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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00144
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: June 28, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00144
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
    Main: Sports
        page 8
        page 9
    Main continued
        page 10
    Main: Classified
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
Full Text





1lDRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
t,04 LIBRARY WEST
UNVERITZY OF FLORIXDA


CA\I:NE

Road Trips
Can Stimulate
Kids

Editorial, Page 4
11111


-. r.F -.-. 3 Z61

Church
Youth Plan
Fundraiser

Story, Photos, Page 6


Festival Tennis
Tournament
Draws 28 Teams

Story, Page 8


Wednesday Morning






Monticello


138TH YEAR NO. 49, 50 CENTS


Humane Society
Discusses
Fundraising

story Page 10













ews


%)V"VQL.J'I .All JINE2T,200


iCity Looking To



Adjust Fees For



Water, sewer


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Jefferson County School
District was the top of 10 dis-
tricts earning the most points
in grade schools, over the last
year.
Gov. Jeb Bush and Educa-
tion Commissioner John L.
Winn report that Jefferson,
along with Gadsden and Madi-
son Counties, districts that
have historically earned low
grades, each raised their dis-
trict grade to a "C" this year,
for the first time ever.
For Jefferson County, this is


a 46 point increase over last
year.
- Jefferson was also one of 23
counties to improve one or
more letters over their 2004-05
district grade.
District grades are calculated
using the same components as
school grades.
These include: student per-
formance on the FCAT, stu-
dent learning gains, and the
learning gains of the lowest 25
percent of students.
In 2007, the bar will be
raised again for school grades.
Scores from the Science
FCAT, students in the lowest
25 percent on the Math


FCAT, and Grade 11 and 12
FCAT retakes will be included&
in the district and school grade
calculations.

News TO Print 1
Issue Next Week
The Monticello News will be
closed Tuesday, July 4, and
reopen 8 a.m. Wednesday,
July 5.
One combined edition, of
the News will be published
Friday, July 7.
Deadline for news and ad-
vertising in the Friday paper is
noon Wednesday, July 5.


Two Operations in

Deficit At Present


LAZAROALEMAN
Senior StaffWriter

A study undertaken by the
Florida Rural Water Associa-
tion (FRWA) indicates that the
city's water and sewer rates
need to be adjusted if the two
operations are to become fi-
nancially viable.
The study found that both
enterprises are operating in a
,deficit; that fund reserves in
both accounts are very low;
that the city has invested mini-
mal capital in the two opera-
tions in recent years; and that
critical elements of the infra-
structure for both systems will
have to be replaced in the
coming years.
William M. Secoy, a water
circuit rider for the FRWA,
presented the study's findings
to the City Council on Thurs-
day night.
Bottom line, the study rec-
ommends rate adjustments to
bring the rates back into line
with the cost of providing the
service; to end the annual defi-
cits and stabilize the finances
of the two operations; and to
build reserves for needed capi-
tal improvements down the
road.
The study recommends first
and foremost that the monthly
service rates for water' and
sewer be broken into different
categories for residential, com-
mercial I, and commercial II.
Presently, water users inside
the city pay a flat fee of $12.50
monthly for 3,000 gallons,
whether" commercial or resi-
dential. (Residents outside the
city pay $18.75 for the same
service) All pay 25 cents extra
for every 750 gallons above
the 3,000 gallons.
For the sewer system, resi-
dential users pay $23.50
monthly .inside the city and
$35.25 outside the city. Com-
mercial users, meanwhile pay
rates calculated on the type
and size of the particular busi-
ness.
Under the recommended
rate structure, residential water
users would pay a monthly
base fee of $15.75 for 3,000
gallons; commercial I users
would pay a base fee of $23.75
for 4,500 gallons; and com-
mercial users II would pay a
base fee of $126 for up to
24,000 gallons.
(Residents and businesses
outside the city would pay 25
percent more for the base fee.)
Water users who exceed the
monthly allocation of gallons
would pay additional charges,
figured on every 1,000 gallons
above the baseline.
The table of additional
charges for water users: $1.70


BILL SECOY, a water circuit rider with the Florida Rural Water Association, presents
the findings of his study to the City Council on Thursday night. (News Photo)


City Okays Beautification


Plan For Courthouse Circle


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Vintage postcards that land-
scape architect Winston Lee
passed around to City Council
members Thursday night
showed that the courthouse
circle was graced with palm
trees in the 1950s and 60s.
It may well be too that that
look of old returns, depending
what a committee of city offi-
cials and tree'"experts decide
Friday.
Lee, who has undertaken the
beautification project of the
courthouse circle on behalf of
the Main Street program, pre-
sented the council with his
conceptual master plan Thurs-
day night.
That plan calls for the addi-
tion of numerous islands of
green space around the circle
and adjacent public areas, as
well as the addition of trees, to
break up the asphalt monotony
of the circle.
Lee said he was seeking di-
rection from city officials on
the type of trees they wanted
planted around the circle so
that he could complete and
submit the plan to the Depart-
ment of Transportation (DOT)
by the July 1 deadline.
Main Street is hoping for a
$160,000 grant from the DOT


to accomplish the beautifica-
tion project. That money,
which will allow for the pur-
chase of the trees and other
materials, as, well as for the
borings and irrigation system,
is a reimbursable grant.
Meaning that the community
will have to finance the project
upfront and then get reim-
bursed from the DOT once the
project is completed. Hence
the City Council's involve-
ment.


Lee recommended tl'ar (l-e
council go with either sable or
phoenix palms, both of which
have contained canopies that
wouldn't overreach the street.
He pointed that although
properly part of the downtown
area, the DOT considers the
circle an urban intersection,
which makes it subject to state
rules. And state rules stipulate
that tree trunks must be clear
eight feet from the ground and


IPk~


. 4A'


WINSTON LEE talks with Merry Ann Frisby prior
presentation before the City Council on Thursday
(News Photo)


to his
night.


for every 1,000 gallons be-
tween 0 and 3,000 gallons;.
$1.75 for every 1,000 gallons
between 3,001 and 6,000 gal-
lons; $1.80, for every 1,000
gallons between 6,001 and
9,000 gallons; and $1:85 for
every 1,000 gallons beyond
9,001 gallons.'
For the sanitary sewer
system, residential users would,
pay $19 monthly for 3,000 gal-
lons; commercial 1 users
would pay $28.50 monthly for
4,500 gallons; and commercial
2 users would pay $152
monthly for 24,000 gallons.
All categories of sanitary
sewer users would pay an ad-
ditional $2.50 for every 1,000
gallons above the baseline (see
related story).


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

A memo put out by City
Clerk Emily Anderson follow-
ing Thursday night's rate
structure workshop points to
an error in the calculations,
relative to the sewer rate pro-
posed by the Florida 'Rural
Water Association (FRWA)
study.
Anderson said the error rep-
resented both good and bad
news.
"The bad news is that the
sewer residential rate of $19
did not include any usage,"
Anderson noted in her Friday
e-mail 'to council members.
"So; a normal customer using
3,000 gallons would really pay
$19 plus $2.50 x 3 (at $2.50
per 1,000 gallons), or a total of
$26.50. This is $3 more than
the present rate."


Again, these rates apply to
residents inside the city; resi-
dents outside the city would
pay at least 25 percent more.
SThe study's income projec-
tions for the water enterprise
show that under the present
rates, the city is in the hole to
the tune of $38,943. Under the
proposed rate adjustments, the
city would be in the black
$300 in the first year, $552 in
the second year, and $7,133 ih
the 'third year.
The income projections were
similar for the'sanitary sewer
enterprise.
Under the present rate struc-
'ture, this Qperation is S17,916
in the red. Under the new
rates, the operation would
break even in the first and sec-
ond years and it would show a
profit of $14,661 in the third
year.
-(See City Clerk Page 2)


The good news, Anderson
continued, was that "those who
are using only small amounts
of water per month will see a
rate reduction."
"Which is really what we
want, anyway," she wrote.
Anderson gave the following
examples, applicable to the
sewer rate only:
A resident using 1,000 gal-
lons or less per month pays
$23.50 now and would pay
$21.50, under the new structure
($19 + $2.50).
A resident using 2,000 gal-
lons or less per month pays
$23.50 now and would pay
$24 under the new rate ($19 +
$5, or $2.50 x2).
And a resident using 4,000
gallons or less per month pays
$23.50 now and would pay
$29 under the new rate ($19 +
$10, or $2.50 x 4).
(See Rates Page 2)


T'43


CITY CLERK, EMILY ANDERSON, in talking with Mayor
Julie Conley, discovered an error in the calculations,
following the workshop. (News Photo)


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


City Clerk Notes Error

in Proposed New Rate


(See Courthouse Page 2)

School District's Grade Of "C"

Is 46 Points Higher Than 2005


WEDNESDA JNE28,2006,


3',' "


I













PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 28, 2006 J.



Johnston's Meat Market Takes


On New Look, Adds New Hot Bar


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


If you haven't noticed, John-
ston's Old Fashion Meat Mar-
ket -- formerly known as John-
ston's Locker Plant, Inc. -- has
been upgrading in recent
months.
Beyond the obvious exterior
facelift -- including a new fa-
cade, large open front porch
with picnic tables, soon-to-be-
paved parking lot and elevated
billboard sign -- the business
has remodeled its interior and
expanded its offerings.
Not only can customers still
buy the finest selection of
quality meats anywhere -- i.e.,
hickory-smoked sausages,
country cured bacons, fresh
meats cut-to-order, and fish
and poultry on ice -- they can
also now buy garden fresh
vegetables, specialty sauces,,
syrups and preserves, and bar-
becue meals cooked right on
the premises.
Not to mention that John-
ston's continues processing
deer during the hunting season
and caters parties of up to 600
people on half a day's notice.
"It's been a long haul, with
lots of hills, lots of bumps and
lots of aggravation," says
owner and operator Hal Ben-
nett, who has been planning
the changes since he took over
the 80-year-old family busi-
ness in 1997. "But we're about
there now."
Bennett, for the record, is
married to the former Becky
Shuman, granddaughter of Fe-
lix Johnston, founder of the
business. He is the son-in-law
of Felice .and Cap Shuman,
who operated the establish-
ment previously.
Those familiar with the old
',Johnston's will hardly recog-
nize the remodeled interior,
with its vibrantly colored
walls, tasteful displays of
meats and specialty products,
country-styled dining area for
customers who choose to eat
onsite, and lots of memorabilia
everywhere.
It's all part of the new pres-
entation, a repackaging of the
old quality in modem garb to
make the establishment more
appealing to today's consum-
ers.

"It's a draw card to get cus-
tomers in to buy the fresh
meats and vegetables," Bennett
says of the remodeling, espe-
cially the addition of the
kitchen. "We're expecting to
triple business in time due to
the facelift, new atmosphere,
presentation and general
cleanup of the building. We
draw a tremendous amount of
out-of-county business. My
goal is to get 90 percent local
trade and 10 percent out-of--
town."
If the number of vehicles out-
side the establishment on any
given weekday afternoon is
any indication, Bennett's gam-_
bit is paying off. The establish-
ment is packed for lunch every
weekday

"The response has been
overwhelming," Bennett says.
"I can see where we're going
to have to expand at
lunchtime."
The lunchtime specials in-
clude a wide variety of barbe-
cued meals, sandwiches and
side orders, all reasonably
priced between $3.50 and
$7.50. Customers can order the
meals for takeout or enjoy
them right on the premises.
Don't call it a restaurant, how-
ever. Call it a hot bar, Bennett
says.
"All the barbecue is to go,"
he emphasizes. "They're wel-
come to sit and eat in the sit-
ting room or the porch if they
want. But it's not a full-
fledged restaurant. They have
to clean up after themselves."
The success of the hot bar
and the catering business not-


withstanding, Johnston's main-
stay remains its fine line .of
meats, especially its pork prod-


ucts, and most specifically its
mild and hot-spiced hickory-
smoked sausages.
The proof is in the number
and diversity of the meat-
buying customers w4o fre-
quent the shop, many of whom
travel extraordinary distances
to get their favorite products.


de-boned, cut up for wrapping
or ground up for stuffing into
sausages, and smoked with the
utmost attention to ensuring
quality.
"Part of the secret is cold
boning," Bennett says. "It's
putting the whole hog in a
cooler for 24 hours until it


memorabilia, he says, is for the
enjoyment and edification of
customers, especially the
young.
"I'm a firm believer of
teaching the young about what
the old days were like," Ben-
nett says. "A lot of kids think
food comes in a box. We at


Courthouse Circle


(Continued From Page 1)
that canopies cannot extend
over the street, he said.
Given the DOT criteria, il
limited the types of trees thai
could be planted to oaks, mag-
nolias and palms, Lee said.

Another consideration, he
said,;was cost. The DOT grant
requires that 50 percent of the
money be used for'trees. Oaks
cost $2,000 each, Ee said.
-- Palms, on the other hand, cost
$10,000 each, ensuring that the
purchase of fewer trees would
meet the 50 percent require-
ment.
"I recommend,palms as the
best way to go," Lee said, add-
ing that six phoenix palms
would serve ideally.
The recommendation met
with strong opposition from
Councilman Brian Hayes.


"I don't like palms," Hayes
I said emphatically. "They're
not native. I'm only one vote,
Sbut I'm not for palm trees on
t the courthouse circle. This is
not Palm Beach or Daytona.
I'm prejudiced against palm
trees north of Orlando."
Although not as vocal as
Hayes, other council members
expressed varying degrees of
dislike relative to palm trees.
t Surely, local nursery and for-
estry experts should be able to
recommend some other type of
tree that was native to the area
and that met the DOT require-
- ments, Hayes said.
In the end, Mayor Julie Con-
ley appointed a committee to
meet 8:30 a.m. at City Hall to
decide the issue. At worse, the
committee was instructed it
should go with a mix of palms
and some other native specie.


SCity Clerk Corrects Error
(Continued From Page 1) than what we talked about last


HAL BENNETT stands behind the glass counter showcasing Johnston's hickory-
smoked sausages and fresh-cut meats. The establishment is in the process of remod-
eling and expanding its services. (News Photo)


Indeed, on a typical day, one
is likely, to encounter folks
from around the state, around
the country and sometimes
even from other countries.
Some of the latter aficionados
like the products so well, they
have Johnston's ship them or-
ders regularly out-of-state and
even overseas.
"Every week we have out-
of-town folks from south and
central Florida and sometimes
. from places as far away as
California, the Virgin Islands
and Australia," Bennett says.
"They tell us this is one of
their major stops when they
are visiting in the area. We
also have a large Leon County
draw. I'd say 30 percent of our
business is from Leon'County.
They come for the Black An-
gus meats, such as the
rib-eyes, New York strips and
tenderloins."

What makes Johnston's
products, and their sausages in
particular, so special?
For starters, Johnston's hick-
ory smokes its country meats
with actual wood, not gas, and
then seasons them with special
ingredients that remain a fam-
ily secret.
Equally important, when it
comes to the pork products, is
the "whole hog process," Ben-
nett says. Meaning that the
hogs are freshly killed, chilled,


chills and then boning him ut
so that the meat is flaky. Most
operations hot bone as soon as
the hog is killed, which makes
the meat like jelly. It's more
costly and time consuming to
cold bone, but it pays off in
quality."
Add to that friendly cus-
tomer service.
"When you walk out of here,
you feel good," Bennett says.
"You don't feel like you've
been stripped. We've got the
quality and the service."
In fact, Bennett's so sure of
the superiority of his sausages
that he's willing to put them
up against anyone else's sau-
sages in the industry.
"I can line up any 10 people
and blindfold them and let
them try our sausages and try
someone else's," Bennett says.
"I'll bet you 10 to one that
they will say our sausage is
100 percent better. Ours have a
different texture and taste. I
think we can beat anyone in
the world with our regular
whole hog hickory smoked
sausages."
Bennett plans eventually to
add a 'specialty case featuring
shrimp, steak kabobs, pork
chops and other special items.
He also foresees eventually qf-
fering organic vegetables and
adding more memorabilia, of
which he's asking the commu-
nity to contribute items. The


Johnston's don't mind giving
kids a tour of the meat proc-
essing plant as an educational
thing."
Johnston's Old Fashion Meat
Market is open 8 a.m. 6 p.m.
Monday through Friday and 8
a.m. 5 p.m. Saturday.
For more information, call
997-5622.

Rates
(Continued From Page 1)
The city has approximately
1,417 water accounts. Of
these, 52 percent are residen-
tial, 47.9 percent are commer-
cial, and 1 percent is for
irrigation. It has 1,360 sewer
accounts, 58.3 percent residen-
tial and 41.7 percent commer-
cial.
Secoy said the new rate
structure would promote con-
servation and lower wastewa-
ter flows. He said it would also
accomplish city officials' goal
of taking the burden off resi-
dents who use minimum
amounts of water and place
that burden on those who use
the most water.
City officials take up the mat-
ter again 7 p.m. Tuesday, July
11, at City Hall.
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NOTICE

EMILY ANDERSON, CLERK/TREASURER FOR THE CITY OF MONTICELLO,
FLORIDA, HEREBY GIVES NOTICE REGARDING THE
2006 MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS:

OFFICES AND VACANCIES TO BF FILLED:
CITY COUNCIL GROUP 1
CITY COUNCIL GROUP 2

QUALIFYING DATES:
JULY 17, 2006 12:00 NOON THROUGH
JULY 21, 2006 12:00 NOON'

ELECTION DATES:
First Primary 09/05/06
General Election 11/07/06

PERSONS SEEKING TO QUALIFY SHALL DO SO AT THE OFFICE OF THE
JEFFERSON COUNTY SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS,
380 WEST DOGWOOD STREET,
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA


The problem, Anderson
pointed out, "is that with so
many broken meters, we are
going to have approximately
400 customers paying only
$19, regardless of what they
actually use." __
Anderson recommended the,
council consider reducing the
base rate for the water charge
to $11, with an additional
charge of $1.70 per 1,000 gal-
lons used.
The FRWA in its presenta-
tion recommended a $15.75
base charge, with 3,000 gal-
lons included in the base fee.
The current fee is $12.50.

In the examples Anderson
gave in the memo, residents
who use no water during a
month still pay $11. Residents
who use 1,000 gallons or less
per month pay $12.70 ($11 +
$1.70).

And residents who use 2.000
gallons or less per month pa\
$14.40 ($11 + $3.40 or $1.70 x
2).
"For those using 3,000 gal-
lons per month, the price sug-
gested here is 35 cents more


night," Anderson wrote. "But_
-like on sewer, those not using
much water will have a rate re-
duction."


Health Programs

~ Arthritis Self-Management ~
Ease your pain with daily self-care designed
by the Arthritis Foundation. Six Fridays.
Topics include nutrition, medication, exercise,
using joints wisely, and coping with
depression. Call (229) 228-8014 to register.
Friday, July 7 Aug. 11
9-11 a.m.

~ Childbirth Education ~
Comprehensive course for expectant
parents. Five evenings. Pre-register by
calling the Archbold Maternity Center at
(229) 228-2943 or 228-2812.
Monday, July 10 Aug. 7

~ Women & Heart Disease~
Heart disease is the leading cause of death
in women, yet remains widely
underdiagnosed because its symptoms differ
so much from men's symptoms. Learn about
detection and treatment of heart disease in
women at this free class. Presented by
Interventional Cardiologist Richard Kerensky,
M.D., in the Williams Education Center, on
the ground floor ofArchbold's East Tower.
Pre-register by calling (229) 228-8087.
Wednesday, July 12, Noon

~ Other upcoming events ~

Health Fair & Free Screenings
Saturday, July 22. Call (229) 228-2751.

Camp H.E.A.L.
For children who are grieving.
Saturday, July 29. Call (229) 227-5520
or 1-800-290-6567.


~~i^^l----------------


;:::::.-


L































ATTENDING a production of "Beauty and the Beast," are members of the Jefferson
County Retired Educators Association. From left, Martha Hall, Mathye McCloud, Mag-
gie Stokes, and Mary Madison.


L4L .










I'lL. i.AiJ&afa^


SCHOLARSHIPS were awarded at the Jefferson County Educator Association's SchOl-
arship Brunch, recently. From left, Chairperson Albert Thomas, Jr.; Linton
Wildgoose, scholarship recipient; Vice-chairperson Dr. Flossie Byrd; Crystal
Brinson, scholarship recipient.


Baker Named To Oversee

Animal Shelter Operations

FRAN HUNT
StaffIN riter ,..: : .., & .N *; '


Xah Baker has been named
by the Humane Socier, 10,
oversee operations at the
shelter.
This comes about in line
with staff changes at the
shelter.
Present Shelter Caretaker
Cheryl Bautista will continue
in her capacity until Sept. 1
when she and her husband
will relocate to California.
At that time, Kevin Kelly
will take over as the shelter
caretaker, residing on the
premises. Baker will be his
supervisor.
Baker is a veterinarian
technician and will serve in
the capacity of shelter
operations overseer, though
her official title has not yet
been determined.
She comes to Monticello
from the Thomas County
Humane Society and Animal
Control, where she served for
two years as director.
Previously, she worked at
Veterinary Associates for 5-6
years as a veterinarian
technician.
Baker is also a County
Humane Society member.
She served as the chair of the
local clinical committee in
2005 and also served as
organization secretary for 3-4


XAN BAKER has been named by the Humane Society to
oversee operations at the animal shelter. (News Photo)


months at that time.
Baker will, oversee the
entire operation of the shelter,
as well as performing tasks
such as fecal exams,
removing stitches, performing
heart worm checks, giving
yearly vaccinations,
administering prescriptions
and medications prescribed
by veterinarians, and the like.

Though Baker doesn't offi-


cially begin working here un-
til July 10, she has already be-
gun brainstorming ideas to
save the shelter money, items
that will be needed, and any
changes that may have to be
made to improve operations.
Baker, who. has been an
avid animal lover all of her
life, looks forward to serving
Jefferson County, and making
the local shelter the best it can
be.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 28, 2006 PAGE 3

Retired Educators


Award Scholarships


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Re-
tired Educators Association
(JCREA), hosted the Chap-
ter's Annual Scholarship


Brunch, June 13..
Chair and Vice-chair Albert
Thomas and Flossie Byrd in-
troduced Crystal Brinson,
and Linton Wildgoose, schol-
arship recipients.
Photos were taken of the re-
cipients and their parents,


Frances and Louis Brinson
and Geraldine Wildgoose, and
the recipients were presented
plaques and framed pictures.
Scholarship checks will be
presented at the time of en-
trance to the college or uni-
versity of choice.
President W. B. Barnhart,
Sr. conducted the business
meeting
Brief remarks made by sev-
eral attendees of the May
FREA Assembly/Convention.
Pictures were viewed of dif-
ferent assembly activities and
events, such as the live per-
formance of "Beauty and the-
Beast", and the Captain's
Award Dinner.
The District luncheon,
hosted by District 2 Director
Beverly Kelley, held in the
FREA President's Suite was
discussed.
Following acknowledgments,
refreshments of assorted
sandwiches, vegetable tray
items and soft drinks were
served.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Chamber of Com--
imerce extends it thanks to all
lhe sponsors of the Water-
melon Festival.
Sponsors include Platinum
Sponsors: Monticello -Planta-
non Steve Walker III, Ste-
piip't Demott.


Farm Insurance), Great Ad-
venture Outfitters, Big Bend
Timber, Bird & Leinback,
Kelly & Kelly Properties,
Payne & Son, Bass Electric,
Morrow Insurance, and Boyd
Family Farms.
The Chamber also thanks
all who supported the Water-
melon Festival, 'including:
Edenfield's Hardware, Jack-
son's Drug Store, Monticello


.Florist, Brenda Sorer
Gold sponsor: Progress En- Stewart's BP, Gelling's F
.. erg,.. ers, Snapdragon, Imagin
Silver Sponsors: Luther teriors & Antiques,,
Pickles, Tominirr Surles (State Farmers and Merchants B



Haunted Tours


isen,
low-
e In-
and
ank.


Draw 78 Patrons


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Big Bend Ghost Track-
ers haunted tour of
Monticello, following the
Watermelon Festival festivi-
ties, brought the largest crowd
since the haunted tours in Oc-
tober, totalling 78 people.
BBGT Founder Betty Davis
reported that the tour included
people from Jefferson
County, Tallahassee, Thomas-
Sille, Valdosta, Marietta, and
even one family from Arkan-
sas, who were staying at the
KOA Campground on their
way south, just so they could
attend the tour.
"There were so many peo-
ple, we had to split them into
two groups,!" said Davis,"with
the first group about 15-20
minutes ahead of the second.
"Those who are not faint of
.heart, experienced an eerie
and spine-tingling haunted
tour, led by. lantern light,"
Davis said
During he tour, appear-
ances were made by both
Dr. Palmer and John Perkins.
Some 10 people went on
the ghost hunt in the old 1827
Cemetery following the tours.
Davis said that there were
quite a few on the tour and
hunt, who caught images of
orbs and ectoplasm.
"No one has ever' left disap-


pointed," she added.
Davis added that the popu-
larity of the Monticello
haunted tours have grown so
greatly, that group members
are anticipating conducting
the regular monthly haunted
tours, twice per month, rather
than just once.
Call 508-8109 for reserva-
tions for future tours.


starts July 11
NFCC Madison, Fla

Website: WWW.NFCC.EDU 3
TO REGISTER:


850.971=3162


Notice of Monticello City Council
Committee Meeting
An Ad Hoc Committee of the Monticello City
Council will meet on June 30th at 8:30a.m. to
discuss final plans for a grant application for down-
town beautification approved by the City Council.
The meeting will take place at City Hall, 245 S.
Mulberry Street.




G Three Sisters :

Guest Chef: Rob Mazur
Financial Consultant U
Merrill Lynch
Preparing his fabulous fillet
i Fri. 6-30-06, 5:30pm until...

321-7102
juE*******E 7 N N N N EU


When was

the last

time you

made an

investment

,that saved

lives?


LIFE
- SAVER


When you invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
enormous-healthier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around., t's a dividend that builds a
strong community.


307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL 32303 (904) 414-0844


Chamber Thanks

All Melon Festival

Sponsors, Supporters


OY1~- r I


----- ----L1~-


SF.

I Wl,











PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 28, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
A Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

OcAn^ LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax' 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net
S-. -E B J&


Road Trips Can


Stimulate Kids


Instead of letting the kids
watch DVDs during your next
road trip, use those long hours
in the car to sharpen their''
minds.
That's the advice from Dr.
Katherine Wiesendanger, an
education professor at"
Longwood University in
Farmville, Va. She offers these
tips for turning those mindless
hours in the car to
mind-sharpening
opportunities.
No minivan sallying forth to
vacation wonderlands can ar-
rive without a designated navi-
gator.
Why not appoint your child
to the post? An official trip
navigator's title and duties are
a great way to reinforce map
reading, mathematics and ge-
ography skills.
Dr. Wiesendanger recom-
mends ihat during the trip, par-
ents require the navigator to
trace the family's progress on
a map.
Every hour, call for an offi-
cial report from the back-seat,
asking the navigator to detail
location, current direction of
travel, the next exit, the nearest
town and the next state.
Mom or Dad can also add a
mathematics component to
navigator reports by asking for
the total miles traveled and re-
maining, which the navigator
can learn to compute using lo-


cation information and the
map's scale. The driver can
use the odometer to double-
check.
Dr. Wiesendanger suggests
that road trips also present op-
portunities for kids and parents
to sharpen verbal skills. Story-
telling, for example, can in-
- volve the entire family and ex-
ercise everyone's mind.
One idea is to use "story
starters." One family member
starts the story with a simple
"Once upon a time" statement.
Each family member takes a
turn to build on the story.
These stories can take imagi-
native, often humorous turns
that entertain and create
memories.
Another mind exercise idea >
is having kids keep a daily va-
cation journal, starting in the
car. Writing brief reflections
on the daN 's experience a.id to-
morrow's anticipation lets kids
practice expressing
themselves.
The journal also becomes a
vacation keepsake that kids
and parents are likely to treas-
ure a few years down the road.
Finally, Dr. Wiesendanger
suggests there is no substitute
for the book. Hours in the car
provide plenty of time for
reading calisthenics for the
mind anytime. Books on tape
or CD are also great options to
pass the time.


Opinion & Comment


Credit Card Offers Flatter


Seems like every week I get
another offer of a credit card
with fantastic rates and a
whopping credit line. I us-
pect you get this kind of s ff
too.
I rather like! the letters that
accompany the offer. They are
surefire pick-me-ups.
The letters usually go some-
thing like this: "You've been
chosen for this super duper
credit card with next to noth-
ing interest rates (for the first
six months, you understand),
because of your outstanding
credit history.
"A person in your position
needs access to instant cash
and a system to keep track of
your purchases which we do
for you in 'our monthly billing
process.
"We offer you a line of
credit of up to,$25,000."
See what I mnean about these
letters pumping up the old
ego? These credit card folks
think I'm something special,
don't ya see?
I have to admit they are right
about the need for instant cash.


Publisher's


Notebook


Ron Cichon


Just the .other day I took my
daughter to lunch and had just
enough money with me to pay
the check.
Had either,of us ordered des-
sert, we would have been
washing the dishes!
,:,.: Of. course, :I -rarely carry
much cash with me because I
usually don't need it. I don't
shop and buy anything so what
do I need with cash?
Then there's the matter of
the record the credit card com-
pany offers to keep for me. Is
that such a big deal?
Do folks really need some-


p

At


body else to keep track of what
they spend? I dunno.
On to the credit line up to
$25,000: That certainly has a
nice ring to it, doesn't it?
There's somebody out there
,eager to put $25,000, in. nmy
hands, Such a deal!
You understand, of course,
the offer reads "up to"
$25,000. So the credit line
could be a paltry $1,000.
As I said, the letters with the
credit card offers are pick-me-
ups and for that one should be
grateful.
There's so much about us
suggesting we're not young


enough, rich enough or trim
enough that it's nice to hear a
positive word now and then.
Too bad responding to the
credit card offers can be a first
step to serious financial prob-
lems. Experts say bankrupt-
cies are at an all time high and
easy credit is a major factor.
Students graduating from
college are inundated with of-
fers for credit -cards. Many
have no jobs.and the attraction
Iof using their new credit cards
is pretty irresistible.
-There's something wrong
with that picture, isn't there?
As for me, the credit card of-
fers keep coming and I keep
throwing them away. That
system seems to be working
pretty well.
Sometimes I take a minute to
read the letters just for a
chuckle.
I don't know where they are
getting their information but
they say I have an outstanding
credit record and deserve in-
stant cash up to $25,000.
Who am I to argue with
these major companies?.


Be Wary Of Polling Data


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
June 26, 1996
Heat, humidity and a high
spirited crowd marked the fi-
nal- week of the 46th annual
Watermelon Festival.
The county's volunteer fire
departments want the county
to give them more money for
their operations.
If you're wondering' about
the high visibility of law en-
forcement officers at this
year's Watermelon Festival
events, credit the recently cre-
ated reservist units for much of
that.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
June 25, 1986
An estimated 5,000 people
turned out for the Watermelon
Festival Parade Saturday
morning.
Kimberly Newsome and Ste-
ven Bulloch are the new Wa-
termelon Festival Little King
and Queen for 1986.


Writer Thani

For News Coi
Dear Editor:
The Early Learning Coali-
tion would like to thank you
for the recent article published
about our provider apprecia-
tion dinner, "Evening With
The Stars."
It is essential that the child
:are providers who do so


With the close of Florida's
Legislature, county officials
learned they have additional
time to levy an optional gas
tax. A letter to that effect was
mailed to commissioners June
9 by the executive director of
the state association of county
commissioners.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
June 24, 1976
Annette Rea was crowned
queen of the Watermelon Fes-
tival Friday night. Serving in
her court are Jane Pafford, first
runner-up; Cheryl Parcell, sec-
ond runner-up; Sally 'Bentley,
third runner-up; and Marsha
Jackson, fourth runner-up.
The Canoe Race at the Wa-
cissa River drew 53 entries and
the record for the 12 mile race
was set by Jack and Sperry
Rademaker who covered the
distance in one hour, 26 min-
utes and 30 seconds.
(See From Our File Page 5)


ks Paper

average
much for our community are
honored, and your article
helped to make the public
aware of what these generous
individuals do.
If you have any questions,
feel free to contact me at 850
385-0551, ext. 319.
Nakia Beasley
Public Relations Intern


By DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

The use of polling data has
been around for years. I have
always been available and ea-
ger to participate in just one
poll, but I, nor any relative or
the multitude of people I
know, have ever been queried
regarding their opinion.
That makes me wonder, who
in the heck are these pollsters
contacting to get their re-
sponses? This then begs the
next obvious question, how
come we seem to automati-
cally give instant credibility to
the polling information with-
out any forethought or hesita-
tion?
I learned a long, long time
ago in a college statistics class,
that it is possible to make num-
bers pertaining to any data do
just about anything you want.


Accordingly, obtaining and
then analyzing polling results
is only as good (and honest) as
the person or agency formulat-
ing the .polling questions and
calculating the results.
Let's suppose the polling
question is: "Do you like fresh
donuts in the morning?" Let's
assume that the responses are:
Yes -64%, No 28% and Unde-
cided 8%. If the pollster is
being paid by the donut indus-
try, one would expect the re-
sults to highlight the "over
whelming" desire for fresh do-
nuts in the morning.
If the egg industry eager to
sell more eggs is paying the
bill, then one might expect the
headline to read, "Nearly one-
third of respondents prefer to
have something other than
sweets for breakfast."
If it is the anti-suger lobby,
them the analysis might be,
"Most Americans are addicted


to sugar" or "Up to one-third
of Americans are now kicking
the sugar habit." You see, it's'
all about how you want the
public to perceive your data to
ultimately sway their opinion
or actions.
I once called the White
House comment line in the
early days of the Clinton presi-
dency when congress was pro-
posing cuts in domestic
spending for the bloated
school lunch program.
Before I could make a com-
ment regarding what I wanted
to talk about, I had to answer a
polling question. The question
went something like this, "If
you think Congress should
continue to fully fund the
school lunch program'that pro-
vides milk to America's poor-
est children, please press one.
If you believe poor children
should be forced to go hungry
at school, press two." DA!


Who in the world would press
two?! I'm sure the polling data
presented to Congress showed
100% backing for an increase
in the school lunch program
funding.
I am not without shame re-
garding the use of polling data.
I have used national polling in-
formation to' support a point I
wish to get across or circum-
stance that I wish to emphasize
in some of my columns.
I try to pick and choose se-
lectively to best guarantee the
accuracy of the data, although
I am aware some questions
could have been framed to
achieve a specific outcome.
I always keep in mind the
old saying, "He who controls
the question, controls the re-
sponse." Accordingly, I never
use Democratic or Republican
sponsored polling data, or

(See Be Wary Page 5)


Flag Deserves Respect


By DANIEL S. WHEELER '

Often I am asked by report-..-
ers, "What harm does it do to
burn a flag?" This question
usually comes from young
men. and women, most of
whom aren't veterans, and I i
frequently sense that they
really don't understand why
this issue is important.
Recently, I was asked this
question: "Tommy Lasorda
told the story of a flag burning
during a Dodger game in 1976


where Rick Monday ran out on
the field and tore the 'flag away
from a protestor. When they
-became aware of what had
,happened, the crowd stood and
.sang 'God Bless America.'
Doesn't that prove that we
don't need the flag-protection
amendment?"
I was reminded of what Gen.
Patrick H. Brady, Medal of
Honor recipient, said. He
pointed out that nobody can
change your mind about pro-
tecting our flag. It's the chil-
dren-of America that we have


to think about.
What happens when they
lose, or are no longer taught,
respect for our flag? What will
happen when an enemy threat-
ens out nation, or even attacks
our country, and our moral fi-
ber has become so desensi-
tized our patriotism has been
so eroded that ordinary citi-
zens aren't willing to stand and
fight for the United States?
Brady reflects on those who
have died in battle, and those
who risked their lives for this
great country. He says that the


men who wear the Medal of
Honor risked their lives for
their country many of them
died but he wonders if they
would be willing to risk their
lives for the "country we are
becoming."
Then I think about those
thousands of men and women
singing "God Bless America"
in Dodger Stadium. Why were
they doing it? Well, obviously
they did it because they loved
their flag.
(See Flag Page 5)


From Our Photo File
'-f -
.... "


MAIL CARRIER Clyde Strickland, with letter, was well supervised when he sorted his
mail for the last time in Nov., 1990, retiring after 35 years. Postmasters under
whom he served were present to honor him. L-R: Tom Braswell, Jr.; Strickland,
Frank Carney, Tom Braswell, Sr. (News File Photo)


I


I I I~ I


I














Brotherhood Awards


Four $500 Scholarships


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 28, 2006 PAGE 5
-..

'


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Brotherhood of Christ.
Episcopal Church announces
the award of four $500 schol-
arships to graduating students
from Jefferson County.
.Each applicant had to com-
plete an essay on character,
church, and community in-
volvement, and provide letters
of recommendation from their
Pastor and a teacher.
In addition they had to meet
with an interview committee
from the Brotherhood and
discuss their educational
plans.
This year's recipients are:


Corie Smith from Aucilla
Christian Academy. She is a
members of Calvary Baptist
Church in Monticello and will
be attending Clearwater
Christian College in Pinellas
County.
Michelle Allen is from Jef-
ferson County High School.
She is a member of Casa Bi-
anca MB Church and will be
attending Tallahassee Com-
munity College.
Hannah Clark is from
Brookwood School. She is a
member of Christ Episcopal
Church and will be attending
the University of South Caro-
lina at Columbia.
William "Casey" Gunnels is
a graduate of Aucilla Chris-


tian Academy. He will be at-
tending Florida State
University in the Fall, and at-
tends Lloyd Baptist Church.
The Brotherhood is able to
award these scholarships be-
cause of the generous support
of their annual Gourmet Din-
ner by the community. '
The proceeds of the Gour-
met Dinner supports numer-
ous community based
activities throughout the year.

Anyone interested in the
. community based activities of
the Brotherhood may contact
Father Mal Jopling or Broth-
erhood President Bill Hopkins
through the church office at
997-4116.


.;


._. .A.
'". f ,
... ._.....- ....


FATHER MAL JOPLING, TOM VOGELGESANG, HANNAH CLARK


x ;.K:~l~' ;~~4


A


Be Wary Of Polling Data


(Continued From Page 4)
other corporate or organization
sponsored data because it is
obvious they have a specific
agenda that the polling is de-
signed to support.
Someone could launch a poll
tomorrow with the question,
"Do you hate Bush's guts?"
Most compassionate Ameri-
cans don't "hate" the
president, although they may
disagree with some or most of
his policies.


I would expect, therefore,
that the overwhelming re-
sponse would be "no" I don't
hate the president, yet some
unscrupulous pollster could,
then use this data and conclude
that President Bush',s "favor-
ability" rating has jumped
overniiLht it90 percent'
I guess the point that I am
trying to make is be very care-
ful about forming opinions or
taking actions, based upon
nebulous polling data no mat-


ter how credible the source
may appear to be. It is m\
opinion that e en some nation-
-ally recognized polling organi-
zations have appeared to
"ske\'" their questions in
search of obtaining answers to
support a particular agenda
Recent stainscs sho\ that at
home, I am right over 50 per-
cent of the time, but I am sure
that my wife can come up ith
some bogus data that contra-
dicts the truth.


I,


i.i


FATHER MAL JOPLING, TOM VOGELGESANG, CORIE SMITH


Flag Deserves Respect


(Continued From Page 4)
Throughout the lives of those
who rose to their feet, we had
laws protecting Old Glory.
Many probably risked their
lives in her defense. They un-
derstood that "the tree of Lib-
erty is watered with the blood
of patriots."
That's why they stood and
sang.
But what of this generation
and of the next? What are they


being taught about love of
country? How many of them
will start each school day
pledging their allegiance to our
flag, as most of us did? How
many of them will learn the
proper way to respect her, and
what she means and why patri-
otism is important?
It's certainly true as we've
heard people say one person
burning a flag, or urinating on
it, or defecating on it, or tram-


From Our Files


(Continued From Page 4)
Candidates who are seeking
the Sheriffs post are James
Scott, sheriff; Ike Grant, Am-
bulance Service Director; and
Danny Monroe, III, farmer and
rancher.
FORTY YEARS AGO
June 24, 1966
Miss Carolyn Branch, daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Jack L.
Branch, received her nurse's
cap and pin at graduation from
nursing school at Jacksonville
University Saturday evening.
Members of the Junior De-'
partment of the First Methodist
Church are spending this week
at Centenary Church Camp
near Quincy. Rev. Tom Price,
Carol Jo Odom and Steve
Bevis are serving as
counselors.
Postmaster Tom Braswell
presented the program last
Wednesday at the weekly
Meeting of the Kiwanis Club,
showing a very interesting film
on zip coding.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
June 15, 1956
James L. Temple has been
named head coach and athletic
director of Jefferson High.
Roy Finch was installed as
president of the Monticello Li-
ons Club Monday night. Oth-
ers installed were Ike Ander-
son, Wesley Gramling, Sid
Soule, Bill Griffin, Roy Heff-
ner and George Jewel.
Mrs. L.S. Delph has the dis-
tinction of being the first
woman to be called to serve on
a jury in Jefferson County.
SIXTY YEARS AGO
June 14, 1946
The marriage of Miss Nelle
* Zoe Hawkins, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. J.N. -Hawkins of
Monticello, FL, to Mr. Paisley




1-00USnavy -NAVY
wwwunavyj obs.com


Livingston, son of Mr. and
Mrs. N.B. Livingston, of Aus-
tin, Texas, was solemnized at
5:00 o'clock Wednesday after-
noon, June 26, at the Monti-
cello Methodist Church. The
Rev. J.L. Hunter officiated at
the double ring ceremony.
Thurman Hodges was intro-
duced at Kiwanis Club as the
newest member, having trans-
ferred his niembership from
the Quitman Club..
Mrs. Paul McIntosh, Miss
Virginia McIntosh 'and Miss
Bettilee Bird spent Sunday in
Quincy visiting Mrs. McIn-
tosh's sister. Mrs. and Mrs.
J.D. Martin and Miss Ivy Con-
nell spent the week at Daytona
Beach where they attended the
Florida. Conference of United
Methodists:


RO

DON'T

2006 Clh





S['L, 3353





239,98,

-, A 80


pling it under his feet, will not
harm Old Glory. But it's not
true that no harm is done.
The harm is done if the
American people fail to re-
spond to such vile and hurtful
conduct. The harm is done
only if, by our apath\. we con-
done the defiling of the banner
that has draped the caskets of
our American heroes. Edmund
BuLke once said: "The. only
thing necessary for the triumph
of evil is.for good men to do
nothing."
Failure to protect our flag by
law is not a celebration of lib-
erty, it is the celebration of
evil. A great nation cannot pre-
serve its greatness by turning a
blind eye and a deaf ear to that
which is wrong, to that which
is destructive, to that which is
immoral and evil.
What harm does it do to burn
a flag?
Over time it destroys the
very fabric of our nation. It un-
dermines the goodness that
makes us great; and it ensures
that future generations will not
stand and spontaneously sing
"God Bless America" because
they will not know that once
- God did.
Daniel S. Wheeler is the Presi-
dent of the Citizens Flag Alli-
ance,- Inc., and the Executive
Director of The American Le-.
gion National Headquarters in
Indianapolis, Indiana.


FATHER MAJ JOPLING AND CASEY GUNNELS


FATHER MAL JOPLING, MICHELLE ALLEN AND TOM VOGELGESANG


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PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 28, 2006


Lifestyle


...... Wacissa Church Youth


iLJ Plan Fundraising Event


YOUTH of Wacissa Pentecostal Holiness Church attend the "Mercy Me" concert
in June. From left, Jacob Gray, Jesh Barrow, Anthony Stringfellow, Theresa Phelps,
Lean Barrow, Katie Simon, Lacy Warren, and Sarah Boland.


Extension Agent Copeland

Describes Health Benefits

Of Ripe Watermelon


With watermelons now in
season, Family and Consumer
Sciences Extension Agent
Heidi Copeland describes the
health benefits of watermelon.
"Sweet, cool, crunchy wa-
termelon is packed with vita-
mins, minerals, and health
enhancing phytochemicals,"
said Copeland.
This popular treat contains
more cancer fighting lyco-
pene than any other fresh fruit
or vegetable, including toma-
toes.


"Lycopene, a powerful an-
tioxidant abundant in red
fruits and vegetables, may
help prevent prostate cancer
and heart disease." Copeland
explains.
In addition to lycopene, wa-
termelon has plenty of Vita-
min A and C, is high in
potassium and fiber, and con-'
tains just 80 calories per two-
cup serving.
Because watermelon is 92
percent water, it is also a great
snack to help keep the body


hydrated during the warm
summer months.
Choose a ripe melon," said
Copeland. "Watermelons will
not continue to ripen much af-
ter picking."
Copeland recommends
choosing a firm, symmetrical
watermelon that is free of
bruises, cuts and dents.
A ripe melon should feel
heavy for its size.
The underbelly should have
a creamy spot of yellow.
Copeland reminds residents
to remember to wash their
watermelon with soap and
water before cutting.
Every part of the water-
melon is edible, including the
rind and seeds .


DIAMBRA

First Birthday
Delilah Diambra, daughter
of Tammy and Jason
Diambra, celebrated her first
birthday, Friday, June 16. '
Maternal grandparents are
Nancy and Tom Stover of
-Monticello.
Paternal grandparents are
Suzanne and Bobby Smith of
Tallahassee, and Dot and Paul
Diambra of Glencove, AL.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

More than 350 people at-
tended the celebration of
"Evening with the Stars," an
awards dinner held to honor
childcare providers tlqough-
out the region. -
Our Blessings Early Learn-
ing Center, of Monticello,
was one of 16 early learning
programs recognized.
The Angela Lewis Family
Child Care Home, of Jeffer-
son County, was also recog-
nized.
The event was sponsored by
Arbor Education and
Training, Regions Bank, and
Kaplan Early Learning Com-
pany.
Providers from Jefferson,
Gadsden, Leon, Liberty,


Madison, Taylor, and Wa-
kulla counties assembled at
the University Center Club
*for the annual event.
The keynote speaker was
Lynn Eldridge. executive di-
rector of the Early Learning
Coalition of Northwest Flor-
ida, who spoke on reaching
for the stars.
Her inspirational speech
served to remind all providers
that they play a crucial role in
helping young children 'real-
ize their potential.
The Early Learning Coali-
tion of the Big Bend Region-
is a not-for-profit agency
dedicated to providing leader-
ship and advocacy that builds
a community where all chil-
dren are prepared for success
in school.


Homes Of Mourning


Bob W. Denmark
Bob W. Denmark age 70, a
retired mechanic died Thurs-
day June 23, 2006 in Tallahas-
see.
Graveside Services were
held Monday June 26, 2006 at
11:00 a.m., at Bethlehem
Cemetery Lake City Florida.
The family received friends at
Beggs Funeral Home Monti-
cello Chapel on Sunday June
25. 2006 from 5:00 until 7:00


When Bethany was born with the same
Disability as Colin, the DeVaults called on
Easter Seals. Today, Colin sw'ims like a fish
and Bethany rides her bike. One in five
Americans has a disability and Easier Seals
is there with help, hope and humanity. Call
Easter Seals or visit www.easter-seals.ors

Creating solutions.
changing lives.


Donation can be sent to Big
Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan
Center Blvd., Tallahassee,
Florida 32308.
Mr. Denmark was a native of
Lake City, Florida. He has
lived in Monticello for the past
30 years.
He is survived by one son
Robert Mores of Pinetta, Flor-
ida, and one daughter Carol
Denmark also of Pinetta.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Wacissa Pentecostal Holi-
ness Church Youth Group is
planning a fundraiser and
Hurricane Awareness event at
the church's Christian Life
Community Center in Wa-
cissa from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.
Saturday.
As a community awareness
project, the youth will be
helping the church announce
the opening of the Fellowship
Hall as a Community Center
during the 2006 hurricane


season.
They will distribute Hurri-
cane. Survival Guides .from
the Capital Area Red Cross
along with information about
what the Community Center
has to offer.
Members of the community
can come out, get their vehi-
cles washed, and have a bite
to eat while taking a tour of
the Community Center.
The youth will be accepting
donations and providing egg
rolls, hot dogs, cold drinks,
and baked goods.
They hope to raise money
for a trip to Wild Adventures


to see Grammy Award Win-
ning Artist Steven Curtis
Chapman on July 15.
The church is located in
Wacissa 'on State Road 259
(Tram Road.)
The church youth group
participates in activities every
Sunday from 10 a.m. until
noon, and plan monthly
weekend activities and out-
ings.
This group also leads the
church Praise and 'Worship
Service once a month with a
drummer, guitar player, bass
player, and singers.


Washington Awards

Local Scholars $11,000


'. ",
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WASHINGTON


Friends Of

Libary To

Meet Thurs.

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The regular meeting of the
Friends of the Library will be
held 7 p.m. Thursday at the
Library.
President Carl Hanks will
bring the group up to date on
the continuing reorganization
-of the Friends.
The public is urged to at-
tend this important meeting.
Everyone is welcomed.
"An investment in knowl-
edge always pays the best in-
terest." Ben Franklin





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Scholarships were awarded to
21 local students, totalling
$11,000.
For seven years, Shirley
Washington has provided the
awards.
Explaining her motivation
for providing the
scholarhsips, Washington, a
retired educator who taught
39 years, responded: "This is
my way of motivating the
young men and women of our


community, and reinforcing
the importance of continuing
their education, so that they
can become productive citi-
zens. This is my mission, my
pledge, to the youth of this
county.
As a native of this county,
a mother and grandmother, I
feel that I can be an advocate
on behalf of many children
who need and merit my sup-
port.," Washington said.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 28, 2006 PAGE 7
( __ .. o '. 2 : 4"". ? :.


Parent Meeting Set

For Project KICK


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
A parent meeting concern-
ing Career Awareness Day
will be held by Project KICK
5:15 p.m. Thursday at the
Monticello/Jefferson Boys
and Girls Club on Mamie
Scott Road.
Professor Dr. Roberta Ru-
bin, and counselors from FSU
will speak about issues, such
as anger management, peer
pressure, leadership, and cul-
tural awareness.
Each month the students en-
rolled in the Boys and Girls
Clubs learn about one or more
of these issues.
Through this program par-


ents are asked to sign a 1-year
contract allowing counselors
to work with them and their
children on these and related
issues.
Food and door prizes will
be provided.
Door prizes were donated
by local merchants including
Pizza Hut, Glorious Mane,
and Movie Gallery.
They recently attended the
MercyMe concert in Tallahas-
see.
The youth program, is for
boys and girls ages 8-18 and
all area children are invited to
join in the fun, fellowship and
worship.
For more ,information con-
tact Pastor John Cain at 997-
4636.


Andris Donates $500

To Boys, Girls Club


DEBBIE SNAP
Staff Writer


Steve Andris, of the Jeffer-
son. County Kennel Club, re-
cently presented the
Monticello/Jefferson County.
Boys and Girls Club with a
$500 Check. -
Director Gerrold Austin re-
ports that the funds will be
used for planned events for
the children enrolled in the


summer program.
The Club members will also
continue to hold fundraisers,
such as carwashes and tho
like, throughout the summer
months, to add to the funding
for special events.
The Counry Boys and Girls
Club members, staff, and a
fe%% parents v ill travel to Val-
dosta, GA,Thursday, July 27
to spend the day at Wild Ad-
ventures, as one of the. Club's
summer events.


ELEANOR HAWKINS was among the models at the Fes-
tival Fashion Show/Luncheon.


CHRISTI BESHEARS pauses at the
smile for our camera.


Fashion Show to


t.'..


JES BOYS, GIRLS CLUB Director Gerrold Austin dis-
plays a $500 check donated for club activities by Steve
Andris of JCKC. (News Photo)


Torch Club Chartered

At Boys, Girls Club


MARY ELLEN GIVEN
Shop.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
Shirle,V Washington,. ad\ sor
for the nev. I1 chartered Mon-
ticello Boys and Girls Club
Torch-Club is expected to go
before the City Council on
July 11 with a request to
"adopt" Chestnut Streer as a
Club project, Director Gerrold
Austin reported.
This street adoption is just



S.





!! ri
r 2 i ?
f!


KATRINA WALTON
(News Photos)


the "first" of ma'n. projects in
'the planning stages for the
Toich Club
Members.will learn respon-
sibilir% by keepingtheir street
free of debris.-'
They will also visit resi-
dents of local nursing homes.
During' their visits they will
play a few games of Bingo;
read with them; maybe dine
with the residents, and even
bring a gift.


I.'.


in a number from Milady's Shop.


'.4.
.4,


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:PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED.. JUNE 28. 2006


Sports


Melon Weekend Tourney


Draws 28 Tennis Teams


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Despite the extreme heat
over the weekend, 28 mixed
doubles tennis teams, twice as.
many teams as last year, met
to vie for the championship in
the Watermelon Festival ten-
nis tournament.
Spokesperson Amy Harri-
son reports that many of the
matches were played to tie-
breakers.
Though there was much
tennis action taking place at
;all courts at the Recreation
Park and the Country Club,
,scores were not available for
'all matches, and results were
,not available from the speed
serving contest Friday.
Players met on the courts at
8 a.m. Saturday and Sunday,
.wrapping up play for each
:day at about 6 p.m.


"We had a lot of good peo-
ple,and a real good time," said
'Harrison. "We had a tent set
up in the shade, and plenty of
coolers and iced watermelon
to keep the players cool."
Players competed on three
levels of play, 6.0, 7.0, and
8.0, which resulted in the
team of Cathy Jackson and
Steven Demott winning first
place in the 6.0, taking the
first match, 6-1 and their sec-
ond, 6-2,
Leigh Walker and Kevin
Home took second.
Dina and Ross Wagers won
the consolation trophy in a
tiebreaker:
Marsha Plaines and Ridgely
Plaines took first place in the
7.0 division.
They took the trophy in a
6-3 tiebreaker in the third set.
Trisha Wirick and Lee All-
man took the consolation tro-
phy.


In the 8.0 division, the team
of Mitch Rogers and Eunice
(last name not available) took
first place.
Mark Wirick and Robin
Whitlock took second place,
winning a tiebreaker in a
close 11-9 match.
Mark Wirick and Whitlock
lost the first set, 6-1, lost the
second, 3-6 and came back to
take the third, 11-9.
Harrison added that if a Sor-
est Player Award were Pre-
sented Monday morning, it
would most likely go to
Trisha Wirick, who played a
total of eight matches in the
hot sun over the weekend,
five on Saturday and three on
-Sunday.
Harrison thanked the Tennis
Association, Farmers and
Merchants Bank, Simpson's
Nursery and Malloy's
Nursery.


Babe Ruth League Wraps


Up 9-9 On The Season


STATE FARM INSURANCE Coach Pitch players were honored at the Recreation Park
Annual Awards Ceremony. From left, Winston Lee, Sportsmanship; Ricky Finlayson,
Most Valuable; Brooklyn McGlamlory, Most Improved.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Babe Ruth league was
blanked by Wakulla, 19-0, in
district play, to wrap up at
9-9 on the season.
Monticello won the District
runner-up slot, and each


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello A's baseball
team stands 2-8 on the season,
after losing, 10-9, in a battle
with Eufala, Sunday.
James Wesley started on the
mound, pitched five innings
and gave up eight runs, five
walks and struck out three.
Reggie Norton pitched thpe
final two innings, gave up two
runs, three walks and struck
out one.
At the plate, Reggie Norton
went two for four with three


player and coach was
awarded a trophy and the
team received a plaque.
"We just couldn't get any-
thing going," said Coach Jim
Norton. "Wakulla. was: the
better team on the field that
day."-
The local team only received
three hits during the game,


hits including two singles and
a double; Telvin Norion went
two for three; stole three
bases and scored three runs..
Joe Jones went two for four,
smacked a home run, a triple,
and scored one run.
James Wesley went one for
three, one double; Curtis
Highto%%er andRonzo Wade
each went one for four; and
Lance Nealy went. one for
four, scored two and hit one
double.
The A's are slated to face
off against Concord, 3. p.m.,
Sunday, here.


they were made by Telvin
Norton.. Marquice Dobson
and Mason Shiver.
Shane Broxie was the start-
ing pitcher, tossing two in-
nings and gi, ing up 11 runs,
"a slew of hits numbering
12', 0 walks and striking out
two.
Clark Christy' replaced
Broxie on the mound in the
third, giving up five runs on
se en hits and walking one.
Dobson came in to replace
Christy after Christy was in-
jured at the plate, by a fast-
ball in the kneecap, and was
taken out of the game.
Dobson gave up two runs
on three hits, walked three
and struck out one.
Spokesperson Bear Register
concluded that the coaches
did a good job ". ith the boys.
Coaches include, Norton,
Doug Shiver and Randy Cur-
tis.
Playing in the Babe Ruth
league were; Telvin Norton,
Marquife Dobson, Randy
Curtis, Shane Broxie, Kemar-
ian ,Kirksey, Clark Christy,
Nicholas Parker, Jordan Rig-
don, Jimmy Tillman, A. J.
Murphy, Alfonzo Footman,
and Mason Shiver.


C & F-FENCING Coach Pitch Team receiving awards include, from left: Ty Chancy,
Most Valuable; Shawn Blue, Sportsmanship; Casey Demott, Most Valuable; Brandon
Holm, Most Valuable; Douglas Gulledge, Most Valuable; Brjan Bowman, Most Im-
proved. (News Photos)


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Jefferson A Team

Falls To Eufala 10-9


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UNITED WAY Festival Bed Race entry. Pushers are
Bobby Plaines and Ray Hughes. Rider is Karen Frazee.


ROBERT AHSLEY FRAMING won Best Dressed Bed
Award. Pushers are Danny Morris and Chris Hubert.
Rider is Paige Thurman.

w





n ;.^ ,. J'' ,
.,, ,.,.. = :.." :4, % --r 4
.. .. : '- =, -; .l.4.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 28, 2006 PAGE 9

YOUR BEST INVESTMENT -
IS IN YOUR LOCAL
HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER


NYI


If It Happens In Our County
You'll Read It In
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Monticello, Florida 32344


BIG BEND HOSPICE Bed Race entry. Pushers are Greg
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(News Photos)


Monticello


News


'You Can't Be Without It'











PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 28, 2006

Humane Society Discusses Horseshoe
Tournament

Fundraising Possibilities set At Park


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
The Humane Society dis-
cused several fundraising
ideas at its recent meeting.
The discussion began when
President Caroline Carswell
advised the group that thus
far, $1,692 had been given to
the organization in pledges
and donations, during the re-
cent membership drive and
$171 was donated during the
Watermelon Festival adoption
booth.
"Funds are desperately
needed now." said Carswell.
"We have got to figure out
ways to get some money
coming in. We need money if
we are to continue with op-
erations at the shelter. If we
don't come up with
something, we'll be in danger
of closing."
Members began brainstorm-
ing, with many good ideas be-
ing discussed, plans and deci-
sions made and dates set.
New shelter director of op-
eration Xan Baker said she
had already made arrange-
ments with the pet food com-
pany, Pedigree, that would


save the shelter $500' per
month in feed bills.
"I have to figure out how
much dog and cat food we re-
quire per month, and they will
donate it," said Baker.
She added that with her
training as a veterinarian tech-
nician, that would also save
money on monthly vet bills.
Vice President Martha Jean
Martin said that plans are al-
ready in the works for the an-
nual Bless the Beast, slated
for Saturday, Feb. 17 at the
Opera House.
She said that the first plan-
ning meeting for the event
was slated for 7 p.m.,
Monday, Nov. 6, at the
Chamber.
"We can determine during
that meeting whether or not
we have to meet again in De-
cember," said Martin.
Treasurer Margaret McMu-
ray suggested holding Bingo
fundraisers. "People loye'
playing Bingo," she said.
"We can have the event ei-
ther catered or serve
barbecue," McMurray added.
Carswell said the idea was
feasible. "We can get prizes
donated, determine where to


hold it and how exactly Bingo
is played," said McMurray.
Carswell added, "This is
also something that we can do.
once or twice per month."
"We:need to do something
fast," 'said Carswell. "We
need a garage sale."
She suggested gathering do-
nations, and having them
stored at the office of Luther
Pickles, located at 440 W.
--Washington St.
"When we hold the sale, we
can hold it in the vicinity of
his office," said Carswell.
"And if any large donations,
such as boats come in, call
me."
She added that members
could also sell Cokes, ham-
burgers and hot dogs, and Hu-
man Society T-shirts and note
cards during the event.
In related news, she said
that Snapdragon had offered
-to carry the T-shirts and note
cards 'in their store.
Additional ideas discussed
included holding a critter
poker run at the park and
holding a golf tournament in
the spring.


ITigers Ready
For Football,
Season


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer.


The Tiger football team be-
gan meeting four days per
week Mondy, in preparation
for the upcoming season.
Head Coach Harry Jacobs
estimated that some 34 play-
ers are working on condition-
ing, endurance skills and
strength, weight lifting, run-
. ing and the'obstacle course."'
"That's good for building
the team back up to strength
after being out for the sum-
mer," said Jacobs.
He added that he expects
the season to be as goodyif not
better than last year, with.
,many players returning.

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1wwwl:navyjobs.com


FMB won the final heat in the Festival Bed Race. (News
Photo)


WE TAKE THE
DENTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


The annual July 4 Men's
and Women's Doubles Horse-
shoe Tournament will be held
Tuesday, July 4 at the Recrea-
tion Park.
Sign-ups take place from
8:30 a.m. until 9:30 a.m., with
the tournament to follow.
The tournament is limited to
the first 40 teams and the en-
try fee is $10.
Trophies will be awarded
for first through fourth place
winners.


Elizabeth Suto.
Killed by a drunk driver
on February 27,1994, on Bell Blvd.
in Cedar Park, Texas.
If you don't stop your friend
from driving drunk, who will?


Caminez, Brown &


Hardee, P.A.

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997-2535 (on Carroll ill) 229-226-0717 562-2962


]Richert Desin GULF COAST LEE FULLER ~ OWNER Sister Fay
SR ctem D design H. P Palm Reader & Advisor
Custom Design House Plans METAL M ORRIS FULLER PAINTING LLC Are you Unhappy? Worried? Sad?
Drawn to Permit Specifications ROOFING S3' Wide LHave you been Disappointed?
*Additions *Garages *Blueprints Galvalume Give me a call and let me help you.
tel.: 850-997-5770 Cell: 850-508-9362 o f 3' Wide Office (850) 671-2286 Serving Leon County for 50 years
fax:850-997-2351 acceFull sin tock Painted Cell (850) 284-6134WeDoParties! TarotCards *PalmReadings'Astrology
1055 S. Mulberry St. Monticello, FL 32344 s. Call in for 2 free questions!
special Flashings Made-AII Types Warranted.Metal Available Licensed by County & City
Patrice V. Richert cut to your desired lengths Delivery Service Available 8366 Guerry Lane, Tallahassee, FL 32317 Mon.-Fri 10am-8pm, Sun 1-5pr, 1729 Mahan Drive
whiskigirl42@earthlink.net Call Toll-Free 888-393-0335 352-498-0778 Horseshoe Beach, FL Lic. & Insured (850)878-9327


, ^











MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 28, 2006 PAGE 11


To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED

Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....'$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGALS
LEGAL NOTICE
The Jefferson County Planning
Commission subcommittee will meet
to discuss subdivisions on July 10,
2006 at 700 P.M. at the Monticello
Chamber of Commerce, 420 W.
Washington Street, Monticello, FL
32344. The meeting may be
continued as necessary. From the
Florida "Government in the
Sunshine Manual", page 36,
paragraph c: Each board,
commission, or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision
thereof shall include in the notice of
any meeting or hearing, if notice of
meeting or hearing, is required, of
such board, commission, or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the
board, agency, or commission with
respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she
will need a record of the

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LEGALS '-
proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings, is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be
based. For information contact the
Jefferson County Planning
Department at 445 West Palmer
Mill Road, Monticello, FL 32344,
telephone 850-342-0223.
6/28/06, c
LEGAL NOTICE
The Jefferson County Planning
Commission will hold its regular
monthly meeting and workshop on
July 13, 2006 at 7:00 p.m. The
meeting will be to discuss
subdivisions, and service areas.
The meeting will be held ifi the
Courtroom of the Jefferson County
Courthouse located at the
intersection of US Highway 19 and
US Highway 90 in Monticello, FL.
The meeting may be continued as
necessary. Information concerning
the meeting is available at the Jef-
ferson County Planning
Department, 445 W. Palmer Mill
Road, Monticello, FL 32344,
Telephone 850-342-0223.
From the Florida
"Goverihment in the Sunshine
Manual", page 36, paragraph c:
Each board, commission, or agency
of this state or of any political
subdivision thereof shall include in
the notice of any meeting or
hearing, if notice of meeting or,
hearing, is required, of such board,
commission, or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the
board, agency, or commission with
respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she
will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings, is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be
based.
6/28/06 c
In accordance with FL Statue:
Public Auction, July 15, 2006 @
10:00 AM, 1992 Infi Vin#
JNKNG01C8NM211407
Jul-y 29, 2006 @ 10:00AM;' 1993
Plym Vin# 1P3XP64K5PN621885
To be sold as is for Towing &
Storage charges. Conditions &
Terms at Auction. Dave's Towing,
7261 East Washington St.,
Monticello, FL 32344 /
(850)342-1480.
6/28/06, c

HELP WANTED

Electric Meter Change-Out
Field Technicians: How would
you like to earn some extra
money during the summer
month? Utility Meter Services
is looking for temporary meter
change-out field technicians in
the Monticello area. You must
have a valid Florida driver's
license, pass a pre-employment
drug test and background
check. We will train qualified
individuals. Starting salary will
be $15.00 Please call 407-831-
6669 or send your resume to
ums@asplundh.com UMS-EOE
EOE
6/21-6/30c
Caregiver immediate opening,
caring/responsible, 90/59
highways area, Thursdays and
Friday, upto $60 per day clear.
Call 879-8698, 224-4131.
6/28-6/30, pd
Accepting applications for
fulltime lumberyard personnel
with a clean driving record,
knowledgeable of building
materials and customer friendly.
Must be 18 year s or older.
Application may be obtained at
1400 South Jefferson Street,
Monticello.
6/7,tfn c


Now- Hiring 7,

CNAs Risk Manager

Full-Time or Part-Time
Sign-On Bonuses

Clinical Liaison RN or LPN, Full-Tirne

Risk Manager RN Only, Full-Time, Mon-Fri.



Marshall Health

A Rehabilitation Center

1-850-584-6334
207 Marshafl Drive Perry, R. 32347
Drug Free WOrKplaCe-,Equal opportunity Employer
I


HELP WANTED


Monticello News Needs Clerical
help for busy administrative
office. Please call Ron Cichon
997-3568.
tfn
Teacher Positions Available:
Monticello Christian Academy,
Elementary, Middle, High
School, call 997-6048 for details
or submit resume to: MCA,
1590-N. Jefferson St.
Monticello, 32344.
6/2-6/30, c
Janitor/Maintenance: Part time
position. Must be able to
perform some maintenance as
well as janitor duties. Call
MCA, 997-6048.
6/2-6/30, c
Mechanic-Waukeenah Fertilizer
850-997-4460
tfn, c 6/7
Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn, c
FOR SALE
Roosters and laying chickens
$10 eAch; Goats, female $100
each. Leave message 997-0901
6/28, 30 pd -
Pop-Up Camper, clean & in
very good condition; gas stove,
refrigerator, A/C--All work.
$1500.00 997-2232 leave msg.
6/28, pd
Deluxe Vulcan Convection
Oven. Superior Cooking &
baking performance, 40" W x
41 /2 D $3000.60 perfect for
restaurants.
Self-serving Drink Cooler
contains 3 shelves designed to
hold bottles or can drinks $450
perfect for restaurants and
convenience stores. 459-2138,
997-4646
6/9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28, 30, pd

FOR RENT
3 BR, 1 'A BA)house in country.
Call )97'-3368
602 I tl'n
Roommate Wanted. Nice, Big
Home on 4 acres, 15 minutes to
Tallahassee. $340. 997-2422
6/23, 28, pd
Prime downtown office. space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980.
11/30, tfn, c
2 Bedroom/1 Bath, Screened-in
porch-Upstairs, Workshop,-
Workout Rm., W/D hookup
downstairs. Available July 1.
One year lease, First & last
month, $300 deposit, $575
monthly, 997-2845 Sam, US 259,
144 Old Buzbee Rd., Wau-
keenah (No Pets), Utilities not
included.
6/21-6/30, pd
Jefferson Place Apartments, 1 &
2 Bedroom, 1468 S. Waukeenah
St. Office 300 Monticello.
997-6964 Equal Housing
Opportunity.
6/2, tfn, c


Monticello

News



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We accept all vouchers
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Pool & Youth Activities

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Statistics Show People Remember
85% of what they read
and 15% of what they hear


,_ DELTA HEALTH GROUP
g. H& Brynwood Center
A 97.- Bed Skilled Nursing Facility located in Monticello, FL
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service needs of residents and families. Long term care experience.
Experience the Delta Difference!
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1656 SOUTH JEFFERSON STREET
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PHONE: 850-997-1800, FAX: 850-997-7269
WWW.DELTAHEALTHGROUP.COM
Drug Free Workplace EOE/m/f/d/v WEB ID TD8362539




NURSES


LOOKING FOk INNOVATIVE

FLEXIBLE HOURS......


Need more time with family? Want

to return to school? Just ?????


Marshall Health & Rehab Center

has just the opportunity for you


Call Sue Love, RN
850-584-6334


REA-L-EST E
HANDYMAN SPECIAL: 3
bedroom 3 '/ bath, 2150 sq. ft.
Needs Drywall, Painting &
Siding ARV $250,000 Ask
$130,000. (850) 997-3271
6/23, 28, 30, pd

Would you like to rent an office
downtown? Call 997-5517, leave
message and phone number.
TFN 5/12/06

FO P .
FQ." D
Keys-on Vista Road, 251-6958
Monday 6/26 in a.m.

SERVICES

Episcopalians tend not to be
demonstrative. No one expects
you to shout Amen or
hallelujah! On the other hand,
it's OK if you do. Christ
Episcopal Church, three blocks
N of the courthouse. Sunday
service at 10:30 AM. 997-4116
6/28/06, c
Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for a assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
available
1/19, tfn

BUSH CUTTER Lawn Mowing,
bush cutting, tree work, and
pressure washing.
997-4189
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd, 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
new menopausal products.
Jackson's Drug Store.
5/12 tfn, c



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Serious About Sellinq?
List today!





Homes That "Talk" Just Sell Faster

Amazing Buy!!! Mixed Use Property 12
plus partially cleared acres on US 19 south
land use designation permits 4 houses per
acre near Dennis' Trading post only $36,500
per acre

Best Residential Buy in Town!
2 bedroom 1 bath home in great shape with
fenced yard and big family room behind IGA
on Bowman Street Now $76,500-A Talking
House

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly
wooded acres Only $36,500

Lloyd Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath split plan
with very nice master suite 1993 Fleetwood
on 2.6 acres $76,500-A Talking House

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big double-
wide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in re-
mote, oaks, pond, north of Greenville only
$329,000

Country Livinq at it's Best! Comfortable 4
bedroom 3 bath home on five fenced acres
with guest cottage w/bath, 2 car garage, big
shop, pasture 100 pecan trees and a nice
pool Only $400,000

Fine Homesite Close to Town 12.5 private
acres with big trees and pretty fields perfect
for a fine home $265,000

Just Listed Choice 2.39 acre tract on
Shady Lane near Lake Wooten, South of Old
St. Augustine Rd and east of SR 59 $36,500

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 5 acres available
on the east side of town high and dry in quiet
location with lots of game, 9 year old planted
pines, profit from both appreciating land and
growing pine Only $11,500 per acre

Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500

Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a.very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900-A
Talking House
Rentals
Dogwood Street 2/2 home $850
Bowman Street 2/1 rent while waiting for a buyer
$650
Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2/2 MH 5 ac $650
Lloyd Acres 3/2 rent while waiting for buyer $550
Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
Simply the Best!
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


I












PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 28, 2006


Abused Horse Rescued


By Humane Society


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

An abused horse, Midnight,
was recently- rescued by the
Humane Society.
Spokesperson Margaret
McMurray said that Midnight,
who is approximately 25
years old, was rescued and
brought out to her property
for rehabilitation over Me-
morial Weekend..
"He was very skinny, no
more than. skin draped over
bone, very neglected and ex-
tremely depressed.
"You could see it in his


eyes," said McMurray. "He
was starving for love, atten-
tion and care. He had no food
or water for a long time."
She said power had been
turned off in his location and
so there was no way to get
water to him.
McMurray said the first day
on her farm, he began to show
changes. "He was just so
happy to finally be getting
some food, water and atten-
tion," she said. "Altogether, it
took several days before he
started wanting to even act
like a horse."
She said that though his per-
sonality continues to blossom,


he is still quite thin. "It will
take a while to get him back
to normal," said McMurray.
She said that presently,
Midnight's eyes are big and
bright. His personality im-
proves each day and he is to
the point of neighing, pranc-
ing, playing and getting frisky
with the farm mare. _
She said the horse might
be up for adoption, when he is
well.
Anyone wishing to contrib-
ute to Midnight's continued re-
habilitation, can senci
donations to JCHSI, PO Box
559, Monticello, FL 32345.
Specify Midnight Fund.


i .m









is Owner Bernier Spahalski. From left: Mary Frances Gramling, Ethel Hall, Shari Se-
nea, Vivian Mills, Nora Hall, Spahalski, Nicole Honcell, Jerry Sutphin, Frank Blow.
(News Photo)


Short Circuit Causes

Mobile Home Fire


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Fire Rescue responded to a
structure fire, approximately 2
p.m., Saturday at 8290 South
Jefferson Street, near Tyson
Rd.


Structure damage was con-
tained to the living room area
of the double-wide mobile
-home.
Chief Mark Matthews said
that the home owners were at
home at the time the fire
started, and were able to ex-
- tinguish a good portion of the


flame beforee Fire Rescue ar-
rived on the scene.
He said the living room,
kitchen and hallway of the
home suffered severe heat and
smoke damage, however, the
three bedrooms in the home,
which were closed off,, suf-
fered little damage.
The fire was investigated by
the State Fire Marshall's Of-
fice, which determined the
cause of the fire .to be a short
circuit in the electrical cord of
an air conditioning window
unit.
Firefighters were on the.
scene approximately two
hours, including investigation,
time.
No injuries were reported.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Family and Consumer Sci-
ences Extension Agent Heidi
Copeland reports the exis-
tence of a helpful a new web
site, "Solutions For Your
Life".
The site is located at:
www.SolutionsForYourLife.u
fl.edu.
Copeland remarked that as
Americans are increasingly
turning to the Internet to find
information, the UF/IFAS
created this comprehensive,


No One Hurt

in Cherry St.

Shooting

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

City Police were called to
the vicinity of the 800 block
on Cherry Street, about 3 p.m.
Saturday.
Investigator Chip Springer
reported that witness stated
that Peterson and his friend
Wesley Johnson, 55, also of
Monticello, were having a
disagreement, when Peterson
allegedly pulled out a gun fir-
ing two shots in the direction
of Johnson.
Johnson was not injured.
Timothy Peterson, 54, of
Monticello, has been arrested
and charged with possession
of a firearm by a convicted
felon, and discharging a fire-
arm in public.
Peterson is now in the
County Jail.


new web site.
The site compiles, hundreds
if sites and publications, as
well as numerous other re-
sources for both the general
public and industry profes-
sionals.

She said the "Solutions For
Your Life" is easy to
navigate, visually appealing.
and relevant.

The site presents topics re-
lated to agriculture, commu-
nity development, the
environment, families and
consumers, lawn and garden
care, and youth development
all in one portal.,


MIDNIGHT, shown as he looked when this abused horse was rescued by the Humane
Society.




Beltone Holds Grand


Opening, Ribbon Cutting


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

. Beltone celebrated its grand
opening and ribbon cutting
ceremony Thursday morning,
after which, attendees were
treated to fresh fruits, a vari-
ety of finger foods and bever-
ages.
Beltone is located on the
second story of the former li-
brary building on Cherry


Street.,
Business hours are Thurs-
day by appointment. Call
997-2333 for an appointment.

Operating the establishment
are office manager Shari Se-
nea and owner, consultant,
senior associate and hearing
instrument specialist, Bernie
Spahalski.
Services provided include,
hearing evaluations, service
and repair on all hearing aid


makes and models, and also
batteries for all makes and
models of hearing aids.
"The emphasis of our prac-
tice is on the patients rather
than the hearing product,"
said Senea.
"Since we recognize that no
single manufacturer can pro-
vide the best solution for
every patient, we offer eight
other lines of products, along
with the Beltone."
She explained that a hear-
ing loss may not be obvious.
"In most cases, it is so grad-
ual the person doesn't even re-
alize that a loss of hearing has
occurred," said Senea.
She offered some symptoms
which may indicate a hp-ring
loss. They include;
*Turning the TV to a vol-
ume higher than normal.
*Asking others to repeat
themselves.
*Difficulty understanding on
the telephone.
*Hearing but not under-
standing what is being said.
*Difficulty in hearing or un-
derstanding in a crowded or
noisy place.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

An EMS.A'..alienes: Cam-
paign is scheduled for 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. on Saturday, July 1
in the parking areas around
the Courthouse Circle.
Ambulances will be on site
for the public to view and
tour, and, the Bloodmobile
will be stationed in the area.
The purpose of the cam-
paign is to make the commu-
nity aware of the work EMTs
and paramedics do, and to
meet them, to recognize them,
and to thank them for their ef-
forts and time.,
It is also a time to promote


community awareness of the-
services EMS offers.
There will be balloons and
other handouts and pertinent
information for those attend-
ing.
The event is planned for
adults and children alike,
Contact NFCC EMS
Coordinator/Instructor Re-
becca Cash for more informa-
tion, at 973-1673.


Fuller JOins Team At TBA


Dale Fuller has joined Tjlla-
hassee Builders Asso'ciaiion
(TBA) as Membership Serv"
ices and Marketing Director
She is a native of Monticello,
the daughter of Vaughn Evans
and Delores Evans and a
graduate of NFCC and FSU,
with a degree in communica-
tions.
She has more than 20 years
of experience in sales, market-
ing and public relations.
She has owned an advertis-
ing and 'marketing firm for 15


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