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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00149
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: July 19, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00149
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
    Main continued
        page 7
        page 8
    Main: Sports
        page 9
    Main continued
        page 10
    Main: Classified
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
Full Text




LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE. FL. 32611


Thomas Hogle
Opens CPA
Office Here

Story, Page 3


Mental
Illness Often
Not Diagnosed

Editorial, Page 4


Mike Holm
Athlete,
Coach

Story, Page 9


Jan wadsworth
woman's Club
President,

Story, page 1 I


Q P Wednesday Morning ,






Monticell


1 o'TV P A TfTn r A Cf -I.'-'


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


* tr lAr I lX. .JT l3 t, A 1 IkA __ _ _ _


ews

WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 2006


City Approves



New Rates For



Water, sewer


CITY COUNCIL members briefly visit with others following a meeting. The council
last week approved a measure that will increase water and sewer rates, effective in
October. From left, Mayor Julie Conley, Coucilman Luther Pickels and City Attorney
Bruce Leinback. (News Photo)


Group Proposes Dr. Jordan

Memorial Park On Pearl St.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

A local group is calling for
the conversion of the city-
owned property next to the
Women's Club. on Pearl Street
into a memorial park for the
late Dr. Reginald David
Jordan.
Wendy Moss and Betsy
Pertierra presented the pro-
posal to the City Council last
week.


'Moss and Pertierra are. co-
founders of C-SAW, Inc., a
nonprofit organization with the
stated goal of providing "an
educational forum with bal-
anced perspectives on humane
issues through community
service."
The memorial park is being
spearheaded by the Memorial
Park Society, which falls under
the auspices of C-SAW, Inc.
The society wants to transform
the under-used city playground
into a park that honors Jor-


dan's legacy.
J*ordan was a local veterinar-
ian, musician and avid reader.
The lot currently has four
pieces of playground equip-
ment, but it is, largely utilized
as a parking lot and drive
through to Dogwood Street.
The society envisions a
showcase park that includes
benches and tables, a reading
garden, a gazebo and patio, a
water fountain, an arched entry
and a children's play area.
(See Memorial Park Page 2)


, 4 ... .


~r
*1'


THIS MERRY-GO-ROUND is one of four pieces of playground equipment on a city-
owned lot between Pearl and Dogwood streets, next to the Woman's Club. A local
group wants to convert the lot into a showcase park honoring the late Dr. Reginald
David Jordan. (News Photo)


Vandalism At Chase Street Park

Prompts City Officials To Action


New Charges 14.8%

Higher Than Before,


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

City officials last week ap-
proved new water and sewer
rates that represent a 14.8 per-
cent increase over the old
rates.
The new rates, based on a re-
cent study by the Florida Rural
Water Association (FRWA),
go into effect Oct. 1.
.. At the same time, city offi-
c ils authorized City Superin-:
tendeni Don Anderson to
spend up to $6,000 in overtime
pay to,replace the 350 or so
broken water meters in the city
over the next few months (See
related story).
City officials consider repair
of the broken water meters a
critical component in their ef-
forts to establish a fair and eq-
uitable rate structure.
The new rate schedule ap-
plies to residential and com-
mercial users inside and
outside 'the city. It further dis-
tinguishes between residential
and commercial users, and be-
tween light and heavy com-
mercial users, neither of which
the present rate schedule does;
Following is the new rate
schedule for water users, fig-
utred on a monthly basis:
Residential users will pay
$15.75, which includes 3,000
gallons; commercial I users
will pay $23.75, which in-
cludes 4,500 gallons; and com-
mercial II users will pay
$141.75, which includes
45,000 gallons.
Residential water users with
broken meters, however, will
pay $15.75 monthly regardless
of gallons used. At least they
will until their meters are re-
paired. Hence, city officials'
urgency to have the broken
meters repaired as soon-as pos-
sible.


Meanwhile, users of city wa-
ter for irrigation purposes will
pay $1.85 for every 1,000 gal-
lons pumped.
And users of city water out-.
side the incorporated area will
pay an additional 25 percent.
on their bills.
Too, an accelerated rate
schedule 'kicks in for all
classes once the gallons in-
cluded in the base charge are
exceeded.
SThe accelerated rate sched-
ule transliies into an' additional
charge of $1.70 for gallons be-
tween 0 and 3,000 above the
base; $1.75 for gallons be-
tween 3,001 and 6,000 above
the base; $1.80 for gallons be-
tween 6,001 and 9,000 above
the base; and $1.85 for gallons
9,001 and up, above the base.


Thus, for example, a resi-
dential household inside the
city that uses 4,000 gallons of
water in a month will pay
$17.45, or the base charge of
$15.75, plus $1.70 for the ad-
ditional 1,000 gallons above
3,000 gallons.
Presently, water users inside
the city pay.a flat fee of $12.50
monthly for 3,000 gallons,
whether commercial or resi-
dential. Users outside the city
pay $18.75 for the same serv-
ice. All pay 25 cents extra for
every 750 gallons above the
base 3,000 gallons.
The new rate schedule for
%%aste\\ater or sanitary se%%ers'
also is based on a set monthly
'Charge for the different classes.
with an additional $2.50 for
every 1,000 gallons of water
used.
The new \-aste\Iater or sani-
tary sewers rate schedule goes
as follow, again figured on a
monthly basis:
(See New Rates Page 2)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


After years of bemoaning
and belaboring the fact of bro-
ken water meters, city officials
last week finally bit the bullet
and gave the go-ahead for the
replacement of' the malfunc-
tioning equipment.
Councilman Luther Pickels
was most immediately respon-
sible for the decision. But
Councilman Tom Vogelgesang
has been pushing for resolu-
tion of the matter for years.
Serving as the catalyst that
ultimately gave impetus to last
week's decision, however, was
the financial and rate study by
the Florida Rural Water Asso-
ciation (FRWA).
The study found that absent
the repair of the 350 to 400
broken water meters, the city


would never be able to estab-
lish a fair equitable rate struc-
ture.
Always in the past when city
officials had discussed the.
malfunctioning meters -- and
the discussions go back many
years -- the talks inevitably
broke down on the question of
funding.
Last week, city officials de-
cided that the repair of 'meters
was a task that needed to be
accomplished even if the city
had to go into debt to do it. But
their hope was that the new
rates they approved effective
October will generate enough
money to pay for the project.
"What's wrong with giving a
mandate to repair the water
meters in 60 days," an evi-
dently exasperated Pickels said
at one point in the latest dis-
cussion. "I've sat on'the coun-
(See City Crews Page 2)


Chase Street


-LAZARO ALEMAN
-Senior Staff Writer

Repeated acts of vandalism
at the Chase Street Park in the
southeast part of town have
caused city officials to take ac-
tion.
City officials are now con-
sidering the hiring of a neigh-
'boring resident or some other
,retired individual on a part-
'time basis to keep an- eye on
the park.
At the same time, city offi-
cials are exploring the feasibil-
ity of installing doors on the


now open rest-room facilities
and locking these after day-
light hours.

City Officials ||N
Say Problem I
Started With k**
Park Opening

There's even talk of mount-
ing surveillance cameras on
the premises, to capture im-
ages of the person or persons
responsible for the damage.
Too, Police Chief David
Frisby has promised that his
department will vigorously -


pursue the prosecution of any
individual identified as a po-
tential culprit.
City Superintendent Don
Anderson reported to the City
Council last week that the van-
dalism started almost immedi-
ately after the park's inaugura-
tion and has continued un-
abated ever since.
He said sinks have been torn
off their mountings, water
spigots ruined, and paper dis-
pensers pulled off the walls.
But the most persistent
problem involves people doing.
their business outside the ac-.
(Continued From Page 1)


CITY OFFICIALS are considering hiring a part-time person and installing cameras on
-the premises, among other measures, to curb vandalism at the Chase Street Park in
the southeast part of town. (News Photo)


City Workers To Give

Water Meters Priority,


I I


IJXTH V FAR No- 54- 50 CENTS


Y


. -3


":


"I












PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 19, 2006


Jackson's Drugs Owners

Awarded Heart Of Hospice


Covenant Hospice recently
awarded Charles and Tracey
Jackson, of Jackson's Drug
Store, a Heart of Hospice
A ward.
A not-for-profit organiza-.
lion, Covenant Hospice cares
for patients with limiting ill-
nesses, and recognizes acts of
kindness and continued gener-
osity, with this award.


Ca
Ho
hos
a
yea


Dr
M(
Ch


Melissa Taylor RN CHPN, are special people."
ise Manager for Covenant They have always been will-
)spice, has been the local ing to meet the needs of Cove-
spice nurse for 13 years, and nant Hospice patients, even
Monticello resident for 21 after hours, and on weekends.
ars. "We wish to thank Jackson's
Drugstore for their continued
Taylor said: "Jackson's: and compassionate -care of the
ugstore has been serving Covenant Hospice patients in
onticello for 40 years, and the Monticello area," Taylor
larles and Tracey Jackson- said.


Jefferson Elementary School

To Host Back To School Dance


THE CHARLES JACKSONS, of Jackson's. Drugs, were presented a Covenant Heart of
Hospice for their support of the program. From. left, Tracey Jackson, Charles
Jackson, Melissa Taylor, RN, CHPN for Covenant Hospice.


New Rates OK'd For Water


(Continued From Page 1)
Residential -- $26.50, which
translates into the base charge
of $19 plus $7.50, or $2.50 x 3
(3,000 gallons, with a maxi-
mum charge of 6,000 gallons
on all residential accounts);
commercial I -- $39.75; con-
sisting of the base charge of
$28.50 plus $11.25, or $2.50 x
4.5 (4,500 gallons); and com-
mercial II -- $265, consisting
of the base charge of $152.50
plus $112.50,. or $2.50 x 45
(45,000 gallons).
Users with broken meters',.
meanwhile, pay only the base
charge, regardless of the num-
ber of gallons used. At least
they will, again, until their me-


ters are repaired.
Which again explains why
,city officials are so anxious to
have the broken meters re-
paired as quickly as possible.
Residential users presently
pay $23.50 a month inside the
city and $35.25 a month out-
side the city, with the rates for
commercial users calculated
on a formula that takes into ac-
count the type and size of the
particular business.
The new rates are expected,
to generate enough money an-
nually that the city will be able
to establish reserve accounts
for needed improvements to
the two systems in the future.


The water and sewer opera-
tions are enterprise accounts.
Meaning that they are sup-
posed to be self-supporting. At
present, however, the two op-
erations are barely able to sus-
tain themselves.
City officials plan to review
the just adopted rate schedule
again in another year or so,
once the 350-or-so broken me-
ters have been repaired and
have time to produce results.
It's expected that a study of
the system then will yield
more accurate data and clearer
picture of water use, thereby
allowing for the formulation of
more accurate and realistic rate
structure.,


Memorial Park Proposed on Pearl St.


(Continued From Page 1)
Indeed, the plan even calls
for the: creation of 'a gentle
slope where folks can gather to
hear small concerts. The park
would also be available for pri-
vate functions.
"We're- asking you-to allow
us to go forward with the plan


and use the property," Moss
told the council. "We want to
make it a jewel for the com-
munity."
'She said it would take a
public/private partnership to
get the grants arid other neces-
. sary funding 'to bring the pro-
ject to fruition.


City efficjals expressed en-
thusiasi' for the idea. They in-
structed Moss' to draft a
public-rivate partnership
agreement and submit it to
them for review at the next
council meeting.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Readying for students, to,
return to school, the staff at
Jefferson Elementary School,
has, planned some upcoming
events.
A Back .to School Dance,
Thursday, July 27, in the
cafeteria, will be hosted and
chaperoned by staff members.
The dance is open to pre-K

Democrats

TO Hold

Supper Party:
The Jefferson County Demo-
cratic Party invites citizens to
an old fashioned supper party
7 p.m., Thursday, July 27, at
the Opera House.
There \. ill be an opportunity
to meet local and district can-
didates, and Precincts 9, 10,
and 15 are specifically invited.
Entertainment is planned.
Donations are accepted and
reservations welcomed.
Contact the Democratic Of-
fice at 997-3113, Eleanor
Hawkins, 997-2863, or Gladys
Roann, 997-5209, to reserve.
Next meeting is Aug. 8, at
New Bethel AME Church.


City Crews TO Give Water Meters Priority
C/nf iU i u.n I n d F n P 11


cil three, years now and we've
talked of doing this but no-
body's had the guts to do it.
We've been waiting three
years to get the money and it
hasn't materialized."
Bill Secoy, the FRWA water
circuit rider who conducted the
study for the city, agreed that
repair of the meters was key to


what the city wanted to do
with its water rates.
"Repair of the meters would
allow you to go to the pay-as-
you-use system," Secoy said.
With that, the council
authorized the expenditure of
$6,000 in oyertime,pay to have
city crews replace the broken
meters. City Superintendent


Don Anderson .is. to report to
Council monthly on the status
of the repairs.

Anderson is to tell the coun-
cil members how many meters
have been repaired during the
last month, how much over-
time was expended, and how
many more meters remain to
be replaced.


Mc~ntosh Clini


Help us fight amyotrophic
lateral sclerosis, better known
as Lou Gehrig's disease.

Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717 ww*.mdausa.org


through sixth grade students.
Time of the dance for pre-K
through third grade is 5:30 to
7 p.m., and the time for fourth
through sixth grade students,
'hours are 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Parents are asked to plan to
pick up their children on time.
During the dance, 2006-07
school T-shirts will be for
sale, as will poster sized pic-
tures, and refreshments in-
cluding hot-dogs, pizza by the
slice and juice.
Students must dress appro-
priately.
For further information call
342-0115.
A Back to School Barbecue





1480 W. Washington

Now Serving,
Dine-In
Take Out
BAR-B-QUE
Everyday Specials $5.50
Open
Mon. -Fri. 8-6
Sat. 8-5
997-5622


and Open House will be held
2-4 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 6, in
the cafeteria.
The menu consists of.hot-
dogs, baked beans, and potato
salad.
The meal is free to JES par-
ents only.
Parents. are invited to come
to the event and meet the
staff.
The first day of school is
Aug. 10, and school hours are
7:30 a.m. until 2:30 p.m.

Volunteers needed
for research study
Do you struggle with anxiety?
Have you had.sudden,
severe panic reactions?
Do social situations make
you nervous or uneasy?
You may be eligible to receive
free treatment in our
research study!

'ANXIETY &
behavioral
SHEALTHCLINIC

Please call for a free telephone evaluation
and more information.
Anxiety and Behavioral. Health Clinic
Florida State University
.(850) 645-1766
www.anxietyclinic.fsu.edu '


A Special Meeting ill be held on
Monday, July 24, 2006 at the Desmond
M. Bishop Administration Building
at 6:00 p.m.

An agenda may be picked up at the
administration building Monday through
Thursday between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.


NOTICE OF PROPOSAL TO AMEND THE

COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE LAND USE

MAP OF THE CITY OF MONTICELLO

'AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MONTICELLO, FLORIDA AMENDING
ITS COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY; PROVIDING
FOR FINDINGS OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR JURISDICTION; ADOPTING AN
AMENDMENT TO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FUTURE LAND USE MAP
FOR APPROXIMATELY 420 ACRES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY;
AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
The City of Monticello proposes to adopt the following amendment to its future land use
map by Ordinance 2006-08. The future land use map proposed designation is RLD
(Residential Low Density),with certain portions reserved as Conservation Zone (CV).for
a parcel located in the southwestern quadrant of the city and identified on the map below.
A public hearing on the ordinance will be conducted by the Monticello City Council on
August 1, 2006 at 7:00 p.m. at Monticello City Hall, 245 S. Mulberry Street, Monticello,
FL 32344. Interested persons may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the
proposed ordinance. The entire text of the ordinance may be inspected at City Hall, 245
S. Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday.


IC )r7 r'


* CHERYLJ. BARNES, M.D.

Board Ccttificci Dcrmnatologi1t

:O Adui Pedirrc D,.Prm tr)i, g-


S Vascular lesions

Hemangiomas

Atopic dermatitis
S* Skin cancer treatment and surgery

S General medical dermatology

I 19 West Hill Street, Thomasville, Georgia
To make an appointment, please call
(229) 225-1900 or 1-800-782-8507 *


US 90


MONTICELLO










US 19S


mql -rOE; S N DR


A 1/f7toY7 /w..PC












MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 19, 2006 PAGE 3
low&


S3 Thomas Hogle, CPA Opens

Office At Cherry Commons


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Thomas R. Hogle, CPA,
'will provide accounting and '
financial services at 1180
Cherry Street, Suite E, Cherry
.Street Commons, through his
affiliation with Genworth Fi-
nancial Securities Corpora-
tion, member of NASD/SIPC.
Office hours, are 9 a.m. to 5


p.m., Monday through Friday,
or other times by
appointment. The office num-
ber is 997-0438.
Hogle has more than 35
years of experience in public
and private accounting, in-
cluding. experience with
Ernest & Young, CPA's, as
controller of Apopka Growers
Stipply, and as a sole practi-
tioner in Longwood, Fl.
He assists individuals and-


businesses with their account-
ing and tax needs. He also
specializes in retirement plan-
ning, as well. as financial
planning for for children's
education, or any other goal.

Hogle and his wife, Betty,
moved to Monticello in 2003
to be closer to their family.
. They are active in commu-
nity life and are very happy to
be living in this, area.


THOMAS R. HOGLE, CPA, is a.member of Genworth Financial Security Corporation
and will provide clients with accounting services and financial planning. (News
Photo)

June Rainfall Above Average


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Rainfall in the County for-
June was 6.84 inches, slightly.
above the county average of
6.09 inches.

In June of 2005, rainfall here
was at 9.27 inches. '
Only Levy and Taylor Coun-
ties, of the 14 county Suwan-
nee River Water Management
District, surpassed Jefferson in
the amount of rainfall in June.
The District average rainfall
in June was at 6.29 inches in--


the 14 counties slightly below
the District average for, all
years of 6.47 inches..
.Counties.comprising.the Dis-
trict include: Alachua, Baker,.
Bradford, Columbia, Dixie,
Gilchrist, Hamilton, Jefferson,,
Lafayette, Levy, Madison, Su-
wannee, Taylor and Union
Counties. .
Cumulative rainfall for the
past '12 months 49.2 inches,;
compared to the long term av-*
erage annual Distinct' rainfall
of f55.6 inches, resulting in a
deficit of about 11 percent.
At the Aucilla River in La--


Humane Society Seeks

Items For Yard Sale


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

As a part of the ongoing ef-
fort to raise funds for operat-
ing "the'Shelter, the:'-,Human'e'-'
Society will conduct a yard
sale, 9 a.m. until 1 p.m., Sat-
urday, Aug. 5, at 440 West
Washington Street (the office
of C. Luther Pickets, CPA).
In order to ensure the suc-
cess of the sale, the Humane
'Society asks the help of the,
community in donating any-
thing and everything.

Vandalism
(See Vandalism Page 3)
cepted method, he said.
How to phrase it delicately?
Anderson asked. The point
was that city employees were
having to remove feces from
the floor, walls and toilet seats,
,he said.
"Our crews are having a tre-
mendous problem keeping the
bathroom clean," Anderson
said.
American.Heart
Associationot .
Fighting Heart Deaseo

It keeps
more than
memories
alive.


"We need lots of junk to
sell," said spokesperson Mar-
garet McMurray. "After all,
one person's junk is another
person's treasure." She notes
that all donations are tax de-
Sductible... :.
'Even if you don't have any-
t' thing to donate, mark your
calendar, and come to our
yard .sale, to see what treas-
ures you can't' live without,"
concluded McMurray.
To arrange for pickup or de-
livery of donated items, call,
McMurray at 997-1765 or
545-1840.


mont, June rainfall was at,
46.76 inches, versus 48.06
inches in the average June.
The District continues to rec-
ommend that water conserva-'
tion bean ongoing activity for
all water users.
Water is conserved by using"
the minimum amonit needed,"
for specific applications, and,..
by irrigating lawns, plants, and'
crops, only when necessary,
and in the. morning before 10
a.m and in the evening hours,
after 3 p.m., when lower tem-.
perature and wind velocity re-
duces the amount of water lost
to evaporation.

SEE TttE fUtUM







Witiyour help, ""my kids"
can look forward to
,' a future without
neuromuscular diseases.
Please volunteer
today.


Muscular
Dystrophy Association
o 1-800-572-1717
www.mdausa.org


It Works Wonders.


American .
Heart ,il 151
Association


II 'Ould 'u pl :, h ,', :,- ,,
U'" Jnd 'l i ,ji '..': .jl'j r .:.,
I: I, r, ; ,1 .. I,



Your donation
could change '
a life. Please :
call us at )lunreers
1.800.899.0089 (AlAnicca,'
or ,sit A C
www.voa.org .'.-, .-. -


County Dental Clinic Cares

For Eligible Children


Dr. Peggy Bums joined the
Jefferson County Health De-
partment in March, and has
been welcomed with open
arms by the citizens of the
County.
"We are so proud to have Dr.
Burns working v. th us," said
Kim Bamhill, County Health
Department Administrator.
"She. brings a wealth of ex-
perience to our. dental clinic,
and she really understands the
role of public health dentistry
in iiipico\ ing the overall health
of our citizens.".'
Over the past three months,
patient visits to the clinic have
cc'i1sistenlI, increased, as citi-
zenis learn about the, Health


Department's services, and gel
Sto know the dental clinic staff.
"We take special pride in the
way we treat our patients,"
Bums said. "We aren't con-L
cerned .%ith who they are, or
what background they come
from. Everyone deserves to re-
ceive care in a professional en-
vironment where tl-e\ feel'
comfortable and respected,"
Dr. Burns comes to Jefferson
County from Sugarland,- TX,
and has four daughters, ages 8-'
18.
Her experiences as a mother
add to her perspectdie as a
dentist. "I understand that par- -
ents need to trust me to pro-
vide .dental health 'for their


entire family," said Bums. -
In addition to her work :in
dentistry and her devoted time
to her family, Dr. Bums enjoys,
reading and relaxing at home.
The County Health Depart-
ment Dental Clinic .is open 8
a.m, -to 5 p.m:, Monday
through Friday, anid the .clinic
primarily .provides care to
Medicaid eligible patients,
ages 2-21.

However, the clinic does
provide emergency services to
adults.
In addition, to Dr. Bums, the
clinic staff includes a .regis-
tered dental h',Lieniist, two
dental assistants, and an office
coordinator .


To schedule a, dental ap-
pointment, call 850-342-0170;
ext. 14S. ". .


ell Do the Math


98% = Graduation rate
2004 through 2006

23 = Graduates in 2006';

$1,030,000 = College scholarship
$$$'s they earned


Limited Sophomore &

Junior openings available.

Call 201-5744


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Monticello. News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

^OcQA LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays -,Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net
\ % TiE~ifiliflif iifiliilfl il


Mental Illness


PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 19, 2006




From Our Photo File












4












IN NOV, 1990 Altrusa Club members distributed food, donated by area wholesalers,
to needy families. Here they sort through hundreds of pounds of fruits, vegetables,
and eggs. From left: Eleanor Hawkins, Ruby Whtison, Adrienne Funderburke (of Tal-
lahassee), Kay Foland, Joe Whitson, Bobbie Krebs. (News File Photo)


Often Not Treated Oninion R Commant


A recent survey by the
American Psychiatric
Association (APA) found that
many people know little or
almost nothing about the
warning signs, causes and
effective treatments for mental
illnessess even though in any
given year, one in five
Americans suffers from. a
Yliagnosable mental disorder.
Each .year, more people,,
suffer from a mental illness
than from cancer and diabetes,
combined .
Research shows that mental
Illnesses are causedd b% genetic
and' environmental factors,
traumatic events and other,
physical illnesses and injuries.
Yet one-third of Americans
ihistakenl) believe -emotional
or personal- weakness is a
major cases of common mental
illnesses and almost as many
think old age is a major cause.
As a.result, many Americans
may not get the help they need.
Mental illnesses are real and.
treatable. According to the
National Institute of Mental
Health (NIMH), the rate of
successful treatment for
depression (70 to, 80 percent)
is much higher than the rate
for other chronic illnesses such
as heart disease (45 to 50


percent).
Change in personality.
InabilitN to cope with'
problems and daily activities..
Marked changes in eating or
sleeping patterns. Extreme
highs and lows.
These are just some of the
warning signs of a mental
illness, such as depression or
anxiety disorder.
Only 47 percent of those sur-
veyed.felt well equipped to un-
derstand and identify the basic
warning. signs of a common
mental illness, such as depres-
sion, anxiety disorder or' post-
traumatic stress disorder.
The great majority- 84 per-
cent- said they would like to
know more about how to iden-
tify these warning signs.
If you want to know more,
free, information is available
on the APA's consumer Web
site at www.healthyminds.org.
Thete you can find the facts
about common mental ill-
nesses, the warning signs and
where to turn for help.
Your family doctor' or a psy-
chiatrist can also answer ques-
tiQns and provide help.
By learning more, you may
be able to help someone you
know who may be;.suffering
from mental illness lead a
healthier, happier life.


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
July 17,1996
William Olin Chandler, the
local stockyard operator who
last week reneged on his ear-
lier deal with the state and
answered Monday morning on
the original 15 charges.

District One School Board
Member Edwin Faglie an-
nounced on Monday his candi-
dacy for reelection to the seat
he has held the past four years.
Faglie has served as a board
member, for 20 years, having
formerly held the District four
seat until the district lines were
redrawn in 1992.
The Sheriffs Department re-
mains busy over the weekend
with a series of unrelated ar-
rests.

Officials of the Suwanee
River Water Management Dis-
trict will hold a town meeting
7-9 p.m. Thursday. inly 25 at

the Jefferson County Library
on Cherry Street.


TWENTY YEARS AGO
July 16, 1986
Monica Munroe, from Mon-
ticello, daughter of Nicole'
Pack and Robert Munroe will
be competing for the title of
Miss Florida/USA 1987.
Mordaunt "Heedly" Bishop
has announced his candidacy
for reelection for County Com-
missioner District Number 1.
Local attorneys and the Flor-
ida Bar Association are hoping
to place a ,law library within
the county's new library facil-
ity, which is still in the plan-
ning stage.
THIRTY YEARS AGO'
July 15, 1976
An 86-year-old business that
once sold mules and groceries
will continue, under new own-
ership, to supply residents with
their hardware and building
supplies. Ace Hardware Store,
which will not be Jefferson
Ace Hardware.and Home Cen-
ter, was purchased recently
from Gene Beatty by Bill
(See Our Files Page 5)


Writer Expresses Thanks

To Finder Of Her Wallet


Dear Editor:
This letter is to express my
sincere appreciation to .the
young black man who found
my wallet at Jefferson Square,
Monday, July 10. 2006, and
turned it in to the Hong Kong
Chinese Restaurant.
I do not know who he is, but


I am grateful and must admit
that we do have some honest
young men in the community.
If the young man sees this
letter in the newspaper, please
contact Nancy Benjamin at
(850) 508-4003.
Nancy Benjamin


Bertha Settled Zack Down


Big Zack was a heck of ad
football player but he had a lit-
tle trouble on the.dance floor..
Fact is, Zack had a line trou-,
ble getting the girls to dance
with him period.
I guess it was his technique.
He approached girls at the Fri-
day night school dances the
same way he approached op-
posing linemen. The linemen
knew when they tangled with
Zack the ,iris just recoiled in
fright. .
Zack would d stand against the
wall w ith oilier guys (\ ou re-
member iho"\ that worked,
boys on one side and girls on
the other) until he spied a girl
he % anted to ask to dance.
He'd go clumping across the
floor like an elephant and, bel-
low "You wanna dance with
Zack?"
The girl's eyes would widen
and she'd stiffen in fright,
shake her head and run for
somewhere, the ladies room I
guess.
Zack would come back
across the floor, (clump,
clump) and report to whoever
would listen that the girl didn't


Publisher's :''s''


Notebook )





'Ron Cict I


want to dance. .
He was pretty baffled by
l6e lI refusal
SNo'% and then some 2al1
on Ild be' bi'.a\e enoOghli i
'Jddc' w*ith" Zack "ifid'tl'hat u &'
soinllilneIi1 to behold

He didn't exactly dance,
what he did was sort of throw
the girl around the floor some-
how always catching her be-
fore she fell .
She looked like clothes do in
a clothes, dryer, bouncing
around.
One night Zack asked Bertha
to dance and it was magic. I
think she's the last woman he
ever asked to dance 'cause


they got married 'right after
high school and last I knew
were still very happily married
410-plus yeas later. "
Bertha was what 'ou miiiti'
ca3ll a lille on the stout side
And she was solid. She may
have been a.secret, weightlifter,
I dunno.
Anyway, Zack would try to
throw Bertha around like did
the other girls but Bertha held
her ground. She was by gosh
determined 'he'd dance with
her' like he was supposed to
and she had the size. and,
strength to make the point,
I was there the first time Zack
and Bertha danced and it was a
little jerky to start but they hit


their stride midway through
the song. Word went up on the
bo.%'s side of the dance floor,
"look at Zack, look at Zack.''
Zack came off the floor:
looking a little bewildered say-
ing. "That Bertha's quite a gal.
quite a gal.".
Thiswas probablN the first
time in a long time Zack didn't.
ph\ sicall\ dominate someone.
A few days later Zack was
seen carrying Bertha's books
and by the time the next Friday
night dance rolled around,
Zack and Bertha were regulars'
on the dance floor.
Zack continued to be a terror
on tlit'gridiroih dirig hlsseni-'
ior year but Bertha had tapped
into his gentle side.
I was miles away in service
when they 'got, married after
graduation and read about the
wedding in"'my hometown
newspaper.
I also learned about their
children through: the newspa-
per anid years later learnedthey
had c'febrated their 40th anni-
versary.
Bertha was just what Zack
needed. It's great when things
work out like that.


Death Penalty Sparks Debate


DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist
If you want to start a small
riot over dinner, then bring up
one of those sensitive major
subjects of the day like the
death penalty. You may be
surprised who you find on ei-
ther side of this issue, and be
prepared to withstand the on-
slaught of everything from
strong disagreements to down
right personal attacks on your
intelligence and character.
As you know, the death pen-
alty has been around since the
advent of "civilization." Over
time, it has been handed out as
a sentence for everything from
stealing a loaf of bread to mur-
der. In the United States today,
the death penalty is reserved
primarily as a sentence for pre-


meditated murders, although.
things like' high treason may
still qualify\ a person for execu-
tion
As society has become mpre
civilized, a large number of
people have come to believe
that it is ethically and morally
wrong to intentionally take an-
qther person's life. Accord-
ingly, the voters 'of several
states have chosen to abandon
the death penalty. in favor of
life in prison, while other
states are holding firm to the
conviction that murderers
should pay the ultimate price
for their evil deed.
Arguments in favor of the
.death penalty are many, but
one of the primary early be-
liefs was it acted as a strong
deterrent for others who would
otherwise be inclined to com-


mit the same acts. The famous
(hanging judge) Judge Roy
Bean of wild west fame, saw
that convicted criminals were
startingg up" immediately after
their sentencing.
I am sure that it had a rea-
sonable impact on would be
horse thieves and cattle
rustlers. Unfortunately, we
can't overlook the fact that
there were probably some in-
nocent folks unjustly swinging
at the end of a rope .too. An-
other more simplified justifi-
able argument is quoting the
Old Testament phrase, "An
eye for an eye", from the old
Hebrew laws.
Opponents of the death pen-
alty are primarily liberal. They
believe that a civilized society
should not intentionally kill
another human being as a form


of punishment 'or retribution.
They find' themselves as
"strange bed fellows" with
conservative Christians who
believe that such barbaric acts
are not justifiable and are mor-
ally contrary to our Judeo-
Christian values.
The anti-death penalty sub-
scribers believe that permanent
incarceration is a. more appro-
priate penalty and the correct
course of action'for an intelli-
gent and reasoned society.
They also point to, the recent
death penalty cases that. have
been overturned and innocent
people released through the
use of DNA.
So who is right? Today's
convicted murderers who are
sentenced to death, "live" on
death row for an average of
(See Death Penalty Page 5)


Boost American Products


Patriotic symbols abound
from .California .to the New
York Island. Americans eat ap-
ple pie, sing the National An-
them at baseball games and
visit the Statue of Liberty.
They also demonstrate
"American pride" by making
certain choices as consumers.
Some favor Ford and GM over
Toyota or shop at American
Apparel, the trendy clothing
company with all operations in
Los Angeles.
A
First and foremost, consum-
ers seek the best product at the


best price. Country of origin is
often an afterthought; only one
in five Americans seriously
considers it when making buy-
ing decisions, says America's
Research Group.
The reality is that Americans
probably underestimate the
value of their buying decisions
and how they can affect the
nation's economy and future.
According 'to the Federal
Trade Commission, the "Made
in USA" standard means that
all or virtually all" of the prod-
uct was- made in the United


States. Only automobiles, tex-
tiles and wool products are re-'
quired to display the country
of origin.
One sector increasingly af-
fected by the "Made in USA"
mantra is domestic manufac-
turing, especially with the out-
sourcing of jobs to China, In-
dia and other countries.
Intense competition drives
down product prices, while
American manufacturers bal-
ance higher operating expenses
including labor and health
care.


In fact, manufacturing jobs
typically pay 23 percent more
than other economic sectors
according to the Bureau of
Economic Analysis.
This contributes to the 22
percent higher price tag of do-
ing business in the United
States, which almost equals the
total cost of production in
China, says a study by the Na-
tional Association of Manufac-
turers (NAM)/Manufacturers
Alliance.
Ultimately this affects U.S.
(See Boost Products Page 5)














Death Penalty Sparks Debate


(Continued From Page 4)
over ten years and sit in prison
at taxpayer expense for years
and years going through multi-
ple appeal processes. Arguing,
therefore, that the death pen-
alty as a "deterrent" is hardly a
defendable position.
Likewise if we are going to
evoke the eye for an eye ra-
tional, then fathers also should
be stoning their daughters to
death for having sex out of
wedlock like the Old Testa-
ment laws dictate. You can't
"cherry pick" and follow just
the Bible verses that suit you.
On the other side, life in
prison today is not what it
once was. With the exception
of one County in the south-
western .United States, there
are no "chain gangs" doing
hard physical labor every day.
or living and sleeping without
amenities like air conditioning
or television. So the thought of
spending your life in a govern-
ment contracted prison facility
might not seem too awfully
bad for a moron who can't fit
into our society.
Additionally, "life in prison"
isn't always exactly that. More
often than not, many convicted
murderers are actually released'
from prison to go out and per-
petrate their violence yet again
on others. And x\e can't forget
that "overcrowded prison"
thing hanging over ,our heads
now can we? And how about
those infamous parole boards?
Why even the like of Charles


Manson has tme opportunity
every few years of being pa-
roled!
I, like many Americans, am
looking for .some kind of rea-
sonable and acceptable middle
ground in resolving this com-
plex and emotional issue. Un-
der the current circumstances,
the death penalty being used as
a deterrent just isn't working.
Accordingly, that leaves exe-
cution as purely a form of pun-
ishment and revenge. Each
individual must personally de-
cide if that, in and of itself, is
acceptable? Conversely, the
threat of "life in prison" also.
isn't working as a deterrent and
viewed by many as a totally
inadequate means of punish-
ment for such horrific crimes.
Ending the life of a con-
victed murderer must be car-
ried out quickly in order for
such actions to have any
chance of being a significant;
deterrent. We would also ha e
to accept the fact that in our
haste to exact punishment, we
also may be executing some
innocent people. The alterna-
tive is to make "life in prison"
an actual punishment and not
just incarceration at taxpayers
expense.
I could live quite easily with-
out the death penalty, if I only
knew that the convicted mur-
derer was actually regretting
every, day he woke up in
prison. Not because it was a
personal inconvenience or sim-
ply restricted his freedom, but


Boost Products


(Continued From Page 4)
jobs, export potential and even
research and development.
Economist Joel Popkin notes,
that during the recession of
the early 2000s, more than 3
million manufacturing' jobs
were lost.
The good news is that
American consumers,hold
some power.
"Although more things ar6
made in America today than
ever before, U.S. Manufactur-
ing faces some stiff challenges.
Consumers can support legis-
lation that helps manufacturing
thrive in America, by reducing
costs and leveling the interna-
tional playing field. One per-
son can make a difference."
Said Bill Canis, vice president,
at The Manufacturing Institute
the research and education arm
of the NAM.
Companies like Zippo light-
ers, Procter & Gamble,
Boeing, Caterpillar, Channel-
lock and tens of thousands of
smaller companies are com-
mitted to preserving American
manufacturing and jobs.'
"Channellock hand tools, for
examplehas supported Ameri-


Our Files
(Continued From Page.4)
Hughes, Mack Morris and
Gordon Roberts.
With 260 subscribers and $1
million in pledge
capitalization, organizers of
the Bank of Jefferson County
filed their application for a
charter with the State Banking
Department yesterday.
Congratulations to Pink
Hightower and his Bee Hop
team the number one team,
and the All Star Coach. The
All Stars have won their first
two games.
FORTY YEARS AGO
July 15, 1966
Mr. and Mrs. L.G. McClel-
lan and children, Gayle and
Greg of Ocala, spent Saturday
and Sunday with Mr. and Mrs,;
Bill Anderson.
Judge and Mrs. Kenneth
Cooksey, Katherine and Jim
spent this week in Pensacola
attending the county judge's
meeting.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
July 15, 1956
Mr. G,W, Dunnavant has
been appointed a band director
Sfor the Monticello School for
the year 1946-47. Mr./ Dunna-
vant has recently been dis-
charged from the Navy Naval
Air Symphonic Orchestra until'
his recent discharge.


can jobs and commerce for the
past 120 years- while remain-
ing family, owned and oper-
ated- which is a rarity these
days. Channellock's home-
town of Meadville, Pa., thrives
today largely because it has
helped so many employees and.
suppliers realize the American
., Dream," Cani; Continued.
The continuous challenge for
Channellock a',d simial manu-
facturers is educating consum-
ers about what distinguishes
their products from competi-
tor's. .Elevated operating cost
often force a higher price point
for "Made in USA" products,
so manufacturers differentiate
themselves \\ith superior qual-
ity and craftsmanship, .aggres-
sive investment in emerging
technology and even 'less tan-
gible benefits such as compre-
hensive emplo, ee-enrichment
and recognition programs '
So before grabbing the ne\t
shopping cart, commit to in-
formed shopping Bu\'ing
products that are "'Made ,in
America" may be the most im-
pactful acts of patriotism, just
ahead of eating apple pie.

1-800-USA-NA\T
.wwwnavyjobs.com:


because society was willing to
exact realistic punishment in
retaliation for his evil conduct
in exchange for not ending his
sorry life.
One important thing to re-.
member in the national argu--
ment is that the anti-death pen-
alty crowd are also the, "let's
treat murderers humanely",
groupies. I don't care if we go
out of our way to treat com-
mon criminals with some sense
of humanity.
In light of eliminating the.-
deathipenalty, however, I want
murderers like the guy who re-
centhl shot those three inno-
cent kids in the head, serving a.
life sentence,. eating commu-
nity stew every day with no
television, computer, tele-
phone or visitation rights.
He should have no contact
with other inmates, no b6oks,
games or cards to pass the time
and an empty cell so he has no
distractions and plenty\ of time
to concentrate on his perpetual
sorrt existence
In essence, I want him to start
wishing every day that he was,
indeed dead. No more" "Have
a nice day".
If -e had the intestinal forti-
tude to actually implement
such a "hard time" system, we
could also include pedophiles.
criminals %%ho leave their vic-
tirs paralyzed or mentally in-
capacitated. kidnappers and,
.drug lords in these life long
tough facilities.




DREAMS COME

TRUE











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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 19, 2006 PAGE 5


Monticello

News


Get Your
Annual
Subscription
Today!


In State:

$45.00


oteA


KIRK



REAMS'




Clerk Of Court




Fellow Jefferson County Voters,

I have known Kirk Reams his entire life. He is a native
Jefferson County citizen who is a hardworking, trustworthy
person; a person with a determined sprit and high values. Kirk
possesses great intelligence as evidenced by his graduation from
the Florida State University College of Law and the MBA
program. Kirk delivered mail throughout his college career. His
work ethic and dependability are unmatched. Carriers have to be
available as the slogan states: "Through rain, sleet, snow and
gloom of night, nothing keeps these carriers from the swift
completion of their appointed rounds." I believe that. Kirk
Reams is the most qualified candidate to carry out the important
job responsibilities of the Clerk of Court. If you elect Kirk
Reams for Clerk of Court, he will deliver.
If you are in the area, feel to join Kirk at a free cookout this
Saturday, July 22 at 11:00 a.m. in downtown Aucilla.

Sincerely,



Gerald Bailey
Registered Jefferson County Voter


PAID POLITICAL AVD. BY GERALD BAILEY, MONTICELLO WITH CONTENT APPROVED
BY KIRK REAMS, DEMOCRAT FOR CLERK OF COURT


Complete Upper and Lower'Dentures
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PAGE 6. MONTICEfL.L.0 (FL). NEWS. WEDf.. .JULY 19. 2006


Lifestyle


Rotary Club Hears

About Mortgages


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
The Monticello Rotary Club
met Friday, and heard a pro-
gram about Mortgage Lend-
ing presented by Ray Griffin.
He spoke about real estate
growth in the community
among the retired, and about
the working class wanting
"the slower pace of life."
He discussed finding homes
for his clients, and spoke
about the SHIP program and___
the Rural Housing program,
among the- possibilities for
home buyers.
Griffin has been active in the
banking and mortgage lend-.
ing industry for 18 years.
He encourages everyone to
become involved in the corn- :
munity by joining an organi-
zation, and shopping locally.
In other news, President
Tom Conley reminded the
members about the Christ


Episcopal Church Food Pan--
try donation project; which he
will promote throughout his
term as president.
Members will bring food
stuffs in weekly, or be fined.
The Club has also commit-
ted to work on the St. Phillips
Community Playground pro-
ject.
This project will begin with
a group of youths arriving
from Tennessee, ready to help
with the work, Monday, July
24, and remain for one week.
A $300 donation towards
the project was made by the
Club.
Sylvia White, assistant gov-
ernor for the District, awarded
Past President Bill Beaty a
..Presidential ,Citation for
achieving the goals set for the
Club bn the National.Organi-
zation during his term.
.: "Service above self is what,
this Club does," White stated.


The Library is composing a
cookbook to raise money for
the Lifelong Learning Center
Digital Bridge Computer
Classes.
As the title "Community
Pride on the Table: Recipes
for Lifelong Learning" sug-,
gests, the Library is expecting
community action... ) ;...
The Library needs 350 reci-
pes to be submitted bylMon-
day, July 24.
However, recipes will be
collected until the quota has
been fulfilled.
It is to be rioted that this
will be the first cookbook in
the history of the Library to
be published.
SIn addition, the book will
provide an index of all:con-
tributors, and computer tips.
This fiundraiser is fostered-
by the Friends of the Library.,


and was originated by Judith-
Jones and brought into exis-
tence by. Ann Planner and:
other Digital Bridge students.
Proceeds from the sale of
cookbooks will be used to
purchase more equipment and
software to make the Center
more conducive to leaning.
Cookbooks are not expected
to exceed '$12. They are ex-
pected to be available for sale
in November. .
Volunteers are needed to
work on the cookbook.
For more information con-
tact Angela Scott at
342-0206.
SRecipes can be mailed to'
the Library, 375 South Water
Street, Monticello or, faxed to
342-0207 or, e-mail to
jcpleamirjefferson.Iib.fl.us


Raulersons Observe

50 Years Of Marriage


Jean and Weaver Endel
Raulerson celebrated their
50th Wedding Anniversary
Thursday, June 29, 2006 with
a trip to .Branson, MO., a
Golden Anniversary gift from
their children and grandchil-
dren.
They couple was married
June 29, 1956 at the Church
of God in Monticello.
Both are graduates of Jef-
ferson County High School.
Hle retired after 38 years
with the Florida Power Com-r


'RAY GRIFFIN, mortgage lender,speaks to Rotary about
growth in the County. (News Photo)


Kathy Woody CARD OF THANKS
Will Marry The Cuyler Family would
,Will Marry ,like to extend our deepest
Ahthony Newbon'heartfelt thanks and gratitude
.to all of our friends tor \our
, Kathy \Vood& will marry : prayers, condolences, in-kind
Anthony Newbon 5 p.min. Sat- gifts, and for just being there
urda3., Aug. 19, and Memnorial during the loss of our beloved
MB Church in Montecello: one, "Fannie Odom Cuyler."
He is, the son of Ed.Murra,, Special thanks to: Covenant
SSmith and the late Judy L. Hospice, Jefferson Nursing
Newbon Center and Branch Street' Ft-
She is the daughter of Caro-, "neral Home.
lyn Thompson, of Monticello,,, The Cu ler Family
and Delleno Woody, of Jack- ,
son\ il!e. .. '


New Arrival
Breanna Kaschmitter an-
nounces the birth of, her
brother. Thomas Benjamin,
born Jul', 12 to Thomas and
.Becca.Kascihminer,. ofAlonti-
cello.
He e'eighed 7 ibs. 12 oz
Parnemal grandparents are
Jack ajnd Elaine Kaschmitter;
of Mopticello.
Maternal grandparents are
- Deloyd and Bonnie Loveless,
of Monticello.
Paternal great grandparents
are George and Maggie
Kaschiniter. ofMonticello.

Maternal great grandparents
are Deloyd. and Sara
Lom less, of Monticello.


pany.
She retired from many years
in the banking industry.
They now reside in Cler-
mont. and have four children:
Renee (and Donnie) Knight,
Donnesia Raulerson; Jeanne
(and Clark) Gey, and Weaver
(and Melissa) Raulerson.
The Raulersons also enjoy
their grandchildren: Jessica
and Wesley Knight; Justin
and Valerie Gey; Hunter,
Peyton, and Addison Rauler-
son.
".... "w


MR. AND MRS. WEAVER ENDEL RAULERSON


DEADLY
NEUROMUSCULAR
DISEASES

Please help us put"
,the brakes
on 40
neuromuscular
diseases.


Homes Of Mourning


Gay Nell Braswell I
Mrs. Gay Nell Braswell, age
75 of Madison died Friday,
Y July 14, 2006.
Services were held Monday
July 17, 2006 at l:00a.m. at
' Beggs Funeral Home Madison
Chapel. The family received
Friends at Beggs Chapel, on,
Sunday, July 16, from 6:00 un-
til 9:00 p.m..

Mrs. Gay Nell was born on
August 5, 1930, in Bay Min-
nette, Al, the daughter of'the
Slate Walter Hamac and Min-
S nie Nixon Hammac. She lived
* in Jefferson County before
moving to Madison 28 years
ago. Before becoming a home-
maker, she. was one of Madi-
-sons' best know caterers and
food service entrepreneurs.
She was a loving wife, mother
P and grandmother. She loved
the Lord and her Christian in-
fluence was evident in her eve-
ryday life: She was a member
' of Fellowship Baptist Church
in Madison for 12 years, prior
to moving her membership to
Hopewell Baptist Church in
Madison.
She is survived by her hus-
band of 43 years, Dave
Braswell of Madison. One son,
Sammy Rutherford (Jackie) of
Monticello; Four daughters,
Shirley Quinn (Jack) of Craw-
fordville; Lisa Riley of Madi-
son; Lucinda Roberts (Ken) of
Miami, and Mary Donna Pip-
pin of Madison. One sister
Joyce Merrill (Henry) of Lake-
land.


S: he was blessed iih 12
grandchildren and 11 great
grandchildren. She had many
nieces and nephews who
Looked up to her as a, special
Aunt and Friend.
She was predeceased by. a
son Terrill Dennis Rutherford.
Contributions may be made
to the Hopewell Baptist
Church Building Fund, 4730
SW Co. Rd 360, Madison, FI
32340 or to Big Bend Hospice,
1723 Mahan Center Blvd.,
Tallahassee, Fl.





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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 19, 2006 PAGE 7


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Mike Holm Coaches, Plays


On Teams, Here, Elsewhere


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 19, 2006 PAGE 9



ACA Cheerleaders


To Attend Camp


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Mike Holm is one of the
many county residents who
play and coach area sports.
I He has been involved in
sports since the age of eight,
when he began playing base-
ball at the Recreation Park in
Chaires.
Later, Holm played baseball
for two years at Lincoln High,
and in 1979 at the age of 17,
he began playing in the soft-
ball league at the Recreation
Park, here.
After 27 years of playing
ball, his love for the game
continues to grow.
"What keeps me enthused
about the game, is that I like
being with a good bunch of
guys, and enjoy the camara-
derie with the guys, and the
competition," said Holm.
"It's also a lot of fun going
out of town to play, and I just
love coaching the children."
He began coaching at the,
age of 22, when he coached
his cousin's softball and bas-
ketball teams, for several


Aucilla Christian Academy
Principal Richard Finlayson
has determined the varsity'
coaches for the 201-06-I 1
school year.

In his first year for the Warri-
ors, Joe Striplin will coach var-
sity football.
-Dan Nennstiel will continue
coaching cross country.
Melissa Kinsey will coach
the varsity cheerleaders.
Dan Nennstiel will coach
boys' basketball.

American Stroke
Association.,
A Division of American
Heart Association .

ime, Mare4hes on
For people over age. 55, the incidence of
stroke more than doubles in each ,
successive decade.
Stroke Warning Signs:
Sudden numbness or weakness in
the face, arm, or leg, especially on
one side of the body.
Sudden confusion or trouble
speaking or understanding.
Sudden trouble seeing in one or
both eyes.
Sudden trouble walking, dizziness,
loss of balance or, coordination.


years.
The teams he has coached
locally include: helping Mon-
ticello Merchant's softball
team, with Rodney Roberts
. and Bert Teasley, for ten
years; Capital City Bank T-
ball for four years, C & F
Fence for two years; assisted
the Monticello Milling Little
League for one year; coached
the Farmers and Merchants
Bank flag football team for
three years.-
He has also coached several
teams in Tallahassee for his
stepson.
Holm plays for two softball
teams,, Russell Construction,
'Kinco Marlin, and BC Power
Design.
He has also played in the
Watermelon Festival Softball
Tournament for the past. 15-
20 years.
He has also played in the
Church Softball League, and
coached the Elizabeth ,Baptist
team, for the past eight years,
He 'has played flag football
for Realty Corp. in Tallahas-
see for the past 25 years,
where he plays receiver and


Daryl Adams wil
girls' basketball.
Ray Hughes will cor
to coach the baseball t
Roslyn Bass will con
coach the softball tear
Finlayson conclu
the school looks to s
things from all teams
few of which have b
ing advantage of the
room being open for
mer months.


safety.
Holm has also played for
the Thomasville YMCA for
the past three years for the
RSC Bulldogs. His team won
the league in Tallahassee
(softball) last year, and sec-
ond in Thomasville (flag foot-
ball).
"After I finish playing the
season with Tallahassee (soft-
ball), I get about one week
off, then I go play for Tho-'
masville (flag football).
Though he has a family,,
wife, Sandy, sons, Bradley,.
11, and Brandon, 9, he makes:
time to play his favorite,
sports and i'vrIve his family.
"on weekends that I have
to play out of lown. most of
the time, I take my wife and


HOLM



,Diamonds

To Play

Jasper


boys with me, and we turn it' FRAN HUNT'


into a mini vacation," said
Holm.
"We've traveled as far as El
Paso, TX, TN, all the states in
.the southeast ," he said.
He attributes this to the fact
that he plays two or three
nights a week, and every other
weekend, to his understanding
wife.'.


Lady Warriors Play

Hoop In Summer League


FRAN HUNT:
Staff Writer


Aucilla Christian Academy
varsity girl's basketball coach
Daryl Adams, has been taking
several of the varsity and jun-
ior varsity basketball players,
to play in a sumrrer league "
Adams said that scores and
statistics were not docu-
mented, because the main


purpose behind the
,was to improve fundar
and the overall game..
Games are played
Monday and Wednes
Rickards High.
."Remember, athl
made in the off-seaso
Adams. "I've seen
improvement in the g
look to see great thin
them during the season


league. The' teams from' different
mental schools each have .two 20-
minute running ;halves, for
d every each game.'
sday, at The schools the Lady War-
riors were able to play
etes are include: Rickards, Lincoln,
in," said Leon, State Champions Flor-
a lot of "" 'ida `: igh, Stale Runner-up
irls, and North Florida Christian, arid
igs from Chiles.
n.- Lady Warriors participating
in the Summer league include'
Lisa Bajile. Nicole Matliks,
iy r ho A-danias, said ran point
guard ill summer, and did'a.
,ery, good job of it. "She has
mirnpro\ ed a lot" said Adams.
SAlso, Rikki Roccanti, Mi-
1 coach chaela Roccanbi, Savannah
iWilliaemDs, Angela McCune,
Chelsea Dobson, .Stephanie
ntinue Dobson,, Tiffany Brasington,
team. andCCourtne\ Biasinoton.


ntinue to.
m.
ided that
see good
s, quite a
been tak-
eo weight
the sum-


OUR LIFELINE
IS TOLL-FREE

Grab the line and
let us help you.

THE VOICE OF HOPE.
/1-800-572-1717


Staff Writer


The Monticello Lady D
monds softball team are sla
to face 'off, against Jasp
4:30 p.m., Sunday, there.
Coach Roosevelt Jones s
he is looking forward to
good game.
The Lady D~iamonds cons
of Shericka P.arri-h, Kit
Thompson, Nikki Coo
Tanya Young, Ashley 'All(
Lisa Crumitie, Keandra Sea
rooks, Kista Hills, To.anJr
Miller, Melissa, Fannie ,M
Fead, Lillie Djiiels, Di2
Fead, Barbara Crunlit.,,a
Bria Young.
In related news, the Nlei
cello Kings of the South v
ball team,, is also slated-;
play 'against Jasper, 4:30 ,pO
Sunday, there, '


Freedom of

the Press is

Everybody's

Freedom!!.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Varsity and junior varsity
cheerleading squads at Au-
cilla Christian Academy,
practicing their routines over
the summer.
Spokesperson Melissa Kin-
sey said the girls have been-
coming together one day per'
.week, several hours a day
since the last day of school,
prjciicing moves, technique
and conditioning.
Next week, all of the girls
will be attending the annual
cheerleading camp, hosted by
the Universal Cheerleading
Association at the Methodist
Fellowship Hall, 8 a.m. until
4 p.m., Monday through
Wednesday.
The girls will be working on
safety techniques, new cheers
and team building exercises.
ated The roster for both the var-
er, sity, and junior varsity squads
er, have been determined.


aid
'a

sist
dra;
ks,
en,


nd
lae
Mile



rft-
to
T.,


Returning to the JV this
year are Dana Watt, Kalyn
Brown and Kaitlin Jackson.
New to the squad are Stacey
Brock, Shelby Witmer, Keli
Dollar, Sunnie Sorensen, Me-
gan Lee, and Taryn Copeland.
The JV sponsor is Brenda
Brown.
Returning to the varsity
squad, are seniors Brittany
Hobbs (CO-captain), Angie
Steinberg, Joanna Cobb, cap-
tain, Caitlin Murphy (CO-
captain), Taylor Rykard,
Shaye Eason, and ,Amanda.
Hunt.
Juniors returning to the Lady
Warriors include Ramsey Rev-
ell and Paige Thurman.
Returning sophomores are
Erin Kelly, Katelyn Levine,
and Savannah Williams. New
to the squad are sophomores
Regan Clark, Savannah
Reams, and Mallory Plaines.
The team sponsor is Melissa
Kinsey.


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 19, 2006


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN
AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA CASE NO: 06-029-CA.
WELLS FARGO BANK
MINNESOTA, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, SOLELY IN ITS
CAPACITY AS TRUSTEE,
UNDER THE POOLING AND
SERVICING AGREEMENT
DATED' SEPTEMBER 1, 1999,
HOME EQUITY LOAN ASSET
BACKED CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 1999-3 Plaintiff, vs. PAUL
E. EIDSON; PHYLLIS L. EIDSON;
UNKNOWN TENANT I;
UNKNOWN TENANT' II;
PARKWAY PINES SUBDIVISION
PROPERTY OWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC.; EFC
HOLDINGS MORTGAGE, and any
unknown heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, and other unknown
persons or unknown spouses
claiming by, through and under any
of the above-named Defendants,
Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: PARKWAY PINES
SUBDIVISION PROPERTY


How TO KEEP

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drugs. That every


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potentialof causing -
catastrophic damage

to your child. To learn
more about drugs and

how to talk with your

kids about the subject,
call for a free parent's

handbook.

i-800-624.-0100


OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.
ADDRESS UNKNOWN
CURRENT RESIDENCE
UNKNOWN And any unknown
heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors
and other unknown persons or
unknown spouses claiming by,
through and under the
above-named Defendant(s), if
deceased. or whose last known
addresses are unknown.. YOU ARE
HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action
to foreclose Mortgage covering the
following real and personal
property described as follows,
to-wit: LOT 1, PARKWAY PINES,
PHASE 1, as per map or plat.
thereof, recorded in Plat Book "B",
Page 86, of the Public Records of
'Jefferson County, Florida,
TOGETHER WITH a Mobile
Home located on property. has been
filed against you and you are
required to served a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Natalie Kaye Curts, Butler &
Hosch, P.A., 3185 South Conway
Road, Suite E, Orlando, Florida
3281'2 and file the original %ith the
Clerk of the above-styled Court on
or before 30, days from the first,
publication, otherwise a Judgment
may be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complain.
WITNESS my hand and seal of said
Court on the 5th day of July, 2006.-
In accordance with the Americans,
with Disabilities Act, person with
disabilities needing a special
accommodation to participate in
this proceeding should contact
Court- Administration at the
.Jefferson County Courthouse,
Nlonlicello. Florida 32344,
Telephone (850) 997-3596, no later
than seven (7) days prior to the
proceeding. If hearing impaired
(TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V)
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay
Service. Carl D. Boatwright
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COUR In
" 12,- 19,06,C


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA. (CAS NO 2006-19-CC
P.ARK T. BRITTLE, Plaintiff, vs.
STEPHANIE C. GRANTHAM,
ANTONI\ E. CARRIN, and
R\VMlOND M. CARRIN,
Derfndantsn. NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE TO
WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, by
authority of. that- certain final
judgment of foreclosure entered
June 28, 2006 in the above-styled
case, that I, CARL D.
BOATW.RIGHT. as Clerk of the
Circuit Court. JeffersqoniCounty,
will sell at public sale the folloiin,
'described real property: ....See
attached Exhibit A The sale will be
held between the hours of 10:00
a.m. 2:00 p.m. E.S.T. on Thursday,
July 27, 2006 at the North door the
Jefferson County Courthouse,
Monticello, Florida, to the highest
and best bidder for cash, in
compliance with Section 45.031 of
the Flotida Statutes. Dated the 10th
da3 of July 2006 CARL D.
BOATWRIGHT: Clerk of the
Circuit Court The following
described land in Jefferson County
Florida One -half undivided interest'
in seventeen acres of land, more or
less, in the Northwest corner of the
Southwest Quarter of the Southwest
Quarter of Section 35, Township 1


ASAs seen

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on T V.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310 g
J.G Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


North of Range 3 East, said
seventeen acre tract being all of the
lands lying North and west of the
County Road located in the
Northwest corner of said Southwest
Quarter of Southwest Quarter
above described and bounded on the
North by the North line of said
Southwest Quarter of Southwest
Quarter and on, the West by the
West line of said forty and bounded
on the South and East by the North
border of said county road, except
one acre thereof previously sold to
George High in the extreme
northeast corner of said described
land TAX Identification
#35-IN-3E-0000-0010
7/12,7/14,7/19/06,c


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN. AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
FILE NO. 06-62-PR IN RE:
ESTATE OF ANNIE PEARL
BLAKE DEAN, DECEASED.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS The
administration of the Estate of
Annie Pearl Blake Dean, deceased.
whose date of death was March 9,
2006; is pending in the Circuit
Court for Jefferson County,
Florida, Probate Division; File
Number 06-62-PR; the address of
which is Jefferson County
Courthouse, Monticello, FI 32344.
The names and addresses of the
Personal Representative and the
Personal Representative's attorney
are se Iforlh below. All creditors of .
the decedent and other persons, who,
have claims or demands against
decedent's estates; including
unmatured, contingent or'
unliquidated claims, and who have
been served a copy of this notice,
must file their claims with this court
ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF
THE DATE THAT IS THREE (3)'
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF'
THE FIRST PUBL IC kTION OF
THIS' NOTICE OR THIRTN (30)
D 'YS AFTER THE D\TE OF


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION File
- .Number: 06-74-PR IN RE:
ESTATE OF D NNI A.
THURMAN, DECEASED. NOTICE
OF -DMINISTRATION .The
Administration ofr he estrae of
Dannn \. Thurman. deceased. File
Number 06-"4--PR is pending in the
Circuit Court for Jefferson County,
Florida:. Probate, Division, the
address of which is Jefferson
County Courthouse, Room. 10
Monticello, Florida 32344. The,
names and address of the personal
.representative and of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below. ALL INTERESTED
PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:


Landscape Design,
Maintenance,
Sod, Nursery,
Complete
Lawn Service


1JU N% IND4APN


Servig All Jefferson County's Landscaping, Needs



MENTION THIS ADlS l

& RECEIVE 10%

I ) SCOUNTI





1105 EST AHA


l


is offering all 2006 F150's, F250's and
Rangers at Ford Motor Company's
("Friends and Neighbors") X-Plan Pricing
and it's marked on all Factory Invoices.

F250 4x4 Diesel Crew Cab Super Duty King Ranch stock 2oi 3m
MSRP $52,780.00
X-PLAN $46.675:93
FORD REBATES $3,000.00
You Sales Price $43,675.93


F250 4x2 Super Cre,,
MSRP
X-PLAN.
FORD REBATES
Your Sales Price-


XLT Loaded stock #260200t
$33,635.00:
$30247.00
$3,500.00
$26,747.00


RANGER 4X2 Sport Super Cab Leather Loaded nlck BO,2AO.lt


MSRP
X-PLAN
FORD REBATES
Your Sales Price


$24,350.00
$21,497.00
$3,000.0l "
$18,497.00


As of July 14th All 2006 Light Duty Trucks Will Be
Covered By Ford's, All New 5 Year 60,000 Mile
,Powertrain Warranty .
NO RUNAROUND, NO GIMMICKS. JUST GOOD CLE 1A DEALSIN AN
ENVJOI4BLE 4T.110SPHERE.!


S/ 100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL

S. FOREIGN & DOMESTIC,
Body & Paint Work Frame. Straightening


WE TAKE THE
ACCIDENTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


1630 E JACK S N ST.i
(Located behind Langdale Auto Mall)


McCormick Electric LLC Castaneda
Quality Service Always
Your Local Electrical Co. M asonary, LLC
Residential Service Work Welcome ,. COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL
850-567-0949 (5 586
850-591-4806 (850) 508-6396
Lic. & Ins. ER#13013417 2 H ir Lic. & Ins.
rustymccormick@earthlink.net Brick & Block
24 Hr. Service


URNETTE PLUMBING & ARROLL HILL AUTO,ELECTRIC, INC. Northside Mower and
Register's
SWELL SERVICE "Complete Auto Electric Repair Service" Small Engine Repair
Family Owned Since 1902 M 1-St rage For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Plumbing Repairs ~ Wells Drilled ~ Fixtures-Faucets Pumps Snapper, Murray & More Warranty
Replaced Sewer & Water Connections Tanks Replaced315Waukeenah wy Repairs for all makes & models
Water Heater Repairs- All Repairs 1/4 Mile off US 19 South ,..Pick & lr v
.5Thomasville Road 115 AlbanyRd. Pickup & Delivery Service Available
997-25(on Carro $Mi) 229-226-0717 562-2962



Richest Design GU.FCOAST LEE FULLER OWNER Sister Fay
Richert Design H PUL MO JrFU PAITI G C Palm Reader & Advisor
Custom Design House Plans OOING MORRIS FULLER PAINTING LLC Are you Unhappy? Worried? Sad?
Drawn to Permit Specifications ROOFING0 All Types Have you been Disappointed?
*Additions *Garages *Blueprints All Types HaGive youm e a call and let me help you.inted?
tel.: 850-997-5770 Cell: 850-508-9362 Metal Office (850) 671-2286 Serving Leon County for 50 years
fax 850 997 2 Ful line of Roofingunty for 50 years
fax: 850-997-2351 accessories in stock g Cell (850) 284-6134 We Do Parties! Tarot Cards*Palm Readings*Astrology
1055 S. Mulberry St. Monticello, FL 32344 Call in for 2 free questions
1055 S. Mulberry St. Monticello, FL 32344 special Flashings Made-All Types Warranted-Metal Available 1Call in for free questions!
Licensed by County & City
Patrice V. Richert Cut to yourdesired lengths Deliveryervice Available 8366 Guerry Lane, Talldhassee, FL 32317 Mon.-Fri 10am-8pm, Sun 1-Api, 1729 Mahan Drive
whiskigirl42@earthlink.net. call Toll-Free 888-393-0335 352-498-0778 Horseshoe Beach, FL Lic. & Insured (850)878-9327


'SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM. All other
* creditors of the decedent and other
persons who have claims or
demands against the decedent's
estate, including unmatured,
contingent or unliquidated claims,
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM
FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED. THE DATE OF
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
,NOTICE IS. : JULY 19, 2006.
attorney for Personal
Representative: Cathi C. Wilkinson,
of Pennington, Moore, Wilkinson,
Bell & Dunbar, P.A. Post office Box
.10095, Tallahassee, Fl 32302 (850)
222-3533 (850) 222-2126 (fax) Fla.
Bar #0282693 Personal
Representative Kechia Dean 4953
',West Capps Highway Monticello, Fl
32344
7 19.26!06,c


'


estate of the decedent must file their
claims with this court WITH IN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is July 19, 2006.
Attorney For Personal
Representative: T. Buckingham
Bird P.O. Box 247, Monticello, Fl.
32345 850-997-3503 Fl Bar ID
#0006176 James A. Thurman 213
Ward Road, Monticello, Fl. 32344.
7/19,26,c
LEGAL NOTICE The Jefferson
County Planning Commission will
hold its regular monthly meeting
and workshop on August 10, 2006
at 7:00 P.M. The meeting will be
held in the Courtroom of Jefferson
County Courthouse located at the
intersection of US Highway 19 and
US Highway 90 ,in Monticello, Fl.
The meeting may be continued as
necessary. Information concerning
the meeting is available at the
Jefferson County Planning


All persons on whom this notice is
served who have objections that
challenge the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of this Court are
required to file their objections with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER
OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All
creditors of the decedent and other
persons have claims or. demands
. against dependent's estate on whom
a copy of this notice is served within
three months after the date of first
publican of this notice must file
their claims with this Court,
WITHIN THE,LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM. All other creditors of
the decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the


c\ERLAIVr













MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 19,2006 PAGE 11 "


To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


ii
LEQALS ~ -


Department, 445 W Palmer Mill
Road, Monticello, Fl. 32344,
Telephone 850-342-0223. From the
Florida "Government in the
Sunshine Manual", page 36,
paragraph c: Each board,
commission, or agency of this state
or. of any political subdivision
thereof shall include in the notice of
any meeting or hearing if notice of
meeting or hearing is required, of.
such board, commission., or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that if a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the
board, agency, or commission with
respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she
will need a record the proceedings,
and that, for such purpose, he or she
may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings, is made,
which record includes the testimony
and evidence upbn which the appeal
is to be based.
7/19,06,c

HIFP WANTED

The Jefferson County Road
Department will be accepting
employment applications for the
following positions; Truck
Driver; must have Florida Class
"A" cdl drivers license, excellent
driving record, at least 2 years
experience driving and also
experience with road equipment
such as backhoes.
Equipment/Operator; must
have a high school diploma or
equivalent and valid Florida
drivers license, a cdl would be
desirable but not required.
Experience running a backhoe,
small dump truck and roadside
mowing tractors. For
applications please stop by the
Road Dept. Office any week day
7:30am to 4:00pm. located 1484
S. Jefferson Street. Phone
997-2036.: Closing date' is July
31, 2006
.7/7,12,14,19,21,26,28 ,c
The City' of Monticello is
accepting applications for the
position of Police Patrol Officer.
This position requires a
minimum of a high school
diploma and Florida Police
/Standards. The successful
candidate must live within 25
miles of .Monticello Police
Station. Applicant must
complete a Department field
training program within the
first month. The position
requires a background check.
Salary and benefit information
is available upon request. Sub
mitt application and resume to
Monticello Police Dept. 195 S.
Mulberry St. Monticello, Fl.


BRYNWOOD CENTER
A 97 BED SKILLED NURSING FACILITY IS IN SEARCH OF:
Director of Nursing
We are seeking a dynamic person to join our team as D.O.N. Must have a FL RN
license. Experience in a skilled nursing facility preferred but not required.
We offer a very competitive salary & benefits package.
If you are interested in this GREAT opportunity, contact the Administrator TODAY!!
Experience the-Delta Difference!
Brynwood Center
1656 South Jefferson St. Monticello, FL 32344
phone: 850-997-1800 ~ fax: 850-997-7269 ~ www.deltahealthgroup.com
DRUG FREE WORKPLACE EOE/m/f/d/v




Housing Vouchers

* We accept all vouchers
i, 4 2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 ~.4/2 $895 -$50 dep.
* Pool & Youth Activities

5756571

Nre .RNgorL n-_n NI


Services is looking for
temporary meter change-out
field technicians in the
Monticello area. You must have
a valid Florida driver's license,
pass a pre-employment drug test
and background check. We will
train qualified individuals.
Starting salary will be $15.00
hr. Please call 407-831-6669, or
send your resume to
UMS@asplundh.com. UMS-
EOE
7/19,21,26,28,c
MAINTENANCE- PT 36 Unit
Apt Complex Resume/Apply to
Heritage Manor, 1800 East
Texas Hill Road, Monticello, Fl
32344 Fax: 850-997-7288
Phone: 850-997-4727
7/19,21,c


32344 by July 19, 2006
EOE/Drug-Free Workplace.
7/14,19,c.
DRILLERS HELPERS
No experience needed. Some
Travel Required. Great Pay &
Benefits. Career Opportunity
* EOE & Drug Free (800)
487-9665
7/19,21,26,28,c
The positions are as follows:
English Teacher: Degreed
individual possessing a teaching
certificate in Language Arts.
Math Teacher: Degreed
individual possessing a teaching
certificate in Math.
Guidance Counselor: Degreed
individual who is certified as a
guidance counselor.
Reply to:
Greenville Hills Academy 742
SW Greenville Hills Road
Greenville, Florida 32331
850/948-1200, Fax 850/948-1330
7/12,14,19,21,c
Teacher Positions Available:
Monticello Christian Academy,
Elementary, Middle, High
School, call 997-6048 for details
or submit resume to: MCA,
1590-N. Jefferson St.
Monticello, 32344.
7/19,21, c
Janitor/Maintenance: Part time
position.. Must be able to
perform some maintenance as
well as janitor duties. Call
MCA, 997-6048.
7/19,21, c

Child care provider for
Christian preschool. Must have
experience and 45 hour
training. CDA preferred. Please
call Connie at 997-6400.
7/19,21,26,28,c
Wanted nursery worker
experienced in trimming and
shaping container trees,
irrigation. Must have own
transportation and furnish
references. Apply in person at
Ox Lake Tree Farm, 585 Lott
Rd., Monticello, Florida
997-40!8
7/12,tfn,c
Kennel Technician- Part-time.
Must be reliable. Apply .in
person to Veterinarian
Associates, 1599 North Jefferson
Street. No phone calls please!
tfn,c
Cashier, available to work shift'
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn, c
Electric Meter Chahge-Out
Field Technicians.Utility Meter *


10' x 5' original Monticello
Simmons Drugstore soda
fountain mirror, late 1800's,
great condition, $350 997-2015
7/7, tfn, c


'Two Dogs, male. 1-black
Newfoundland mix, 1-Boxer
iHusky mix with blue eyes.,
7/7/06 at East First and Ashville
Hwy. 997-2763
7/14,19,pd csh

F E---
To good home- two cats. House
*broken. Owner recently
deceased, 997-5211.

SER^EVITC AR


We don't quiz you on your
beliefs before welcoming you.
Christ Episcopal Church, three
blocks N of the courthouse
.Sunday service at 10:30a.m..
997-4116.
7/19,c
MASONRY: Chimney Repair,
"Small MasonryFree Estimates/
All work Guaranteed) Call
Larry 997-1276
'7/12,14,19,21,26,28,pd


Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug. Store. We 'bill
Medicare Call for a assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
available
1/19, ifn

Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd, 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
.Have you been taken(off your
hiormone-. replacement? See our
new menopausal : products.
Jackson's Drug Store.
5/12 tfn, c


New Company

To Monticello


REQUIRES A CERTIFIED

WELDER/SfHOPMAN,


Duties To Include:
Fabricating, Welding, Sand Blasting,
Painting & Equipment Maintenance.
Must Have or Be Willing To Obtain
CDL License.


'Call (770) 614-3893 or fax

resume to: (770) 614-3795


INSTRUCTIONAL COORDINATOR
of criminal Justice Program wanted at
North Florida Community College. Partial
Duties include: scheduling of instructors,
courses and facilities; maintenance of
records; teach classes as needed; participate
in department and college activities.


Qualifications:
Hold or have held Certification from
CJSTC in one or more fields and have a
minimum of two years experience in the
field. Must have current certification as
CJSTC CMS instructor. High Liabilities a
plus. BA/BS Degree preferred. Entire job
description on website.

Applications to, Director HR NFCC, 325 NW
Turner Davis Drive, Madison, Florida 32340.
Applications packet requires letter, resume and
application. Application is available on
website at www.nfcc.edu. k
Applications must be received by
July 28, 2006. EOE


* Washington St. Apartment
2/1 2-deluxe two bedroom units for rent
* Marvin St
3/2 house for rent or owner financing / with low down
payment
* York St.
3/1 house for rent or owner financing / with low
down payment
* Noel Dr.
3/2 Single Wide
* Commercial Building Restaurant or Office
* First Street 2/1 Low Rent
SWe accept section 8
Wyche Property Managemen

(850) 997-3271


FOR REN :
3 BR, I '1 BA house in country .
Call 997-3368
6/21 tfn
Prime downtown office space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980.
11/30, tfn, c
Jefferson Place Apartments, 1 &
2 Bedroom, 1468 S. Waukeenah
St. Office 300 Monticello.
997-6964 TTY-Acs711 Equal
Housing Opportunity.,
6/2, tfn, c
3-Bedroom, 2-Bath, in country,
no pets, 509-8745.
7/14,19,21,pd


FOR SALE..


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com



Serious About Sellinq?
List today!




Homes That "TalkJust Sell Faster




Just Listed! Won't Last!! Like New, roomy, 3
Bedroom 2 bath home with big carport, nice.shed"'
with 5 acres on very nice lake near1-1,Q and .US,: ..,,
19 $385,000 See it at www.TimPeary.com

Amazinq Buy!!! Mixed Use Property 12 plus
partially cleared acres on US 19 south land use
designation. permits 4 houses per acre near Den-
nis' Trading post only $36,500 per acre

Best Residential Buy in Town!
2 bedroom 1 bath home in great shape with
fenced yard and big family room behind IGA on
Bowman Street Now $76,500-A Talking House

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly wooded
acres Only $36,500'

Lloyd Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath split plan with
very nice master suite 1993 Fleetwood on 2.6
acres $76,500-A Talking House

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen.in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Country Livinq at it's Best! Comfortable 4 bed-
room 3 bath home on five fenced acres with
guest cottage w/bath, 2 car garage, big shop,
pasture 100 pecan trees and a nice pool Only
$400,000

Fine Homesite Close to Town 12.5 private
acres with big trees and pretty fields perfect for a
fine home $265,000

Just Listed-Under Contract Choice 2.39 acre
tract on Shady Lane near Lake Wooten, South of
Old St. Augustine Rd and east of SR 59 $36,500

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South near
Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000'

Terrific Land Investment-Under Contract 5
acres available on the east side of town high and
dry profit from both appreciating land and grow-
ing pine Only $11,500 peracre

Home Site close to town on West Groovervilie
Road only $14,500

Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bedroom 2
baths, screened porch on a very pretty 1.6 acres
in Lloyd Acres $74,900-A Talking House
Rentals
Dogwood Street 2/1 home $850
Bowman Street 2/1 rent while waiting for a buyer
$650



Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340 See all our listings at
www.TimPeary.com
Simply the Best!
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


AKC Register ,Lab puppies
Black 8 weeks old. Shots &
wormed. $200.00 'each. Good
Blood Line. Call Mike at Cell
251-8074 or Home 997-0180.
,77.12.,14.19.21.26,28.pd
Pop-up Camper Trailer- 2
Queen and I single bed. \ern
good condition, $1500. Call
997-2232 between 6-10p.m.
7/14,19,21,pd


WWAVNAW


ww'WVM












PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JULY 19, 2006

Jan Wadsworth Elected


Woman's Club President


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Jan Wadsworth, newly
elected president of the Mon-
ticello Woman's Club
(MWC,) has been an active
member of Monticello and the
Jefferson County community
since 1989.
She and her husband,
Virgil, moved here from St.
Petersburg to continue their
work at the Jeffetson County
Kennel Club (JCKC) in a full-
time capacity.
Wadsworth lbft Long
Island, NY. after high school
and headed for the year-round
Florida sunshine.
She retired from the JCKC
after 30 years, and enjoyed
her years there.
She became involved with
the Monticello Garden Club
.(MGC) through an invite
:from Jackie Andris.
Subsequently, she was
chairman of the Mignonette
Garden Circle for 10 years,
,and Garden Club .President
for two years, and held vari-
ous other positions during .her
,years with the Club.


Ft-


WADSWORTH


She became a Master
dener in April 2001, i
proud to announce this
when asked.
She is a lover of Beg
They are inside, outside
all around her home, she

Her involvement wit
MWC began with the
to a meeting by toni
her'now friend and confi


S *" I When Lane suggested she
become the 50th member of
the MWC, she just couldn't
turn the honor down.
She has held many officer
positions since that first visit.
This is her first time holding
the position as President.
She says, "I am.honored and
*. very proud to have been
elected President of the
Woman's Club.
"I am eager to get started.
I've got a few new fundraising
ideas I want to try, and with
the help and support of the
Club members, I'm sure they.
will succeed."
-Her goals during her presi-
dency are to increase mem-
bership, to continue to stay
involved with national, state
r Gar- and local events, and to hold
and is successful fundraising events.
honor Her fellow club members
say that she is a planner and a
onias. person that sees a job through
e, and to the end.
says. They too look forward, to a
successful year ith her at the
h the helm.
invite She says that she will con-
Lane, tinue to stay active in both
dant. clubs.
%\'ads\'.orth has also ven-
tured into a newly organized
volunteer group Friends of
Green Industries Inc., an agri-
cultural, env ironmental, 'and
educational cOmmunIrN bawed
organization.
Wadsworth has a son, Rich-
*e, non- ard who resides in St. Peters-
s.erving burg, and ''a 7 year old
children Pekinese called Missy.
orders She has a few cats, and es-
pecially enjoys humming
of spe- birds. They visit her during
persons the'months of March through
orders. October.
provided She has'a collection of hum-
social, mingbird ornaments and the
services like.
unity, She i. a cancer survivor,
who lives and enjoys life to:
it's fullest each day, every
provided day.
epilepsy She can be reached at 997-
f care- 4440 for information about
,atment groups with which she is in-
taking volved.


ated by
ted and
Health


han 30
h coin-
and

at 222-
rik.net -


MILLER


CDEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

. Karen DeRosier, MSW,.
MPH, Preverition and Educa-
tion Coordinator for the Epi-
lepsy Association of, the Big
'Bend (EABB) will show a.
First Aid video and will be
available to answer questions
relating 'to seizures, epilepsy,
children and pregnancy after
the 9-30 a m..July 25 Jefferson
County Community Coalition
meeting.
The EABB creates aware-
ness and removes misconcep-
tions about epilepsy..
The agency provides serv-
ices for the entire spectrum of
age -groups, including age-
appropriate curriculums, refer-,
rals for neurological care, and
subsidized prescriptions.
Epilepsy is a neurological
condition characterized by a
recurring disturbance in the
electrical activity of the brain,
which' can occur at anytime in
life.

Questions,

Anyone?.
Get the answers you can
trust about government
programs, benefits, and
services from the Federal
Consumer Information
Center.
'Just call toll-free:
1-800-FED-INFO
(That's 1-800-333-4636)
Mon-Fri 8am-8pm ET
Or visit
www.pueblo.gsa.gov/call
U.S. General Services Administration


The EABB is a private
profit organization
men, women, and c
with epilepsy/seisure di
and their families.
It is a sole provider
cialized services for
with pilepsy/seizure diso
Among services pi
are information about
medical, and support s
available in the comr
and referrals.
Information is' pr
about the treatment of e
and the importance o:
fully following the tre
plan which includes
medication regularly;
Biccle helmets, don:
the EABB, can be fitt
picked up at the County
Department.

DeRosier has more tI
years of experience witi
munity, development
healthcare concerns.
She can be reached a
1777 or eabbpe@earthlii


Heather Miller Wins

FL. Fair Scholarship


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
The North Florida Fair As-
sociation has named local
resident, Heather Miller, as
the 2006 winner of the Lloyd
Rhoden Agricultural Scholar-
ship'
She is the daughter of Mi-
chael Miller.
She has been an active mem-
ber of her school, has won nu-
merous Scholastic Awards
and was recently promoted to
a Major in JROTC.
Miller is also involved in
community activities and
events, belongs to various as-
sociations related to horses
and equestrian activities, and
is Vice-president of the 4-H
Wrangler Club .
Her .o' eof horses %'as dis-
pla\ed at the Fair in the form
of a quilt that was a year in
the making, and took first


prize.
In her spare time she has
assisted at summer camps and
after school programs in-
structing young children in
riding, equine safety, and gen-
eral horse care.
Miller's interest in horses
has her pursuing a career in
Equestrian Science, at Central
Florida Community College.
After completing this pro-
gram and earning her degree
she plans to pursue a career as
manager of a large horse farm
on a professional level while
continuing her education, in
an. equine program.
Each. year the Fair Associa-
tion chooses a student who
plans to major, in agriculture
education at a Florida institu-
tion of higher learning.
The award continues up to
four years as long as the re-
cipient continues to meet the
requirements.


Kevin Kelly Named

Shelter Caretaker


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Resident Ke\ in Kelly will
officially take over the duties
as Humane Society Caretaker,
Sept. 1, v.hTien. present care-
taker Cheryl Bautista moves
to join her husband in Califor-
nia.
The lifelong animal lot er
looks forward- to officially
taking over. his duties.
"I have had dog; and cats
all my life,' said Kell\. "And
I used to work in an animal
hospital in Miami. I just love
being with animals."
SKelly has been involved
with the Humane Society
since October, when he was
hired on a part-time basis as a
general laborer at the shelter
His responsibilities include,
cleaning of the buildings,
readying, manning ,and trans-'
portation of animals for adop-


Freedom .of

the Piress Is

Eve.rybodly,'s

Freedom !,!


,
Don't trade it

-donate it

Upgrading your car?
Avoid the hassles
of selling your old
.{'1AERICAN car-and possibly
ASSOCIATIONe pocket a tax savings!

Call I-800-LUNG-USA to find out how you can help.,
Web site: http://www.lungusa.org


l LIFE


immunity
turns are
lore active
eir lives
builds a


When was SAVER

the last

time you


made an

investment

,that saved. When you invest in our coi
through United Wq'y, the re
lives? enormous-healthier kids, m
seniors and teens turning thi
around. It's a dividend that
strong community.

307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL 32303 (904) 414-0844


a '


Elizabeth'Suto.
Killed by ,i ..f, .1 ..
on February 27 1994,. ru .E,. II F ,J
in-Cedar Park, Texas.
SIf,you don't stop your friend
from driving drunk, who will?


tion booths every other
weekend at Petsmart in Talla-
hassee, general upkeep and
.lawn work, feeding, and wa-
tering of all of the animals,
cleaning the cages and when
he gets the opportunity, so-
cializing and petting the ani-
mals. He will also be living
onh site upon the departure of
Bautista.
Currently on a erage. Kelly
%korks five days per week at
the shelter, and comes in on
each of his days off, checking
to see if his help is required
"I don't mind volunteering to
help, I like helping, Cheryl
and just love being around the
animals," said Kelly. "I just
try to help out when and
where I can."
He is a single man. "The ani-
mals are my. kids," he con-
cluded as he stroked one of
the shelter kirtens.
AMERICAN HEART
MEMORIALS &TRIBUTES

1-'800-AHA-USAI


.4 .


.'.



-


KELLY

Monticello News
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