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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00145
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: June 30, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00145
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
    Main continued
        page 7
    Main: Sports
        page 8
    Main continued
        page 9
        page 10
    Main: Classified
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
Full Text






LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UIIIVERZILY L' FLORIDA


GOD'BLESS AMERICA /A


CELEBRATING INDEPENDENCE DAY


July 4th


Friday Morning
[ Frda Monn


Monticello


I IRT14 VIP. ADRNO-'50.n0CrNTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays.


ws
FRIDAY, JUNE 30,2006


Jail Now Housing Women


Long-Standing, Costly,

Problem Finally Fixed


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Sheriff David Hobbs re-
ported to commissioners last
week that the jail now is hous-
ing female inmates.
The jail, in fact, has been
housing female inmates for the
last month and. a half, he said.
Hobbs presented. the infor-
mation matter-of-factly, mak-
ing no big-to-do about it. But
given the county's long-
standing and costly inability to
house female inmates in the
past, the .news actually repre-
sents quite a significant ac-
complishment.
Consider, commissioners
budgeted $75,000 last year
alone to house female inmnatie
in other counties, at a cost of
$35 per day per inmate. That's
not counting transportation,
medical and other incidental
costs.


Hobbs rightly figured that at
$35 per day, multiplied times
the seven female inmates that
the jail is now able to house.
the savings will prove signifi-
cant over time.
Hobbs didn't go into great
detail how he had managed to
accomplish the-feat, gi% en that
the news was offered offhand-
edly during a budget hearing.
But the solution apparently in-
volved putting two compo-
nents into place..
The first required that the de-
partment hire enough female
correctional officers to allows
for a female officer to be on
duty 24 hours a day. seven
days a week.
The law allows female offi-
cers to monitor male inmates.
9f but not the other way around
At least one female officer,
must be present at all times to.
monitor female inmates.
In the past, the department'
has had a problem hiring


enough correctional officers,
let alone female. correctional'
officers. But Hobbs said he
had been able to hire enough
female officers to staff each
shift with at least one such of-
ficer.
"I have four female correc-


tional officers now," he said.',
,,The second component in-
volved designating an area of
the jail for the housing of the
female inmates,,who must be
kept-separate and out of view
of the male population.
Sometimes, a solution to a


SHERIFF DAVID HOBBS, right, reviews budget figures
with Commissioner Skeet Joyner, Hobbs is asking for
$648,000 in additional funding for his department.
(News Photo) 1


complex\ problem is simple be-
yond belief and so obvious it
eludes easy discovery.
"I rigged something up for
$25," Hobbs told commission-
ers at the budget hearing.
What he did, he offered
briefly in explanation after-
wards, was to put up curtain-
like screen that blocks view of
the designated female inmate
area and provides privacy.
Hobbs said the solution al-
lows the jail to, designate eight
beds for female inmates, one
of which bed is kept-%acant in
case a feniale is booked during
the night.
He said the jail averages be-
tween five and eight females
per week, but has had as high
as 14 female inmates at one
time.
The male inmate population,
meanwhile, has gotten as high
as- 77, he said. Last week, it
was at 56, Hobbs reported.
The jail has a total capacity of
-110 beds: .
Hobbs said his goal is even-
tually to hire enough correc-
tional officers that the jail can
begin housing inmates from
other counties and from the


federal prison system. That
way, the jail can begin gener-
ating revenues, he said. .
"It takes a lot of money to
run the jail," Hobbs said.
In. related news, Hobbs is
asking for a $648,115 budget
increase for his department,
from $2,516,885 last year to
$3,165,000 for the coming
year..
The increase includes a
ihree-percent pay increase for
employees, $80.,0(0 for the
purchase and equipping of two
patrol cars, and the hiring of
additional personnel, possibly
one depura and two more cor-
rectional officers.
The increase also reflects an
expected 15 percent hike in in-
surance, premiums, the result
of the $2 'million lawsuit a
Leon County jury awarded
several South Florida plaintiffs
earlier this year.
The plaintiffs' complaint al-
leged racial discrimination and
misconduct onf the. -part of
'deputies handling a midnight
traffic stop stemming :from
a controlled drug buy earlier in
the day. The incident, which
(See Women In Jail, Page 2)


Coordinator Job Courthouse Renovation


Back On Agenda T Get Underway Soon
Officials first threw out the
LAZARO ALEMAN figure of $1n2d5,0.1. But Clerk
iLAZAROcALEMAN figure of S125,0. But Clerk do the State Attorney's office Lewis recommended a
Senior Staff Wrier of Courts Dale Boatr right LAZ.AROALEMAN also," Lewis said. middle-of-the-road approach.
pointed out that such a Senior Staff Writer That middle road calls for the
.It appears that county offi- amount would barely accom- e ... COnStr Ction county to bid the project in its
cials are serious about reestab- plish the goal. If things go according to Ex ected To entirety, but to stipulate a later O .
F ,. -- ti--- B(Bi ^jy ., ., .. .Expec tedU TO -z:;* dtrin ate for> certo;n n-m*


fishing the position of county
coordinator.
Richard Musgrove, the
county's first and only coordi-
nator, resigned about two years
ago.
Ostensibly, the resignation
resulted from budgetary con-
straints. But more accurately,
the resignation came at the re-
quest of the board because of
job performance issues.
Commissioners at 'a recent
budget workshop more or less
agreed to put $150,000 in next
year's budget for the hiring of
a newv county coordinator.


List Exceec

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

And the winner of the big-
gest budget increase request
for the coming fiscal year is
Road Department Superinten-
dent David Harvey.
Harvey is asking for an in-
crease exceeding $1 million in
his budget for the coming year.
More specifically, he's asking
for an additional $1,068,433.
The increase includes a four
percent pay increase for per-
sonnel as well as $81,000 for
the hiring of four additional
employees, bringing the de-
partment up to 29 people total.
It also includes expected
hikes in fuel and road materi-__


"That figure won't do- it,"
Boatwright said. "Remember,
you're starting from scratch
again. You'll need to establish
an office, buy computers and
other office equipment. You
would need $120,000 just for
salary and benefits, and that at
a minimum salary."
Remember too, he added,
that the position would need an
assistant.
Commissioner Junior Tuten
then revised his earlier recom-
mendation.
"Let's put $150,000 in the
budget and we'll cut whatever


MUSGROVE


department budgets we have to
cut to get the money," Tuten
said.
Commissioner Skeet Joyner,
for one, was adamant that the
- money for the coordinator po-,
sition not come from the
$603,000 that the county will
soon begin receiving from the
state for being a fiscally con-
straint county.
"Let's leave the $603,000
alone," Joyner 'said several
(See Coordinator, Page 2)


Ip


is $1M
al costs, as well as $200,000 ) ,.
for the repair of the bridge '* ;
over the Aucilla River on CR-
257.

Money Needed .
For Equipment -. '
HARVEY


"We either fix that bridge or
close the road," Harvey said of
the latter request.
The bulk of the additional
money Harvey is requesting,
however, is slated for the pur-
chase of heavy equipment.
Among the machinery that
Harvey is proposing to buy: a
brush cutter, priced at around
$110,000; an excavator, priced
at about $190,000 used and
$300,000 new; and a small


grader, priced at around
$189,000.
Harvey said the new equip-
ment and additional personnel
is needed to keep the depart-
ment effective.

Commissioners promised to
give the request serious con-
sideration. But they didn't give
it much hope of being ap-
proved as submitted.


_ plans, the renovation of the old
high school buildings for use-
by the county as a courthouse
annex should begin in mid
September.
That's the word from
Manausa, Lewis & Dodson
Architects, Inc., (MLD), which
is overseeing the project.
MLD architect Randy Lewis
told commissioners last week
that his firm should have: the
architectural and. engineering
plan completed by the second
week of July.
"We will advertise in the
third week of July and hold the
pre-bid conference in early.
August," Lewis said. "The bid
opening should be in the third
or fourth week of August. And
the notice to proceed should be
issued by the second week of
September."
Lewis said that it will take
between five and six months to
complete the project once it
starts.
The renovation is to be di-
vided into phases, with each
phase to be undertaken as the
money becomes available. To-
-tal cost of the project is pro-
jected to be about $1.5 million.
So far, the county has about
$600,000.
The idea is to renovate the
buildings for the courtroom
and for the Public Defender's
office in the first phase. Addi-
tionally, the State Attorney's
office may be renovated if the
funds permit.
"If the numbers come in su-
per good on the courthouse
and the Public Defender's
buildings, we might be able to


Begin In Fall
Subsequent phases will en-
tail the renovation of the build-
ings for the Property
Appraiser, Tax Collector and.
other county operations.
A question that keeps aris-
ing is whether commissioners
should bid the project in its en-
tirety or in stages.
The argument for bidding
the project in its entirety --
even if the county has to bor-
row money to do it -- is that it
will result in a lower cost, es-
pecially as the price of build-
ing materials keeps rising.
The more conservative ap-
proach is to bid the project in
stages, as and when the fund-_
ing becomes available.


of the project.
That way, Lewis said, the
county can assure a better pric-
ing and at the same time give
itself time to come up with the
additional funding. He warned,
however, that given the rising
cest of construction materials,
that stipulated waiting period
can't be very long.
Commissioners are hesitant
to decide the issue one way or
the other, until the hard num-
bers come in from the bidders.
"Until we know the num-
bers, it's all conjecture," Com-
missioner 'Junior Tuten said
more than once, advice that his
colleagues appeared to be fol-
lowing.
(See Renovations, Page 2)


RANDY LEWIS, center, is the architect overseeing the
courthouse renovation project. Lewis expects the work
will begin in mid September. (News Photo)


Road Dept's Wish


~-~. _--- --- --; -~--:-c--":: : -----;;;- -;-~L~- --;-- ;rr-- --:-. ;---- -------ir---- r -:------ ~' '- ; ---"----r.-- c ---


IJ81 H Y EAK tN V- )u, Du %-rllm l


F I.











PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 30, 2006


"At


DURING enrichment time at JCHS Boys, Girls Club,
De'Andre Fagan, grade 10, accompanies vocalist La-
Tasha Jones, grade 12.


women
(Continued From Page 1)
took place in 2001, occurred
well before Hobbs took corn- .
mand of the department.
The increase also reflects an
increase in service demand,
due to a growing population.--
a theme echoed. in other de-
partments' budget requests.
"The calls are increasing,"
Hobbs said, remaarking that the
department registered 2,400
more calls, last year than the
previous year. ,
Too, he said, the department
was having to' absorb the sal-
ary of one of' three people
whose salaries previously had
been paid by a gra nt.
"For the past several years,
W' e have had a grant of be-
tween $150,000 and $200,000
every year," Hobbs said. "You
could use the money to enforce
drug activities and for salaries.
But the president cut the grant
,for some reason. We got a
$90,000 grant instead of


in Jail
$200,000 this year. That won't
fund three people. We'll have
to absorb the salary of one of
the three."
Hobbs said the other salary
his budget was having to ab-
sorb was the position of victim
advocate, which counsels
crime victims and helps then
negotiate 'the criminal justice
system ....
sHe said the state grant that
has paid for the position in the
past was "pla, ing out. fizzling
out.".:
What's more, it was getting
more and more difficult to get
the funding on a timely basis',
he said.
"I'm not even going to deal
with them anymore," Hobbs
said of the state, agency that'
doles out the. grant money..
"It's getting too frustrating. So
my budget will have to absorb
the salary to keep up the pre-
sent level of service."


Renovation To Begin


(Continued From Page 1)
County officials' goal. is to
convert the old high 'school
buildin',s on Water, Street into
a courthouse annex and offices
for the variouss county opera-
tions.
. Ultimately, 'the goal is to
consolidate most government
operations at Water Street re-
lieving the overcrowding in.


'HAPPY FOURTH OF JULY'

GOD BLESS AMERICA

OUR JEFFERSON COUNTY COMMUNITY

FRED SHOFNER
Candidate for Re-Election
Jefferson County School Board
District 3
Pd .Pol. Ad, Approved & Paid by Fred Shofner Campaign Account




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the old courthouse and provid-
ing the. public with a more
convenient location.
The goal also is to vacate
county-owned buildings in the
downtown, district so that these
can be better utilized by busi-
nesses, hopefully sparking
more economic development
in the area.


I Choose
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insurance plan
that keeps YOU
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Call 850-997-9981
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FMB Insurance Services
108 E. Washington St.
Monticello, FL 32344
A Contracted General Agency for
Ba BlueCross BlueShielt
of Florida


NOTICE!

City Hall Will Be Closed
Tuesday, July 4th

Garbage will not be picked up
on Tuesday but the Tuesday
route will be serviced
on Friday.

HAPPY INDEPENDENCE DAY!



THE JEFFERSON COUNTY
SCHOOL BOARD

Announces the regular school board'
meeting to which the public is invited.
The meeting will be held
at the Desmond M. Bishop
Administration Building on
Monday, July 10,2006 at 6:00 p.m.

Agendas may be picked up at the district office at
1490 W. Washington Street, Monticello, FL.
Monday through Thursday between the hours of
8:00-a.m.-and 5:00 p.m. A copy of the school
board packet will be available for review at the


Coordinator Back On


(Continued From Page 1)
times, in response to another
commissioner's allusion to the.
funding.


Joyner, Ilong with' the legis-
lative lobbying committee,
was instrumental in, the county
'receiving the state funding.


Caminez, Brown &

Hardee, P.A.

JoND. CAMINEZ
BOARD CERTIFIED CIVIL TRIAL ATTORNEY
IAN BROWN

CARY A. "BO" HARDEE, III






A

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1307 S. JEFFERSON STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
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The Jefferson
County Utility
Coordinating
Committee
will theet at
9:00 a.m. July 12,
2006, at the
Jefferson County
Extension Office,
275 North
Mulberry Street


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Gary L. Wright, president
and CEO of Farmers & Mer-
chants Bank, announces the
addition of Dr. .William Sim-
mons to the Bank's Tallahassee
Business Advisory Board.
"FMB's financial success is
based in no small part on its
dedication to meeting the
needs of local businesses," ex-
plained Wright.
S"One important aspect of our
success comes from the efforts
of our local Business Advisory
Board, and Dr. Simmons will
be a welcome addition to our
Tallahassee group."
Dr. Simmons is Board Certi-
fied.in Pediatrics, and a partner
with the North Florida Pediat-
ric Associates, P.A,
He is a member of the Florida
Medical Association, and a
member of the American Col-
lege of Legal Medicine.
Dr. Simmons moved to Tal-
lahassee in 1988, and is active
in numerous community serv,-
ice groups
'He serves on the Advisory
Board of the Girls & Boys


School officials report the
dress .code for the Jefferson
County Elementary School,
2006-07 school year.
It is the intent of the policy.
that each student will' wear
clothing and which will ap-
pear clean-cut, sized appropri-
ately, respectable, and not dis-
tracting to 'others.
Appropriate' clothing will
also eliminate safety hazards
and accidents.
For the lower half of the
body acceptable .clothing in-
cludes: Khaki pants, capris,
skirts in a' solid color' (navy,
tan, denim blue and black)
All pants, shorts and skirts
are to be worn at the waist. If.
they have belt loops, a belt
must be worn.
Hemlines for shorts and
skirts must be no shorter than
the student's kneecaps. Over-
sized or baggy clothing will
not be allowed.
For the top half of the body:
Solid colored dress shirts,
polo shirts with collars and
sleeves, and plain T-shirts in
the colors of black, gold, tan,
navy blue, or white, may be
worn.
A small insignia located at
the top pocket area, is the
only insignia acceptable for
the shirts.
Polo shirts of the appropri-
ate size may be worn tucked
in or left out; all other shirts
must be tucked in at the waist.
Shirts worn out must cover
the midriff, when arms are
raised above the head.
Shoes:
Regular shoes or tennis


Freedom of

the Press Is

Everybody's

Freedbatlf!


SIMMONS


Town of North Florida.
He also serves on the
Boards of both Trinity
lic School and John
Catholic High School.
Dr. Simmons will be
intoked,in setting the
tion of FMB business d
mention the Tallahse..


shoes, with toes and
covered, are required.
Shoes must not hav
l t1nMcI No Trl fli -fln


or ociea nu. p w p-nj p, ,J .
feet, bedroom slippers. or
heels are allov. ed.
Sttidents may not wear hats,
bandanas, or head coverings
of any kind %while inside of
the school buildings. ,
I Students ma\ not wear or
display. clothing that makes a
political statement, camou-
flage clothing, banners, or.
flags'.
The school colors are black
and gold; The mascot is the
Tiger.
Friday is School Spirit Day,
and everyone wears a school
shirt.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 30, 2006 PAGE 3


Truck, Car Collision Backs


Up 1-10 Taffic For Hours


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

A collision. between a-
tanker truck and a car, at
12:18 p.m., Monday, backed
up traffic in the westbound
lane of 1-10 at mile marker
222, for several hours.
FHP reports that Donald
Woodard, 48, of Baytown,
TX, was driving his 2003 In-
ternational semi-tanker com-
bination rig eastbound on I-10
in the inside lane.


A 1992 Honda ,ve
driven by Natalie C. I
22, of' St. Augustine,
traveling eastbound in
outside lane..
Woodard changed lane
struck Bassa's .vehicle w
sideswipe, then qi
turned left, causing the
to overturn..
The trailer landed on 1
Bassa's vehicle, crushi
flat.
Woodard lost control,
eling .into the median,,.
going the trailerr with, B


hicle, vehicle underneath.
Bassa, Both vehicles came to a final
was rest on the median where the.
i the trailer came off Woodard's'
rig, and both vehicles over-
es and turned.
vith a The trailer came to a final -
uickly
trailer rest, partly blocking the inside
a. l lane of westbound I-10.
top of 'Fire Rescue Chief Mark
ing it Matthews reported that one
lane of the westbound lane
trav- was shut down, causing traf-
drag- fic to back up.
assa's '
'He said that the lane was
congested from approxi-,
mately noon until 5:30 p.m.,'
mainly because of the cargo
Woodard was hauling, a
cryogenic liquid called Argon -
dr (used in welding and flores-
3rd 'cent light fixtures).
He explained that Argon -is
a gas that has been com-
pressed into, an extremely
c9ld liquid with a temperature
of about -300 to -320 degrees
below zero, and that the
tanker was daniaged and the .
liquid \%as %enting and spill-,
"It is so extremely cold, so
when it hits the air, .it dissi-
pates back into the gas form,"
said Matthews. "This was
causing dense, and dangerous :
fog-like conditions."
He said that because the
tanker .as 'damaged, fire-
fighters feared that if they at-
tempted to upright the
vehicle, that it could split
open.
"We had to .locate another _
vehicle and transfer the. load "
School before we could upright it,"
Catho- said Matthewls.
Paul II
He stressed that Argon is
actively, not poisonous.
direc- FHP reports that both driv-
evelop- ers were wearing seat belts,
;eg "' received minor injuries, and
that the ,collision was non-
alcohol related.
Woodard's vehicle sustained
$50.000 damage, Bassa's ye-
hicle, $8,06().
ES No charges are pending.

I heels
heels after Board
e heels Meeting Set


July 11I
Suwannee Rit er Water Man-
agement District Governing
Board will meet 9 a.m., Tues-
day, July 11, at District Head-
quarters, Hwyi49 and Hwy 90
East, in Live Oak.
The purpose of the meeting
is to consider'District business
and to conduct public hearings
on regulatory and land acquisi-
tion matters. \
A workshop will follow the
board meeting.
All meetings and workshops
are open to the public.


-- %, ..


** ^ ? ., -^ ; .. .". "






'. :-

-. A





TRAFFIC was backed up for hours on 1-10 East, Mon.
- day, after a tanker truck and car collided and wound up
on the median. (News Photo)



City Police Seeking

Replacement Of ficer


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Police De-
partient is currently recruit-,
ing new officers. .
: MPD Investigator, Chip,
S' springer said the department
is, seeking. to replace Officer
Tim Hightower, who .served.
with the department for ap-,
:,.,pro\irnately 10 \ears as a pa-.
trol officer, and left about a
month ago, to pursue a career
in the private sector.
Springer stated that MPD is
-an Equal Opportunity Em-
ployer and a drug-free ,work.
place.
The position requires a
minimum of a high school di-
ploma and Florida Police
Standards training N within. the
first month of being hired.
The starting salary range is
$25,000-$28,000 andjsuccess-
ful candidates will take home
the issued 'vehicle and must
live within 25 miles of MPD.


Elizabeth Suto.
Killed by a drunk driver
on'February 27,1994, on Bell Blvd.
in Cedar Park, Texas.
If you don't stop your friend
from driving drunk, who will?


Candidates must undergo a-
background check and drug
testing.
Springer stressed that expe-
- rience will be gained in all ar-
eas of the position, and the
candidate will complete 'a
Field Training Program.
Paid Vacation and benefits
information is available upon
request.
The city of Monticello will
also pay for college courses.
Interested candidates should
call 342-0150 for further in-
'formation.


in Business
25 Years

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

To show appreciation to his
longtime customers, owner of
the' Kwiky Mart in Aucilla,
Warren Kinsey, celebrated his
25 years of business by pro-
viding chicken and rice meals
for his customers. Saturday.
"We fed about 150-200 peo-
ple," said Kinsey. "We started
serving at 11 a.m. and the last
bit of it was served at 2 p.m."
Customers enjoyed a full
meal of chicken and rice,
bake. beans, Cole "slaw, dill
pickles and rolls. '
Kinsey added, that alto-
gether, they had prepared a
total of 15 gallons of chicken
and rice, five gallons, each of
baked beans and cole slaw,
and provided two gallons of*
dill pickles.
"This is just something to
show customers my'apprecia-,
tiont," said Kinsey. "It's just a
fun thing to do."
He related that business has
been pretty much the same
over the years, though, the
store has gro\ n a little.
The Kwiky Mart opened
June 24, 1981.






1480 W. Washington

Now Serving
Dine-In
Take Out
SBAR-B-QUE
Ei'eryday Specials 55.50
Open
i Mon.- Fri. 8-6
Sat., 8-5

997-5622


FLORIDA STATE I r.LFLO-F,; iO'' R Bi'AGOOD ',it,h.':'F 10P:D.',i AND
ROLLOVER YOUR D.R.O.P.
Relax...you've earned it.' But let's make sure your r-.er:rmrnr -.' qi
still work hard for you. Ask me today how to move ,o'ur P OP to a
State Farmm Traditional IRA. WE LIVE WHERE YOU LIVE"










Tommy Silrles. Agent
425 Sje[ferson S'Teet
Mc.nticello. FL 32344+..
BU 5 6 -10CiO 8 't .



UKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR | STATE FARM IS THliERE
Providing Insurance and Financial Services
Consult your tax or legal advisor for specific ad e.
S ,'tl...:r TrU sra lT Hfjrr 1.: l ,_ i lli i 1-. F -m r.. ,, T,, .TI'


Dr. William Simmons

Named To FMB's

Business Advisory Boa


Off icials Report


Dress Code At JI


Farmers




Merchants Bank








Will Be Closed

Tuesday

July 4th, 2006

In Observance Of

Independence Day


Normal Banking Hours

Resume Wednesday

Member F.D.I.C. An FMB. Bank












PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 30, 2006


Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to:' Mornticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-9.97-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net





Tribute Timely


For July 4th


U -


Opinion & Comment


Flag waving is never.more
appropriate than on our na-
tional holidays, especially the
Fourth of July. What the Flag
of the United States of Amer-
ica really means has been ad-'
dressed by Milton Caniff, the
late illustrator, whose famous
adventure cartoons have in-
spired patriotic young Ameri-
cans for decades.
Caniff s tribute to Old Glory,
written in the 1960's, is titled
"You Are The Flag." It goes
like this:
You've been aware that bits
of cloth, stitched into .ensigns,
are the symbols of the, vibrant
youth of other days, who an-
swered when the burden. fell
on them to carry a freedom's
torch another step ahead of
apath) and'fear:; when avarice
or despair became a threat to
what had been achieved b) toil
and earnest seeking to
improve. -
It now seems eas 1to assume
that you'd ha\e rallied to the
newborn colors flown at Bun-
ker Hill and in the cold of Val-
ley ., Forge, but agonizing
choice divided men of decency
at every, moment in the awe-
some sequence of travail
which faced the colonies and
spawned a way of life un-.
known before Patrick Henry
spoke our invocation in a voice
which thunders down the
years.

The Battle Flag Dixie cannot
truly tell how deep the chasm
in that phase of glory and de-
feat so close to home. Yet
from the clash of brothers
came the hopeful bastion of a
breed alone in conflict with a
world of blind obedience to
power. As free men falter in
far places, now the Stars and.
Stripes loom larger as the like:


of hope against the tides of red
which pound our shores.
Under this mantle grew the
Reeds and Mayos in the heal-
ing arts. Washington and Lin-
coln pioneered' in government,
native born and nro\'n Busi-
ness produced a Carnegie and
Ford, Elliot and Einstein flow-
ered in the fields of education.
Carver and Salk took science
routes to triumph .and renown.
The Wrightsand Glenn broke
bounds of air, then space. Edi-
son and Bell gave voice and
ear to all mankind while wor-
ship, free from fear, found ha-
ven here, allowing Mather and
Cabrini rights unknown in old
worlds shadow places.
In this still vast, rewarding
land, where, in the midst of
wails ofi advantage and -decay,
there yet arise unslickled nefri':
who, scoff.at whining-.odds.
We are a people of our own
design and purpose, young
enough a nation that the atro-
phy of dismal portent has not
cooled our zeal... Hence, in
this blooded heraldry there lie
unfinished seginents of a scene
of long horizons, past and fu-
ture; then and now.
You'll hear the weasel words
of harpies bending to the blow
of temporary hurt, but when
the going's tough,, think back
on all the young, Americans,.
much like you, who passed the
test when bleakness dulled the
future of:their land. The tat-
tered banners symbolize, how
well they stood and held
against the flood which never
full stopped, nor ever shall.
.Now the day is yours! Don't
wait for other guys to do the
job, to carry high the hallmark
of our faith in what we've
won.
The other guy is You. You
Are The Flag!


Columnist Reviews

Da Vinci Movie


By REX M. ROGERS
Columnist

If you've read The Da Vinci-
'Code, the book, don't bother
watching "The Da Vinci
Code", the movie. Depending
upon what part of this over-
long movie you're viewing,
you'll be disappointed, befud-
dled, grossed out by the self-
inflicted violence of one of the
characters (gratuitously, be-
cause his spiritually wrenching
self-flagellation is unnecessar-
ily shown twice in detail I
closed my eyes), or most of
all, just plain bored.
If you're a Tom Hanks fan,
you'll know he could have
done so much better. If you
like mysteries, you'll not really
recognize one here because
most of the middle period of
the movie is a seminar on what
you should be thinking. If
you're a Christian you may be
offended, but more likely


- .ou'll be relieved. If this is
the "threat" to Christian faith
people were worrying about,
then the\ overstated the prob-
- lem.
I watched the movie on its
opening day because day be-
cause people have been asking
me what I think and I wanted
to give them a credible answer.
I think this movie at times of-
fers blasphemous content, but
the movie is so stilted the con-
tent is more deadening than
spiritually unsettling.
It's possible, of course, for
people whose understanding of
their faith is limited or for peo-
ple who are spiritually con-
fused to in turn be confused,
misled 'or spiritually harmed
by the content offered in this
movie. But I think it's more
likely that whoever you were
and whatever you believe
when you go in to the cinema
will be who you are and what
(See DaVinci Movie, Page 5)


. Short Takes & Other Notions


By MERRY ANN FRISBY

Immigration has. been in the
news front lately. There is the
notion here that people who
want to move to the US should
learn English. This is a very.
sore spot with many local
folks. There may be a more
practical need to learn English
thai'hunr feelings
If you ,anit to sell anythiniig
on the internet, I suggest that
starting you invitation with
"Hei!" Is a bad idea. I am
blessed with an, internet service
that segregates spam.
I get so many spami messages
with non-English spelling that
I wonder what these people, are
thinking. Here are some re-
cent samples: "You, gape for
shooting..." "New I am sure it
was Revel in" or my favorite
"Life after college' ._


For me, life after college was
getting rid of those ;tacky
wooden purses with wine la-
bels glued on them. Do these
messages inspire you to send
them money? Do you want to
give these people your credit
card number? Do you have
any idea what they are selling?
I admit that the southern ver-
siop of English can be,,confus-
ing to Ia non-native.. 'I had a.
friend who moved to Tallahas-
see in the summer. When she
stopped at a 'country store for a
soda the clerk asked "Glass
eyes?" And she thought he
was remarking about her con-
tact lenses instead of a cool
drink.
Monticello southernese de-
mands that you call the local
nut a peecan not a pecon.
Years ago I needed a flat fixed.
A Monticello gas station man


kept asking about my 'tar' and
I kept telling him. that I -had a
flat. My friend Diddy Brown
needs a drink of waterer' my
thirsty friend Sonny Patterson
wants a 'co-cola.' .
Sometimes poor communica-
tion gets more dangerous..
Once I talked to a man who,
was in trouble. He had an ex-
tremel! southern accent...... He
asked the price of coffee in a


but one live in the south. Fix-
ing to go'to the store, or need-
-ing a drink of water is like a
secret handshake.
It means that ,you are part of
the club that lets-an old %woman
have your seat on the bus.
You are part of the club that
writes thank-you notes and
knows that you would be
struck down if you EVER
-- walked down the street with a.
i-C .arette lhan o onwl otur nf ri.-i


store run by a Pakistani man .. mouth.
They did not understand what There are shared values and
the other was saying. you can predict with a fair cer-
-you can predict With a fair cer-


Eventually this .lead to a.
fight and these two otherwise
gentlemen, both beaned each
- other with glass coffee pots.
Southern parents raised me
'but my husband's mother was
from Nebraska. I have raised
all of our children to say they'
are "fixing to," ,which drives
their Dad crazy. However, all--


tainty how another person-will
react. If someone calls you a
piss. ant, you had better
beware. If he calls you a yal-
ler piss-ant, you had better
duck.
Well, since it is so so very
hot today. I am fixing to get in
mah pool before I get the va-
-pors.


Global Warming Debated


By DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist


A hot button issue that just--
keeps showing up is the debate
over global warming. The
problem is, of course, there are
credible scientists and scien-
tific "evidence" to strongly
support both sides of the issue.
So, how is the average per--
son supposed to know what is
really going on with our planet
and .climate? Are we and fu-.
ture generations in danger of
destroying the very environ-
nment essential for all living
things? The "chicken little" of
the issue, (Now I didn't say AI -
Gore did I?) run around pan-
icking that the "sky is falling",
while nay sayers insist that the
planet is just going through a
cyclic pattern the same as it


lifetime. So who's right?
As a former science teacher,
I' have been aware of, anc
closely following.the argument
about global warming foi
years. I give the most credibil-
ity to the National Oceano-
graphic and Atmospheric Ad-
ministration (NOAA) data
aind studies, because they
have no agenda to advance and
; serve as "honest brokers".
Here is what we know. There
does appear to be an increase
(one degree) of, atmosphere
manning g due to an increase in
the "'greenhouse" gases. These
eases are essential to us .be-
cause they trap the warmth of
'the sun in our atmosphere and
keep the planet at constant re-
gional seasonal temperatures.
The danger is the overload-
ing of these gases in the atmos-
phere and trapping more that is


has always done throughout its- !'desired, which would ulti-


mately cause significant
, changes in life forms and thei
I very existence.
t This increase is credited t
r the burning of fossil fuel
(coal) mainly throughout th
industrial ages, especially in
America. Before you get too
excited, however, remember
that water vapor is by far the
most dominant "greenhouse'
gas.
- Today, the United States i
the leader in reducing all form
of harmful emissions into tha
atmosphere. Unfortunately
newly developing industrial
nations such as China and In
dia deem it more important -t
improve their capitol invest
ments and profits than worr
about the effects of their op
erations on the atmosphere.

Advocates of global warm
S-ing point to the melting of the


It frozen poles as evidence of in-
r creased global warming. While
there is indeed the loss of ice
o at the North Pole, there is .a
s large group of scientists that
e attribute this loss to natural
n causes they refer to as '.'Arctic
o Oscillation."
r This is a cyclic weather phe-
e nomena of a spinning ring of
" air over the pole that reduces
the ozone layer and makes sig-
nificant changes in the surface
s winds, which they believe con-
tributes to thinner ice.
at Another argument is that
Y' there is more severe weather,
al especially hurricanes. Easy to
say, coming off last year's
0 hurricane season. Watch out
for tricks here. Most advocates
y of global warming use hurri-
cane data going back 35 years:
In actuality, the most active
hurricane season on record
e (See Global, Page 5)


Off Roading More Popular


Americans are known for
seeking the roads less traveled
and, in many cases, continuing
to journey even after the road
ends.
More than 50 million Ameri-
cans went off-roading in 2005,
a 42 percent increase since
2000.
For fans of off-roading, there
are two considerations when
taking to the dirt and rocks of
off-road driving: safety and
ecology.


Safert starts with having the
right equipment a vehicle
that's designed for uneven, un-
predictable terrain and tough,
dependable tires that can take
the punishment of dirt, rocks,
ra\ ines and more. And by fol-
lowing ecological guidelines,
,, you can help ensure that trails
Swill be enjoyable for other ad-
venturers.
"' 1. Inform someone of where
\ou are going and when you
expect to return.


2. Make sure your vehicle
has plenty of fuel.
3. Ride at safe speeds for ex-
isting conditions.
4. Travel straight up and
down hills never traverse the
face of a hill; it may cause
your vehicle to slip sideways
or roll over.
5. Cross large rocks or other
obstacles slowly, at an angle,
one wheel at a time.
6. Cross ravines at a 45-
degree angle.


7. Only cross streams at a
designated fording point.
8. Never turn around on nar-
row roads, steep terrain or un-
stable ground.
9. Avoid stopping in tall
grass or brush, which can be
ignited by engine heat.
10. Reduce tire pressure to
improve traction in tough off-
road conditions. ,
To highlight some of the best
(See Off Roading, Page 5)


HOMEBOUND Teacher Dr. Mark McCoy, discusses the prize winning card design of
his student Jeffrey Kimberlin, in Nov., 1990. (News File Photo)


.












MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 30, 2006 PAGE 5


Flossie Davis Foundation


Awards 2 Scholarships


WILBUR DAVIS, left, son of Flossie Davis, presents
$1,000 Flossie Davis Foundation Scholarships to Linton
Wildgoose and Michelle Allen at a reception held in
their honor.


'7

I



I


4x


JCHS Boys and Girls Club Director Charles Smith pre-
sents framed certificates to Flossie Davis Scholarship
recipient Linton Wildgoose.



DaVinci Movie Review


(Continued From Page 4)
you believe when you come
out.

Dan Brown's "The Da Vinci
Code" has sold. more than 43
million copies so far, so he is
laughing all the way to the
bank. But I read a lot of nov-
els, ,and I did not think
Brown's plot was all that en-
gaging. At times, the book,
like the movie it spawned, is
downright slow. I did not ap-
preciate the author's twisted
history and theology. I did not
like reading about the Lord Je-
sus described in a manner I
considered dishonoring to him.

I am concerned about super-
stitious people embracing a
book of fiction as truth, but I
don't think this book will have
a long shelf life. I especially
am not worried about the
book's ostensible threat to
Christianity.

There is always much new
error but truth is eternal.
Surely we do not think that a
book as shallow as this one can
overturn the evidence of centu-
ries and millions of people's
lives that .God Is and that
Christ is the Way, the Truth,
and the Life?
Christianity has survived
much greater threats than this.
I'm not understating the
book's blasphemous themes.
I'm just saying the Sovereign
God is not surprised by them.
In my estimation, "The Da
Vinci Code" movie is DOA.

Rex M. Rogers, who holds a
Ph.D. In political science from
the University of Cincinnati, is
a syndicated newspaper col-


umnist in almost 100.newspa-
pers and president of
Cornerstone University, Grand
Rapids, Mich.


D I ES"A The parent agency for the
DEBBIE SNAPP Foundation is the Chaires
Staff Writer Community Life Enrichment
Center Inc., an outreach of the
The Flossie Davis Founda- Chaires' Community Apos-
tion held an evening of cele- tolic Holiness Church.
bration Saturday, in honor of Flossie Davis was known
scholarship recipients Mi- by many as "Mother Davis,"
chelle' Allen and Linton and her house was that home
Wildgoose. away from home for FAMU



Global Warming


(Continued From Page 4)
was in 1940 with 23 storms
making landfall. Last year be--
came the most active "named
storm" season eclipsing 1933..
However, 1935 still holds the
number one position for the,
most powerful ranked hurri-
Cane. The remainder of the
top ten are all between 1886
and 1960.;
Interestingly, one of the low-'
est decades for the least storms
and those making landfall was
between 1970 and 1979 during
the height of our industrial out-
puts before strong environ-.
mental laws limiting green-
house emissions were enacted.
How about El Nino causing
more cyclones in the Pacific
Basin? El Nino may be intensi-
fied by global warming, but is
believed by many scientists to
be a weather phenomena that
could go back' for millions of
e ears.
It is the surface warming .of"
the Pacific Ocean, which some
attribute to creating an increase
in. Pacific storms. Interestingly,
while Pacific tropical cyclone
acti irt, has indeed, increased
in the world's northern hemi-'
sphere, Cyclonic activity is
significantly .down .in the
southern.
Most significantly, we can't
ignore the importance of the
sun's radiation output. Solar
flairs anid'"black spot activity
send out large volumes 6f tadi-'


ated energy. Between 1550
and 1800 there was little if any
such activity by the sun and
the earth underwent a mini-ice
age. Summers were no longer
predictable in northern Europe
and in 1750, the Swiss Alps,
glaciers advanced to engulf
'farms and towns.
Unfortunately, there are
many uncertainties related to
the study of global warming.
Some things such as the laws
of physics are very reliable
others are, at best, the results
.of limited historical data,
guesses as to the true meaning
of available data, or. outright
unknowns.
Our response to global
arming should not be "knee
jerk" hysteria, but guided by
the.current and future reliable
scientific technology ahd de-
cided by careful evaluation of
proven and realistic facts.
Unfortunatel,- politics has
injected its opportunistic evil
into this important issue. 1, for
one, am tired of hearing that if
you disagree with the environ-
mental wackos position, you
are automatically out to de-
stroy our water, air, forests and.
world.
While panic is far from nec-
essary, I do believe that a con-
scientious and balanced
approach to protecting our en-
vironment is important as a na-
tion and as responsible care
takers of our planet.


S. DOers Club Diabetes
nn 'rn, "iln ihTn MAt1


abuElljJ VE gb16fN u


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The DOers Diabetes Support -
Club will meet 12:15 p.m.,
July 13, at the Health Depart-,
ment, 1255 W. Washington
Street.
The meeting will consist of
a question and answer
session.


Health Educator Bonnie
Mathis said that anyone hav-
ing questions pertaining to a
diabetes nutrition plan, is en-

couraged to attend the meet-
ing for a quick nutrition
review.


Free nutrit
recipes will b


campus students, Bond Com-
munity families, and many
families of Miracle Temple
Apostolic Holiness Church, as
well as Chaires Community
Apostolic Holiness Church.
As Mistress ofCeremony,
Sister Naomi Williams glided
through the evening begin-
ning with the introduction of
Bishop Freeman Davis Jead-
ing in the Prayer and Scrip-
ture.
Charles Smith, director of
the Jefferson County High
School Boys and Girls Club


presented the recipients with
gold framed certificates of ac-
complishments in academics,
and for exhibiting unselfish-
ness in community volunteer-
ism.
He told of their club activi-
ties involvement's and deeds.
Wilbur Davis, son of
Flossie Davis, then presented.
each of the recipients a check
for $1000 towards their edu-
cation.
Michelle Allen will pursue a
career in Early, Childhood De-
velopment at Tallahassee
Community College.
Linton Wildgoose will pur-
sue a career in Engineering at
North Florida Community
College.


Off Roading Popular


(Continued From Page 4)
off-road trails in the country,
BFGoodrich Tires, in conjunc-
tion with Tread Lightly and
United' Four Wheel Drive As-
sociations, has launched its
Outstanding Trails program.
The program is dedicated to
the responsible use and preser-
vation of these off-road trails
and will 'aid in the effort -to
keep these tails sustainable.
"Last year, more than 50
million people sought adven-
ture through recreational off-
road driving; the sport is ex-
ploding in popularity," said
Kaz Holley, brand director for
BFGoodrich Tires. "Each one
of the trails highlighted in this
program is amazing, and em-
bodies the very best in off-'
roading.
The program identifies five
of North America's best trails.
From desolate desert stretches
to towering peaks and rolling
hillsides, these trails are
unique in toughness and-
beauty. -
After a careful selection
process, five of North Amer-
ica's "outstanding" off-road
trails were nominated for
uniqueness, terrain type and.
enthusiast following: :
Historic Naches Pdss, also'
known as the Lontigmire
Wagon Train, takes off-road
drivers over the Cascade
Mountains in Naches, Wash.
Upper Tellico Trail, Trail
#4, located in the Nantahala
National Forest, is located in
an area where Tennessee,'
North Carolina and Georgia-
meet.


Black Bear Pass, near Ou-
ray, Colo., is,a picturesque trail
nestled in the San Juan Moun-
tains.
Pyeatt Draw, a scenic and
exiting trail situated in Payson,
Ariz.
Hell's Revenge, with its
slick sandstone slopes, brings
adventure to thrill seekers in
Moab, Utah.

WILD Board
Sets Meeting
Wilderness Coast Pulblic Li-
braries (WILD) Governing
Board will meet 2 p.m., Mon-
day, July 10, at the Jefferson
County Library, on Water
Street.
For additional information '
call (850) 926-4571.

















starts Julyll
NFOtC.- Madison, Fla

We.te WWWNF DU
TO REGISTER: WI

850.973.1


tion literature and -
)e provided: hree Sisters !
'Three Sisters

Guest Chef: Rob Mazur i

Financial Consultant

MerrillLynch

511 Preparing his fabulous fillet

Fri. 6-30-06, 5:30pm until...

321-7102
. . .


sonal Injury -Insurance Settlement
1ngful Death *Defective Products
:o Accidents -Truck Accidents
& Fall Accidents -Motorcycle Accidents
Home or Hospital Visits Upon Request
NOTHING UNLESS 0 1 A 1-.-\
FIV vnYR CAS EB


For any kind of government information,
from student loans to Social Security benefits to
buying surplus government property,
go to www.FirstGov.gov. Need more help?
E-mail us or call 1 (800) FED INFO.



I FIRSTGOVgov
.v.rnment me.d...easy


New Uniform Shop in Thomasville

Scrubs & More
312 S. Broad St. Thomasville, GA 229-227-1!
Mon-Fri, 11-6 Sat, 11-2
"Helping You Look Great At Work!"
Scrubs *Uniforms *Shoes & Asscessories


f~HlilfiBWIIB~s~i~i


I

















, cv 1 n/ M irWi.LrT .n .0 ,l). NEWS. FRI.. JUNE 30, 2006


Lifestyle


Cookseys Observe

50th Anniversay


E Lloyd Lions Seeking

iNew Meeting Place


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Barbara and Paul Cooksev.
of Lamont, will celebrate their
50th Wedding Anniversary on
Saturday, July 15, with a re-
ception from 3-5 p.m. In the
Fellowship Hall of Lamont
Baptist Church.
The couple was married
July 13, 1956 in Lamont at
the home of her parents, the
late Louise and Carlos Capps.
They lived in Lamont for
most of their married lives.
She is a retired postal clerk
from the Monticello Post Of-
fice and he is retired from the


Department of
Transportation.
Their children are Kay
Lewis and husband Ruben of
Eridu, Paula Cooksey, and
Janet Cooksey of Waukeenah,
and Ann,Cooksey of Perry.
Their grandchildren are
Nikki Lewis Wotherspoon
and husband Paul, Liz Lewis,
and Josh Lewis; and their
great granddaughters are Ken-
dal and Allie.
The couple invite all family
and friends to attend the, re-,
ception.
' "Your love is a treasured
gift, we request no Other,"
they say.


Homes Of Mourning


Johnnie Mae Davis
Brooks
Johnnie Mae Davis Brooks,
age 68 a retired secretary, died
Thursday, June 22, 2006. in
Bradenton.
Funeral services will be held
on Saturday, July 1, 2006, at
11 a.m. EDT at Gethsemane
Missionary Baptist Church,
526 9th Avenue West Braden-
ton under the direction of-
Westside Funeral Home in'
Bradenton (941-722-4960)
with graeside services to be :
held on Sunday, July .2, 2006
at 2:00 p.m. at, Mt. Olive
Cemetery in Capps.
A native of Jefferson
CountN. she had been a long-
time resident of Palmetto be-
fore retiring to Mionticello sev-
eral years ago.
Survivors include two
daughters, Patrice (Johnny)
Rumph and Wanda Brooks.
her parents,, Cleveland and
Rosa Frazier. sisters Alma
Marie (James.) Lewis and Ethel
Zeigler, nine grandchildren,
one-great grandchild, along.
with numerous other relative
and friends.,
She was preceded in death in
2004 by a' daughter Shawn
Brooks. Tillman Funeral Home
is in charge: of local arrange-
ments.
Eloise Thompson
Eloise Thompson, age 78, of
Monticello, died June 23,
2006, at Brynwood Nursing
Center.
Thompson was a native of
Jefferson County for 78 years
and a house wife.
She is survived by her hus-
band Andrew Thompson, 5
sons Paul Geathers. (Baker
Field, Ca.), Columbus Parker
Jr. (Melbourn), Andrew
Thompson Jr. (Colorado
Springs), and Rickey Thomp-
son (Tallahassee) and one
daughter, Irene Thomspon (of
Monticello), 17 grandchildren
and 17 great grands.
Funeral services will be July
1, 2006, 3 p.m. at Memorial-
Missionary, Baptist Church,
with J.B. Duval moderator. In-'
terinent will follow at Pallbear-
ers Cemetery. Pallbearers are
Clarence Whitfield, Johnny
Whitfield, Robert Williams,.
Donna Whitfield, George
White and Henry Woody..
Honorary pallbearers are Dea-


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Mose "Dick" Wilson,
Sr. "
Mose "Dick" Wilson,: Sr.
also. known .as Mose Rivets,
Sr. 'age 85. a retired farmer and
entrepreneur died Sunday,
June 24, 2006. at home in
Monticello.
The service will be at 11:00
am. on Saturday, July 1, 2006
at St. Phillip AME Church in
Monticello with burial' at the
Church Cemetery with military
honors. Family will. receive
friends (viewing) 2 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. Friday, June 30 at,
Tillman Funeral Home.
A native and lifelong resi-
dent of Jefferson County. Mr.
Wilson was a WWII Army
Veteran, a former school bus
driver, entrepreneur and
farmer.
Cherishing his loving mem-
ory is his wife Mary Thobbs
Wilson) of Monticello. Other
survivors include four sons,
Jbe Arthur (Annette) Wilson,
James Lee Wilson and Laverne
(Elvira) Wilson, all of Monti-
cello and Willie James Rivers
(Barbara) of Winter Haven;
two daughters Gloria Jean
Monroe and Wanda Faye
(James) Wilson of Thomas-
ville, GA.; 32 grandchildren,
35 great grandchildren, one'
great great grandchild and a
host of nieces, nephews other,
relatives and friends. He was
preceded in death by his sons,
Mose ,Jr. and James, daughter,
Betty and sister, Roxie
McNeil.
Corine E. Hudson
Corine E. Andrews Hudson,
79, who retired as a registered
nurse from Tallahassee Memo-
rial Hospital, died Monday ,
June 26, 2006.
The service will be at 11a.m..
EDT Saturday at St. Marga-
ret's Catholic Church, with
burial at Tallahassee Memory
Gardens. A rosary will be said
one hour before the service; at
the church. A viewing will be,
from noon to 8p.m. EDT Fri-
day at Strong & Jones Funeral
Home (850-224-2139). In lieu
of flowers, memorial contribu-,
tions may be made to Big
Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan'


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Lloyd Lions Club met at the
home of Kevin Campbell this
week to discuss a new meet-,
ing location.
The group came up with a


the BP Travel Center in
Lloyd, on a soon to be deter-
mined date.
An Installation of Officers
dinner will be held at the BP
Travel Center conference
room, on a date.to be decided
at the July meeting.


few suggestions which will be The. Lions Club meets at 7
checked out and discussed at p.m. 'on the first and third
their next ineeting, on Tues- 'Tuesday of each month.
lday, July 11. For information about up-
Possible fundraisers for the coming events, or member-
club were also discussed. ship contact Campbell at
A car wash is planned at '212-4875 or 9,97-1754.


IJuly Summer Reading

Programs At Library


MR. AND MRS. PAUL COOKSEY


The Library Summer Read-
ing Program %ill host a Mag
Lab :at 10:30 a.m. .on Thurs-
day, July 13.
The Lab will discuss prisms
and magnification for stu-
.dents in grades 2 through 8,.

The'program is especially
geared to those interested in
,Science.
A craft program titled Grow
It. will be offered 10:30 a.m.
Friday, July 14. Participants
Will be given instruction on
how, to. create vegetable


prints.
Heidi Copeland, agent for
the, County Extension Office
\ill provide the instruction.
A Bird Show is planned
10:30 a.m. on Thursday, 'July
20, to which the community is
invited. .
Some magnificent, birds are
expected to be on hand.
The Library is open 9 a.m.
ori Tuesday through Saturday.
Closing hours are: 8 p.m,
Tuesday ; Wednesday through
Friday, 5:30 p.m.; and 3 p.m.
Saturday .


Church News Notes


Northside Church of Christ
will hold Vacation 'Bible
School 8:30 a.m. to. 4 p.m.,
July 8. Theme is "Bound for
S the Arctic Challenge: Pulling
Together- As God's Team."
Lunch will be served.


'MR.,AND MRS. PAUL COOKSEY
July 13, 1956


Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL
3230'8 .
Born in Havana, Corine was
the daughter of the late Silas!
and Rebecca Andrews. She
moved to New York, where
she met her husband, Ch'ancey.
After working many years in
New York, she went'to school
to become a registered nurse.
She and Chancey moved back
to Havana and later to Monti-
cello. She worked for many
years at TMH before retiring.
She was a very active member
of St. Margaret's Catholic
Church.
Sur\ i\ ors include six grand-
children Cynthia T. Jimener)
of York, Pa., Theodore D.,
Davis and O'Kima C. Davis ;
.(and Dexter), all of the Bronx,
N.Y., Thurston Davis (and
Lauren) of Tallahassee and
Mia Davis (and Fred) of Ha-
vana; a stepsister, Ella Mae
Morgan of New York; three.


sisters-in-law, Emma Simmons'
(and Whitfield) of East
Orange'Union N.J., Doroth)
Andrews of Havana and
Naomi Washington of. Talla-
hassee; a brother-in-law, Wil-
lie Hudson. of Bronx; 13 great
grandchildren; a host of nieces
and nephews; her devoted
friends, Carol -Muller, Carol
Spruce,. Ruby Whlitson and Mr.
And Mrs. Lajara Ale Man., all
of Monticello, Shanda Sapp of
Madison and Dr. Rachil Rob-
inson of Tallahassee; Big Bend
Hospice of North Florida; and.
a host .of other sorrowing
friends and relatives.
,She was preceded in death
by her husband, Chancey; her
parents; a son, Theodore
Davis; and three brothers,
Freddie. Lee Andrews,, James
Andrews and Nathan Andrews.


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AS.SOCIAfION
MEMORIALS &TRIBUTES '

1800-AHA-USA!
This space provided as a public service.
@199,. American Heart Association


First Baptist Church of Mon-
ticello will hold a Patriotic
Musical program 6 p.m., Sun-
day. The program includes
new choir music, group. sing-
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ites. .


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Triple L Club Hears


Patriotic Program
was added to the pledge by a
DEBBIE SNAPP Congressional Act on June
Staff Writer 14, 1954. -
To veterans throughout
Triple L members and their '--American history, the. Stars
guests met for a patriotic pro- and Stripes has served as a
gram, Tuesday, lead by Irene symbol of their service and as
Evans. a continuing testimony that
A program on Flag Eti- the service was worthwhile..
quette, was also presented by The program continued with
Shirley Widd. patriotic music and songs. All
She distributed booklets attending received an appro-
about Flag Etiquette and in- private decorated writing pen,
structed the attendees about complements of Widd and a
the proper way to display a handmade flag pin, compli-
flag. ments of President Mary
SWidd talked ab6ut the Pledge Helen Andrews.
.of Allegiance to the Flag. Most attendees were
The wording of the pledge dressed in red, white, and
varies slightly from the origi- blue for this meeting.
nal, which was drawn up in Covered dish items they
1892 in the. office to The- brought also complemented
Youth's Companion Magazine the program theme.
in Boston. Hostesses were Nancy Pace,
It was first used in the pub- Fannie Mae 'Purvis, Ethel
lic schools in celebration' of Stiickland, and Connie Sule-
, Columbus Day, October. 12, phen.
1892. An Ice Cream Social and
The pledge received, official BBQ is planned for 6 p.m.'
recognition by Congress in an Thursday, July 13. This is a
Act approved June 20, 1942. Triple L activity and will not
h p: take the place of the July 25
The phrase, "under God" meeting.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 30, 2006 PAGE 7

Extension Agent's Tips

For Summer Salads


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Tips about creating good,
healthy summer time. salads
can be found at the web site
of: MyPyramid.g'ov, Exten-
sion Agent Heidi Copeland,
relates.
The site. stresses the use of
unrefined, good quality food.
"Most anything can be used
to make a salad," said Cope-
land. "Use what your family
enjoys and you will have a
cost-effective, nutritious, al-
most effortless meal."
Make half of your grains,
whole and consider trying
brown rice, wild rice; cracked
wheat (bulgur), whole wheat
' pasta and couscous in your
salad,
Vary your vegetables, and
eat more -ibrantly colored


ones. Try corn cut off of the
cob, blanched, fresh beans,
boiled potatoes, grape toma-
toes, broccoli and spinach,
Copeland recommends.
When using lettuce, it
should be well washed and,
the darker the color,. the
better.
When focusing on fruits,
choose fresh, frozen, canned
(not in syrup) or dried.
To avoid excess fats and oil,
use only what you need. Try
a bit of oil mixed with a fla-
vored vinegar, herbs and
spices.
For calcium-rich foods, go
low-fat or fat free when you
chose milk products for your
salad.
And go lean with protein.
Vary your protein routine by
choosing 'fish, beans, peas,
nuts and seeds to enhance
. your salad.


SHIRLEY WIDD was the speaker for the Triple L June
Patriotic Meeting. She displayed this crocheted flag
was made years ago by her sister-in-law, and passed
on to her. (News Photo)


Garden Circles, Except


Camellia, On Hiatus


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

While the Monticello Gar- -
den Club is comprised of four
Garden Circles that meet.
monthly, three of which are
on summer hiatus until meet-
ings resume in the. fall.

The Camellia Circle is the
onl\ Circle to meet during the


summer months at 2 p.m. on
the third Sunday 'of the'
month.
Circles which resume meet-
ing in September include:
The Founders Circle, which
meets noon on the second
Tuesday of the month.
The. Magnolia Circle meets
at noon on the third Mdnday
of the month.
The Mignonette Circle meets


at 12 noon. on ,the second
Wednesday, beginning i
September.
Among the activities of th
Garden Club this \ ear are:
, Club and Circle officers, at
tended an Officer's Trainin
Summit, in September.
Members made a goo
showing at the District IlI Fa
General Meetinto in Madison.

At the Fall General Nleetin


"IT'S BACK"


in October, a "Fun With
Flowers" program was of-
fered' to members and their
guests. Members created Fall
Centerpieces for themselves.
Their hats were creati'el
decorated and awards were
d won by a chosen few.
n Members observed Florida
Arbor Day in, January by
e planting trees at the Oakland,
Cemetery.;:
t- A Plant Exchange and Sale
g .was the program for their
Spring General Mleeting in
d April.


11l


g


For National Arbor Day in
April, members planted trees
at their chosen locations.
Members made yet another
good showing to the District
III Spring General Meeting in
Liye QOak, for a program on
water conservation.
In May, Club and Circle of-
ficers attended the National
Garden Clubs Convention and
the FFGC State Convention in
Orlando.
They enjoyed a week of en-
lightening programs, work-
shops, training sessions, and
hobnobbing with national' and
state officers and dignitaries.
More recently, the Club
sponsored two 4-H members
*to attend Camp Cherry Lake
in July.
The Garden Club is arrang-
ing the installation of cement
benches of the Library, on
Water Street..
The Club w ill partner with
the newly organized group,
Friends of Green Industries
Institute.
President Dianne Braren
can be contacted at 997-3729,
about upcoming Circle activi-
ties and for membership in-
formation.


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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 30,2006


Sports


FMB Golf Tournament


Winners Announced


Warmack, fourth with 91.
FRAN HUNT L. Weimorts shot an 89; B.,
Staff Writer Buzbee, 91; and J. Fuller, 98.
In the eighth flight, K.
The 41st annual Farmers Ryan, first with 83; J.
and Merchants Bank Water- Weldon, second, with 85; Mr.
melon Golf Tournament, was Golf, third, with -88; and B.
hosted at the Country Club Bellflower, fourth, with 88.
over the weekend, with Mar- J. Ikner shot 89; T. Folsom,
cus Beck named champion 90; and Roy Kinsey and T.
after shooting a 68 and 68. Swords, each shot 91.
He won by seven shots over In the ninth flight. R. Strick-
his closest competitor. land, first with' 93; J. Jordan,
Dick Whitmore finished second, with 93; B. Edwards,
second, which he has done third with 93; and C. Jackson,
seven times in the past. fourth, with 94.
The event kicked off with J. Harris and H. Beshears
the Past Champions each shot 93; F. Golden, 95;'
Shoot-out, Friday. and B. Ranew, 98.
During the past champions In- the tenth flight, S. Sa oyv,
shoot-out, one player was first, with 98; T. Rehberg.
eliminated per-.hle, until Ja- second, % ith 99; K. Buzbee,
red Sullivan was left standing third with 104. and Young-
and declared the champion of blood shot a 98.
past champions. B. Williams, 103; C. Castle-,
,ton, 105; A. Cooksey, 106;
A total of 96 golfers were and J. Hunter. 114.
shooting it out during the Saturday night, the Whiter-
two-day, 12 heat event. melon Dance was held and a"
Spokesman Chuck Cham- full barbecue dinner was
bers said it was a real treat to served.
have county native, and Hall Todd Thigpen, Mary Joe
of Fame pro football player Wyche and Johnny Thigpen
for the LA Rams, Jack. performed the cooking tasks.
Youngblood, compete in the "What a great meal," said
tournament. Chambers.. "Thanks for a
tournament.
great job."
In the first flight, J. Johnson From 9 p.m. until 1 a.m.,-
finished first with 82; C. "-the band, 19-South kicked off
Cantley and R. Veal tied with the music for the capacity
an 83; Wentworth and B. Hin- crowd. "It was a great evening
kle each shot a second a third of music and dancing," said
place tie; and J. Harrell fin- Chambers.
ished fourth, with 84. 2006 Watermelon Queen
During the second game in Joanna Cobb, presented the
that flight, R. Wentworth and champion's trophy to Beck.
B..Hinkle each shot a 78 for Watermelon Princess Dana
second and third place; and J; ," .Jane Watt, presented 'Beck the
Harrell shot an S4 fo4faiuthrt, trophy for- leading at the dse
.., i..... 8 v ,i of the firstiday.
D.' Mtchell; 82; C. Cantley Beck will have his name en-
and R. Veal each shot 83. graved on the plaque of
In Championship B, J Sulli- champions that hangs in the
van finished first with 76; Country Club trophy room.,
Bobby Plaines .finished sec- "We want to thank FMB,
ond with 76; M. Dickey fin- Gary Wright and Jerald Ikner
ished third with 77; and M. for all their support making
Puhl, secorid with 90; R. the. Jefferson County Club's
Watt, third, with 88; and C. _.41st tournament, a success,"


ACA Warriors Ready For


Start Of Football Season


Aucilla athletes, consistently
numbering 15-18, continue to
Meet three nights per week'
for summer football related'
workouts.
The boys varsity and JV
players, and the coaches have
been getting together every 6
to 8 p.m., Monday, Wednes-
day and Thursday evening in
the weight room, working on
running, agility, -football re-
lated exercises such as pass-,


ing and catching, and working
on both defensive and offen-
sive plays on the field.
Coach Joe Striplin said that
he expects more players to
turn out after the summer, as
many potential players are cur-
rently busy with summer jobs.
"They will make up for the
time they lost out on by the
time we have our first game,"
said Striplin., "The first offi-
cial practice will be 7 a.m.,
July 31."


Lady Diamonds Tie Lloyd 4-4;
Primetime Downs Kings 31-6


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

After teaching a 4-4 tie in
the second inning, the softball
game of the Lady Diamonds
against Lloyd, was called.
The Lady Diamonds are
slated for action again against


Mayo, 4 p.m., Sunday at the
Recreation Park.
In related news,' Kings of
the South fell to Primetown
31-6, and Coach Wilbo Ellis
said he does not keep nor
publicize statistics.
The Kings are also slated
against Mayo, 4 p.m.,
Sunday, here.


I's her future.Do the math'


He said that players and
coaches would be working on
getting stronger and faster, on
agility, and making improve-
ments to both offensive and
defensive tactics to improve
the team.
Of those attending the work-
out sessions, Striplin said
there were two players who
have not missed one day,
Matt Dobson, who attended a
quarterback camp at Valdosta
State University recently, and
Reggie Walker.
Players reporting for work-
outs on a consistent basis in-
clude Steve Griffin, Wade
Scarberry, J. T. Ward, Josh
Carswell, Michael Kinsey
Woody Vollertsen and Daniel
Greene.
. The first official game of the
season is set against St.
Augustine, Aug. 15.
Striplin said the first three
games of the season are away
games, slated for St.
Augustine, Gainesville, and"
Cottondale. .The season.
schedule will be forthcoming.
Coaches assisting Striplin
include Loren Vause, defen-
sive coordinator, Terry Dob-
son, working with the
receivers and defensive backs,
and Richard Watt, working
with the linebackers and tight-
ends.
Striplin concluded that the
2006-07 football season
looked to be a promising one,
with the return of promising
players.
The Jamboree is slated for
Aug. 8, where Aucilla, John
Paul, Carrabelle and Munroe
will play a scrimmage game.


CHICKEN DELITE, Coach Pitch award winners include, from left, Nick Matthews,
Sportsmanship; Robert County, Most Improved; Christopher Miller, Most Valuable,
Stephon Roberts,.Most Improved.


Chamber concluded.
Reams shot a 78. .
In Championship A, Beck
finished first with 68; D.
Whitmore finished second
with 71; M. Grant took third
with 69; R. Bechtol finished
fourth with 71;' Billy Boy
shot 71; and S. Olive shot 75.
In the second flight, B.
Fletcher finished first ith 70,
R. Avant finished second with
72; Big Bird finished third
with 73; and M. Dees finished
fourth with 75.
Big "H" shot a 73; M. Lynn
shot a 74; and N. Prine shot a
76.
In the third flight, C. Collins
took first with 78; J. Walton
took second %% ith 78; R. Blue
took third with 78; and T.
Monroe took fourth \\ ith 82.
Big Head shot a '78; S..,
Tomlinson shot 81; and L.
Bennett and B. Schofill each
shot an 82.
In the fourth flight, G.
Bishop finished first with 85;
T. McCabe, second with 87;
A. Clements, third with 84;.
and S. White, fourth, with 89.
J. Sherer arid S. Rissinan
shot an 84; M. Revell shot an
87; and R. Kinsey shot a 91.
In the fifth flight, H. Shows
finished first % %ith 78; B. Pop-
pell finished second with 79;
J. Evans, third, \ ith 76; and
M. Bishop, fourth. \ ith 81.,
B.,Warmack shot a 77; B.
Searcy shot a 79; and Earl
Cooksey shot an 81.
In the sixth flight, T. Smith'
took first \\ith 83; D. Phelps
took i second with 82; T.
Wetiheringron rook third 'ith''
82;, J. Wolfe shot an 84; D.-
Boatner shot an 85-; and D.
Brewer shot an 86.
In the seventh flight, M.
Carney, first, with 89; K.
T. Brown Jr., and L. Ben-
nett each shot a 77; :and R.
Howell finished fourth with
76.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 30, 2006 PAGE 9


Celebrating July 4th


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Call for quality work
45 Years In The. Trade
Jerry Cole PiTnting Corp...
850-997-7467 850-544-2917
Residential Commercial
Interior Exterior



Sorensen Tire Center
Jeff Sorensen
Major Credit Cards Accepted
FROM WHEEL BARROW TO 18- WHEELER
.e: 've Got Your Tires! '
Computerized Wheel Balance and Alignment Front End Work,
S : 'Brakes, Auto-Truck Repair '
'On/Off Rdad Service TrUck ~ AG/Industrial Tires & Repair
1300 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL. 32344
850-997-4689


Monticello
BURGER KING

R.UR.GER-



342-1050
1209 S. Jefferson, Monticello, FL


A.K. Strickland
Golf-Carts

1184 A. Capital Circle NE
Tallahassee, FL
566-1342


C. Luther Pickels,


CERTIFIED PUBLIC A ACCOUNTANT

440 West Washington Street
Post Office Box 413
Monticello, Florida 32345




GREAT ADVENTURE
OUI I,11 R5 iRS
*Merril's, Chaco's, Crocs, Georgia Boot,
*Columbia,,Woolrich, Royal Robbins, Life is
Good, Flyshacker, Crabtree & Evelyn, Burt's
Bee's, Boker Knives, Coast, LED's *Pet Supplies
*EMOTION KAYAKS
255 N. Jefferson Street -Monticello, FL 32344
850-997-5900
Swww.greatadventureoutfitters.com




CHICKEN DELITE

635 S. JEFFERSON ST.
MONTICELLO, FL 32344

997-4939


LLj


SJf zrson


lonticello's Established Skilled
Nursing Facility
Paul Kovary Administrator

Located on Hiy,. 19N
Monticello, Florida
850-997-2313


The Nimble Thimble
"Custom Interior Workroom & 'Sewing Center"
*Bedspreads Slip Covers
*Upholstery *Draperies Instock
Fabltics *Top Treatment *Cornices
*All Kinds of Designs
Mon. Fri. 9 a.m. til 5 p.m.
13035-C US Hwy 319 N. *Thomasville, GA'
229-228-0563


Bari's Liquor Store






1277 S. Jefferson St.
997-4410







Freddy Pitts ~ Agency Manager,
Doug Helms ~ Agent
'Ser' ing Jefferson, Madison & Ta) lor
105 W. Anderson St., Monticello
(850) 997-2213
-503 W. Base St., Madison
(850) 973-4071



Danny's Collisions
&
Customs, LLC
765 E. Washington St.
997-1500


200 E. Washington St.
~ Monticello, FL


Member F.D.I.C.


An FMB Bank'


Advance Auto Parts

Advance o
AutoPartslX

Free Battery Testing & Installation

1321 .S. Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL 32344
997-4444


~~~~~~~~~~~~~+~~~++~C~~~+~++t~t++~+++t+*


*
S**
*.
' *


<*
*
I*-
*
.*
.*
*
*
-*I

')*

1*


w .l^


Farmers
& Merchants
Bank









PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 30, 2006


Sessions vary in length from 5, 6 & 7 days long. .85-926-3361
Prices vary from $365 to $499 & up depending
on activities.mrn mi
Optional fee based activities* include Indoor Skate Park, BMX,.Westem and
English Horseback and very few spots left in ATV and Paintball. I
*Not all optional activities available every session.


The name and image of Spamky are registered trademars of the National Fire Protection Association. Quincy, MA


SHousing Vouchers
We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities
5756571 '


Monticello


News


You Can Count On
Us To Find The
Source!!


BUSINESS



DIRE CTORY
TfcTT~rTOT?


Portable Toilets
Billy Simmons Septic
850-509-1465 cell
850-997-0877 home
Clean Portables for construction sites,
< family reunions, parties
SEvents and Types


DOUG'S TREE & LAWN
SERVICE,


Trimming
Mowing.
Removal
Maintenance.


0 Stump Grinding
0 Aerial Device
0 Bush Hogging


Your Local Professional Painters
Interior Exterior
Lie. & Ins. #4676 ,


BORDER 2 BORl1@ ~4DER GARDENSI


Lawn & Landscaping
r- ------------------- ---
Mention This Ad & receive
I A 10% Discount ,
11025 East Mahan 877-4550,


997-0039 Lic. & Insured


B & M Tractor Service CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC. LAHIUTA
Specializing in Food Plots, Bush Hogging, Realtor Tinm Peary raig
Liming & Fertilizing, Spraying, and Fencing
., 850-997-4340 "Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"' Larichiuta
See allour listings) "l Lloyd, FL 32337
j www.TimPeary.com ero
Brad McLeod Simply the Best! *Clay
Call: 850) 210-2942 .NMack McLeod
Cell (850) 545-2325 Cell I. homasv lle.Road115 Albany Rd..Sand-..
Home: (850)o997- 1451 Hi', ( 8.' t Realtor Tim Peary SellsReal Estate! asvilleRoad 115 Albany *Sand
10534 South Salt Rd, Lamont, FL. 32336 Simply the Best! (on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717 'TOP Soil


Register 's Mini-Storage

315 Waukeenah Hwy.
(1/4 Mile Off US 19 South)

997-2535

Septic Tank & Land Clearing
Complete Septic Service & Repair
Lot Preparing & Land Clearing
Thomas B. Scott, Sr.
Rt 1 Box 137
Lamont, FL 32366
ph:997-5536 cell: 933-3620

*Lot Cleaning *Driveways *Dig Ponds *Road
Building *Culvert Installation *Fill Dirt-
*Limerock *Gravel
Billy Simmons, Owner
Backhoe and Hauling Septic. TanksContractor &
Excavation Contractor .
Phone: (850) 997-0877
Cell: (850) 509-1465
Inured D.O.H. Lic. #SR0971265
Visa & Mastercard Acceptedl


MR. MERCHANT
THIS SPACE
COULD BE
YOURS FOR
ONLY $10.00


1-10 CHEVRON


Marlboro $3.04 pack, $8.80
3-pack, $26.99 carton + tax
305 $1.59 pack, $4.47 3-pack
14.00 carton + tax
Morgan's Chewing Tobacco
$1.96 pack, $5.55 3 packs,
$21.42 carton +Tax
Swisher Sweet Honey Flavored
King Cigars 2 for $.69
Bring this ad, receive a
Free 20 oz. Fountain Drink
with any purchase
WE ACCEPT ALL MANUFACTURERS
COUPONS









The Decorator's


VVa rehouse


Residential & Commercial Lic.# cgc #1507547
YEAGER CONTRACTING CO. INC.
CUSTOM HOMEs



PH: 997-2296 CELL: 508-2383


A LB^ WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!
WE 997-6500
WHEN You NEED To SOLVE COMPUTER PROBLEMS.
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY ONSITE SERVICE
*Diagnosis Repair *Upgrades *Installations *Consultations
'Tutorials'*Removal of Viruses, Adware, Spyware


Appliance Repairs:Pino u
'Washers, Dryers, Stoves, Call for quality work
Refrigerators. 45 Years In The Trade
Owned & Operated by.Andy Rudd Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
997-5648 850-997-7467 ~ 850-544-2917
Leave Message *Residential ~ Commercial *Interior ~ Exterior

THURMAN TRACTOR SER VICE
MOWING HAROOWING- MR. MERCHANT
FooDPLOTS THIS SPACE
LIC. & INS.
S.COULD BE
James Thurman, LLC
850-997-5211 OURS OR
850-545-0139 ONLY $10.00


I.-


Le, LLC

260 N.
Cherry Street


Furnishing & Accessories


Custom Mowing
Specializing In Small Lots
(850) 997-2170



TONYY de SERCEY
Light Harrowing & Grading


Opening 1-80,-572-1717 M R. M ERCHANT
the door wmdaaoo THIS SPACE
t oCOULDBE Keaton Tire Repair
to hope OULD BE. "Service Is Our Business on and off the Road"
Muscular Dystrophy
Call our | | sinp h
YOURS-FOR EDDKEATON 850-997-0903 Shop
lifeline. TRAVIS KEATON 850-264-6871 Cell
It's toll-tree. ONLY $10.00 54Capps Hwy 850-997-0937 Fax
Lipee. .. Lamont, FL 32336 850-997-5443 Home!


TyroneDavibs
Sales Manager
.


I Ultimate
rage Auto

877-7222
Very large selection to choose from
All trade-ins are welcome
Best rates as low as 4.5%
Free warranty on every vehicle sold
ag G00D (PEDT AD (R[DiT,
e! iT DOENT MATER


CallTYRNEh*r maingi
h a p e h e U t i a e a ,1


John Wilson
Painting Service
342-3288


i











MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 30, 2006 PAGE 11


To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


NOTICE 2
'-I -~
-


The Jefferson Community Water
System Board will meet 7 p.m.,
Thursday July 6. 2006 at 395 Water
Mill Road (Tank Site)
6/30,c


Therapists wanted-Licensed
SLPS in Miami-Dade and
Broward counties. Bilingual a
plus. Per diem & F/T.
Bilinguals Inc. Child & Parent
Services. (866) 696-0999 x122
www.bilingualsinc.com
6/30 fcan
Accepting applications for
full-time lumberyard personnel
with a clean driving record,
knowledgeable of building
material and customer friendly.
Must be 18 years or older.
Application may be obtained at
1400 South Jefferson Street,
Monticello
6/7, tfn, c
Mechanic Waukeenah
Fertilizer. 850-997-4460
6/7, tfn,c
Want home most weekends with
more pay! 'Run Heartland's
Florida Regional! $.42/mile
company drivers $1.22 for
Operators! 12 month OTR
required. Heartland Express
(800) 441-4953
www.heartlandexpress.com
6/30 fcan
Caregiver H\S)s 90/59, $50 a
da8 clear. Thursday) and Frida).
8:00am-8:30pm, 850-879-8698
or 224-4131.
6/30,7/2,pd
TEACHER POSITIONS
AVAILABLE: Monticello
Christian Academy Elementary,
Middle, High School call
997-6048 for details or submit
resume to: MCA, 1590 N.
Jefferson St. Monticello, 32344.
6/2-30, c'
JANITOR/MAINTENANCE:
Part time position. Must be able
to perform some maintenance as
well as janitor duties. Call
MCA, 997-6048
6/2-30, c


Cashier. available to work shiftC
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn
Electric Meter Change-Out
Field Technicians: How would
you like to earn some extra
money during the summer
month? Utility Meter Services
is looking for temporary meter
change-out field technicians in
the Monticello area. You must
have a valid Florida driver's.
license, pass a pre-employment
drug test and background
check. We will train qualified
individuals. Starting salary will
be $15.00 hr. Please call .407-
831-6669 or send your resume
to ums'i'asplundh.com UMS-
EOE
6/21-6/30,7/5.7/7c
BUSINE.
OPPORTUNITIES


ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE
Do you earn $800/day? 30
machines, free candy. All for
$9,995. (888)629-9968
B02000033. Call us: We will not
be undersold.
6/30 fcan
Vending Route: Snack, All
Drinks, All Brands. Great
Equipment, Great Support!
Financing Available With $6K
Down. Call Tom: 1(954)
971-93,01
6/30 fcan


Keys on Vista Road 251-6958
6/30,pd
Pekinese dog. Found Monday,
6/26 on South Main Street at
Hwy. 90, 997-2506

SERVICES

Handy Man-pressure washing,
woodworking, painting, home
repairs,interior/exterior, siding,
trim and housekeeping. Call
Billy @ 251-4575
6/30-7/28/06 p
Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
new menopausal products.
Jackson's drug store.
5/12 tfn
BUSH CUTTER Lawn Mowing,
bush cutting, tree work, and
pressure washing. 997-4189
6/21-6/30p
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn


Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quick responses.
6/22, tfn
Peters Satellite -- Your Satellite
Dish dealer. We offer
equipment, installation, repair,
parts, and prompt service. We
also offer Go-Karts, utility
trailers and lawn mowers.
Located at: 1150-Old Lloyd
Road, Monticello, Fla.
850-997-3377
1/25, tfn, c
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. \\e bill
Medicare Call for assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
NOW AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn


Roosters and Laying Chickens
$10 each; Goats, female $100
each. Leave message. 997-0901
6/30, pd


Deluxe Vulcan Convection Oven
superior cooking & baking
performance, 40W" x 41 1/2" D
$3000.00 perfect for restaurants.,
Self Serving' Drink Cooler
contains 3 shelves designed to
hold bottles' or can drinks' $450
perfect for restaurants and
convenience stores. 459-2138,
997-4646 .
6/9,14, 16, 21, 23, 28, 30, pd


Empire 35,000 BTU unsented
gas logs and insert. Logs in
place and VI" flex line installed.
Seldom used. First $250 for all
takes it hoine. 997-8604,
519-0277.
6/30,7/7 pd


Prime downtown office space
now available in Cherry Street'
.omanmos.. Jack Carswell,
N1,7-1980.-'
1/30 tfn, c
-. Spacious 2 bedroom, I bath
with sunroom, w/d hookup,
large storage: area. Walk to
town, amenities. $700.
251-0760
6/30, c
2 Bedroom/1 Bath, Screened-in
porch-Upstairs, Workshop,
Workout Rm., W/ID hookup
downstairs. Available July 1.
One year lease,, First & last
month, $300 deposit- $575 a
month. 997-2845 Sam, US 259,
144 Old Buzbee Rd, Waukeenah
(No pets) Utilities not included.,
6/21-6/30 pd
3 BR, 1-1/2 Bath, house in
country. Call 997-3368.
6/21 tfn c
Jefferson Place Apartments, I'
and 2 bedroom,. 1468 S.
\\aukeenah St. Office 300
Monticello. 997-6964 (Equal
Housing Opportunity.


* Complete makeover, new to
market. 3 bedroom, 1 bath in
great location. Large yard.
$112,500. For details:
997-1898, 251-0760
--6/30, c
In-town 4 bedrooms...Spacious
-Two Story. Central Heat &
Air. Needs some paint. 580 S.
Waukeenah St. $75,000.
Close to Town...Spacious 3
bedroom. Beautifully
landscaped at the end of historic
Dogwood Street. Carport, Shed. B
Just a walk to the park. City
Utilities. 210 Simpson Avenue
$139,900.
5 Acres w/3 bedroom... Mobile
home built in 2000 by Schult.
Big ; bedrooms, Fireplace and
large decks. Private. Clean
nonsmoking.
Call Mark Vollertsen,/ Sabor
Real Estate 850-997-1691 for
details.
6/30,7/7c


-HANDYMAN SPECIAL: 3
bedroom 3 '/ bath, 2150 sq. ft.
Needs Drywall, Painting &
Siding ARV $250,000 Ask
$130.000. (850) 997-3271
6/23, 28, 30, lid

Buyers Market Coastal North
Carolina 95-100% LTV
Financing. Call CCL Inc. Realty
(800) 224-5020
6/16fcan


Moving Sale Infant clothes to
plus size, misc. household items,
furniture, everything must go.
472 Lake Rd. Fri. & Sat 8 am
until
6/30 pd
Estate Sale July 1st, 2nd, 3rd
all day House and contents, car
and shed, building materials 8
miles east of Monticello on Hwy
90
6/30c


What's In Your
Wallet?

Is It Enough??

Don't You Deserve:
Super Pay & Benefits
Home Every Weekend
Run Southeast Only
Sign On Bonus
80% Drop & Hook
Immediate Rider Pro.
CDL/A 2Y'rs OTR
Call Today To Get
Yours!
Shoreline Transportation

`877-208-9176


SAB OR R E A L E S T A T E
MARK VOLLERTSEN
-\ Realtor

Sales Associate

850-997-1691 or 850-459-4864
You Name It I'll Find It, Ready To Sell It, It's Sold!
Residential ~ Commercial~
Mobile Homes w/Land ~ Acreage,






.. .. ....


Now Hirin



CNA


Harrison Plan iti Rose Plan


-A- REALTORS BRING CLIENTS AND GET PAID ***
(Developers have agreed to pay a $500.00 bonus to a realtor presenting
a sales contract at the open house with a successful closing.)
(Developers have agreed to pay $5,000.00 to a realtor presenting five contracts at the
open house with a successful closing of all five contracts.)
Bonuses will be paid at closing**A
Bank Financing will be available.
Directions: Take 1-10 West to Quincy (Ext. 174), turn left on Hw3y 12 West. drive 2 miles, turn
left on 274 Providence (drive 3 miles),
Palms Development located on the right. -


Contact:

Latasha T. Murray, Realtor

(850) 980-8644


* Washington St. Apartment
2/1 2-deluxe two,bedroom units for rent
* Marvin St .
3/2 house for rent or owner financing /with low down
payment "
* York St.
3/1 house for rent or owner financing / with low
down[payment:
. Noel Dr.
3/2 Single Wide,.
* Commercial Building Restaurant or Office
* First Street 2/1 Low Rent

Wyce roery 'ange en

(80 9737


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com

Serious About Sellinq?
List today!





Homes That Talk' Just Sell Faster

Amazinq Buy!!! Mixed Use Property 12
plus partially cleared acres on US 19 south
land use designation permits 4 houses per
acre near Dennis' Trading post only $36,500
per acre

Best Residential Buy in Town!
2 bedroom 1 bath home in great shape with
fenced yard and big family room behind IGA
on Bowman Street Now $76,500-A Talking
House

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly
wooded acres Only $36,500

Lloyd Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath split plan
with very nice master suite 1993 Fleetwood
on 2:6 acres $76,500-A Talking House

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big double-
wide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in re-
mote, oaks, ponid, north of Greenville only
: $329,000 : ., ...

Country Livinq at it's Best! Comfortable 4
bedroom 3 bath home on five fenced acres
with guest cottage w/bath, 2 car garage, big
shop, pasture 100 pecan trees and a nice
pool Only $400,000

Fine Homesite Close to Town 12:5 private
acres with big trees and pretty fields perfect
for a fine home $265,0000

Just Listed Choice 2.39 acre tract on
Shady Lane near Lake Wooten, South of Old
St. Augustine Rd and east of SR 59 $36,500

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000 -

Terrific Land Investment 5 acres available
on the east side of town high and dry in quiet
location with lots of game, 9 year old planted
pines, profit from both appreciating land and
growing pine Only $11,500 per acre

Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500

Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900-A
Talking House
Rentals
Dogwood Street 2/2 home $850
Bowman Street 2/1 rent while waiting for a buyer
$650
Aucilfa Forest & Meadows 2/2'MH 5 ac $650
Lloyd Acres 3/2 rent while waiting for buyer $550.
Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
Simply the Best!
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


- -- r I- ---


GRAND OPENING at "THE PALMS"

OPEN HOUSE
July 1, 2006 10 a.m. 3 p.m.
REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED


~


































The Farm Service Agency
(FSA) offers loans to farmer,
and ranchers to purchase farm.
land and finance agricultural
operations.
FSA's loan programs are de.
signed to help producers whc
are temporarily unable to ob-
tain private or commercial
credit.
In many cases, applicants are
beginning farmers who have
insufficient net worth to qual-
ify for financing through a
commercial lender.
Farm ownership, loans o:
farm operating loans may be
obtained as direct loans for
maximum of up to $200,000.


It is the responsibility of the.
producer to notify the Farm
Service Agency, at 997-2072,
of any changes in farming op-
erations throughout the year.
Changes that may affect a
determination include: a
change in contract shares
which may reflect change of
.land lease from cash rent to
share rent, or from share rent
to cash rent.
A change in the size of the
producer's farming operation


Club, on St. Phillips Road, are
open for members from 7:30
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday
through Thursday. -
Four programs are held
each day. These are: the Aca-
demic program, which in-
cludes reading, language arts,
math,, and science; Enrich-
ment program, which includes


Y Guaranteed loans can reach a
s maximum indebtedness of"
-. $852,000.
Emergency loans are always,
direct loans for farmers who
may have suffered physical or
production losses in disaster
areas designated, by a Presi-
I dential or Secretarial disaster
- declaration.
Rural youth loans, loans to
beginning farmers, and loans
for sociall, disadvantaged ap-
plicants are also available
through FSA.
For detailed information on
r loan eligibility, or the different
e available loan programs, con-
a tact the loan staff at (859) 973-
2205.


Earlier A Child is

Taught, The Better


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


S*Gie your child things or
toys they can touch, bang, and
shake, so they learn how
things work.


Family and Consumer Sci- *Use math games in your
ences Extension Agent Heidi daily routines. Count stairs as
Copeland relates that the ear- you climb, or peas on a plate,
her a: child is taught, the and the like.
better.
Leanring begins when ba- *Give choices, based on the
bies first open their eyes. Re- child's -age.. For instance,
search shows that children are young children may be able to
borri ready to leam, Copeland decide between two books to
said. read before bed.


She listed some ways to
help parents get their children
excited about learning; even
as babies and toddlers:
*Talk together. Copy your
baby's sounds and encourage
your baby :to imitate you.
*Point out and name the
things around you. For in-
stance, as you peel a potato,.
show it to your baby, say
what it is, and let the baby
touch it.


*Let your child be the prob- -
lem, sohler, figuring out the
solution for himself.
*Read together. It's never,
too early to, start. And when
you: read together, let your
child hold the book and point
to the pictures as you read.
Copeland concluded that
children learn best through
their everyday experiences
with the people they love.


by the addition or deletion of a
farm.
A change in the structure of
the farming operation, includ-
ing any changes in 'the mem-
tbers' shares.
A change in the contribu-
tions of farm inputs, of
capital, equipment, active per-
sonal management, and a
change of farming, interest not
previously disclosed, including
the farming interests of a
spouse, or minor child.


PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 30, 2006

July Events At


Boys, Girls Clubs


CASH N AsWseen
FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, On I.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794.7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Stmctured Settlements!


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The July, schedule for the.
Boys, Girls Clubs begins
Monday.
Both the Monticello/Jeffer-
son Club, on Mamie Scott
Road, and the St. Phillips


arts, crafts, and games; Tech-
nology program, which in-
cludes computer lab; and PEP
program, which includes fit-
ness, and recreation.
Members will be at the Rec-
reation Park 1:30-5:30 p.m.,
on Monday.
Tuesday, the clubs will be
closed in observance of the
July 4th holiday.
Members will spend their
Wednesday at the YMCA in
Thomasville, GA.
On Thursday, July 6 and the
Monday of July 10, 17, and
24,members will enjoy mov-
ies of their choosing.
There will be skating on
Tuesday, July 11 and' a trip to
the Mary' Brogan Museum on
Thursday, July 13.
Members will be kept enter-
tained at the Chuck-E-Cheese
and Fun Station on Tuesday,
July 18.
Green Industries has in-
vited the members to visit on
Thursday, July 20 for a "Gar- _-
den Experience."
There will be Bowling on
Tuesday, July 25 and the
month will end with an
Awards Night on Thursday,
July 27..
On Friday, July 21 the-
members will enjoy a day of
fun and laughter at Wild Ad-
ventures, thanks to a generous
donation made by Steve'An-
dris and the JCKC.


AA, AL-ANON

Set Meetings
The Monticello Serenity
Group of Alcoholics Anony-
mous (AA) and Al-Anon
meet 8 p.m. on Mondays for a
Big Book meeting at Christ
Episcopal'Church office 425
North Cherry Street.
AA meets 8 p.m. Thursday
for a 12 Steps-12 Traditions
meeting; and also 8 p.m. on'
Saturday for group, discus-,
sion.
Call 997-2129 for more in-'
formation.



.I


AII'S

' ITRYI E


'MY NAME is Victoria, and I rule the roost. I don't like
other cats or dogs, but if you take me home and treat
me well, I'll be a wonderful pet.' Victoria is one of the
animals available for adoption at the shelter. (News
Photo)


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