Rebecca Carson, Skylar Dickey, J.
T. Harp, Erica Keeler, Donnie Kin-
sey, Summerlyn Marsh, Sarah
Riley, Larrett Terrell and Hank
Wirick.
In second grade, earning all A's
were: Erin Lee, Ally Mall, Rean
Montesclaros, Tomas Swickley,
Justin Welch, T. J. Swords, Justin
Welch and Emma Whitmer.
All A's and B's were: Taylor
Copeland, Jake Edwards, Meagan
Giddens, Ian Haselden, Sam Hogg,
Taylor McKnight and D. J. Wilk-
inson.
In the third grade, earning all A's.
were: Ty Chancey, Ricky Finlay-
son, Doug Gulledge, Sarah James,
Winston Lee, and Bryce
Sanderson.
Earning all A's and B's were:
Cole Barclay, Morgan Cline, Abi-
gail Floyd, Cheynne Floyd, Hunter
Handley, Brooklyn McGlamory,
Carson Nennstiel, Jonah Newberry,
Amber Paulk, Kelsi Reams, Sadie
Sauls and Haleigh Gilbert.
In fourth grade earning all A's
were: Rachel Lark, Aimee Love,
Jessica Welch and Annie Yang.
Earning all A's and B's were:
Tanner Aman, Justin Brown, De-
van Courtney, Lauren Demott, Ja-
cob Dunbar, Dakota Ely, Kayla
Fulford, Ashley Herbert, Matthew
,Hutchenson, Capas Kinsey, Marisa
Thomas, Christiana Reams and Ca-
sey Demott..
In fifth grade, earning all A's
were: Ashli Cline, Tres Copeland,
Jay Finlayson, Hannah Haselden,
Kaley Love, Hadley Revell, and
Wendy Yang.
Earning all A's and B's were;
Russell Fraleigh, Hannah Haselden,
Bradley Holm, Jared Jackson, Da-
kotah McGlamory, Whitney
McKnight, Ashley Schofill, Hans
Sorensen, Pamela Watt and Audrey
Wynn.
In the sixth grade, earning all A's
were: Matt Dobson, Tyler Jackson,


and Shelby Witmer.
Earning all A's and B's were
Vickie Perry, Trent Roberts, Tori
Self and John Williams.
In the seventh grade, earning all
A's were: Katherine Hogg and
Kaitlin Jackson.
Earning all A's and B's were:
Taylor Baez-Pridgeon, Taryn
Copeland, Anna Finlayson, Nikki
Hammrick, Kent Jones, Lisa
Kisamore, Carolyn Mueller, Eliza-
beth Riley and Sarah Sorensen..
In the eighth grade, earning all
A's were: Wilson Lewis, John Ste-
-plens, and Dana Watt.
Earning all A's and B's were:
SSeth Whitty, Buddy Vollertsen,'
Ryan Pritcher, Sydney Plummer,
Matthew Harrington, Clay Fulford,
Lane Fraleigh, Kalyn Brown, Tif-
fany Brasington, Jessica Hunt, Ja-
cob Pitts, Samantha Roberts, Brian
Scholte, Jake Walker, Daniel Ward
and Ryan Barclay.
In the ninth grade, earning all A's
were: Rebekah Falk, Byron Love,
Mallory Plaines, Michaela Roccanti
and Savannah,Williams.
Earning all A's and B's were:
Rhegan Clark, Chelsea Dobson,
Nikki Kisamore, Katelyn Levine,
Casey Strickland, Kayla Williams,
and Luke Witmer.
In the tenth grade, earning all A's
were: Rebekah Aman, Benjamin
Buzbee, A. J. Connell, Courtney
Connell, Stephanie Dobson, Will
Hartsfield, Alfa Hunt, Prateen
Patel, Ramsey Revell, and Tristan
Sorensen.
Earning all A's and B's were:
Courtney Brasington, Jayce Davis,
Lindsey Day, Claire Knight, and
Woody Vollertsen.
In the eleventh grade, earning all
A's were Caitlin Murphy, Jennifer
Pitts, Rikki Roccanti, and Taylor
Rykard.
Earning all A's and B's were: Jo-
anna Cobb, Serena Harvin, Brit-
tany Hobbs, Will Knight, Melissa


books, a daily chore at the li-


Martin and Angela Steinberg.
In the twelfth grade, earning all
A's was Corie Smith.
Earning all A's and B's were: Keri
Brasington, Jana Connell, Ben
Grantham, Casey Gunnels, Jenni-
fer Hagan, Catherine Hope, Katie
O'Steen and Kristen Tuckey.


Please do not encourage
Florida's wildlife to do
things that are not -
natural. Help keep ,'
our wildlife safe.


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 11, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
SPublisher

.,i, RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

SLAZARO ALEMAN'
Senior Staff Writer


'Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
'POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
;Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774 E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Blinded Veterans


Get Needed Help


Just as World War II veterans
,came to their aid after they were
newly blinded in Vietnam, five
Spurple-heart recipients Tom Miller,
Mike Lewis, Buddy Spivey, Sid
'Ordway, and Roy Kekahuna and
,other members of the Blinded Veter-
tans Association (BVA) are doing
'their part to help a new generation
:of veterans:
These five are now assisting a
'group of several dozen young men
and women who have suffered eye
casualties in Operation Enduring
lFreedom (OEF, Afghanistan) and
.Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF).
They are living up to their organi-
,zations motto, "Blinded Veterans
Helping Blinded Veterans."
The Vietnam veterans provide
,counseling and practical assistance
to help the newly blinded sort
through the range of emotions that
affect them on a daily basis.
"We are talking, in many cases,
:about kids 20-21 years of age who
,have lost their sight from contact
,with an improvised explosive
device, or from any incident in
,Which shrapnel has entered the eye,"
'said Miller, who was blinded by a
landmine explosion in 1967.
"We hope to help these veterans
and their families, who have sacri-
ficed so much, meet the challenges
of blindness and access the services
that will allow them to lead produc-




Take Chill


Energy Cc
A little preventive maintenance
,can mean big savings and increased
comfort for homeowners anytime of
,year.
For example, experts say in colder
weather it's possible to save as much
as 10 percent on an energy bill by
'reducing the air leaks in a home.
Find and fix the leaks.
There are a number of places that
can be the source of an air leak.
Homeowners are encouraged to pay
particular attention to doors, win-




From Our
TEN YEARS AGO
% January 3, 1996
The consolidated effort of local
agencies to provide Christmas gifts,
food and clothing for needy families
resulted in a total of 46 families and
:100 children within these families
being reached.
SIt's thai time of year again when
holiday spirits prevail, waist lines
expand, and, faced with the prospect
of a new beginning -- symbolized by
the New Year -- people resolve to
make improvements.

TWENTY YEARS AGO
December 31, 1985
Members of the Wacissa Volun-
teer Fire Department have made a
New Year's resolution to build a fire
station.
Eight different fires have occurred
in Jefferson County and the City of
MIonticello starting with Christmas
Eve.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
'-No information available.


tive lives, both in the short and long
term."
Miller has served as BVA's Ex-
ecutive Director in Washington,
D.C. since 1994. The effort to sup-
port veterans of the wars in Iraq and
Afghanistan began in early 2004
with a series of conference calls in-
volving newly blinded veterans,
their families and the blinded veter-
ans from the Vietnam era.
The telephone meetings have, in
many cases, resulted in additional
one-on-one conversations and per-
sonal visits to the OEF/OIF
veterans.
"The originator of the conference
calls was Bob Kozel, a VA blind re-
habilitation outpatient specialist in
the South Texas Health Care
System," said Miller. "Bob knew
that we older guys could perhaps
communicate and highlight the im-
portance of the rehabilitation proc-
ess better than anyone else because
we have lived through it ourselves."
BVA is not a government entity
and is funded through the generous
contributions of countless Ameri-
cans who remember the sacrifices of
our nation's blinded veterans.
BVA is currently seeking some
115,000 men and women in the
United States who are unaware of
their eligibility for services and
benefits.



Off


)sts
dows and places where plumbing,
ducting or electrical wiring pene-
trate exterior walls, floors, ceilings
and soffits over cabinets.

To test your home for leaks, hold
a lit incense stick next to a suspected
source of an air leak. This is best
done on a windy day.
If the smoke travels horizontally,
you have found a leak that may need
caulking, sealing or weather-
stripping.
(See Take Chill Off Page 5)


Files
FORTY YEARS AGO
December 31, 1965
The Monticello Garden Club an-
nounced the winners of the outside
lighting contest: 1st place, Mrs.
Robert Murdock; 2nd place, Mrs.
Stephen Walker and 3rd place, Mrs.
W.W. Bassett Jr.

The largest crowd of youngsters in
recent years, possibly since the inau-
guration of the pre-Christmas visit
of Santa Claus to Monticello was on
hand last Thursday afternoon at the
courthouse to renew acquaintance
with the jolly visitor.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
December 30, 1955
Mrs. Dolly Fountain was installed
as Worthy Matron of the local Order
of Eastern Star. Judge Shuman is
Worthy Patron.
Lt. and Mrs. Charles K. Bowden
of Enid, OK, entertained with a
Yule party at the home of her
mother, Mrs. Richard Gilbert.


Opinion & Comment


Does 'Cranky' Come With Age?


I don't like football games that
end after midnight, fish that don't
bite on my schedule, and cotton in
aspirin bottles.
Fact is, I'm not too crazy about
music that hurts my ears, children
that whine and have no manners,
and store personnel who don't know
how to say "thank you" to custom-
ers.
Following a motorist who tosses a
soft drink container out of the win-
dow disturbs me, and drivers who
shout obscenities in traffic really
grate on my nerves.
Good heavens, I suppose I'm get-
ting old and cranky!
I notice my friends are getting old
and cranky too. They gripe about
lots of stuff and their patience is thin
at best.
The other day one of them said
they didn't like hearing the word,
"old!" That tell you anything?
, What I think is happening here is
we're heading to the last rodeo.
And, we would like these years to
be the best ever.
So, there's no time for nonsense


Grand kids want to run and jump.
We like walking and no jumping.
The younger generation goes outv
for the evening around 10. I cer-.
tainly don't understand that. At 10;
or shortly thereafter, I think every--;
body should be home and in bed.
The good thing about us is we'
don't cause the. law enforcement"
community any problems.
No we do not. We don't rob and,
steal, break into houses, steal cars or
anything like that. That all requires
too much energy. Besides, you ever
hear of anybody "walking" from the
law?
If we did wind up in Sheriff
Hobb's jail, we'd drive his medical
care budget out of sight. What with-
pain medication, ointments, meta--
mucil, eye care, and other require-,
ments for maladies, the county_
would have to boost the jail budget.
Oh well, aging is something and it-
ain't for sissies.
My late friend Ben Ervin said it'
well. He said it was his constitu-
tional right to be left alone. I likeJ
that!


and stuff that upsets us.
We're already constantly dieting,
exercising, and watching our choles-
terol.
We eat stuff that tastes like paper
because "it's good for us."
Tasty stuff like fried chicken and
cheeseburgers and thick steaks are
off the diet.
,Fake eggs, fake cheese, butter sub-
stitutes, and fiber are now important.
We eat salads and convince our-
selves how delicious they are. A bag
of potato chips is verboten, not to
mention cashews, cheeze-its, and


any other snack that does not taste
like paper.
Even with all of this, the scale is
not our friend.
Small wonder we get cranky!
I haven't even mentioned creaky
knees and sore feet.
Then there's the matter of hair or
the lack of it. Some of us used to
have a lot of hair.
Like the scale, the mirror is not
our friend.
I I look in the mirror and see my
late father. How'd he get in there, I
wonder'?


Reduce Education Bureaucracy


BY DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist


Today's teachers are some of the
most dedicated individuals in public
service. Most are well trained and
adapted to achieving success in the
classroom.
As there are many exceptional
educators, there are, unfortunately,
also teachers who have no business
in a classroom. A shortage of trained
professionals and lack of competi-
tive salaries, often causes an educa-
tional system to "turn a blind eye"
and retain such incompetence.
The victims, of course, are the
children unlucky enough to have
substandard teachers for instructors.
To the credit.of the vast majority of
teachers, their dedication and long
hours provide students an opportu-
nity to obtain a quality education.
Teachers come equipped today
with more skills, technology and'
quality materials than educators of
the past. Education is easier, more
interesting (and challenging) thani
ever before. Innovations and crea-,


tivity in today's classrooms make
schools of twenty years ago seem
like the stone age. All that is left is
for students and parents to get seri-
ous about taking advantage of this
remarkable opportunity.
Unfortunately, American's lost a
golden opportunity years ago under
the Reagan administration to elimi-
nate a major bureaucratic, money
eating federal monstrosity called the
national Department of Education.
Together with its counterparts, the
individual and equally bureaucratic
State Departments of Education,
they are clearly the best examples of
the proverbial "Hickabod" machine.
The mystical Hickabod machine
has an insatiable appetite for gob-
bling money on one end and pro-
ducing virtually nothing on the
other.
In my entire tenure as a teacher, I
never found a single colleague who
could give one example of some-
thing the federal or state depart-
ments of education had done for
them, their students or their class-
room.
There were numerous adverse ex-


samples, however, of what those bu-
reaucratic agencies had done to
them as educators. Aside from over-
sight of the Florida student aca-
demic testing program, I (and I
would hope my state congressional
representatives) am at a loss why we
should'continue to shove tax dollars
down this rat hole.
Standardized student testing and
teacher certification can easily be
made the responsibility of county
school districts. After all, it is their
students who are affected.
Additionally, a major benefit to
us all would be the incredible
amount of tax dollars saved. That,
along with the Lottery monies,
could be funneled back into the
counties, thus reducing significantly
our personal property taxes for edu-
cation. Loss of control over the ma-
nipulation of the state education
budget and lottery dollars could ex-
plain our elected state representa-
tives reluctance to move forward on
this issue.
Regarding student testing, I am foi
the Florida student performance
testing program. The very idea that


ADHD Affects Adults Too


According to new research,
att-ntion-deficit/hyperactivity disor-
der (ADHD), a condition largely
known to affect school aged chil-
dren, is also having a very real af-
fect on the adult population.
The research, released by phar-
macy benefit manager Medco
Health Solutions, Inc., found that
the number of younger adults age
20 to 44 taking an ADHD medica-
tion doubled from 2000 to 2004 and


boys than girls, use of the medica-
tions is equal between adult men
and adult women.
"We're now beginning to recog-
nize that many children don't out-
grow ADHD but continue to show
symptoms into their adult years,"
said Dr. Patricia Quinn, director of
the National Center for Gender Is-
sues and ADHD, and professional
advisor to Children and Adults with
Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Dis-


that it's an issue for both men and order (CHADD).
women. "Untreated, this disorder can have
The report also found that while terrible consequences for adults in
ADHD medication use in children is terms of their home and work life -
two to three times as high among with job loss and divorce being


common outcomes."
Dr. Quinn offers the following ad-
vice to help adults identify the
symptoms and get the proper diag-
nosis and treatment for ADHD:
Know The Symptoms: Having
persistent trouble staying organized
and focused on the task at hand, fre-
quently feeling overwhelmed and
often procrastination are telltale
signs of adult ADHD.
While men tend to'vard impulsive
and hyperactive behaviors, women
often suffer from depression and
anxiety and are frequently misdiag-
nosed and treated for those condi-
tions instead of ADHD.


a school system can say that they are
properly educating their students,,
without having to justify such an
important claim, is unconscionable.
To the detriment of the teaching-
profession, most educators and ad-
ministrators are in "lock step" in op-
position to such testing. Excuses
range from time consumption and
test reliability to the necessity to
"teach the test" at the expense of
other valuable instruction. More
smoke screen here than objectivity.
Yes, testing does take time. Yes,
the fear of doing poorly as a school
forces most institutions to devote
considerable amounts of time to
tested areas. If a school's educa-
tional model was on track and effec-
tive in the first place, then they.
would not have to change a thing
about their daily curriculum.
It is interesting to note that since
inception of standardized testing in
the state of Florida, student perform- ;
ance ha's steadily increased every'
year. Doesn't that make you wonder
what standard the school was satis-
(See Education Page 5)


Duration And Degree Are What
Matters: You can't develop ADHD
as an adult; symptoms must start in
childhood but may go undiagnosed,
especially in girls.
While many people exhibit some,
ADHD behaviors some of the time -
it's a matter of degree; an ADHD di-
agnosis is based on the severity of'
the problem and how it affects your '
ability to function.
Don't Ignore The Signs: Adult
ADHD is a real disorder and can be
effectively managed when properly ;
diagnosed and treated.
(See ADHD Page 5)


Publisher's

Notebook


.Ron cli.-h-oll

































;LISTENING to music outside the Jefferson Josh Wesley, Dusty Shiver, Devon Winiton.
Elementary School Boys and Girls Club, dur- (News Photo)
ling a recent break in activities, are L-R:
r.


ADID Affects
(Contnued From Page 4)
A combinationn of medication and
counseling is usually necessary.
ADID medications can be very
helful but job, marriage and psy-
cllogical counseling may also be
needed to help develop important
Ife skills.
Use ADHD to Your Advantage:
While living with ADHD is a chal-
lenge, it can also be an asset when
properly managed and matched with
the right job.

Being hyperactive can translate
into high energy and drive, day
dreamers are often creative thinkers
and impulsive types can be good.
risk-takers and effective in a crisis.

The key is to choose the right ca-
reer and work environment to make
ADHD an advantage on the job
rather than a disability.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 11, 2006 PAGE 5




DOUBLE YOUR INVESTMENT IN ONLY 1 YEAR!

Builders Lots Available in the |
Fastest Growing Areas in Florida ,

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Opens Door

For You!!


TOSSING the ball during the" after school from left Jaquez Hayes Shukel Mutch, and
program at JES Boys and Girls Club are, Joe Daniels. (News PhAto)


Project Aims To Protect


Wacissa Springs' Water


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The Suwannee River Water Man--
agement District (SRWMD) has
plans to install some 24 monitoring
wells in the upper part of the county
to determine the levels and quality
of the groundwater flowing into the
Wacissa springshed.


As Tom Mirti, a hydrologist for
the SRWMD, explains it, the fund-
ing for the project has yet to be se-
cured from the Department of
Environmental Protection (DEP).
"It's not a done deal yet," Mirti
said.
Even so, the SRWMD's govern-
ing board recently authorized the
district to enter into a contract fo-
the installation of the wells, with tle '


Take Chill Off Energy Costs


(Continued From Page 4)
Don't let energy go out the win-
dow.
While windows can add to a
home's style and comfort, they can
also be the source of a lot of wasted
energy The experts at the Depart-
ment of Energy suggest:
Close your curtains and shades
at night; open them during the day.
Tape clear plastic sheeting in-
side of a window frame if drafts,
water condensation and frost are
present.
Install tight-fitting insulating
window shades on windows that feel
drafty after weatherizing.
For long-term savings, install
storm windows over single pane
windows.
Insulate your home against high


energy bills.
Insulating a home can help reduce
energy costs year-round.
Start by insulating the hot water
heater and hot water pipes. It's best
to follow the insulation manufac-
turer's instructions or get profes-
sional help.
Check the insulation in the attic,
ceilings, exterior and basement
walls, floors and crawl space to see
if it meets recommended levels for
your region.
Control costs by controlling tem-
perature.
Installing a programmable ther-
mostat can be an excellent way to
cut your heating bills. Such a ther-
mostat can be set to lower the tem-
perature when you're sleeping or at
work. The savings may well offset
the cost of the unit.


stiulation that the contract not ex-
cted $60,000.
Mirti said the wells will be in-
salled uphill of the Wacissa springs,
,vhich gets its water from the Flori-
dan aquifer, as does most of the re-
gion.
He said the district will use the in-
formation gathered from the new
wells, as well as from existing wells,
to establish a baseline for the levels
and quality of the groundwater that
flows into the spring.
That way, the district will be in a
better position to identify and ad-
dress changes that occur to the water
levels and quality as a result of
over-pumping, contamination or de-
velopment, among other impacts.
"It will help for the protection of
the spring," Mirti said. "Develop-
ment's not a threat right now in the
Wacissa basin, but it's coming."
He added that it was always better
to see what's coming down the pike
and take measures to protect what
existed, rather than wait until the
damage was done and then try to re-
store the original state.
He said a follow-up survey will
establish the direction of the flow.
The SRWMD currently has a lim-
ited number of monitoring wells in
the county, according to Mirti.


Education
(Continued From Page 4)
fled with achieving before testing
arrived?
Lastly, I, for one, am tired of
know nothing, out of date "experts"
advising the public and political
leaders on education issues. Univer-
sity professors with a Ph.D. and, a
string of other titles behind their
name, who haven't been in a public
classroom for 30 years are given'
credibility.

Hogwash! If you want the best in-
formation, you don't ask the execu-
tive business owner how hard it is to
repair the car engine, you ask the
mechanic. Beware of these so called
"experts" telling you anything about
your child's educational needs.
If anyone really wants reliable in-
formation, they need to go to the
"trenches" where the daily action is
happening and ask a dedicated and
committed teacher!
(Dennis Foggy is a retired Army
Lt. Colonel, former school teacher
and Jefferson County resident.)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Work on the newly named Ike
Anderson Bicycle Trail is proceed-
ing smoothly, according to the engi-
neer overseeing the project.

Joe Miller, of George & Hutche-
son Engineering, Inc., reported to
city officials last week that the trail
is now halfway paved. He described
the paved portion as extending from
Rocky Branch Road to just south of
US 90.


Yet to be paved, Miller said, was
the portion from US 90 to Chase
Street Park. South of the Chase
Street Park, the trail is being cleared
of vegetation, but it will remain dirt


for the time being.
The city initially planned to pave
the entire two miles of the trail,
which ends up at Nacoosa Road.,
Funding problems, however, forced
the plans to be downscaled.
The bicycle trail is being con-
structed with a Department of
Transportation (DOT) grant. The to-
tal cost of the project, including the
design and engineering phase, is
$708,782.

The trail follows the old railroad
tracks from the north part of town to
the south, crossing both urban and
rural areas.

The City Council named the trail
after former Mayor Ike Anderson in
November. Anderson, a colorful
character, regularly rode his bicycle
around town.


The Jefferson County Recyclinq Proqram accepts

the following items for recycling.


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.


Newspapers, Magazines, etc.


All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?

Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.


Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the

collection site for the proper disposal of above items.



The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


Work On Bike Trail Is

Proceeding Smoothly













PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 11, 2006


Lifestyle


Brynwocd Center Re


Anticipate Busy Jan


VANITA DANIELS AND ALPHONZO ROBINSON



Vanita Daniels To Marry

Alphonzo Robinson


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Ann Dickie of Monticello, Joyce
Huntley of Cairo, GA., and Abra-
ham Daniels of St. Petersburg, FL.
announce the engagement of their
daughter Vanita Daniels to Al-
phonzo (P-nut) Robinson.
Robinson is the son of the late
Ruby Ganious Lawrence and the
late Jessie Johnson of Quincy, FL.
The bride-elect attended school in
Jefferson County and later gradu-
ated. She continues to further her.


'a


RICE


RICE


Camellia (


education at Tallahassee Commu-
nity College where she plans to earn
her AA Degree.
She is employed with American
--Home Patient.
The groom-elect is a 1976 gradu-
ate of James A. Shanks.
He is employed at the Florida
State Hospital.
The. wedding is planned for 4 p.m.
May 13, 2006 at Greater Tanner
AME Church, 1911 Martin Luther
King Jr. Blvd. in Quincy, FL.
Family and friends are invited to
attend.



'Rice' Named

Pet Of Week

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Humane Society has named--
'Rice' feline Pet of the Week.
Rice is a female light gray, do-
mestic short haired tabby.
She was born in Aug., 2004, is
-' spayed, and all vaccinations are up
to date.
Shelter Caretaker Cheryl Bautista
described her as being very playful
-and lovable. "She would probably
be a good mouser," she added.
Rice gets along well with other
cats, but it is not known how she is
with dogs.
To adopt Rice or any of the many
other animals at the shelter, call
Circle 342-0244.


TO Tour
Maclay Gardens

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Camellia Garden Circle members
and their guests will travel to Ma-
clay Gardens in Tallahassee, foi
their January meeting, Sunday.
Members will meet at the home
of President Isabelle deSercey at 2
p.m., to carpool to the Garden tour,
beginning at 3 p.m.
Anyone wishing to travel on their
own can meet up with the group at
the Gardens entrance around 2:45
p.m.

Admission to the Gardens is $4 for
adults and there is no extra charge
for the tour.
The Gardens are located north of
1-10 off Thomasville Road. There
are picnic tables available for public
use and members are asked to bring
some light refreshments to share.

Contact Jeanne Brenner at 997-
3109 for an accurate count of those
planning to attending this event.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Brenda Thompson, activities di-
rector for the Brynwood Center, re-
ports activities for the month of
January.
Bingo is held 2 p.m., every
Wednesday, Friday, and Monday.
Stretch and Flex classes are of-
fered 11 a.m. Jan. 11, 12, and 13,
with Hand Motion classes 11 a.m.
through the week of Jan. 16-20, and
Up and Down exercises 11 a.m.
through the week of Jan. 23-27.
News and Views, designed to
keep residents informed and up-to-
date on current events, takes place
9:30 a.m. on Jan. 11, 13, 17, 19, 23,
25, 27, and 31.
The Sonshiners will gather at 9:30
a.m. on Jan. 12, 16, 18, 20, 24, 26,
and 30.
Nails & More service is offered to
those interested 10 a.m. on Mon-
days.
At 10 a.m. each day, a variety of
activities takes place, including: die-


tary sessions, visits from area
.churches such as Elizabeth on the
_Sundays of, Jan. 15, 22, 29, and on
, monday, Jan. 17., and a visit from
-Aemorial Bible on Tuesday, Jan.
2t, and the House of Prayer Band
oi Jan. 28.
A few others are puzzle time,
hapy thoughts, remember when,
coolies and milk, arts and crafts,
moVi, time, outside gatherings, and
donuifrys.
A,rip to Barnhills Restaurant is
planned for 10 a.m. on Thursday,
Jan. 19',
At 11 a.m. on Monday, Jan. 30
and Tueaiay, Jan. 31 there will be a
1 2 3 GO'vent.
Aft noons are filled with
bowling, lubble blowing, mind
trivia, word games, movies, penny
ante, volley billoon, and hangman.
Wine and 'heese parties, banana
split making, .nd birthday parties
are scheduled airandom.
Throughout the month events
such as happy hmur, calendar plan-
ning, western mtvie night, music


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Eleventh Episcopal District
of the Florida Conference, AME
Church, celebrated a Day of Sharing
and local Ministry Ordination and
Deaconess Consecration Service, re-
cently, at the Arnett Chapel AME
Church, in Quincy.
Sisters Archie M. Seabrooks; Es-
tella Hagan; and Arneter 'Hill of
New Bethel A.M.E. Church, Monti-


,I


C t





4


MOORE


cello were consecrated as Deacon-
esses by Right Revereid McKinley
Young, Presiding Bisho1 of the Dis-
trict.
These ladies are widovs and in
good repute and are set aeart after
selection by the Pastor and'he Offi-
cial Board of the church.
They are to encourage, foster, and
improve the general interests 'f the
church; serve the Church of Cod to
praise His glory, and cheer the
fallen.

IN MEMORY
Our love for you today is stronger
than it was nine years ago.
For it is the kind of love that keep.
us together as brothers and sisters.
Sadly missed, but never forgotten.
Your children: Vivian,
Veleta, Joyce, Randy,
Gerald, Mark, Meshia,
mother: Marie Coger,
sister: Everleana
brothers: Joe and Greg
Grandchildren, and
Great Grandchildren


Evangelism Conference
Jan. 23-24 (Monday/Tuesday) \
Dauphin Way Baptist Church, Mobile, Ala. (exit #4,1-65)
THEME: "More Than Ever Before"; from 1 p.m. Monday to 8 p.m. Tuesday
MUSIC: Choirs from Cottage Hill Baptist Church & Dauphin Way Baptist
Church; "Paid in Full" quartet; "Voices," from the University of Mobile
ADMISSION: Free to all, thanks to0Cooperative Program; everyone welcome.



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Also:
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Ministries Raining www.ALSBOM.org
Opportunities! Cill or
Don go on-line for'd etaih 1.800.264.1225, ext. 245
Wilton


Licet


sid e n ts and the community are encouraged
ci e flL t 5to participate.
Any person, group, or organiza-
tion wishing to donate time for the
L a ry residents at Brynwood may contact
.Thompson at 997-1800 to be placed
therapy, ladies night out, and the on the calendar of upcoming events.
Front Porch Gang meeting. Thompson would also like the
Also, ice cream socials, and remi- community to know that National
niscing take place. Hugging Day is slated for Saturday,
Visitations are weekdays from 12 Jan. 21. Stop in the Center for a
-1 p.m. These visits are a treat for visit, leave a good lasting impres-
the residents and. family, friends, sion, and give a few hugs.


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Use Care In Taking Over


The Counter Medication


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The recent constantly changing.
temperatures playing havoc on the
sinuses, prompts the Florida Poison
Information Center (FPIC) to urge
the public to use the same precau-
tions with over-the-counter medica-
tions as they do with their prescrip-
tion medications.
Debra Forest, RN, Senior Spe-
cialist for FPIC states: "As with
prescription medications, dosing
errors also occur with over-the-
counter products, and are often due
to taking or being given a medica-
tion dose twice.
"Last year, the FPIC received
more than 158 calls attributed to
this error. FPIC advises parents
and caretakers to establish a routine
for taking medications, and com-
municate with all family members
to ensure that a medication dose is
not taken or given twice."
Commonly used over-the-counter
products, like pain relievers and
cough medicines, can be harmful if
misused or abused.
Poison Control Centers lists anal-
gesics (pain relievers), cold and
cough medications among the top
substances involved in human poi-
soning exposures.
Guidelines for taking over-the-
Z counter medications safely include:
Read the medication label be-
Z fore each use. Follow directions
2 precisely.
If you do not understand the in-
structions call the product informa-
tion phone number on the label, or
contact your pharmacist or physi-
Scian.
c Follow the recommended dose.
S.Do not extend the maximum daily
dose stated on the label.
Be careful when taking more
, than one over-the-counter medica-
Stions.... .
Medications may contain the
same or similar active ingredients,
which when added together, may



*I
i

!'< .


exceed the maximum safe dosage.
Some over-the-counter prod-
ucts should not be mixed with pre-
scription medications.
Always speak to your pharmacist
or physician before taking more
than one prescription medication r
over-the-counter medicine.
Keep all medications, including
over-the-counter products, out of
children's reach, locked up and out
of sight.
Small amounts of some adult
medicines can be harmful or life-
threatening to a child.
Never call medication candy.
Do not let small children see
you taking any medication.
Keep all medicines and house-
hold chemicals in containers fitted
with safety caps.
Always turn on the light prior
to taking any medication.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla resident Donna Smith-
honored her cousin Miriam Lancas-
ter of Orlando with a birthday party
for her 90th birthday, on Dec. 10.
Smith said that Lancaster drove
all the way from Orlando, alone to
Aucilla.
"She is very active in politics and
she drives up to Tallahassee every
year to attend the Silver Haired
Legislature,." said Smith.
"In Orlando, she delivers meals
to shut-ins and picks up friends
who can't drive and takes them
shopping, to doctor's appointments
and to church."
Smith said that Lancaster also
sings in the senior choir and she
can be heard and seen on the local
radio and television stations in the
Orlando area, with politics, and her


views on current events.
Helping Lancaster celebrate the
special occasion were relatives
Patsy Timmons of Homestead, Jim
- and Sharon Thomas, Mary
Thomas, and Naura Thomas, all of
Tallahassee, Barbara Thigpen and
Joe Craig of Havana, Shirley Wil-
liams of Monticello, Judy
Lastinger, Perry and Dana Last-
inger, and Hunter Lastinger, all of
Aucilla.

Friends attending included Jean
Lacy, Nancy and Stewart Inman,
Margie Brosch, and Ray Quick, all
of Tallahassee, John Little of
Mass., and Vinnie Little of Monti-
cello.
"When we asked her what her se-
cret was, she said eating healthy
and taking vitamins daily," said
Smith.
Smith concluded that Lancaster
was an inspiration to all of them.


IN


If you wear eyeglasses, put
them on before taking any medica-
tion.
Never take medication out of
their original containers.
Be aware of medications or
other household products that look
like candy or food.
Post the Poison Information
center's emergency hotline phone
number (1-800-222-1222), near the
phone.
If you or anyone in your house-
hold takes the wrong kind of medi-
cation or the wrong dose, call the
hotline and the health care profes-
sionals at the center will immedi-
ately respond to poison
emergencies and answer poison-
related questions about
medications, and other potentially
dangerous substances.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 11, 2006 PAGE 7



TIMES LIKE THESE,



WE SHOULD ALL



HiTEN. OUR BELTS.


"Vince and Larry"" 1985 U.S. D
It's a fast-paced, fast-track, fast-lane kind of world out there.
Which is why everyone should buckle their safety belts and buckle them firmly
Because you never know when you might need a little extra security

YOU COULD LEARN A LOT FROM A DUMMY
BUCKLE YOUR SAFETY BELT.


r~i


U.S Departn,,nt ft
ofmnpotao


Miriam Lancaster Feted

Here On 90th Birthday






PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 11, 2006







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Sports


Harvey Initiates

Grandson Bryce

To Deer Hunting


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Following a long-established
family tradition, Road Superinten-
dent David Harvey initiated his
grandson into deer hunting this fall.
Bryce Harvey, 11, bagged his first
deer -- a nine-pointer -- the day after
Thanksgiving.
"He was excited," says Harvey,
adding that he and Bryce's father,
Chad Harvey, made the boy partici-
pate in the skinning process as part
of the overall experience. Call it a
rite of passage.
"I've found in hunting that after
the first kill, you either love it or
you hate it," Harvey says. "In deer
hunting, no one walks the fence.
You either love it 100 percent or
you hate it 100 percent. And he
(Bryce) loves it."
Bryce had been going out with his
grandfather the last couple of years.
But these outings involved only tar-
get practice and squirrel hunting.
"This was his first time deer hunt-
ing," says Harvey, who the week be-
fore shot a 10-pointer in the same
tree stand where Bryce killed his
deer. All Harvey will reveal about
the location is that it's a 40-acre tract
in the county.
It's Harvey's hope to have both his
and Bryce's deer entered in the Flor-
ida Big Buck Registry, which re-
quires a minimum score of 100 to
qualify. He roughly estimates that
his buck will score about 120 and
Bryce's about 115.
Registry scores are calculated on a
complex formula that takes into ac-
count various measurements, includ-
ing the width, length and spread of


the antlers, as well as the number of
points. It's called the Boone and
Crockett score.
The record score is 160, which
has been attained only once or twice
since the registry was established in
the 1950s, according to Harvey.
A self-professed "addicted white-
tail enthusiast", Harvey shot his first
deer -- a three-pointer -- at age 16 in
central Florida, where his family
owned a farm.
His older brother, James, intro-
duced him tb the sport, Harvey says.
But his father, a "a part-time quail
hunter", paved the way by teaching
him about gun safety and responsi-
bility, he says.
Harvey started taking his own son,
Chad, into the woods almost as soon
as the boy could walk. Chad, now
33, killed his first deer at age 15. It
was a spike, or a two antler deer,
Harvey says.
"I took my son Chad and now
Chad and I took Bryce," Harvey
says, adding that the two wanted
Bryce to gain from their combined
hunting wisdom.
More than the thrill of the kill,
Harvey says he enjoys the experi-
ence of being outdoors, communing
with nature and sharing fellowship
with friends and family. Deer meat
is also healthy for you, he says.
During the last 10 years, Harvey
also has developed an interest in
food plotting and quality deer man-
agement. This entails feeding the
deer the year-round to ensure a
healthy herd and culling out the sick
and injured, among other practices.
The idea, Harvey says, is to pro-
duce a better buck-to-doe ratio,
which translates into bigger and
healthier deer.


BRYCE HARVEY, 11 years old, bagged a
nine point deer recently. He has been hunt-


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy
middle school boy's basketball
team defeated Brookwood 25-16
and stand 7-1 on the season
"It was a defensive struggle dur-
ing the first half for us and neither
team shot well during the first
half." said Coach Ray Hughes.
"We scored most of our points in
the third period, outscoring them
10-3."


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Mood Swings,
the women's A-league tennis team,
won three of the six matches in its
first competition of the new year,
with the Golden Eagle Talons.
Following the matches the ladies
rode in a long, white stretch "Hum-
mer" limousine and traveled from
Tom Brown Park to Golden Eagle
Country Club, where they enjoyed
an elegant lunch.
Team #1, Katie Brock and Lisa
Jackson lost its matches, 2-6 and 3-


Team #2, Cindy Wainright

o


Both teams scored seven points
in the fourth period.
Brandon Dunbar scored seven
points, eight rebounds, and six
steals; Clark Christy, seven points,
nine rebounds, two 'steals; Alex
Dunkle, six points, eight rebounds
two steals; Ryan Pricher, three
points; John Stephens, two points;
and Wilson Lewis, three assists.
The Warriors play their final two
game of the season this week, fac-
ing off against Steinhatchee, 6
p.m., Tuesday, there; and Stein-
hatchee, 4:30 p.m., Thursday, here.


substitute player Sandy Varn, lost
its matches, 4-6 and 5-7.
Team #3, Susan Goodwin and
substitute player Kelly Wethering-
ton, won its matches, 6-3 and 6-2.
Team #4, Laura Kirchhoff and
Angie Delvecchio, lost the
matches, 1-6 and 5-7, team #5, Lin-
sey Taylor and substitute player
Roslyn Bass, lost the first set, 2-6,
won the second, 6-2 and came back
to take the win in the tie breaker, 6-
4, and team #6, Maxi Miller and.
Jennifer Ellis, won the matches, 6-1
and 6-3.
The Mood Swins, facp nff


against the Split Steps, 9:30 a.m.,
and Thursday at Forest Meadows Park.
- -'". I2 "
.t,^ '. ^


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

After coming off of a four-game
losing streak, the Aucilla Christian
Academy varsity -girl's basketball
team took a 38-33 victory over Ma-
clay last week.
The Lady Warriors now stand 8-8
on the season.
"This was our best game of the
season," said Coach Daryl Adams.
n "The passes were crisper, we
were shooting better and the turn-
overs were down.
"All of that practice has finally
come to a head and the engine is
rolling," said Adams. "We beat a
good team who beat us by 20
points the last time we played
them."
ACA took a six-point lead in the
first period, leading 11-5, and held
on to that six-point lead through the


second period, in which both teams
scored 15 points.
In the third period, the Lady War-
riors were outscored 9-4 and came
back in the fourth to outscore Ma-
clay, 8-4.
Leading the charge for the Lady
Warriors was Mallory Plaines with
14 points, one shot a three-point
bucket, eight rebounds, five assists
and two steals.
Bethany Saunders, 12 points,
three shots as three-pointers, three
rebounds, two assists, two steals;
and Lindsey Day, six points, seven
rebounds, three steals and one
blocked shot.
Brittany Hobbs, two points, three
rebounds, four steals, one blocked
shot; Caitlin Murphy, two points,
four rebounds, one assist and one
steal; Stephanie Dobson, two
points, two rebounds; Corie Smith,
two rebounds; and Rikki Roccanti,
one steal.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 11, 2006 PAGE 9

ACA JV Girls

Fall TO Maclay

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

S : ".The Aucilla Chriastain Academy-
: junior varsity girl's basketball team
.. fell to Maclay 31-10, and are now
'r -. -.4-5 on the season.
Nicole Masthis, Savannah Wil-
liams, Hanah Sorensen and Chel- .
sea Dobsion each scored two
,points; and Miranda Wider and
,'Courtnet Brasington each scored
', .: ",.: :one point.
IN ~ l


ing with his grandfather David Harvey, right,
for several years. This is his first deer.


Aucilla Christian Academy


Defeats Atlantis 68-26


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Academy
varsity boy's basketball team de-
feated Atlantis 68- 26. last week.
"We were a little out-manned,
but we backed oi? a lot and didn't
really put any pressure on them,"
said Coach Dan Nennstiel.
"It was an easy win for us and a
lot of our players who normally
don't get any playing time, were
able to get some time on the floor,"
*h" said..
S"I was so proud of the players
and our fans for showing the ulti-
mate form of sportsmanship during
the game," said Nennstiel.
"They (Atlantis) took one of their
players who has cerebral palsy, off


WADE SCARBERRY scored
15 points for ACA in the At-
lantis game. (News Photo)


the bench and put him in the game.
We didn't try to steal the ball from
him or block his shots when the
ball was passed to him.
"He made a three-point shot and
when he did, Aucilla fans cheered
him," Nennstiel added.
In his first time starting a game,
Reggie Walker played the entire
game and lead the Warrior score
with 20 points, one assist and eight
rebounds.
Stewart Williams had 16 points
and I rebound for a double-double,
one a- t. : jn d fi e' tz [s. .ind
'W ade ,' t ri.' '" "'_,rf o',-i "
sist, s: ai.L binds and l'oi u i(its"
Ben Grantham, nine points, five
rebounds, one steal; Stephen Grif-
fin, four points, for assists, six re-
bounds, two steals, two blocked
shots; and Luke Sadler, four points,
,one assist, four rebounds and four
steals.
Casey Gunnels, who was ill and
only played one to two minutes at
the beginning of the game, had two
assists and one rebounds;, Jim Ste-
phens had one assist, six rebounds
and one blocked shot.
"We'll play Atlantis again later in
the season," said Nennstiel. "When
we do, I think I'll bring a couple of
the JV's up to play and give them
some time one the floor in a varsity
game."
The Warriors now stand 8-4 on
the season.


FUN WITH DICK &
JANE (PG13)
Fri. 5:20 7:30 9:40 Sat. 1:10
3:15 5:20 7:30 9:40 Sun.
1:10 3:15 5:20 7:30 Mon.-
Thurs. 5:20 -7:30
NO PASSES

CHEAPER BY DOZEN
2 (PG)
Fri. 5:10 7:15 9:30 Sat.
12:50 3:00 5:10 7:15 9:30
Sun. 12:50 3:00 5:10 7:15
Mon.-Thurs. 5:10 7:20
NO PASSES

RUMOR HAS IT
(PG13)
Fri. 5:25 7:35 9:55 Sat.
12:40 3:05 5:25 7:35 9:55
Sun. 12:40 3:05 5:25 7:35
Mon. Thurs. 5:25 7:35
NO PASSES

CHRONICLES OF
NARNIA (PG)
-Fi 4 00 7:00 10:00 Sat.
00 10:00 Sun.
(10 -".4 60( 7:00 Mon. -
Thurs. 4:00 7:00

WOLF CREEK (R)
Fri. 4:05 7:05 9:25 Sat.
1:05- 4:05- 7:05 9:25 Sun.
1:05 4:05 7:05 Mon. -
Thurs. 4:05- 7:05
NO PASSES

KING KONG(PG13)
Fri. 4:15 8:00 Sat.. 12:30 -
4:15 8:00 Sun. 12:30 4:15 -
8:00 Mon..-Thurs. 4:15-8:00

HOSTEL (PG13)
Fri. 5:05 7:20 9:45 Sat.
12:35 2:50 5:05 7:20 9:45
Sun. 12:35 2:50 5:05 7:20
SMon. -Thurs. 4:30 7:15


www.g~i. r sgotechiorg

~Girl Scouts


MOOD SWINGS ladies tennis team #6 members, from left
Jennifer Ellis and Maxie Miller.


Call J.G. Wentworth's
Annuity Purchase Program J.G.WENTWORTH.
866-FUND-549. ANNuITY PURCHASE PROGRAM

Keep Up With What's Happening..... Read The
Monticello News


ACA Middle School Boys

Beat Brookwood 25-16


ACA Girls Defeat


Maclay 38-33


Ladies Tennis Team

Wins 3 Of 6 Matches


Feeling Handcuffed. byY-our Annui









PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 11, 2006

Lady Tigers Fall


TO NFC 62-12


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Lady Tigers varsity basket-
ball team received their worst beat-
ing of the season, falling to North
Florida Christian 62-12.
The Lady Tigers now stand 8-3
on the season.
"We got killed," said Coach Bill
Brumfield. "That's the worst we
have gotten beat this season."
He added that NFC is ranked as
the number two team in the state
and Jefferson is ranked in at num-
bier nine.
"We didn't play for two and a
half weeks during the holidays and
got rusty," said Brumfield, "but
NFC did play."
- "We usually play in tournaments
during the holidays, but this year



JCHS Socce

Beats Apal

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School boy's soccer team climbed
to 1-6 on the season, after winning
one of the past four games.
During the first game against Port
St. Joe, the Tigers fell for a 7-1
loss.
Scoring the only goal for JCHS
was Alex Lingle, who was unas-
sisted on the play and scored with
less than one minute remaining in
fhe game.
"We played most of the game
down one man," said Coach
Earline Knight. "And we played
the last 12 minutes two men down.
Goalie Jason Kirkpatrick had five.
saves in the first half; goalie Jesus
Rosas, nine saves in the second
half.


we didn't and I promise that it
won't happen again."
Other than the holiday rust,
Brumfield attributed the Lady Ti-
gers' loss to having too many turn-
overs during the game.
"We have to play them again
later in the season, and I promise
you, we won't get beat like that
again by them," vows Brumfield.
Keandra Seabrooks had three
points; and Donna Pansom, had
three points, three blocked shots.

Shaumese Massey, two points,
eight rebounds; and Nikidra
Thompson, two points, two re-
bounds.
The Lady Tigers square off
against Chiles, 6 p.m., Thursday,
here, and Madison, 4:30 p.m., Fri-
day, also here.



r Team

achicola
Jashawn Moore had one save.
In the second game, the Tigers
hammered Apalachicola for a 10-2
victory.
Scoring goals for the Tigers were
Thomas Lyle, assisted by Tony
Roberts; Edwardo Barron, unas-
sisted; and Kirkpatrick scored two
assisted by Lyle.
Lyle scored one goal unassisted;
Lingle scored, assisted by Kirk-
patrick; Moore scored, assisted by
Lingle; and Lyle, Kirkpatrick and
Moore all scored a goal unassisted.
In his debut game as a goalie,
Scott Goodlin had one save.
The game scheduled against John
Paul II was canceled due to inclem-
ent weather.
The Tigers fell in the second
game to John Paul II, 8-0.
Kirkpatrick had 14 saves and
Lingle, from the position of
sweeper, had three saves.


JCHS Boys Down NFC


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Tiger varsity boys beat North
Florida Christian 64-57, Monday,
and stand 7-6 on the season; 2-0 in
district paly.
- Demario Rivers led the Tiger
charge with 16 points, four steals.
f James Skipworth, 11 points, six
rebounds; Lamarkus Bennett, eight
points, six assists; Tim Crumity, 15
points; and Paul Huggins, five


points.
Jitavin Bennett, four points; and
Lucius Wade, five points.
The Tigers square off against
Wakulla, Thursday, there and
Madison, Friday, here.
Both games are at 7:30 p.m.



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Bake Sale Set
Saturday At PO


LADY TIGER Shanice Brooks goes for the lay up during a
recent JCHS practice session. (News Photo)


JV Tigers Split Games

With NFC, Florida High
man, four points; and Theo Barger,
FRAN HUNT two points.
Staff Writer The Tigers came back during the
second game and downed North
The Jefferson County High Florida Christian 72-53.
School JV boy's basketball team Fead led in scoring with 25


split its last two games and now
stands 8-2 on the season.
Florida High defeated the Tigers
62-47, in the first game.
J. C. Fead and Dontrell Oliver
both led the Tigers in scoring with
17 points each.
Other scorers include: Maricio
Scott, seven points; Geondre Pitt-


points.
Oliver, 24 points; Reggie Walker,
15 points and 23 rebounds for a
double-double; Barger, Torrence
Tucker and Anthony McDaniel,
each scored two points.
The Tigers face off against Wa-
kulla, Thursday, there and
Madison, Friday, here.
Both game times are at 6:30 p.m.


S The many


-OP of caring

at 1(800) 899-0089 or www vo.torg
P 1 w,,.h ; Volunteers


We give children a better future.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

4-H County Council members will -
hold a Bake Sale 8 a.m. Saturday,
in front of the Monticello Post Of-
fice.
Council members will sell their
baked goods to the public until all
the homemade items are sold.
The donations raised will go to-
wards the goals of the Council.
To donate to the County Council's
efforts contact the Extension Office
at 342-0187.


4-Hers To March
In MLK Parade
4-H members will participate in
the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Pa-
rade Monday, in downtown Monti-
cello.
All the 4-H Clubs and members
are encouraged to turnout for the
event and join in the festivities.


LEGAL NOTICE
The Jefferson County Planning
Commission will review and make a
recommendation regarding a proposed
major subdivision. The proposed
subdivision is to be located about 2.5 miles
southeast of Lloyd on approximately 422
acres. Interested parties may present their
concerns at the Jefferson County Planning
Commission meeting on February 9, 2006

Ready... Set... Shop...
Monticello News
Classifieds


LEGALS '.
at 7:00 p.m. in the courtroom of the
Jefferson County Courthouse located at
the intersection of U.S. Highway 19 and
U.S. Highway 90 in Monticello, Florida
32344. The meeting may be continued as
necessary. From the Florida "Government
in the Sunshine Manual", page 36,
paragraph c: Each board, commission, or
agency of this state or of any political
subdivision thereof shall include in the
notice of any meeting or hearing, if notice
of meeting or hearing is required, of such
board, commission, or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the advice
that, if a person decides to appeal any
decision made by the board, agency, or
commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he
or she will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such purpose,
he or she may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings, is
made, which record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal is to
be based. Prior to the meeting interested
persons may contact the Jefferson County
Planning and Building Department at
850-342-0223 or write the Department of
445 West Palmer Mill Road, Monticello,
FL 32344 and provide comments. The
development proposal may be reviewed
during business hours at the Department
office at 445 West Palmer Mill Road,
Monticello, FL 32344.
1,11, c
NOTICE OF SALE The District School
Board of Jefferson County will receive
sealed bids on a surplus relocatable in the
office of the school superintendent,
Desmond M. Bishop Administration
Building, 1490 W. Washington Street,
Monticello, FL 32344 until 3:00 p.m.
Tuesday, January 25, 2006 at 2:00 p.m.
The bids will be opened publicly at that
time. No bid will be received after that
time. Please mark on envelope "Surplus
Relocatable Sale." Bids will be presented
to the School Board at the regular board
meeting on February 13, 2006 at 6:00
p.m. The bid will be awarded to the
highest bidder at that time. The Board
reserves the right to reject any or all bids.
Please call Donald Johnson, Maintenance
Director at 850.342.0142 to set up an
appointment to inspect the relocatable.
Relocatable must be removed from the
school board premises within thirty (30)
days after bids are awarded. Room:


The Waggoners Trucking-Established 1951
Now Recruiting drivers for our SE Auto Transport Division.
Drivers must have a valid Class A CDL,
1 year and 100K verifiable OTR miles.
Stable work history and clean MVR is a must.
Great Pay, Great Benefits,_Matching 401K.
Contact Susan or John at (866) 413-3074 GOE


Housing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 -~3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571


.U NH.A B D SH.M.. OP.

100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work Frame Straightening


WE TAKE THE
DCNTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


1630 E. JACKSON ST.
(Located behind Langdale Auto Mall) '


BUSINESS 9735





.DIRECTORY ___r_

BURNETTE PLUMBING & Northside Mower and CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC.

WELL SEVICE CallA Rudd For Small Engine Repair "Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"
Family Owned Since 1902
Plumbing Repairs-- Wells Drilled ~ Fixtures-Faucets~ Pumps Appliance Service For Hustler, Poulan, HomeliteMTD, Cub Cadet,
Replaced Sewer & Water Connections ~ Tanks Replaced Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Water Heater Repairs All Repairs Needs @ Repairs for all makes & models.
997-5648 Pickup & Delivery Service Available Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
997-5648 562-2962 (on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717

MONTICELLO'S ONLY LOCAL HEATING & COOLING COMPANY
Simply the Best! T Registers Jamies Bodiy Works
STEWART Register's
ef HEATING & COOLING INC. Mini-Storage For More Information

SSales ~ Service ~ Installation ~ Change Outs 315 Waukeenah Hwy. Call
SResidential Commercial 1/4 Mile off US 19 South

REALTOR Family Owned Office: (850) 342-3294 997-2535 997-4253
R Lic. # RA0067121 CELL: (850) 509-2903











To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED

Your Community Shopping Center


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 11, 2006 PAGE 11

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions i Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGALS
99-004, Sq. Ft. 864, Description: 24 x 36,
Yr. Constructed: 1971, Bldg. 00017.
NOTE: The Relocatable will be sold "AS
IS". The relocatable includes a "wall
hung" A.C. Heat Pump System. NOTE:
Minimum Bid for the 24 x 36 relocatables
is $3,000.00.
12/28, 12/30, 01/04, 01/06, 01/11, 01/13,
01/18, 01/20, c
NOTICE OF SALE The District School
Board of Jefferson County will receive
sealed bids on surplus vehicles in the office
of the school superintendent, Desmond M.
Bishop administration Building, 1490 W.
Washington Street, Monticello, FL 32344,
until 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 25,
2006. No bid will be received after that
time. Please mark on envelope, "Surplus
Vehicle Bid." Bids will be tabulated at
3:00 p.m. and presented to the School
Board at the regular board meeting
Monday, February 13, 2006 at 6:00 p.m.
Please call Willie Carr, Transportation
Supervisor at 850-342-0136 to set up an
appointment to inspect the vehicles. The
Board reserves the right to reject any or
all bids. Vehicles must be removed from
the school board premises within ten (10)
days after bids are awarded 1993 INH/TH
1HVBBPLN3PH524316 DT-360 AT-545
65 Pass. As is Bus #93-36; 1982
GMC/CARGO Van 2GTDG25H8C453263
As Is Vehicle #01. Obsolete bus a $2,000
minimum.
12/28, 12/30, 01/04, 01/06, 01/11, 01/13,
01/18, 01/20, c
NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given
that the School Board of Jefferson County,
Florida, located 1490 W. Washington
Street, Monticello, Florida 32344 will
receive bids on or before 2:00 p.m. on
Tuesday, January 31, 2006 for the sale of
the following described property owned by
the School Board oT Jefferson County,
Florida: OLD ADULT EDUCATION
SCHOOL 700 EAST DOGWOOD
STREET LOCATED ON THE CORNER
OF DOGWOOD AND EAST
WASHINGTON STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA. PROPERTY
APPRAISER PARCEL ID NUMBER
00-00-00-0370-0000-0101 This property is
being sold "as is" and no representations
are made or implied as to zoning, access,
or its suitability for any intended or
specific purpose. The parcel is situated in
the City of Monticello in Jefferson County,
Florida. MINIMUM ACCEPTABLE BID
- $325,000.00 Bids will be publicly opened
at 2:00 p.m. In the board roomo.f, the
district office located at 1490 West
Washington Street, Monticello, Florida.
No bid will be opened if received after 2:00
p.m. Please mark on the envelope,
"Surplus Property Sale- Bid Opening 2:00
p.m. January 31, 2006." Anyone desiring
information on the procedure for
submitting bids should contact Hal Wilson
at (850) 342-0100. It is anticipated that the
highest bid will be presented to the School
Board for approval on Monday, February
13, 2006. The School Board of Jefferson
County reserves the eight to reject any or
all bids. By Fred Shofner, Chairman
Jefferson County School Board, Phil
Barker, Superintendent Jefferson County
School Board.
12/28, 12/30, 01/04, 01/06, 01/11, 01/13,
01/18, 01/20, c
NOTICE
Alumni Band members of Howard
Academy Bee Pipers and Jefferson County
Fighting Tigers, reunion planning meeting
2pm Saturday, January 14, Diane's Place.
Call 222-0302, 997-4501, 284-9149.
1/11, pd
HELP WANTED
Experienced upholsterer, part-time.
Call Minnie at 997-0826.
01/6, 11, ,3, 18, pd
Help Wanted in Lloyd area.
Caregiver Exp. 9:30a 9:30p
,Transportation a must. 224-4131, or
'879-8698 leave message.
11/4,6, 11, 13, pd
:Heavy Equipment Operator:
,experienced operator, needed to run
'different types of heavy equipment in
tLimerock Mine. Some mechanical
'ability needed to perform job
function. Serious inquiries only. Must
be dependable. Full benefit package
included. Drug test, physical and back
ground check required. E.O.E. apply
in person Martin Mariettla Material.
23 miles west of Perry on Hwy. 98.
850-584-6461.
1/11 13, 18, 20, c
NUr:SING: Not An Average Nurse?
Well neither is the rest of the Nursing
Staff at the Taylor Correctional
Institution. When you join the Prison
Health Services team, you will quickly
find that correctional healthcare is a
step above the rest. Join us in one of
these immediate openings: RNs FT
nights, PRN days and nights, 12 hour
shifts; LPN PT nights, PRN days and
nights, 12 hour shifts. We offer
excellent rates and benefits. Contact
Norma Crum, DON at: 850-838-4183,
or leave message with Tammy Searcy
at: 850-838-4073. You may also
forward resume via fax: 850-838-4081
or email: 153hsa@asgr.com EEO/AA
www.prisonhealth.com.
1/11, c


LOST
LE[RT BOLO- AFTIENTION Four
Peacocks Females, dark brown and
buff colors. Pineywoods/Casa Bianca
area. 694-1179, 997-4627 REWARD


SERVICES
Do you have just enough religion to
make you miserable? Try a joyful
church. Christ Episcopal Church,
three blocks N of .the courthouse.
Sunday service at 10:00 a.m.
997-4116.
1/11, c
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drugs, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn fat
and increase energy levels resulting in
considerable weight loss over time.
Hoodiacol consist of 3 key ingredients
incorporated into rice bran oil with
natural flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss, you
may see benefits for the hair, skin and
nails from the Omega 3 and Omega 6
found in rice bran oil. Hoodia
gordonii is a cactus found in the
Kalahari Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and
operated by Andy Rudd, 997-5648.
Leave Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
50l9 523, Quick Responses.
Health Care Equipment Jackson's
Drug Store. We bill Medicare Call
for a assessment of your needs.
997-3553. UPS available
1/19, tfn


DELTA HEALTH GROUP



BRYNWOOD CENTER
A 97 BED SKILLED NURSING
FACILITY.LOCAT, ED IN
MONTICELLO, FL
IS IN SEARCH OF:
DIRECTOR OF NURSING
This is an excellent
opportunity for a licensed
RN with strong leadership
& previous DON/Risk
Mgt. experience but not
required. We offer a very
competitive salary and
benefits package.
Interested candidates should
contact Charmion Holmes at
(850) 997-1800
Experience The Delta
Difference!

Brynwood Center
1656 South Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL. 32344

PHONE: 850-997-1800
FAX: 850-997-7269
www.deltahealthgroup.com
Drug Free Workplace
EOE/m/f/d/v


SERVICES
Backhoe Service: driveways, roads,
ditches, tree & shrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten 997-3116,
933-3458.
FOR SALE
Red Roosters $10 each. Beautiful
Purebred Limousin bull, 14 months
old, Call 997-0901, leave
message.
1/1 13, 18, 20, 25, 27, pd-
LEFT OVER- Merchandise from Big
Chief Pawnbrokers, Electronics,
Handtools, DVD's, VHS, Jewelry,
Reasonable Priced 342-2105
01/6, 11, 13, 18, 20, 25, 27, pd
FOR RENT
Country Living-1 bed, 1 bath, $500 -
997-6653
1/4,6 11..13, pd
Mobile Home on Ashville Hwy. 2
bedroom, I bath. $350 monthly $350
deposit. 850-997-5434
(/11, 13, pd
2 or 3 bedroom $450 $650 per
month near JCKC or 1-10 421-3911.
12/2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28, 30, pd
Prime downtown office space now
available in Cherry Street Commons.
Jack Carswell, 997-1980.
11/30, tfn, c
REAL ESTATE
New Home 1288 Sq. Ft. Living Area,
3 bedroom, 2 bath attached garage in
to';. Call 850-509-0849.
11/30, 12/2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28,


AUTOMOTIVE
No Credit Checks Just Low Down
Payments on Good Cars & Trucks
2 and 4 Door Model As Low As $750
down 850-536-9111 -
www.JumpinJims.con Ask For Mr.
Deal.
11/2, tfn
1978 GMC Pick-up/Camper shell,
long wheel base, good motor, tires,
runs good $3,000 997-5701 Leave
Message.
1/4,6. 11, 13, pd
'87 Mcrcury Sabel $500 Firm. Runs
Contact Kim at (904 497-7093
:/4.fn


HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR
EMPLOYMENT
.., r



Bulldozers, Backhoes,
Loaders, Dump Trucks,
Graders, Scrapers,
Excavators
Train in Florida
-National Certification
-Financial Assistance
-Job Placement Assistance
800-383-7364
Associated Training Services
www.atLn-schools.com


S NOW HIRING

WE ARE SEEKING FULL TIME CASHIER AND
FULL TIME MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL.
*Must be available for any shift
*Must be able to work 30-40 hrs. or more each week
*Experience is a plus
*COMPETITIVE PAY! (Based on experience, back ground quali-
fications, and certain specialties and acquired skills)
**A in FULL. TIME NON-MINOR APPLICANTS ARE REQUIRE TO TAKE A
DRUG TEST AND SUCCESSFULLY PASS A BACKGROUND CHECK!
DO NOT APPLY IF: You ARE NOT ENTHUSIASTIC
ABOUT DOING THE BEST YOU CAN, NOT WORK ORIENTED,
AND IF YOU'RE NOT A TEAM PLAYER!

Please see Patti (Store Manager) or Tommy (Assistant Store
Manager), for application, possibility for interview, and
more information. I
--~Nurse -------- =l


Due to our EXPLODING GROWTH,
Digital Reception Services has openings for
SATELLITE INSTALLATION TECHNICIANS
for our TALLAHASSEE location. We offer set schedules, good pay, exceptional benefits, advancement potential and more! Experience preferred but NOT
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We invite interested candidates to our
OPEN HOUSE
Wednesday, January 18th
9:00am 11:00am
U1:00p 7:00pm
1:00pm 7:00pm


4825-110 Woodlane Circle
Tallahassee, FL
Phone: 850-562-3244
Inlerested in working for a world leader bul unable o oallend??? Apply online of
www.hrmcacclalm.comL/p /jydrscareers or call: 1-877-351-4473.


DIGITAL
RECEPTION
SERVICES, INC.


* Escape to your Haven 10 acres, with
new mother-in-law suite, stable w/
tack/feed room $ 350,000
* New Listing 3Bd/2Ba on 1.19 acres.
Great for rental or starter home. Good
location. $ 124,900
* Charming Brick Home 3Bd/2Ba on 5
cleared acres, fenced yard, 1 car garage,
circular drive. $ 229,900
* Great Golf Course Views Beautiful
home, great neighborhood.4Bd/2Ba, 3.24
acres. 2 car garage. $ 249,900
a Country Living Large 4Bd/2.5Ba on 3
beautiful acres. Pool. $ 385,000
www. cbkk. corn


10(LLY & KELLY
l'ROPFiRTIIS


ffim-nlv the- ----t



tthinl th B !t f


k


k

k

k


A^L

A

A

A


A

A

A

A

A

A


A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

A


A

A
&


Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only $16,500 per acre

New Listinq! 2 bedroom 1 bath home with
small fenced yard, nice family room $87,500

Choice Buildinq Lots in Cooper's Pond
Area cleared and ready to build on, nice
trees, paved road $27,500 each

Look at This! Comfortable 4 bedroom 3 bath
home on five fenced acres w/guest house/
playhouse w/.bath, big shop., 2 car garage,
pasture, 100 pecan trees and a nice pool a
real dream for a growing family $400,000

Hard to Find 5 choice acres on hillside with-
planted pines on quiet graded county road
Asking $12,000/acre

Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom home
in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29.acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $295,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane off Rocky Branch Road and Sunset Street
100'x220 in the City $15,500 each .

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Look at the Price-5 wooded acres on Blue
Lake Road only $22,500

Check Out This One! Under Contract 8
acres with big doublewide and small house on a
pretty old hillside close to Leon County off Julia
Road $160,000
Prime Commercial Property US 19 South


near Pizza Hut Mart $650,000

Nice Hillside Location 10 acres on the east
side of town high and dry in quiet location
with lots of game $12,000 /acre.

Home Site close to town on West Grooverville
Road only $14,500

Rentals Available
2/1.5 mobile home on 2 ac $450
3/2 mobile home Lloyd Ac $650
3/2 mobile home Christmas Ac $650
2/1 home on Dogwood St $850
Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
We have qualified buyers!
Are you interested in selling?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


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..... 1 %..r .........









PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JANUARY 11, 2006


~g ;.~'





/


HADLEY REVELL won first place in the fourth and fifth
grade countywide public speaking contest, with her topic of
"Country Girl."


Countywide Speaking

Contest Winners Told


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The 4-H Countywide Tropicana
Public Speaking Contest drew 11
entries

Winners and the topics of their
Speeches are:
Hadley Revell, first place in the
fourth and fifth grade division, for
"Country Girl;" Tres Copeland, sec-
ond place, for "What My Dad and I
Do Together;" Phidell Lewis, third
place for "Midnight Trip."

Casey Demott, fourth place, for
"Scariest Day Of My Life;" and
Christopher Haugen and Jakeia
Morris, honorable mention.

Emily Howell, first place in the
sixth grade division for "Being A
4-H Member, I Represent B-U-I-C;"
Simone Williams, second place for
"Pressures 11-12 Year Olds Are
Facing, and As A 4-H Members-


How Can These Be Avoided.."
Shelby Witmer, third place for
"Notes From The Third Pew;"
Levi Cobb, fourth place for "My
Christmas;" and Keli Dollar, honor-
able mention.
Hadley Revell and Emily Howell
will represent Jefferson County at
the District Tropicana Public Speak-
ing Contest in May.
"Jefferson County 4-H and I
would like to thank all the teachers
and parents who made the contest
possible," said John Lilly, county
4-H coordinator. ,
"Also, special thanks to the judges
Janet Bellamy and Rachel Kudelko.
amd to the staff at Jefferson Ele-
mentary School for the use of the
Media Center.

"The overall program was suc-
cessful; and all the students did a
magnificent job expressing them-
selves in front of an audience,"
Lilly said.


TRES COPELAND won second place in the fourth and fifth
grade countywide 4-H public speaking contest, with
topic of "What My Dad and I Do Together."


PHIDELL LEWIS won third place
grade countywide public speaking
"Midnight Trip."


- 1.


CASEY DEMOTT, won fourth place in the 4-H speaking con-
test with topic of "Scariest Day of My Life."


..- '. 5 q ._4 -.,















in the fourth and fifth
contest, .-with topic,-
^T ;5. ,'- ". )t-:
i * *"W *;!* ''-. ';
,'' *' --. t .; :;'-l '<; i .... *
i ', '. ..** ',** 4 .- .I- ''-^
,.., .*.<--... .,, 1;

** ".,- - -r .a
.- 'i;- ^ -
."* ...*" ^. -'.,"
: : : "" -." '. *n .:. .'
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in the fourth and fifth
contest, with topic,


~r/.
4,5 N.


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5-.






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<54 's..so.i


EMILY HOWELL took first place in the sixth grade county-
wide speaking contest with her topic "Being a 4-H Member,
I Represent B-U-I-C.


jig.




FAt' r A .


SIMONE WILLIAMS earned second place in the sixth grade
countywide contest with her topic: "Pressures 11-12 year
Olds Face as 4-H Member. How can These be Avoided?"


SHELBY WITMER won third place in the sixth grade county-
wide speaking contest with her topic of "Notes From the
Third Pew."


LEVI COBB took fourth place in the sixth grade division of
countrywide speaking contest with "My Chistmas."


TODAY IH-T IPVOIIP I I riT WORD$.

NOT BAD IOR AN iEX-1AARIINI.


/ N


Stroke can take away a lifetime of speech and language
skills. A certified speech-language pathologist
can help patients find them again. For more information,
contact the American Speech Language Hearing
Association at 1-800-638-TALK or visit www.asha.org.


0 AMERICAN
SPEiiLAIM.AN(! A(I-.
H[EARING
ASSOCIAIION
7 ANNIVERSARY
5 0925 2000


* High blood pressure
(50 million)

* Coronary heart disease
(13.5 million)

* Stroke (brain attack)
(3.8 million)

* Rheumatic heart disease
(1.4 million)


0


I


1996, American Heart Association




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