Group Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.).
Title: The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00160
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Publication Date: January 6, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028320
Volume ID: VID00160
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - ADA7476
oclc - 10124570
alephbibnum - 000579629
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Full Text







Humanitarian
Effort Largest
For Disaster victims

Editorial, Page 4

o


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINEqVTT T,f 77 '7T, "f, i


Health Department
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Story, Page 7


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Youth Soccer
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ews


Fulford Murder Case Is



Now In Very Last Stage


Petition NOW In Hands

Of U.S. Supreme Court


PAUL HOWELL covers his face as he enters the courthouse
during one of his court appearances here. Howell's case is
now before the Supreme Court. (News Photo)



Slave Canal To


Get New Name


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The manmade extension of the
Wacissa River commonly known as
the Slave Canal may soon be called
the Cotton Run Canal.
The proposed name change is in
keeping with a 2004 state law that
seeks to remove all offensive or de-
iogatory names in Florida.

Change Stems
From New Law
County officials learned of the ira.
pending name change from the US -
Board on Geographic Names, which
is responsible for standardizing the
geographic names used by the fed-
eral government in maps and prod-
ucts.
"In accordance with the board's
customary research of every name
proposal, and because local accep-
tance of any proposed name is very
important to the board, we would be
interested to know the opinion of the
Jefferson County Board of Commis-
sioners regarding this change from
Slave Canal to Cotton Run Canal,"
Roger L. Payne, executive secretary
of the US Board on Geographic
Names, wrote the commission in
December.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC),
which administers the Aucilla Wild-
life Management Area where the ca-
nal is located, recommended the
new name.
The push to change offensive
names in the state stems from Flor-
ida State Senate Bill 0444, titled
"Relating to Abrogating Offensive
Place Names". The legislation, how-
ever, does not list the words that are


considered offensive, nor does it pe-
nalize locales for refusing to change
a name.
The renaming of the Slave Canal
to the Cotton Run Canal is one of
three name changes submitted to the
US Board on Geographic Names by
the Florida Department of State, Di-
"vision of Historical Resources. The
other two name changes are Negro
Island in Citrus County, to be
changed to Horseshoe Island; and
Japanese Rock in Palm Beach, to be
changed to Yamato Rock.
The three-mile long Slave Canal
starts just south of Goose Pasture
and eventually joins the Aucilla
River near Nutall Rise Landing be-
fore the latter empties into the Gulf
of Mexico.
Historian Jerrell H. Shofner, in his
book "Jefferson County, Florida"
touches on the construction of the
Slave Canal in the 1850s.
It seems that area planters envi-
sioned the canal as a way to get their
crops -- mainly cotton -- to market
more easily and cheaply by elimi-
nating the costly and arduous 18-
mile overland trek to Magnolia, then
the closest shipping port on the St.
Marks River.
Aware that the Aucilla River emp-
tied into the Gulf of Mexico and that
multiple branches of the Wacissa
River trickled into the Aucilla, the
planters thought that it would be a
relatively simple matter to deepen
and expand one of the branches.
They formed the Wacissa and Au-
cilla Navigation Company in 1831
and successfully lobbied the Florida
Legislature for funding.
In "Canal Fever in North Florida",
state historian Joe Knetsch notes
that the Aucilla-Wacissa project was
one of the numerous schemes pro-
posed in Florida during the canal en-
(See Slave Canal Page 12)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Attorneys for Paul Howell, the
convicted killer of trooper Jimmy
Fulford, have launched a last ditch'
effort to have Howell's life spared.
Attorney Baya Harrison told the
News last week that his side filed a
petition for writ of certiorari with
,.c US Supreme Court in Novem-
ber.
"It's a last gasp effort," Harrison
said.


'I ~
~y.



~'. ,'.
~


A petition for writ of certiorari,
informally called "cert petition", is a
document that the losing side files
with the Supreme Court asking for a
review of a lower court's decision.
The document includes a list of
the parties in the case, a statement of
the facts, the legal questions pre-
sented for review, and the argu-
ments why the court should grant
the writ.
Harrison explained that the Su-
preme Court has no obligation to
hear the case. In fact, the court re-
ceives thousands of "cert petitions"





4,




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LINDA HAMEDANI, library director, shows she can handle
a shovel as well as the next one. Hamedani was shoveling
landscaping mulch for the newly-created flower bed next to
the library. (News Photo)

Conley Elected To Third Term

AS Mayor; Austin, Vice Mayor


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Julie Conley was elected to a third
consecutive term as mayor by her
fellow council members on Tuesday
night.


Sheriff Investigates Shooting


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The Sheriffs Department is inves-
tigating a shooting that occurred
Monday evening in the Lloyd area.
Major Bill Bullock reports that
Willie Harris called the department
about 6 p.m. Monday to say that he
had been shot.
When deputies arrived on the


scene, they found Harris had been
shot in the midsection with a small
caliber firearm.
Bullock says questions exist as to
what exactly happened. He says
Harris first told investigators that he
was standing outside when he was
shot. He subsequently claimed that
the shooting was accidental.
"The best that can be said is that
he's giving conflicting statements as
to what happened," Bullock says.


CONLEY


Councilman Gerrold Austin,
meanwhile, was elected to a third
consecutive term as vice mayor.


Conley and Austin were the only
nominees for the two positions,
which traditionally are established at
the beginning of each year.
Colleagues praised Conley and
Austin for jobs well done during the
previous two years in their respec-
tive offices.
Conely and Austin were first
elected to the mayor and vice mayor
offices in 2004.
Conley, formerly the city clerk
from 1996 to 2004, is Monticello's
first-ever female mayor.
Before Conley, only three women
had served on the City Council. The
first was Marie Hinson, who took
office Jan. 9, 1978.
The second woman elected to the
council was Johann Murdaugh, who
took office Jan. 12, 1987. After that,
it was Emily Anderson, elected to
(See Mayor Page 12)


every year, and denies all but about
100.
"Review of writ of certiorari is not
a matter of right, but a judicial dis-
cretion," according to Rule 10 of the
Rules of the US Supreme Court. "A
petition for writ of certiorari will be
granted only for compelling
reasons."
Which puts the odds of the Su-
preme Court granting a writ of cer-
tiorari and hearing the case at slim
to none -- a point Harrison
concedes.
Still, it's his responsibility to do
everything possible for his client,
Harrison says.
As things stand now, the governor
could well order the execution of
Howell at any moment. But in the


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Cheryl Turner, director of Wilder-
ness Coast Public Libraries (WILD),
is asking county commissioners to
reconsider their decision not to fund
the bookmobile.
In a letter dated Dec. 15, Turner
asks commissioners to reallocate
funds to support at least one day of
bookmobile service every other
week in the current fiscal year.
Turner bases her request on in-
formation received from Property
Appraiser David Ward, who sits on
the WILD governing board. Ward
told Turner that he had refunded
$30,000 to the county from last
year's budget.
Turner said Commissioner Gene
Hall, who also sits on the WILD
governing board, had then offered to
explore the possibility of using
some of the returned money to fund
the bookmobile service.
She said a $10,000 contribution
would provide one day of service
every three weeks, and a $25,000 al-
location would fund two days of
service every three weeks.

,.5


a'


A


interest of seeing all avenues of the
appeal process exhausted, the state
appears willing to await the Su-
preme Court's decision before
acting.
Howell was convicted of the mur-
der of Fulford in late 1994 in Pensa-
cola, FL. He was sentenced to. the
death penalty in early 1995.
Fulford, a county native, was
killed Feb. 1, 1992, when a bomb-
rigged and gift-wrapped microwave
oven exploded in the trunk of a ve-
hicle that he had stopped for speed-
ing on the interstate near the Aucilla
exit.
The bomb, which Howell had 'con-
structed, was intended to silence a.
murder witness in Marianna, FL.


Commissioners were expected to
take up the matter Thursday morn-
ing.

$10,000 Brings
Bus Once Every
Three weeks;
$25,000 Brings
Bus Twice Every,-
Three weeks

The bookmobile stopped coming
here late last year, after commis-
sioners decided not to contribute
$25,000 annually for the service,
which previously had been free.
At the time, Turner explained that
budgetary constraints were forcing
WILD to charge for the service. She
said the combined contributions be-
ing requested from the three served
counties -- Jefferson, Wakulla and
Franklin -- would equal $75,000,
enough to maintain the then current
level of service.
As it turned out, Franklin County
contributed $25,000; Wakulla
County contributed $10,000; and
Jefferson County contributed noth-
ing.


* -


THE BOOKMOBILE may start coming here again, if the
County Commission decides to fund the service. Wilder-
ness Coast Public Libraries Director Cheryl Turner has
asked commissioners to reconsider their earlier decision
not to fund the service. (News Photo)


Published Wednesdays & Fridays FRIDAY, JANUARY 6,2006


County To Revisit


Bookmobile issue


I








PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 6,2006


Library T<


Computer

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
The Jefferson County Public Li--


XP Professional, Microsoft Word
O ffe r 2003, and Microsoft Excel 2003,
Microsoft Publisher 2003, Micro-
C l s e s soft Power Point 2003.
r Cs Finally, participants will be able
to access the Library's Homepage
know how to launch an application, (http://www.jefferson.lib.fl.us)
and create and save files. from home using Microsoft Ex-
The Beginning Computer Class plorer.
will meet every Thursday and Fri- There is $10 fee for supplies in
-day from 10 a.m. to noon during each class.


~ ~ ~ ~ .- *- fl f. *^

:THOMAS LYLE works on the computer at
:the county library. Two computer courses
:are scheduled for serious students. Only


nine participants can be
each class. (News Photo)


accommodated in


'HAPPY' was named canine
S. Pet of the Week by the Hu-
mane Society. She likes peo-
ple and is fun to be around,
but don't try to get near her
food when she's feeding!
'Happy' loves children and
other dogs. (News Photo)


Happy Named Pet Of eek


'Happy' Named Pet Of Week


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
"Happy" has been named canine
Pet of the Week, by the Humane-
Society.
She iA a black and tan boxer mix,
born Feb., 2005.
She is spayed and all vaccina-
tions are up to date.
Shelter Caretaker Cheryl Bautista


the weeks of Jan. 12 through Jan.
27.
This class is for users of all ages
with little or no prior computer ex-
perience.
Participants will learn about the
basic computer hardware such as
the CPU, keyboard, mouse,
printers, scanners, and other pe-
ripheral devices.
Participants will also learn how
to perform basic computer opera-
tions, including using the mouse,
launching programs, manipulating
windows, working with the
desktop, and saving files.
By the end of this class partici-
pants will be able to use Windows


The Jefferson
County Utility
Coordinating
Committee
will meet at 9:00
a.m. January 11,
2006 at the
Jefferson County
Extension Office
275 North
Mulberry Street


brary will offer free computer
classes at the 375 Water Street lo-
cation beginning Jan. 10 and run-
ning through Jan. 27.
Only serious applicants need ap-
ply as space in limited to nine par-
ticipants per class.
Contact Angela at 342-0205 im-
mediately as the Beginning Micro-
soft Word 2003 class meets every
Tuesday and Wednesday from 1,0
a.m. to noon, during the weeks of
Jan. 10 through Jan. 25.
It will introduce participants to all
the basic features they need to cre-
ate professional looking reports,
documents, and correspondence.
Topics covered include Word ba-
sic, editing documents, formatting
fonts and paragraphs, creating basic
tables, working with basic page
layouts, using proofing tools, and
working with Web features.
A prerequisite is that students
have a basic understanding of the
Windows operating system and be
able to use a mouse.
For example, students should


describes Happy as being a very
sweet, playful and a sometimes
slightly shy animal, who is house-
broken.
Happy is extremely good with
older children and other dogs, but
not inclined to share her food, if
approached while she is eating.


To adopt Happy or any of
other many loving animals at
shelter, call 342-0244.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 6, 2006 PAGE 3


Retires After 33 Years
SMO.




his 33 years of service with the City, re- intendent, Webb, Julie Conley, mayor.





Retires After 33 'Years


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Longtime City Employee Holsey-
Webb retired as a City worker last
-week.
Webb served the city as a solid
waste collector for over 33 years,
serving his final day last Friday.


came by my house. I missed him
and I'm going to miss him."
In a quick-witted response, Webb
responded, "I can make it a point to
stop by your house from time to
time," which was met with an erup-
- tion of laughter from those present..
On behalf of the City, Don An-
derson then handed Webb three re--


from time to time?"
Holsey playfully responded,
"That's your job."
Resident Gloria Brown added, "I
don't care who you get, you'll
never replace him. He's a depend-
able person, and that's hard to find
these days."
When asked what his motivation
was to never miss work during his
entire career, Webb said, "I don't
like to sit around the house and I
feel like it would fall apart if I
weren't there."
During his many years of service,
Webb walked ahead of the truck,
explained Don Anderson. "Many
of those on his route are handi-
capped and he goes to the house
and brings their trash to the curb
for them," he added.
Webb said that in his retirement,
he plans to do a lot of fishing and
he will collect aluminum cans and
scrap metals to sell them.


City Police Reunite

Woman, Family


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

While criminal activity was nil in--
the City during the Christmas holi-
days, City Police were able to re-
unite a family in time for
Christmas.
Just after midnight Dec. 21, Offi-
cer Corporal Toby Ward observed
a vehicle traveling on East Wash-
ington Street in excess of the
posted speed, without lights.
Ward made a traffic stop and
found the driver to be an elderly,
76 year-old wortihan who appeared
to be confused and disoriented. ,
Ward requested the Police dis-
patcher run a check on the woman,
at which time, it was discovered

TABLES
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Monticello

News

Prepared To Serve
Our Community


Real tt

Licensing Courses..


his retirement. (News Photos)

He was honored Thursday with a
retirement celebration at City Hall
with city officials, employees and
residents in attendance, many mak-
ing comments about his years of
service.
"He had perfect attendance," said
Evelyn Thomas. "When he did
miss time, it was when he was on
vacation that he had scheduled."
City Manager Don Anderson
added, "He worked for the city for
33 years, four months and eight
days, never missing a day. That
boils down to 9,027 working days
during his career.
"Everybody in the City knows
him and appreciates his service,"
he said. "It's going to be hard to
replace him. He leaves some pretty
big shoes to fill.
"Any of the rest of us would be
easier to replace than him, and that
includes myself, and that's the
truth," said Anderson. "I don't---
know a soul that can replace him."
Mayor Emily Anderson added,
"Today was the last day Holsey


(850) 386-7553
Tallahassee
1882 Capital Circle, NE, Suite 103
Tallahassee, Florida 32308


tirement gifts.
The gifts Webb received included
a heavy red, and a heavy blue,
long-sleeved denim shirt, one
heavy jacket, and one light jacket.
Upon receiving the heavy jacket,-
one resident responded, "I'm going
to have to borrow this coat from
you from time to time."
Webb quickly quipped, "I'll sell it
to you.."
Franklin Hightower added, "It's
been a real honor working with-
you, Holsey, and I appreciate all
that you have done."
Brief comments came from vari-
ous residents and coworkers. One
-coworker said, "I don't want you to-
go. You've always been very de-
pendable. You know, you can
come back if you want to."

Those present began to anticipate
what it would be like working
-without Webb there and. Don An-_
derson interjected, "Holsey, can we
count on you to come back and
help straighten out the collectors


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This course runs for 6 weeks and
the TOTAL cost of the course is $300
(includes Registration fee, Tuition and
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Law AND The Exam Manual with
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to help prepare for the State Exam).

45-Hour Post-Licensing Course
This course runs 4 1/2 weeks long. The
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Class size is limited to 10 students.
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that the woman had been reported
as missing to the Largo Police De-
partment.
She had been missing for more
than 16 hours.
Ward took the woman back to
the Police Department, and con-
tacted the Largo Police
Department.
Family members of the elderly
woman drove from Largo to pick
up their missing loved one.


Lloyd Fire
Department
Sets Meeting
The annual board meeting for the
Lloyd Volunteer Fire Rescue is
scheduled for 7:30 p.m. Thursday;
Jan. 12 at the station.
The main topic of discussion fod
the meeting will be the election of
officers and fire chief.
All interested parties are invited
to attend.
For more information contact,
Jacque Dupuis at 997-1516.


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HOLSEY WEBB opens one of his gifts from the City upon


Kev. uarln anKS
Retired Minister

Why I am a

Republican
I believe it the Republican Party because I believe
in people. I believe in their right to make their own
decisions.... free to enjoy the dignity of living their
own lives without an intrusive government
interfering because it knows what is best for them.
I'm a Conservative... one who believes that the best
Lgoverrunents: are the ones closest to hpom.. They
ser'. e uLi best-because they are, made up .of local
.citizens ....people ,,wlp live .wit.,, those they ,ser.e.
Further, I believe that government should only do for
us those things that we cannot do for ourselves.
I am convinced that individual prosperity grows
out of opportunity, which stems from economic
freedom. People are much more likely to succeed
economically if they are not overtaxed by a big
government who is trying (without success) to "take
care of them".
I also must say that I believe abortion is the taking
of a human life and while I realize that there are
times that, regrettably, abortions are necessary, they
should be restricted much more than they are now.
I believe that marriage is ordained by God as a
sacred union between a man and a woman.
These are but some of the convictions that convince
me that my political home is the Republican Party.
Besides, after being a Republican for 63 of my 84
years, I kind of feel like I belong.

Respectfully,

Are you sure You're

Snot a Republican ?
Why not make it official?
Just call us at 228-4400 and...
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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 6, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

SRAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
.Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
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.....*M* sExRv ME.R.v;;.


Humanitarian


Effort Largest


A year ago, the world came to-
gether to help victims of a tsunami
that devastated South Asia. It was
the largest humanitarian response in
history.
As a result, two months after the
disaster, there were no large-scale
outbreaks of disease and no wide-
spread food shortages.
In that short time, the area recov-
ered to the point that it was already
possible for rebuilding work to be-
gin.
In the first week of the disaster,
the aid effort was led by local peo-
ple and local organizations that re-
sponded to the needs of the survi-
vors. In each of the countries af-
fected, large sections of the public
mobilized in response to the
disaster.
Since the tsunami, Oxfam has
helped more than 1.8 million people
in South Asia and raised more than
$250 million to support its aid effort
across the tsunami affected coun-
tries.
Oxfam's humanitarian program is
providing water and sanitation and
working on shelter and livelihood
projects.
"Our international experience has
taught us that it is usually the poor
who are hardest hit. They are usu-
ally the first to get hit and the last to


get help," said Oxfam America
president Ray Offenheiser. "This
year, we saw that in our own back-
yard with Hurricane Katrina."
Katrina cut a wide swath across
the Gulf Coast and Mississippi
Delta, reaching beyond the urban
centers and deep into rural areas
where some of the most profound
and entrenched poverty in the nation
exists.
The hurricane ripped roofs off
houses, knocked out power, blocked
roads and flattened farmers' fields,
leaving already-marginalized people
homeless and with no means to sup-
port themselves.
Although Oxfam generally fo-
cuses its emergency response on re-
gions where governments and civil
society groups have little or no ca-
pacity to respond effectively, which
is seldom the case in the United
States, the devastation in the Gulf
Coast region led the organization to
launch a rebuilding effort there as
well.
The hundreds of thousands of peo-
ple severely affected by Hurricane
Katrina include many people -
mostly poor, rural people of color -
associated with the grassroots or-
ganizations with which Oxfam
America has long-standing relation-
ships.


ium Our Photo File


\.\y


. 1


MAX BILINSKI, left, Bill Gunnels accepted
the trophy for a golf tournament victory, in
June, 1990. Presenter was Charles Nuzum,


'-a,-- -



Lt. Gov. designate of Kiwanis Division 3.
Bilinksi and Gunnels were part of the win-
ning foursome. (News File Photo)


Opinion & Comment


ml


BY MERRY ANN FRISBY


New Years resolutions:
I have always made new years
resolutions. I consider this time of
year a good time to examine how
my life is working and an opportu-
nity for self improvement. This year
I already have a long list.
Never buy something labeled
"Hot." I am sick to- death of the-
word. Hot is what you are in the'
sweaty sun-blaring summer months
and especially here at our Water-
melon Festival.
I am a regular voter and do not
think I have ever missed any chance
to vote. But after seeing the Iraqi's
walk miles to a polling place and
have the guts to ink up their fingers
amid bombs and shooting, I am in-
spired and humbled.


I resolve never to call anyone fat.
Did you notice that one week after
Fidel Castro called Governor Jeb
Bush 'fat,' the Cuban baseball team
was not allowed to come to Florida
to play? If you want to call yourself
fat, that is OK. I'm just not going to
do it.
Never to be taken care of by a
health care worker with long finger-
nails. Dirt and disease are lurking
there. How do those women perform.
basic hygiene with those long
talons? I plan to refuse.
Fly. I am terrified of taking to the
skies, any reasonable human being
should be afraid of falling from the
sky. However, I have family in Ha-
waii and flying is the only practical
way to get there.
Refuse to pay any late fees. I be-
lieve the financial institutions are


taking advantage with floating due
dates. I pay my bills on time. If I get
a late fee, I am canceling the card or
changing financial institutions.
Drink more coffee. Love the stuff.
It is bad for my stomach. Don't care.
Buy some patchouli oil. Love the
smell. The hubby hates it, have not
.figured out the details of this yet.
Tell my friends how much I love
them, and how important they are in
m y life. ; ; ,,
I am not going to read any more
information letters from politicians.
I got a Christmas card from a candi-
date's wife, who I do not know, it
mentions her family, farming,
church, soccer, breast cancer and
possums. Did she miss anyone?
Walk more. I have been walking
in the mornings. I found an obelisk
in tribute to Mr. Giradeau who


planted the avenue of oaks. You can
only find those things if you are
walking.
Attend county commission meet-
ings. Important stuff happens there.
Become more informed about wa-
ter issues. I know South Florida
really wants to take our water. Have
you ever gotten a drink from a tap
anywhere south of Orlando? Be
brave and try it some time. I'm sure
it is safe but the taste can't be de-
scribed in a family paper.
Watch those cooking shows more
carefully. I am about convinced that
they use canned sizzling noises like
the old variety shows used canned
laughter.
Hope to enjoy myself in 2006 as
much as 2005. I have especially ap-
preciated all the comments, phone
calls from all my friends who read
this column.


Understand Your Auto Help LOW Performing
Insurance Coverage Help Low Performing Students


Knowing the ins and outs of your
auto insurance policy is no accident.
But if you don't know the answers to
common questions, you're not alone.
Most insured drivers do not stop to
think about their auto insurance cov-
erage until after an accident.
That's the absolute worst time to
ponder your policy, according to the
Insurance Information Institute
(I.I.I.), a nonprofit consumer educa-
tion organization.
Following the stress and anxiety
of a car accident, nobody wants to
be befuddled, surprised or angered
by finding out that a standard insur-
ance policy may not cover costly ex-
penses.
As part of a national public infor-
mation campaign to help drivers
better understand their coverage, the
I.I.I, in cooperation with the Con-
sumer Protection Association of
America, has put together a brief
quiz titled "Wiser Drivers Wise Up"
and a companion Web site,
www.wiserdrivers.com. Here's a
sample:
1. If my insured teenager takes my
car without permission and runs into
my neighbor's garage door, what
costs am I responsible for? a) Vehi-
cle repair cost; b) Deductible; c) Ga-
rage door repair cost.
2. If I hit a deer on the road, what
expenses do I incur? a) Deductible;
b) Vehicle repair cost; c) Deer dis-
posal fee.
3. What kind of coverage would
pay my vehicle repair costs if my


car is damaged in a hit-and-run acci-
dent? a) Gap coverage; b) Unin-
sured motorist coverage; c) Property
damage coverage.
4. If my .car is totaled in an acci-
dent, am I still responsible for mak-
ing payments on the balance I owe
on the car? a) Yes; b) No.
5. If I'm involved in an accident
and the other driver is at fault, will I
have to wait to get a rental replace-
ment car? a) Yes; b) No.
Answers
1. b. If you carry collision and li-
ability coverage, the damage to your
car and the garage door both will be
covered. But, you still have to pay
the deductible. Collision coverage is
generally sold with a deductible of
$250 to $1,000 the higher your de-
ductible, the lower the premium.
2. a. If you have comprehensive
insurance, then you are only respon-
sible for your deductible.
3. b. You can receive full reim-
bursement if you have uninsured
motorist coverage.
4. No, as long as gap coverage is
included in your policy.
5. No, if you have rental car reim-
bursement coverage on your own
policy, you do not have to wait for
the other driver's insurance company
to authorize a rental car.
For only a couple dollars a month,
rental reimbursement coverage pro-
" vides a rental car while your car is
in the repair shop after an accident.
If the collision is determined to be
the other driver's fault, the cost of
the rental car could be reimbursed.


Letters to the Editor Welcomed
500 Words or Less

Letters must be signed and include
phone number or writer


Editors Note: This is the second in
a three part series on education.


BY DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist


Trying to educate a child without
strong support and interest from par-
ents is like attempting to teach
someone how to swim without
water. Parental attitudes about the
education process have changed
over the years with the evolvement
of the "dynamic" American family.
Suddenly everyone in the family is
off "doing their thing" and time for-
anything else is at a premium. Ac-
cordingly, the popular notion is to
drop the kids off at school where it
becomes the sole responsibility of
the "school system" to educate their
child.
I always made a point of inform-
ing parents at the beginning of all
parent conferences, when I was
teaching, that I only had their child
in my room for fifty-five minutes a
day, five days a week and that my
time had to be equally distributed
between their child and 34 other stu-
dents.


Someone else was responsible for
their student the other twenty-three
hours a day. I was always hoping
that the parent would get the hint
that they are the major player in
their student's educational success or
failure.
With that in mind, the failure of
today's education system is to recog-
nize the need to first assure that
every student can master the basic
fundamentals of learning, borders
on being criminal. How can learned
educators repeatedly gloss over their
inability to guarantee each child is
minimally armed with the most ba-
sic skills?
Both the liberal and conservative
approaches to resolving this prob-
lem are abysmal failures.. The con-
servative way is to retain students in
grade. In effect, make a student re-
peat the same subjects they just
demonstrated they did not have the
skill (or desire) to successfully com-
plete the first time.
The result is that the student is
now older than his peers, yet still
struggles just to keep up. No wonder
there is a rising drop out rate in
schools.


The liberal approach is even more
devastating. The term used is "con-
tinuous progress." It was designed
primarily to salvage the emotions of
a student by not giving them the
stigma of being held back as a fail-
ure.
The system just simply advances
them (administratively places them)
to the next grade with their peers. It
does not matter if the student dis-
played a total lack of skills and in-
terest in achieving. even the minimal
passing requirements. Now what
you have is a student who learns do-
ing nothing is quite all right and
there is no accountability for ones
actions (or lack there of).
Speaking from a middle school
teacher's perspective, by the time a
student has completed sixth grade,
their teachers know every student's
weaknesses. Some can't read ade-
quately, others struggle with funda-
mental math skills, while some have
no idea how to study or write a com-
plete sentence.
And, of course, there are the few
who via their own personal circum-
stances are simply lazy or just plain
don't seem to care.


Rather than holding students back
to repeat a grade or rewarding their
failure with grade advancement,
consider establishing a dual track
system in seventh grade. The pass-
ing group of sixth grade students
follow the standard seventh grade
curriculum as normal.
The students identified with spe-
cific educational weaknesses also at-
tend basic seventh grade core
curriculum classes with their peers,
but instead of one or two elective
classes like art or home economics,
they attend classes specifically de-
signed to help them with their given
weakness.
Mastering the basics to be able to
accomplish what the other students
are achieving is ultimately more
valuable than salvaging emotions,
rewarding failure or baking cakes.
This program would require par-
ents to be involved in the process.
Near the end of sixth grade or at the
beginning of the new school year,
students and parents would be in-
formed of the effort to improve the
student's specific educational weak-

(See Students Page 5)


Americans Stress About Saving


Americans across the country are
concerned about the need to save
money for the future and the worry
often affects people's daily lives and
relationships.
According to a recent study con-
ducted by American Express, more
than one-third of surveyed Ameri-
cans say their financial situation is
not on track and about half of re-
spondents believe they won't be able
to increase their savings in the fu-


ture.
In fact, 43 percent of those sur-
veyed think about how much or how
little they have in savings at least a
few times a week and 50 percent of
couples agreed that they would have
better, less stressful relationships if
they had more money in savings.
The good news is that there are
easy tips and tools available to help
consumers get back on track.
Gerri Detweiler, consumer advo-


cate and author, has developed sim-
ple methods for improving consum-
ers' financial well-being.
"Americans know how to spend
money but they don't necessarily
know how to save," said Detweiler.
"Financial knowledge is a power-
ful asset. Consumers can easily tuck
away money for the future, striking
a balance between spending money
today and saving for tomorrow."
Detweiler offers these five tips for


saving money wisely:
1. Make it automatic. Set up an
automatic withdrawal from your
checking account to your savings
account each month. It's fine to be-
gin with a small amount, and in-
crease your savings as you get in the
habit over time.
2. Take advantage of programs
that help you build savings, there
are many programs that actually
(See Saving Page 5)


1- Short Takes & Other Notions


A I








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 6, 2006 PAGE 5


zoning" as a method of amending-
'Letters... the Comp Plan.
Lt. His attempt to embarrass Mr. Tel-
lefesen was not appropriate nor ap-
W riter Says om m issio e preciated. Mr. Sutphin's outspoken
W riter SaYS and undeserved criticism was mean-
C mo spirited and abusive.
SHadPerhapsMr. Tellefesen's integrity,
respectability and knowledge of the
Had rede erm i ed A end Copmp Plan poses a serious threat.


Dear Editor:
On December 17th, many taxpay-
ing citizens, including myself, at-
tended the County Commission
meeting deciding on a large parcel
land use change.
If this rezoning consideration had
not been such an important decision
for the future of the county, the dog-
and-pony show presented by the ap-
plicants would have been, at the
. very least, entertaining.
It appears to me that the commis-


sioners held the open meeting only
because it was statutorily required.
Since they did not address the
concerns expressed by citizens
speaking against the zoning change,
they apparently came to the meeting
with a predetermined agenda....to
approve the zoning change. The real
issues were ignored.
Commissioner Monroe was asked
by an audience member to excuse
himself from voting because his-
family lives near the property being


voted upon.
Mr: Monroe admitted that his fam-
ily stood to benefit from an affirma-
tive vote. However, he refused to
step aside, and in fact voted against
approval of the zoning change.

Commissioner Sutphin used the
bully pulpit to chastise Bill Tellefe-
sen (who was not acting as the
chairman of the County Planning
oBoard, but as a taxpaying citizen)
for speaking against the use of "spot


On the other hand, two members
representing the Planning Board,
Corwin Padgett, and Wendy Moss,
spoke about why they did approve
the application.
They were given free rein to speak
and encountered no denigrating re-
marks. Needless to say they have
ties to Mr. Sutphin.
Mr. Padgett represents Mr. Sut-
phin on the Planning Commission
and Ms. Moss is the State Commit-
teewoman for the Republican Party.
Commissioner Hall made the
comment that he used to pick water-
melons on this land. Just because
there are fewer watermelon fields
today, doesn't mean we have to al-
low for uncontrolled, unplanned


growth to ruin our county.
Commissioner Tuten asked the
planning official several times about
the number of units allowed at the
current zoning compared to the re-
zoning, and about the commercial
possibilities being lost to the re-
zoning.
He never, did get a straight answer.
If he had listened, I gave all those
numbers in my comments to the
board.
Commissioner Joyner spoke at
length about the merits of the devel-
opment that would spring forth if
the zoning change was approved.

WK3E1


While listening to him, I felt like a
high-pressured, time-share huckster,
rather than a public servant, was ad-
dressing me.
Finally, he tried to snow the audi-
ence with numbers that indicate this
development would be good for the
county.
As County Commissioners you
are suppose to serve all your con-
stituents, not a chosen few.
If you find promotional work for
land developers more to your liking,
why don't you have the grace to re-
sign from the Commission?
Don Lee


RIDA7
ALE LOT


DOUBLE YOUR INVESTMENT IN ONLY 1 YEAR!


c\j
I..
C
C'j


WHOLES]ALE PR'1 U~ 1 e~ICI'NG-
954-55-531'


Dear Editor:
I have several observations and
comments to make about the Jeffer-
son County Board of Commis-
sioner's and Planning Commission.
Why is it that at Commission
meetings, Director Bob Arredondo
and Staff Attorney Scott Shirley
have conversations with developers
that don't include the public?
Anything said at a public meeting
should be stated "on the record," for
everyone to hear.
Arredondo and Shirley seem to
give every appearance that they rep-
resent the developers, not the public.
Planning has become a sensitive is-
sue here, and the citizens have a
right to hear all discussions, and to
feel that they are fairly represented
- by the Planning Department.
It has also been noticed that sev-
eral Planning Commissioners do not
regularly attend meetings. The pol-
icy, I understand, is that three
missed meetings should result in
dismissal by the County Commis-
sion.
County Commissioners need to
pay more attention to the attendance
of their Planning Commissioners.
Why is County Commissioner
Jerry Sutphin allowed to vote on
any matter involving rezoning de-
velopment or potential development,
when he holds an active Florida
Real Estate License posted with
Westbrook Realty of Monticello?

Any positive vote that Sutphin
makes on rezoning or development
has potential to financially benefit
him. He should not participate, and
should voluntarily withdraw from,
voting on any future matter before
the Board, that involves develop-
ment, rezoning for development, or.
potential development, while he
holds an active real estate license.
Mr. Sutphin is a charitable man
according to the paper, donating,-
$5,000 of his commission salary to


local charities.
But, he is not very charitable to
other public servants. On several oc-
casions he has unjustly criticized
them at Commission meetings.
The most recent strike was at
Planning Commission Chairman
Bill Tellefsen, because Tellefsen did
not concur or defend the majority
vote of his fellow commissioners on
the approval of the Bubba Walker
rezoning request in Waukeenah.
Sutphin's criticism of Tellefsen
was unjust, unfair, undemocratic,
and unnecessary. Note that he did
not criticize Planning Commission
members Wendy Moss and Corwin
Padgett, who rose to speak in favor
of the Walker rezoning request.
The County Commission has re-
cently voted, on two occasions, to
change the Comprehensive Land
Use Plan by rezoning property
zoned Agricultural 5 or 3, to Resi-
dential One.
Five people, the County Commis-
sioners, have the authority to change
- the entire growth plan for Jefferson
County.
They pointed out at one meeting
that the opposition was only 150
strong, and there were 13,000 peo-
ple in the county, so they. assume
that 12,850 people are in favor of
changing the plan.
There is one solution. Let's put his
matter to a referendum vote for the
citizens to decide whether to change
the current Comprehensive Land
Use Plan, which was established as
a guideline for responsible managed
growth.

Let's put it to a vote of the people,
then we'll know who wants what,
rather than letting the politicians de-
cide for us.
The City and County have re-
cently approved more than several
rezoning amendments to allow for
-higher density development.
Approximately 600 houses in sub-


Writer's Attacks On

Commission Personal


Dear Editor:
An injury prevented me from at-
tending the Dec. 15th County Com-
mission meeting in regard to the
Comp Plan amendment rezoning.
However, I reviewed the minutes,
read articles and spoke to many peo-
ple about the meeting.
Mr. Hall is still talking about the
loss of opportunity because there are
no watermelons to pick. It makes
me cringe.
I have no right to speculate about
the depth of the anger his constitu-
ents feel.
Mr. Joyner seemed to know the
product even better than the devel-
opers. Maybe he should act more
like a County Commissioner and
less like a used car salesman.
Salesman work for a percentage.
What is he working for? Certainly
not for the people of Jefferson
County.

Mr. Sutphin (who I have person-
ally heard blabbering about how
much money he has made on land
deals and doing business with a well
known developer) basically asked
Mr. Monroe and Mr. Tellefsen to re-
frain from speaking on the issue.
Both of these men are pillars of
the community, solid as oak. The
two land use amendments are in Mr.
Monroe's district. Thus the people


who are directly affected by these
changes would have had no voice to
speak for them.
It reminds me of a problem we
have down in West Palm Beach. In
the spring the termites grow wings
after they destroy the integrity of
one structure, then they fly to an-
other structure looking for fresh
hard wood.

If my attacks on the County Com-
mission meeting seem personal,
they are meant to be personal.
When I arrived at the County
Commission meeting in October, I
was surprised to see an individual
strutting around openly wearing a
pistol. When I was signing my re-
quest to speak before the County
Commission, he was sitting ten feet
away from me, glaring.

I'm assuming this was due to the
supposed "threats" to the commis-
sioners. I was not intimidated. I was
infuriated.
I am from West Palm Beach
where corrupt politics and goons
with guns are the norm here.
I was wrong about Jefferson
County being vulnerable due. to the
lack of sophistication of its County
Commission.
It is their tenure ag commissioners
that is at risk. They made it
personal.
John M. Dewey


divisions are currently on the draw-
ing boards. Another 200 home
subdivision will probably be pro-
posed and presented to the County,
Planning Commission in 2006.
Can our city and county budgets
withstand the added services that
will be required for these and future
developments?
Do we want high density develop-
ment? We must decide, and not let
the politicians and developers de-
cide for us.
Cheryl Searcy



Saving
(Continued From Page 4)
help you save. For example, em-
ployers often will match your
401(k) contribution, and even credit
cards now offer saving incentives.
The One from American Express
card contributes one percent of
every purchase into an FDIC-
insured high-yield savings account
so you can put away funds for the
future. Your savings will grow each
day because the account earns a
high annual percentage yield (APY),
currently 3.5 percent. You can con-
tribute extra funds to your account
to watch it grow even faster.

3. Save part of your windfalls. If
you get a tax refund, a bonus or a
raise, save a portion of it.
4. Get your family involved. If
you have children, let them help you
save money by clipping coupons or
cutting back on the electric bill. Al-
low them to keep some of the sav-
ings and put the rest toward a family
goal, such as a vacation.

5. Pay yourself. When you pay off
a bill, continue to deposit the
amount of your regular payment
into a savings or investment
account..
By following these tips, consum-
ers can save for future goals such as
buying a new home, booking a va-
cation and retiring. Visit
www.amexone.com for more infor-
mation on how to save easily.


Students
(Continued From Page 4)
ness, by participating in this pro-'
gram.
It needs to be made clear that if
the student and/or parents elects not
to take advantage of this special ar-
rangement, progression to the eighth
grade hangs in the balance.
Additionally, parents must become
an adjunct member of the teaching'
team by doing their part at home.
Their job is to monitor completion
of their student's homework and as-
signments and maintain frequent
contact with the teachers.
"What did you do in school today?
Nothing" and "Do you have any
homework no" are unfortunately
routine responses parents are willing
to accept from their children, espe-
cially as students grow older.
As children mature, they discover
the pleasures of independence and
will do whatever they can to wrestle
their freedom away from their par-
ents.
When it comes to school, teachers
are eager and capable to assist in
breaking this cycle of deception and
putting parents back in control of
their child's education.
(Dennis Foggy is a retired U.S.
Army Lt. Colonel, a former school
teacher and current resident of Jef-
ferson County.)


The Jefferson County Recyclinq Proqram accepts


the following items for recycling.


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?


Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.


Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the

collection site for the proper disposal of above items.




The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


Referendum Vote Should Decide

Comp Plan Change, Citizen Says


Builders Lots Available in the
Fastest Growing Areas in Florida


C\j













PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 6, 2006


Lifestyle


Betty, Danny Monroe Observe

Golden Wedding Anniversary


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Betty and Danny Monroe cele-
brated 50 years of marriage on Dec.
17, 2005.
A reception was held in their
honor, Sunday, Dec. 18 at the
home of Suzette and Stan Monroe.
The couple rode from their home,
'the site of their wedding in 1955, to
the event- in the family's horse
drawn carriage.
A plethora of friends and family
members welcomed their arrival
and enjoyed an afternoon of cele-
brating the occasion.


Guests enjoyed a powerpoint
presentation spanning the years,
with photographs collected by their
children, for this presentation.
Photographs included their mar-
riage ceremony, visiting with
friends, raising five children, Chris-
tian mission trips locally and
abroad, community service, and en-
joying their 10 grandchildren.
Food for the event was prepared
by family and friends.
Carol Buzbee created the three-
tiered cake which was topped by a
golden carriage pulled by white
horses.


Clayton TO Celebrate

95th Birthday Sunday


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

J. E. "Mr. Ed" Clayton will cele-
brate his 95th birthday 2 to 4 p.m.,
Sunday, at the First Baptist Church
Fellowship Hall.
Mr. Ed, as he is affectionately
known, was born the third son of
Annie and J.B. Clayton on January
10, 1911, near Aucilla.
He was a well respected busi-
nessman in Monticello for many
years.
He has been a member of the
First Baptist Church since 1936,
and led the music for the Men's Bi-


ble. Class and the Adult IV Class,
for some 53 years.
Clayton can be seen daily,.
weather permitting, taking his.
walks through town.
He was married for 63 years to
the late Minnie M., and is the father
of the late E. Martin Clayton, DDS.
He has two other children, Judy
Cooksey and husband Joe, DVM of
Jacksonville; and P. Michael Clay-
ton and wife Becky of Monticello.
All friends are encouraged to at-
tend this very special event and to
extend birthday wishes to Mr. Ed.
At his request, there are to be no
presents, as your presence will be
gift enough.


Thomas Sweeneys Observe
50th Wedding Anniversary


Teresa Sweeney reports the 50th
SWedding Anniversary of her par-
ents Thomas and Barbara Bilinski
Sweeney.
The couple were married at St.
Margaret's Catholic Church in
Monticello, December 28, 1955.
Thomas is from Somerville, MA.
and Barbara is from Monticello.
They have eight children and
seven grandchildren.
The Sweeneys now reside in Nor-
folk, VA. but stay in touch with the
Monticello community through their
Monticello News Subscription.



Homes Of
Salome Herring Summers
Mrs. Salome Herring Summers,
89, a retired beautician died Satur-
day, December 31, 2005 in Monti-
cello, Florida.
The service will be at 11 a.m. Fri-
day at Bethel Institutional Baptist
Church in Jacksonville, Florida,
with burial at Evergreen Cemetery.
A native of Washington County,
Florida. Mrs. Summers had lived,jn
Marianna, Florida before mot ing to
Jacksonville many years ago' She
worked as a self-employed beauti-
cian in-Jacksonville. She was an ar-
dent member of Bethel Institutional
Baptist Church.
Her survivors include her sister-in-
law, Doris Groover Herring of Mon-
ticello; and two nieces Sonja K.
Herring Vaughan of Virginia and
Ann Herring of Monticello, Florida.

Mary Frances Williams
Graveside services for Mary Fran-
ces Pafford Williams of Monticello,
FL. were held at 10:00 a.m. on
Tuesday, January 3, 2006 in Laurel
Hill Cemetery on 15th St. Mrs. Wil-
liams died on December 31, 2005 at
her residence. Born on May 29,
1930 in Thomas County, she was
the daughter of the late Will Pafford
and Mary Redfem Pafford who
died during the birth of Mrs. Wil-
liams. She was raised by Fannie and
Jerome Cone who also have pre-
ceded her in death.
Mrs. Williams graduated from
Pavo High School, was a home-
maker and was of the Methodist
faith. She was married to Charles R.
Williams for 59 years and they were
residents of Dixie Plantation for 26
years.
Survivors include her husband
Charles R. Williams of Monticello;


Family and friends celebrated
with the blissful couple on Sunday,
Dec. 18.


The reception was given by the "-iiB 1
couple's children and their
spouses. .
Daughter Suzanne, son-in-law .
Bill, and grandson Liam were un- -
able to attend as they are full-time
volunteer missionaries presently .
serving in Guatemala. ,
Son Lloyd, daughter-in-law Me-
lanie and grandsons Daniel and Asa ,-'; ..
are also full-time, volunteer mis- "-
sionaries but were able to attend as
they are home on furlough from ,.
their new mission in Guatemala.
The Monroe family thanks all
who helped to make this event pos-
sible, those who participated and'
those who make financial contribu- .
tions to the couple's chosen chari-
ties in their honor. "
"God has blessed the Monroe
family and for this we are most
thankful," says son Stan. "They
have left us a legacy of joy; Jesuq,
others, arid then ourselves," he BE
said.


Rev. Mal Jopling To

Be Installed Rector


Rev. Mal Jopling will be installed
as Rector of Christ Episcopal
Church in a special service, 6 p.nm.,
Tuesday.
Officiating at the service will be
Bishop John Howard of the Episco-
pal Diocese of Florida, assisted by
Cannon Kurt Dunkle.
Rev. Jopling and the congregation
invite the community to attend the
service.
The Episcopal Church is the
American part of the international
family of churches that began with-
the Church of England.


TTY AND DANNY MONROE


its distinguishing features include
services that would be familiar to
Roman Catholics, combined with a
distinctly Protestant decentralization
of authority.

Although parishes and dioceses
vary, the Episcopal Church is
known for its centuries old tradi-
tions, tolerance, and openness.
Christ Episcopal Church dates
back to 1840 in Monticello, and the
present church was completed in
1890.
It is located three blocks north of
the courthouse, on North Jefferson
Street.


Band Members

Plan Reunion


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

All Alumni Band members inter-
ested in participating in the plan-
ning of a Reunion for the Howard
Academy Bee Pipers and the Jef-'
ferson County Fighting Tigers, a
meeting is scheduled for 2 p.m. Sat-
urday,. Jan. 1h'ait Diana's Place, at
the comer of/Railroad and Dogwood
Streets. ,/
SFqradditional information con,'
tapt Raynell Williams at 222-0302,
'Shirley Huggins at 997-4501, or
Juanita__Thompson) Hampton at
28.4-9149
School Menu
Monday
Chicken Fajita Meat, Fried Rice,
English Peas, Fruit, Hot Rolls, Milk.
Tuesday
Spaghetti w/Meat Sauce, Green
Beans, Bread Sticks, Fruit, Milk.
Wednesday
Turkey & Cheese on Bun, Vegeta-
ble Soup, Fruit, Cookie, Milk.
Thursday
Oven Fried Chicken, Creamed Pota-
toes, Broccoli, Apple Crisp, Hot
Rolls, Milk.
Friday
Hamburger, Lettuce, Tomato &
Pickle, Oven Fries, Fruit, Milk.


Local NAACP

Plans Meeting

January 15

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The monthly meeting of the Jef-
ferson County NAACP is sched-
uled for 4 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15 at
the Memorial MB Church Annex.
The agenda will include an over-
view and wrap-up of the Memorial
Program held earlier in the day and
the discussion and last minute is-
sues on the upcoming Martin Lu-
ther King (MLK) Parade and
Celebration scheduled for Monday,
Jan. 16 -

Chairman for this year's parade
is Gerrold Austin.
General Committee Reports and
plans for Black History Month, in
February, will also be topics for
discussion.

This group meets monthly on the
third Sunday.
Glyndell Presley, local NAACP
president, can be reached at 997-
6712 for more information.
Community involvement and
member participation are encour-
aged.


Open 7 days
2329 Apalachee Pkwy. "Try Our Sunday Brunch"


- I


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Cox's Soul Food has committed
to feeding the elderly every Thurs-
day in 2006.


Hot lunches will be prepared for
citizens in need.
Clothing will be on hand for dis-
tribution, and requests for services
or help in locating resources will be
taken.
"This is a community effort and a
lot of help is needed to operate this
mission," says Gloria Cox-Jones.


M--we are request ng comm .mens
M u rnl l if l g for financial help, supplies, volun-
M o r i EE teers, or whatever one may have to
daughters Carol Miller of Orange offer," she adds.
Park, Fl., Becky Brown of Craw- Rev. Marvin Graham and the Har-
fordville, FL; son Richard Williams vest Center have committed to fund,
of Monticello; stepmother Katie one Thursday each month. .
Pafford of Boston; sisters Margaret Volunteers already, signed aup in-
Vonier of Pavo, Lois Barwick of clude...iRichard, Nishia Jackson,
Boston, Martha Clark of-:D,.e, Tammie Jackson, Susan Crawford,
Tommie Vick-of-,Pavo; brothers Roy Crawford, Leatha Holmes, and
Randal-rCGoe of Tallahassee and ers
ete Owens; 8 grandchildren.. Her To help in this endeavor, contact
son Roger Williams, brothers Bobby 997457
Pafford, Austin Pafford, Walter Paf- 997-4572 '
ford and sister Betty McKibben,
preceded her in death.
In lieu of flowers donations.may Love Named To
be made to the Georgia Chapter of President's List
the Leukemia and Lymphoma Soci- Local resident Forrest Love was
et t2.5 Cunma ar a w e n k Local resident Forrest Love was
ety 2625 Cu er nd P y named to the President's List for the
Suite 205,:A.tl4nta, Ga. 30339. The fall semester at Thomas University.
family received fnesn Mon- The President's List is designed to
day from 4:00 6:00 p.m. nt-the -fu-.
neral home. Guest may sign the ean a gradnize full point average of 4.0.
Allen & Allen Funeral Home.point average of 4.0.
Allen lleng FuneraHme


Call J.G. Wentworth's
Annuity Purchase Program J.G.WENTWORTH.
866-FUND-549. ANNUITY PURCHASE PROGRAM


Church News
New Bethel, Bethel Philadelphia,
and Mt. Pleasant AME Churches,
Monticello, will hold their second
Quarterly Conference with Presid-
ing Elder 0. C. Williams of the
Quincy District, 2 p.m. Sunday, at
Bethel AME Church.

New Bethel AME Church will
celebrate its second annual Evening
Gala, 6 p.m., Saturday, consisting of
glamorous attire, a spiritual
program, modeling, and dinner. Do-
nation is $5 per person.
***
Sister Martha Jean Wilson will
render her first sermon 3 p.m. Sun-
day at Greater Fellowship MB
Church. Church choir is in charge of
music.


Correction
Because of misinformation given
to the Monticello News, it was re-
ported that the Boys and Girls re-
ceived an incorrect amount of
money to spend on a family in need
over the holiday.
The correct amount was $300.


Cox Soul Food Will

Feed Needy Thursdays


Central

Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166
Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
6 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 6, 2006 PAGE 7


Chamber Meets Tuesday;


Coffee Roaster To Speak


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The monthly meeting of the
Chamber of Commerce is sched-
uled for noon Tuesday, at the
Chamber.
Chamber President Margaret
Levings compliments members
who put so much time, energy, and
spirit into decorating their busi-
nesses arid keeping their shelves
stocked during the holiday season.
Chamber members appreciate the
patronage of residents and look for-
ward to helping to find the perfect
gift, service, or gift certificate for
any occasion.
"For those that missed the Christ-
mas party at the Chamber on that
rainy night of December 8, you
missed a good one," Levings notes.


"Mary Frances Drawdy, Diane
Freeman, and Miss Helen, as well
as everyone who chipped in with
either money or hors d' oeuvres,
made the party a huge success.
"The decorations were stunning,
and Drawdy used live greenery ac-
cented in gold with candles placed
throughout the arrangements," Lev-
ings relates.
Among agenda items for the
Tuesday meeting, is setting a date-
for a short workshop to talk about
the Tour of Homes and other fund
raising ideas.
Guest speaker David Morrissey
from Crooked House Coffee Roast-
ers will provide samplings of his
coffees.
Crooked House Coffee Roasters
has brought fair-trade and organic
micro-roasted coffee to Jefferson
County since 2002.


Morrissey took over the local
coffee roasting business from Su-
zanne and Bill Smith who are cur-,
rently serving as missionaries in
Guatemala.
Then the coffee was known as
"Higher Grounds Cafe."
"For those who have purchased
the coffee in the past, I don't have
to tell you how good it is," says
Levings. "Starbucks has nothing on
this small, local roaster."
Smith and Morrissey work to se-
lect from the finest estates and
plantations around the world and
bring it back to roast in an old
crooked farmhouse in Waukeenah.
The Chamber welcomes Morris-
sey to the community and feel for-
tunate that such a unique business
has joined the ranks of other fine
businesses in the county.


Red Hat Ladies
To Dine In
Thomasville


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The local chapter of the Red Hats
of America will meet 11 a.m. Satur-
day, Jan. 14 in the parking lot of
SDunn's Furniture to carpool to Ori-
ental Buffet on US 19 in Thomas-
ville, GA.
The restaurant also serves a fine
selection of American foods on
their five island buffet tables.
Hostesses for this meeting are
Nancy Kinnee and Rowena Daniel.
Those planning to attend should
contact one of the above ladies for
a head count.
Member Barbara Sheats will pro-
vide the New Years program.
Ladies are asked to come with
their hats decorated for the New
Year.


Health Department Screens For Cancer


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

In recognition of January as Cer-
vical Cancer Month, the Jefferson
County Health Department offers
cancer screenings.
To make an appointment, or for
additional information, call 342-
0170.
Screening for cervical cancer is
crucial because, with early detec-
tion, it is nearly 100 percent cur-
able, health officials report.
Each year, approximately 15,000
women in the United States learn
they have cancer of the cervix. The
American Cancer Society reports
that between 60-80 percent of
American with newly diagnosed in-
vasive cervical cancer, have not
had a Pap smear in the past five
and may have never had one.
The unscreened population
groups include older women, the
uninsured, ethnic minorities (espe-
cially Hispanic women, African


Americans and Asian Americans),
and poor women, particularly in ru-
ral areas.
Since the early 1970's however,
incidence of, and mortality from
cervical cancer have declined
nearly 40 percent, due in large part
to early detection through increased
use of the Pap test.
A simple, painless procedure that
detects abnormal cell growth in and
around the cervix, the Pap test can
be performed in a doctor's office or
clinic.
Often, such cell changes can be
treated before they become cancer-
ous.
Women 21 years of age or older,
and those under 21 who are sexu-
ally active, should ask that pelvic
examinations and Pap tests be in-


Monticello News
Keeps You
Informed!!


cluded in their physical examina-
tions at least once every three
years.


Every women should discuss
with her doctor what testing sched-
, .ule is right for her.


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Sports


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 6, 2006 PAGE 9 ,
____________________ ,1


Lady Warriors Lose Three


Games In Holiday Classic


ACA WARRIOR Luke Sadler informs Bran-
ford opponent that the shot was worth two
points, in the first game with Branford this


ACA Boys Fall To


Branford 58-47


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Following a week off for the
" Christmas holidays, the Aucilla
Christian Academy varsity boy's
basketball team returned to practice
for upcoming games.
Coach Dan Nennstiel said that
/; the Warriors are coming in from a
hard loss to Branford, 58-47, their
second loss to Branford this season.
"We'started out strong and took
an early lead," said Nennstiel. "We
were leading at the half, but Bran-
ford came back strong and out-shot
us from the outside.


~ef~

# I




a;


season. Warriors have since played Branford
a second time.


lachicola once and FAMU one
more time. So, we have a rough
road ahead."
Nennstiel said the Warriors
would be working on a different
defensive tactics and work on a few
more offensively, including putting
pressure on outside shooting by op-
posing teams, blocking, and steal-
ing.
"We are going to add a few more
weapons to our arsenal," he added.
The next game is with Atlantis,
7:30 p.m., Thursday, here.
Nennstiel said he didn't know',.'
anything about them or how they
played, so he didn't know what to
expect.
"If we go in for the win, and play '
hard, we should be able to come
out with the win," Nennstiel con-
cluded.


"It was a close game, a nail-bitter
throughout, just like the other game
against them was." said Nennstiel.
"It was a hard loss for us," he
said. "We went in thinking that we
could beat them. We have to piay
Branford one more time later in the
year and when we do, we have got
to slow down their outside
shooting."
The Warriors began practicing
again last Wednesday, preparing
for the upcoming games.
"We have a really tough schedule
coming up," said Nennstiel. "Four
out of five teams we have to play
are in the state top ranking, we
have to play John Paul twice, Apa-


FRAN HUNT
,Staff Writer

Lady Warriors lost three games
-in the Holiday Classic Tournament
in St. Petersburg, last week, and
dropped to 7-8, on the season.
In the first game against Mount
Dora Christian, the Lady Warriors
lost 77-24.
Leading the score for ACA was
Mallory Plaines with 10 points,
five rebounds, two assists and one
blocked shot.
Lindsey Day, six points, five re-
bounds, two assists and one
blocked shot; Bethany Saunders,
four points, two assists, one
blocked shot; Corie Smith, two
points; and Rikki Roccanti, two
points, two rebounds.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy mid-
dle school girls defeated Madison
Academy 22-13, in recent action,
and are how 3-3 on the season.
"They (Madison) were leading
9-5 at the half, but we came back
strong and got the win," said Coach
Mac Finlayson.
Leading the score for the Lady
Warriors was Sarah Sorensen with


In the second game, the Lady
Warriors lost to North Side Chris-
tian 60-29.
Leading the score for the Lady
Warriors was Day with 11 points
and 14 rebounds for a double-
double, two assists and one blocked
shot.
Saunders, six points, three re-
bounds, two assists, one steal and
one blocked shot; Brittany Hobbs,
four points, six rebounds, three as-
sists, three, steals; Caitlin Murphy,
two .points, five rebounds; and
Plaines, two points, three rebounds,
two assists, two steals.
Stephanie Dobson, two points,
five rebounds; Hannah Sorensen
who was moved up from the JV's,
two points; Smith, four rebounds;
and Roccanti, three rebounds.


10 points, eight of which were
scored during the second half.
Taryn Copeland and Tiffany
Brasington each scored four points;
Dana Jane Watt scored two points;
and Kaitlin Jackson scored one
point.
"We're going to finish with a
flurry," Finlayson said of the final
games of the season. "We have
two games this week and two
games next week and that ends the
season."


In the game against Shores Chris-
tian, the Lady Warriors lost 41-37. "*
Leading the charge for the Lady
Warriors was Plaines with 1.
points, and 10 rebounds for a
double-double, and six steals.
Saunders, two points, three steals.
Hobbs, 'eight points, four rebounds,
two assists, four steals; and Mur-,.
phy, six points, six rebounds, twct
assists.
Day, four points, five iebound,-
two assists, three steals, twM
blocked shots; Dobson, two points,
seven rebounds, two steals; and-
Smith, two steals.
The Lady Warriors are slated t face off against Atlantis Thursday,
and play in a District game against'
John Paul, Friday.
Both games are at 7:30 p.m., here -

The games slated for this wee.
are against Brookwood, 6 p.m.,
Thursday, there and Maclay, 2:20
p.m., Friday, here. I
Next week the Lady Warriorg
will square off against
Steinhatchee, 5 p.m., Jan. 10, there`
and in the final game, Steinhatchee,
3:30 p.m., here.
Disaster Services
Volunteers Needed

Become a trained American Red
Cross Disaster Services Volunteer. ,
Contact the Capital Area Chapter
of the American Red Cross at
878-6080 or visit our web site at
www.tallytown.com/redeross.


+
American
Red Cross


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72 months with approved credit. 6 95% APR financed through Bank of Ihi West.
Pfice is plus tax, tag and $269 doc fee,


All prices exclude tax, tag and lees. '2006 Frontier Requires $1,999 down payment good lot first 90 days. After 90 days payment goes to $329 per month for 39 months. *2006 Sentra Requires $1,999 down payment good lor first 90 days. Alter 90 days payment goes to $239 per month for 24 months. "2006 Altima"
Requires $1,999 down payment good for first 90 days. After 90 days payment goes to $239 per month for 39 months. '2006 Maxima Requires $2,495 dbWirh paymontlgood for lisl 90 days. After 90 days payment goes o $396 per month for 36 months. 12,000 allowable meilos per year $0.15 par mile thereafter. 740+
beacon score required to qualify lor advertised payments. "Gas for a year based on average of EPA estimates lor each vehicle at 12,000 milos per yoari plid with a prepaid Visa. "Based on oil change only at 3,500 miles or 3 months. Nol responsible for typographical errors or onumissions. Pictures shown may not be
actual vehicle advertised. See daealeor fo details. All offers with approved credit. Two or more in stock of each advertised vehicle. Offers expire dalte o publication.


ACA Middle School Girls

Beat Madison Academy


IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY

DIAL 911


VWl







PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 6, 2006

Youth Soccer Begins.

Saturday At Park


FRAN HUNT
Stpff Writer
Saturday morning officially kicks
off the beginning of the annual
Youth Soccer Program at the Rec-
reation Park. More than 100 youth
will participate in the program this
year.
Coordinator Phil Barker warns
that the weather Saturday morning
is predicted to be much cooler and


the children should dress appropri-
ately.
There are eight teams in the pro-
gram. The breakdown follows;
Teams one and two are K-5 and
first grades; Teams three and four
are second and third grades com-
bined; Teams five and six are
fourth and fifth grades combined
and teams seven and eight are
grade six, seven and eight com-
bined.
Saturday action begins with


teams one and two at 9 a.m.; teams
three and four, 10 a.m., teams five
and six, 11 a.m. and teams seven
and eight, noon.
"The first day is going to be a
hectic one, with the team photos
and individual photos, taken 30
minutes prior to the game times,"
said Barker.
He added that additional volun-
teers to assist with the program are
always greatly appreciated.
Anyone wishing to volunteer with
the program can contact Barker at
342-0100.
"We are really looking forward to
another fun season," Barker con-
cluded.


Cox Soul Food Serves

300 Christmas Dinners


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Cox Soul Food served 300 dinners
Christmas Day, including those de-
livered to the staff at Brynwood and
Jefferson Nursing Centers.
"What a smashing Christmas Din-
ner success!" exclaims Gloria Cox-
Jones owner and operator of Cox's
Soul Food.
"The Monticello community really


showed love and care in helping to
provide meals and clothing for our
citizens in need," she said.
The need to provide this special
- free holiday meal is ever increasing,
and Cox's Soul Food is looking for-
ward to doing even more in 2006.
The free dinners will again be
served at Easter, Thanksgiving, and
Christmas day to those in need.
"We humbly thank the Monticello
community for its generosity," said
Cox-Jones.


NOWAVAIlABLE! ,
New PooTables-
Balls Cues.
Other Supplies

1698 Village Square Blvd.'Tallahassee
OpenNoon'til2am7DaqsiWeeld

Ready... Set... Shop...
Monticello News
Classifieds


BUSINESS



DIRECTORY


WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU'!
997-6500
WHEN You NEED To SOLVE COMPUTER PROBLEMS.
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY ONSITE SERVICE
*Diagnosis Repair *Upgrades *Installations *Consultations
*Tuorials *Removal of Viruses, Adware, Spyware


Your Local Professional Painters
Interior Exterior
Lie & Ins. 04676

Jon ilo


A&S Flooring, L.L.C.
43 Years experience
CERAMIC, TILE, CARPET, VINYL,
LAMINATE, REPAIRS & SALES
342-9922 HOME
570-6593 CELL
LICENSED & INSURED


Lawn & Landscaping
r ----------------
I I
Mention This Ad & receive
I A 10% Discount I
-11025 East Mahan 877------------4550
11025 East Mahan-877-4550


Septic Tank & Land Clearing
Complete Septic Service & Repair
Lot Preparing & Land Clearing
Thomas B. Scott, Sr.
Rt 1 Box 137
Lamont, FL 32366
ph:997-5536 cell: 933-3620

Register 's Mini-Storage

315 Waukeenah Hwy.
(1/4 Mile Off US 19 South)


997-2535


DOUG'S TREE & LAWN
SERVICE


Trimming
Mowing
Removal
Maintenance


0 Stump Grinding
0 Aerial Device
0 Bush Hogging


997-0039 Lic. & Insured


Portable Toilets
Billy Simmons Septic
850-509-1465 cell
850-997-0877 home
Clean Portables for construction sites,
4 family reunions, parties
Events and Types


LA CHIUTA


-Limerock
*Clay
-Sand
*Top Soil


Craig
Larichiuta
Lloyd, FL 32337

997-6788


I


CHASE
Jena Fernandez
Senior Mortgage Specialist.
17 Years Of Service
850-224-2427


FHA/VA/CONV.
Self Employed New Construction/Land
Credit issues OK


ATTENTION
BUSINESS OWNERS
-SHOP KEEPERS-

LOCAL PROFESSIONAL
SALES & SERVICE


NOW AVAILABLE:
SECURITY CAMERA SYSTEMS
ACCESS CONTROLS
ALARM SYSTEMS
TELEPHONE SYSTEMS
DATA NETWORKS
BIG BEND


COMMUNICATIONS Co.

997-4150


We accept all manufacturer coupons.

1-10 ChevroIr
Swisher Sweet Little Cigars
Buy One Get One Free
$1.99pk. $8.89 carton +tax
Regular, Light, or Cherry Flavors

Swisher Sweet Kings
5pks. $2.19 +tax

Black & Mild Cigars
.42 ea. $1.79pk +tax

Prices Good Thru Jan. 31, 2006
We have another order of leather purses
Free Crystal Lighter with each carton
cigarettes or cigars.


Call for quality work
45 Years In The Trade
Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
850-997-7467 ~ 850-544-2917
*Residential ~ Commercial *Interior ~ Exterior


U


EDD KEATON
TRAVIS KEATON
54 Capps Hwy
Lamont, FL 32336


850-997-0903 Shop
850-264-6871 Cell
850-997-0937 Fax
850-997-5443 Home


P -- 9ng
^H^^Since 1977


Since 1977
*Licensed *Bonded *Insured
Residential & Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES ~ 997-4100


Richbourg Nursery, Inc.
99 Richbourg Road
Monticello, FL 32344
Tel. 850- 997-3764 Fax 850-997-8388


I I


Call Andy Rudd For

Appliance Service

Needs @

997-5648


i U


Allyn Sikes
Owner
S 1 830 Thomasville Road
Tallahassee, FL 32303
(850) 224-3473 1 (800) 541-8702
www.abbiesflowers.com


Residential & Commercial Lic.# cgc #1507547

YEAGER CONTRACTING Co. INC.
CUSTOM HOMES

Commercial and Agriculture Buildings

PH: 997-2296 CELL: 508-2383


B & M Tractor Service *Lot Cleaning *Driveways *Dig Ponds*Road
Specializing in Food Plots, Bush Hogging, Building *Culvert Installation *Fill Dirt
Liming & Fertilizing, Spraying, and Fencing *Limerock *Gravel
S < -Billy Simmons, Owner
Backhoe and Hauling Septic Tack Contractor &
Excavation Contractor
Brad McLeod ... .... .......... Phone: (850) 997-0877
Cell: (850) 210-2942 Mack McLeod
Cell: (850) 545-2325 C (850) 500346 Cell: (850) 510-03409-1465
Home: (850) 997-1451 Home: (850) 997-3091 Cell: (850) 509-1465
Insured D.O.H Lic. #SR0971265
10534 South Salt Rd, Lamont, FL. 32336 Visa & Mastercard Accepted!

CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"

Mr. Merchant

This Space Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.

Could Be (on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717

Yours For

Only $20 Pam Bowling
Broker Associate

Per Week
1-888-701-2205
W. ww.pamb@nettally.com


Jamie's Body

'Works

Children's Tumbling
Pilates
Personal Training
Cardio/Toning

Call 997-4253 for more information

JAMIE CICHON ROGERS,
CERTIFIED PERSONAL TRAINER
AND GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR


MR. MERCHANT

THIS SPACE COULD

BE YOUR FOR

$10 PER WEEK


I I I


MONTICELLO'S ONLY LOCAL HEATING & COOLING COMPANY

STEWART
HEATING & COOLING INC.
Sales ~ Service -Installation ~ Change Outs
Residential Commercial


Family Owned
Lic. # RA0067121


eN
-~


Tyrone Davis 4.
Sales Manager


Trade
Pl u l, tl01or
I ja ItdOtt
We avA Ver
s'"E.r


CalTRNE1esmaigi

hapn h ltmteWy


O Office: (850) 342-3294
0 CELL: (850) 509-2903


ljltimate

age Auto

877-7222
Very large selection to choose from
All trade-ins are welcome
Best rates as low as 4.5%
Free warranty on every vehicle sold
g 6000 (PRiT, A (REDNT,

S iT DOES T MAWTER


Keaton Tire Repair
"Service Is Oui Business on and ofl the Road"


0


0 1


!!I












To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 6, 2006 PAGE 11

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Thwo editions ~ Wednesdai and Frida ...S7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monda3 Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGAL NOTICE

In accordance -with FL Statue: Public
Auction January 21, 2006 @ 10:00 a.m.
1998 Mitz Vin# JA3AYIIAXWU001618;
February 4, 2006 @ 10:00A.M. 1996
Dodge Vin# 2B4GP2436TR820262; 1990
Niss Vin# JNIHS36PXLWI16247; 1993
Dodge Vin# IB3XC46ROPD170155; To be
sold as is for Towing & Storage charges.
Conditions & Terms at Auction. Dave's
Towing 7261 East Washington St.
Monticello, FL 32344 (850) 342-1480
1/6, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 05-315 CA. In the Matter of
Adoption of CARLEY MARIE DUPREE,
a minor. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: The
unknown father of CARLEY MARIE
DUPREE Address Unknown YOU ARE
,NOTIFIED that a Petition for Adoption
,has been filed and you are required to
-serve a copy of your written defenses, if
,any, to it, on MICHAEL A. REICHMAN,
petitioner's attorney, whose address is
P.O. Box 41, Monticello, FL 32345, on or
before February 20, 2006, and file the
original with the clerk of this court either
service on petitioner's attorney or
immediately thereafter, otherwise a
default will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint or
petition. DATED on December 28, 2005.
CARL D. BOATWRIGHT as Clerk of the
- Court.
1/6, 1/13, 1/20, 1/27, c

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO:
05-134-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHN
THOMAS SCHLEIFER, Deceased.
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION: The
administration of the estate of JOHN
THOMAS SCHLEIFER deceased, File
Number 05-134-PR is pending in the
Circuit Court for Jefferson County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of
which is Jefferson County Courthouse,
Room 10, Monticello, FL 32344. The
names and address of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below. All interested persons are required
to file with this Court, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE: (1)
all claims against the estate and (2) any
objection by an- interested person -oht h"
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the Will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdiction of
the Court. ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED. Publication of this
Notice has begun on January 6, 2006;
.JOAN HEYSER SCHLEIFER Petitioner;
MICHAEL A. REICHMAN Post Office
Box 41 Monticello FL 32345, (850)
997-5100 FL BAR NO: 183518
1/6, 1/13, c
'IN CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND
'JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE NO.
05-CA-2678 CARIE MCNEAL Plaintiff
"vs. BRAIN KEITH WOODY individually,
-Defendant. SUMMONS: PERSONAL
:SERVICE ON A NATURAL PERSON
-STATE OF FLORIDA: TO: Brian Keith
-Woody, 913 N. Mitchell Street,
:Thomasville, Georgia 31792.
IMPORTANT: A lawsuit has been filed
-against you. You have twenty (20)
calendar days after this summons is served
on you to file a written response to the
-attached Complaint with the Clerk of this
,Court. A phone call will not protect you.
:Your written response, including the case
-number given above and the names of the
'parties must be filed if you want the Court
to hear your side of the case. If you do not
file your response on time, you may lose
the case, and your wages, money and
property may thereafter be taken without
further warning from the Court. There
are other legal requirements. You may
want to call an attorney right away. If you
do not know an attorney, you may call an
attorney referral service or a legal aid
office (listed in the phone book). If you
choose to file a written response yourself,
at the same time you file your written
response to the Court you must also mail
or taken a copy of your written response
to the "Plaintiff. Plaintiff's Attorney"
,named below: CLIFFORD L. DAVIS,
ESQUIRE: Attorney for Plaintiff Post
Office Box 1057, Monticello, Florida
32345 (850) 997-0113, (850) 997-0131
Facsimile THE STATE OF FLORIDA TO
EACH SHERIFF OF THE STATE: You
are commanded to serve this Summons
and a copy of the Complaint in this lawsuit
on the above-named Defendant. DATED
ON 11/3/2005. BOB INZER, CLERK OF
THE CIRCUIT COURT.
1/6, 13, c


HELP WANTED
Experienced upholsterer, part-time.
Call Minnie at 997-0826.
01/6, 11, 13, 18, pd
Kalan Kennels Holiday help needed:
Entry level kennel tech. Must love
animals, be over 18, and willing to
work hard. 850-877-5050.
12/2, c, tfn
Cypress Truck Lines, INC Driver
Designed Dispatch. FLA ONLY/Flat
Bed students welcome. Home every
Weekend,most nights (800) 545-1351
www.cypresstruck.com
01/6, fcan
Kennel help. Must have
transportation and love animals.
997-5765.
01/4, o, pd


Caregiver needed in Lloyd are
9:30am-9:30pm. Experienced, trans
portation a must. Call 879-8698 o
224-4131, leave message.
01/4, 6, 11, 13, pd


,a
S-
Dr


Driver Covenant Transport. Excellent
pay & Benefits for Experienced
Drivers, 0/0, Solos, Teams, &
Graduate Students. Bonuses
Available. Refrigerated Now
Available. (888)695-7279 xl9.
01/6, fcan
Taking Applications. Our business is
striping, seal coating, asphalt repair,
etc. Ideal candidate can take on
anything and do it right without
supervision. EOE. Druggies need not
apply. 545-1776.
9/23, tfn
LOST -


FOR RENT

Commercial Building Available. 1900
sq. ft. Downtown Monticello
321-2263.
01/4, 6, pd
Country Living I bed, I bath, $500,
997-6653.
01/4, 6, 11, 13, pd
Spacious 3 bedroom, 2 bath with den,
sun room, garage, large yard. Lovely
neighborhood. $900 plus security.
251-0760.
1/6, c
REAL ESTATE
NE\V HOME 1370 square foot. 4
bedroom, 2 bath for under $475/
month payments. University Homes -
850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
Lovely 3 bedroom, 2 bath home in
great area. 2000 sq. ft. on 1/3 acre
close to downtown. $154,900.
251-0760.
1/6, c
5 Bedrooms! 3 Baths! Plenty of room!
Buy for under $550 a month.
850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
FIRST TIME home buyers. If you
have enough money for a deposit on
an apartment you can probably own
your own home. Call 850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn
DISCOUNTED MODELS Only 2
homes left, must go! Save $$$$ Call
today! 850-576-2105.
11/11, tfn


ALERT BOLO ATTENTION Four FOR SALE


Peacocks- females, dark brown and
buff colors. Pineywoods/Casa Bianca
area. 649-1179, 997-4627. REWARD.
01/4, 6, 11, 13, pd

GARAGE SALE
Saturday 7th 8am 12 pm, Royal
Mini Storage, US 19 South. Various
items, furniture, nurse uniforms, etc.
1/6, pd
SERVICES
Backhoe Service: Driveways, roads,
,ditches, tree and hrub removal, burn
piles. Contact Gary Tuten @ 997-
3116, 933-3458.
tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers, dryers,
stoves, refrigerators. Owned and op-
erated by Andy Rudd. 997-5648.
Leave message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quick responses.
6/22, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available only at
Jackson's Drug, Hoodiacol is
designed to curb the appetite, burn
fat and increase energy levels
resulting in considerable weight loss
over time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key
ingredients incorporated into rice
bran oil with natural flavorings to
give it a palpable taste. In addition to
weight loss, you may see benefits for
the hair, skin and nails from the
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in rice
bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is a cactus
found in the Kalahari Desert of South
Africa. Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits appetite
but increases the sense of satiety. This
tends to limit total caloric intake by
30-40% without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should result
from such a drop in caloric intake.
s/d 5/18, tfn
Do you want to be just a Christian,
with no denominational names, creeds
,or practices? Jesus established His
church called the church of Christ
and you can be a member of it. We
are ready to help if you are ready to
learn. Call: 997-3466.
1/29 tfn (10/3)
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for assessment of
your needs. 997-3553. UPS NOW
AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn

FOR RENT
Prime downtown office space now
available in Cherry Street Commons.
Jack Carswell, 997-1980.
11/30, tfn, c


Rhode Island Red Roosters $10
each. Beautiful Purebred- Limousin
bull, 15 months old. Call 997-0901,
leave message or 997-3568 ask for
Debbie.
01/4, 6, 11, 13, 18, 20, 25, 27, pd
LEFT OVER- Merchandise from Big
Chief Pawnbrokers, Electronics,
Handtools, DVD's, VHS, Jewelry,
Reasonable Priced 342-2105
01/6, 11, 13, 18, 20, 25, 27, pd
Pit Bulls $150 call 997-1705.
01/6, 11, 13, pd
METAL ROOFING SAVE $$$ By,
Direct From Manufacturer. 20 colors
in stock with all Accessories. Quick
turn around! Delivery Available Toll
Free (888)393-0335.


AUTOMOTIVE
1995 Ford Crown Vic. New Tires,
Looks & Drives Like New. $3,800
997-6806 !
10/21, tfn, c
1978 GMC Pickup/Camper Shell.
Long wheel base, good motor, tires.
Runs good $3,000 997-5701 Leave
Message.
01/4, 6, 11, 13, pd
87' Mercury Sabel $500 firm) runs.
Contact Kim at (904) 497-7093
01/4, tfn
93 Ford F250 New tires, brakes, tune
up $4,500
89 Accura Legend SR' 6 cylinder,
NADA Book is $2,400 Selling Price
$1,295
96 Ford Mustang Convertible- Red,
New tip, new tires, 6 cyl. $4,200;
997-6066, 997-6806 Wilson Auto,
LLC.
tfn, c
BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE. Do you
earn $800/day? 30 Machines, Free
Candy All for $9,995. (800)814-6323.
B02000033. Call US: We will not be
undersold!
Nursery In
Jefferson County
Seeking Mature Responsible
Man with experience managing
crews. Must speak Spanish &
English. Excellent Salary, Paid
Vacation, Bonus Benefits
available if qualified.
Call 850-997-8188


CASH in 5 DAYS!
We Buy Mortgages,
Homes, Trailers, Lots, Land!
We Make Mortgage Loans,
Ron Harris
Traders Realty, Inc.
Lic. Mortgage LENDER
878-3957


Housing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615- 3/2 $715- 4/2 $895- $50 dep.
Pool & YouthActivities

575-6571


1

DOLLAR NOW HIRING


WE ARE SEEKING FULL TIME CASHIER AND
FULL TIME MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL.
*Must be available for any shift
*Must be able to work 30-40 hrs. or more each week
*Experience is a plus
*COMPETITIVE PAY! (Based on experience, back ground quali-
fications, and certain specialties and acquired skills)
**ALL FULL TIME NON-MINOR A PLICANTS ARE REQUIRE TO TAKE A
DRUG TEST AND SUCCESSFULLY PASS A BACKGROUND CHECK!
DO NOT APPLY IF: YOU ARE NOT ENTHUSIASTIC
ABOUT DOING THE BEST YOU CAN, NOT WORK ORIENTED,
AND IF YOU'RE NOT A TEAM PLAYER!

. Please see Patti (Store Manager) or Tommy (Assistant Store |
Manager), for application, possibility for interview, and
more information.





C Ueri ied ctiityDircto


Advertising

With The


Monticello News

Opens Door

For You!!


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTY ES
215 N. Jefferson St
Monticello, FL 32344
997-5516


For allur listings see
us an the webl


* .20 acres on the Sop choppy River for great
week-end getaways. $ 70,000
* 2 acres on N. Jefferson prime Bus/Res with
frontage on Hwy 19 N. adjacent .60 acre
available, & must be purchased together.
* Kylee Dr. 5 acres with beautiful pecan trees.
High & dry. $95,000
* 6 acres great location on Whitehouse Rd.
mixed pines/hardwoods. $111,000
* 6.42 acres Pretty acreage with Ig. stocked
pond. $ 89,880
* 9.25 acres Lots of privacy on Gamble Rd.
Convenient to Tallahassee. $ 155,000
* Beautiful waterfront property 16.50 acres
with frontage on Lake Miccosukee. Mostly
wooded, with small creek. $ 288,750


k Simply the Best!









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k

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Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only
$16,500 per acre


New Listinq! Under Contract Big 4 bed-
room 2 bath double wide on 2.39 acres in
Aucilla Forest & Meadows only $49,995

Choice Buildinq Lots in Cooper's Pond
Area cleared and ready to build on, nice
trees, paved road $27,500 each

Look at This! Comfortable 4 bedroom 3 bath
home on five fenced acres w/guest house/
playhouse w/ bath, big shop, 2 car garage,
pasture, 100 pecan trees and a nice pool a
real dream for a growing family $400,000

Hard to Find 5 choice acres on hillside with-
planted pines on quiet graded county road:
Asking $12,000/acre

Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom home
in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $295,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane off Rocky Branch Road and Sunset Street
100'x220 in the City $15,500 each

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000


Choice Buildinq Lots in Town on Morris
Road call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Look at the Price-5 wooded acres on Blue
Lake Road only $22,500

Check Out This One! _8 acres with big double-
wide and small house on a pretty old hillside
close to Leon County off Julia Road $160,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut Mart $650,000

Nice Hillside Location 10 acres on the east
side of town high and dry in quiet location
with lots of game $12,000 /acre.

Home Site close to town on West Grooverville
Road only $14,500

Rentals Available
2/1.5 mobile home on 2 ac $450
3/2 mobile home Lloyd Ac $650
3/2 mobile home Christmas Ac $650
2/1 home on Dogwood St $850
Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
We have qualified buyers!
Are you interested in selling?
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real EIstate!
Simply the Best!


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----------------------------------------------------------


A







PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JANUARY 6, 2006

Big Bend Ghost Trackers

Plan Monthly Tours Here


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
With the start of the new year,
ithe Big Bend Ghost Trackers
(BBGT) plan more activities for
Monticello, known as the Most
Haunted Small Town in the South.
Founder Betty Davis said the
BBGT beginning this month, on
the third Saturday of each month,
Haunted Tours and the Ghost
Hunts will be offered by reserva-
tion only.
g The tours will be conducted be-
ginning at 7 p.m. in front of the
Chamber of Commerce. Addi-
tional tours can. be set each night,
depending on how many people
make their reservations.
"If there's enough people, we
ivill conduct a second tour" said
Davis.
The tours and hunt last 90 min-
utes each and cost $10 each, per
person.
BBGT members will not be in
period dress during these particular
tours, but they will lead groups
through different locations in Mon-
ticello by lantern light.
BBGT are also still offering pri-
vate tours and hunts for groups of
at least 10 people for company em-
ployees, birthday parties, corporate
groups and the like.
BBGT members will be in full
period clothing during these private
tours, which are also led by lantern
light.
. The tours and hunts are $10 each,
per person.
Also on the agenda, members are
planning a spring workshop around
the first of April.
The all day classes include topics
such as ghost hunting techniques,
education, and equipment used dur-
ing investigations, a guest speaker,
as well as the haunted tour and
ghost hunt in the old 1827 Ceme-
tery.
The workshop includes segments


concerning the anatomy of a ghost
hunt, who can be a ghost hunter,
where to find ghosts, spirit commu-
nication, ghost photography, videos
of ghost hunts, how to capture
ghosts on film, how to record
voices of the dead, how to conduct
a ghost investigation, the ghost
hunters tool kit, "The where, what,
why and when of ghost hunting."
Davis added that those interested
in having a residence ghost investi-
gated, can contact the BBGT,
which will conduct the investiga-

City Dry Cleaners
Gets New Owner
LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer
Monticello Dry Cleaners has a
new owner.
She is Eddie Lee Harley, a county
native with 12 years of management
experience as a major with the De-
partment of Corrections.
"I'm excited," Harley says of the
business venture, her first-ever.
The operation now consists of
two locations, the one here and a
second in Madison County. Har-
vey's plans call for the startup of a
pickup and delivery service in Janu-
ary.
Former owners Ody and Joe Van-
denberg, meanwhile, have retained
ownership of the building. It's their
plan to remodel the rear of the
building and convert it into offices,
complete with a cobblestone patio
and benches.
The Vandenbergs operated the dry
cleaners for about seven years.


tion of the residence free of charge,
and confidentially, if the resident
so requests.
Also slated for BBGT members,
is another intense investigation of
the Palmer House, which holds
much paranormal activities that
have been witnessed by many.
"We may even decide to spend
the night," said Davis.
To make a reservation for the
monthly tours, private tours or in-
vestigations, call Davis at
562-2516.

Slave Canal
(Continued From Page 1)
thusiasm that swept the country
following construction of the Erie
Canal in 1825.
The visionary proposals included
a cross-Florida canal from the At-
lantic to the Gulf, one joining the St.
-Johns River to Tampa Bay, and one
connecting St. Marks to Mobile
Bay. The Slave Canal, one of the
few projects to actually come to
fruition, ultimately proved commer-
cially unsound.

Mayor
(Continued From Page 1)
the council in 2000. (Anderson
served two terms as vice mayor.)
Conley's ascendency to the mayor-
ship in 2004 followed another first,
the appointment of Bridgett
Broxton-Mosley to the County
Commission.
Broxton-Mosley was the first
woman and the first Republican
ever to serve on the county's gov-
erning board.


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FUN WITH DICK &
JANE (PG13)
Fri. 5:20 7:30 9:40 Sat. 1:10
3:15 5:20 7:30 9:40 Sun.
1:10 3:15 5:20 7:30 Mon.-
Thurs. 5:20 7:30
NO PASSES

CHEAPER BY DOZEN
S 2 (PG)
Fri. 5:10 7:15 9:30 Sat.
12:50 3:00 5:10 7:15 9:30
Sun. 12:50 3:00 5:10 7:15
Mon.-Thurs. 5:10 7:20
NO PASSES
RUMOR HAS IT
(PG13)
Fri. 5:25 7:35 9:55 Sat.
12:40 3:05 5:25 7:35 9:55
Sun. 12:40 3:05 5:25 7:35
Mon. Thurs. 5:25 7:35
NO PASSES
CHRONICLES OF
NARNIA (PG)
Fri. 4:00 7:00 10:00 Sat.
1:00 4:00 7:00 10:00 Sun.
1:00 4:00 7:00 Mon. -
Thurs. 4:00 7:00
WOLF CREEK (R)
Fri. 4:05 7:05 9:25 Sat.
1:05- 4:05- 7:05 9:25 Sun.
1:05 4:05 7:05 Mon. -
Thurs. 4:05- 7:05
NO PASSES
KING KONG(PG13)
Fri. 4:15 8:00 Sat.. 12:30 -
4:15 8:00 Sun. 12:30 4:15 -
8:00 Mon..-Thurs. 4:15-8:00
HOSTEL (PG13)
Fri. 5:05 7:20 9:45 Sat.
12:35 2:50 5:05 7:20 9:45
Sun. 12:35 2:50 5:05 7:20
Mon. -Thurs. 4:30 7:15


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