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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00143
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: June 23, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00143
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
    Main: Letters
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
    Main: Sports
        page 8
        page 9
    Main continued
        page 10
    Main: Classified
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
Full Text

SLIfRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
4J4 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, FL. 32611

-. -'

Skin Cancer

Screening Fro t

Tour Fe$ wa

Editorial, Page 4 P


SKiwanis
M-etonRRti



Story, Photos; Page


Rotary
Barbecue

serves 520

Story Photos, Page 12


[ Friday Morning


Monticello


138TH YEAR NO. 48, 50 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


wsFRIDAYJUNE 23,
FRIDAY, JUNE 23,2006


1st Green Subdivision OK'd


Project Aims To Keep

County's Rural Flavor
Commission subcommittee is
LAZARO ALEMAN formulating rules to encourage
Senior StaffN Writer such developments, a home-'
grow n group calling itself SIF
The County Commission last-' Land Inc. is proceeding %%ith
week approved what is being .ju-.t such a development on. its
described as the county's first own.
conservation subdivision. Aylesbury Plantation, as the,
At a time when a Planning proposed subdivision is called,,


THE AIM of conservation subdivisions
the rural character of the county by
number and visibility of housing units. (1


is slated for a 111-acre parcel
in, the northeast part of the
count,) just south of Ashville
on SR-221.
The proposal calls for 47
houses to be concentrated on
37 acres of the property, leav-
ing the remaining 73 acres as
communal open' space. Sizes
of the lots \ ill range from half
an acre to one-and-a-half
acres. .
Hines. Boyd, front man for,
SIF, pointed out to commis-
sioners that the ideal model for
conservation subdivisions calls.
for 50 percent of the land to be'
dedicated to green space or
consern anon easement.


In the case of Aylesbury
Plantation, Boyd said, his'
group was dedicating 75 per-
cent of the land to green space.
This was land- that would be
deeded to the homeowners' as-
sociation and that would re-
.-,-. ain in its natural state for--
:- 'i'- recreational or agricultural,
uses. he said.
He further .pointed out that,
absent the decision to pursue a
conservation 'subdivision, his
group could have placed as
Many as 200 houses on the
property, which is zoned
mixed-used suburban residen-
Stial.
is to preserve The development will in-
minimizing the clude 2.5 miles of intercon-
News Photo) nected nature trails and natural


bu offers to shield the houses
from the view of the road.
Bo\d said his group also
had taken steps to ensure, as
much as possible. that the sub-,
division's open spaces ttill be
protected into perperuitr.
This was done, he said,
through the homeowners asso-
ciation's document, which re-
quires a supermajornry for im-
p!ementation of any change
that affects the 73 acres' of
open 1ind.
' Boyd said the requirement
doesn't absolutely guarantee
that the land will never be de-
veloped, given that homeown-
ers associations hate to be re-
newed every 20 years.
But the supermajority re-
quirement goes as far as is le-
gally possible to ensure thai
the 73 acres remain open space
forever, he said.
"You're riot going to get 75
6-0 S0 percent of the landow~n-
ers to vote to change the land
use," Boyd said.
On a somewhat related mat-
ter, the commission approved a
change 'to the development
code that makes it easier and
less costly for developments
that must undergo a second
county review after the initial
approval.
The change stems from a
couple of approved subdivi-
sions that had to undergo sec-


Fire Rescue Eyeing

50% Staff increase


LAZARQ ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

If Fire Rescue Chief Mark
Matthews has his way, the am-
bulance side of liis operation
will increase by six employees
next budget year.
That's an addition of two
paramedics and, four EMTs
(Emergency Medical Techni-
cians), bringing the depart-
ment's total personnel to 18,
not counting Matthews and
Lucille Hunt, who handles bill-
ings and collections.
The extra personnel, Mat-
thews argues, will enable him
to staff an additional ambu-
lance and so deal with the in-


creasing number of emergency
calls, particularly multiple
calls. .
"You need to make the leap
to six' to make a measurable
difference," Matthews said in
response to a commissioner's
suggestion, that he hire only
three additional people the first
year.
Matthews' hope is to accom-
plish the increase via a federal
grant, for which commission-
ers last week gave him permis-
sion to apply. But in case he
should fail to get the grant,
Matthews has included the six
additional positions in his
budget request for the coming
year.
(See Fire Rescue Page 3)


-CITY OFFICIALS recently approved three ordinances
that pave the way for two major developments. From
left, Councilman Brian Hayes, City Clerk Emily Ander-
son, Councilman Luther Pickles and developer Riley
Palmer. (News Photo)

Co. Commissioners Begin
Hearing Budget Requests


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


S. County Commissioners have
begun hearing funding re--
-- ', quests from department heads,,
constitutional officers and pri-
vate groups -- a first step in the
budget preparation process.
Last week, commissioners
heard requests from fire, am-
-bulance, building inspections,
extension, grants, solid waste,
animal control, planning, rec-
.., reaction and roads.
This week, commissioners
were scheduled to hear re-
MARK MATTHEWS, left, fire chief, discusses his plan to quests from the constitutional
augment the department with Commissioner Junior officers, as well from as
Tuten. (News Photo) health, mosquito control, eco-


nomic development, the cham-
ber, Wilderness Coast Librar-
ies and the Refuge House.
Thus far, all the requests
. from the departments heads, at
-least, include increases over
last year's budget.

Department heads justify the-
additional money as being
t needed for pay raises, equip-
ment purchases, higher operat-
ing costs (fuel is often cited as
a factor for the increasing cost
of doing business, as is an in-
creasing population), and for
the hiring of additional person-
nel in some instances.
It's up to commissioners to
review all the requests and
weigh them against the money
(See Budget Page2)


ond, reviews because of state-
mandated modifications or
changes initiated by the devel-
opers. ,
Under .the old rule, a deel-
opment that underwent a
change after approval had to
undergo the entire process
again, no matter ,how minor
the change. That meant the de-
veloper had to wait months
while first the Planning Com-
mission and then the County
Commission 'reviewed and ap-
' i '


proved the changes.
It also. meant the developer
had to pay all the fees in full
again.
Under the new rule, the plan-
ning official can administra-
tively approve the changes,
provided these are minor and'
ultimately lower, the density of
the development. The fees also
are much reduced.
In cases where the changes
are not minor, they increase
(See Green Page 3)


AYLESBURY PLANTATION will include fields that can
be used for recreational or agricultural purposes, de-
pending on the decision of homeowners. (News Photo)


Stage Set For


Housing Boom


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

City officials have now taken-
final action on three ordi-
nances that greatly increase the
size of the city and set the
stage for the construction of
more than 500 houses.
The three ordinances -- num-
bers 2006-05, 2006-06 and
2006-07 -- had their final hear-
ing June 6.
Ordinance 2006-05 relates
to the proposed Crooked Creek
subdivision on US 90 just west
of Holly Hills.
The council action was actu-
ally a formality changing the
city's zoning map to reflect the
earlier amended Future Land
Use Map (FLUM) on the
Comprehensive Plan.
The change rezones the
85.01-acre parcel to R-l, or
single-family residential, in


keeping with the FLUM.
Developer Riley Palmer's
plans call for the creation of an
upscale subdivision on the
property, consisting of 74
houses.
In conjunction with the lat-
ter ordinance, the City Council
also gave final approval to Or-
dinance 2006-07.
Ordinance 2006-07 allows
developers to construct model
homes prior to gaining final
plat approval of their develop-
ments. The ordinance,
prompted by Palmer, stipulates
that the models can only be
used for marketing purposes.
Palmer is expected to begin
construction of a model home
almost immediately. The ordi-
nance allows developers to
build up to three models on
any particular project.
Finally the council approved
the annexation of a 274-acre
(See Boom Page 3)


Fireworks, Off Again


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The July 4 Fireworks pres-
entation is off again, were the
word from spokesman Jerry
Boatwright Wednesday morn-
ing.
"We talked with Bubba
(Bullock) this morning
(Wednesday) and he said
there just wasn't enough time
for him to produce a decent
show," said Boatwright.


"I can see his point. A
rinky-dink show is not what
the people want to see and it's
not his style of excellence.
"What the problem boils
down to is, there has been no
one in charge," he said. "It's
been that way in the past, but
the fireworks shows still hap-
pened. It didn't turn out that
way this year."
"We'll just have to start con-
centrating on next .year's
show," Boatwright stated.









PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 23, 2006


Big Bend Ghost Trackers Float.


REP. CURTIS RICHARDSON was the guest speaker at a recent meeting of the local
Democratic Party. From left, Bill McRae. Gene Hall, Richardson.


Rep. Curtis Richardson 2


Speaks TO Democrats
.. .. =.: -^_ -^


Ihe Democratic Parn, ot In April. registered Demo-


Jefferson County met Tuesday
June 13, at the District School
Board Office, to hear updates
on recent activities, plans for
the future, and Speaker Rep.
Curtis Richardson, of Talla-
hassee, on current problems in
State government.
Local Democratic Party
Chair Eleanor Hawkins reports
that some 35 people were in
attendance to hear about the
recent successful activities, in-
cluding the Second Annual St.
Patrick's Day Fundraiser with
Sen, Rod Smith, Democratic
candidate for Governor as
speaker.


crats in Precincts 3 and 6 were
invited to a barbecue at the
new facility owned by Denise
Vogelgesang and Carrie Ann
Tellefsen.
In May members took part in
a reception for Alex Sink, can-
didate for State Chief Financial
Officer.
Also in May, Democrats
honored the Jefferson County
High School graduate with the
highest grade point average in
government, Crystal Brinson,
with a cash award.
Announced plans for the fu-
ture included participation in
the Watermelon Festival, June


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Family and Consumer Sci-
ences Extension Agent Heidi
Copeland along with Robert
Harrell and Michael Bishop,
.staff assistants with the
County- Emergency Manage-
ment, and Arthur Youngblood
from of Department of Finan-
cial Services, Division of
Consumer Services, Tallahas-
see, set up a "Disaster Prepar-
edness" exhibit in the Farmers
', and Merchants Bank insur-
ance parking lot,.Saturday.

The exhibit drew a lot of
visitors on their way to and
from the Watermelon Festival
Antique Car Show and Dis-
'play, in the main FMB park-
ing lot.


Bishop said hundreds of
promotion items were distrib-
uted, emblazoned with the
name and telephone number
of Jefferson County Emer-
gency Management.
Harrell echoed his agency's
motto "We care in helping
you to prepare."

Copeland distributed a
worksheet to help families
prepare for disasters before
the fact.
Youngblood talked to peo-
ple about insurance needs,
mitigation and the need to be-
informed.

He encouraged all to read
their policy and keep a copy
of it in a safe place, and pro-
vided some valuable re-
sources to assist citizens in
getting their personal docu-
ments in order.


17. giing out free ice %ater
and information, and an ad in
the Watermelon Booklet.
Later this summer, the group
will hold three more precinct
events, as well as house to
house canvassing.
Hawkins said that Dick Bai-
lar in introducing Rep. Richar-
son, thanked him for his
efforts on behalf of the needs
of small counties and north
Floridian.
Richardson was elected to
the House in 2000, and subse-
quently reelected.
For 2004-2006, he was the
House Democratic Caucus
Chair.
His committee assignments
include Fiscal Council, Health
Care Appropriations, Pre-K-12
Committee and Judiciary.
Hawkins said that Richard-
son criticized the Republican
Administration for its failure
to address pressing problems
in the state, and distorting the
views of Democrats \\ ho op-,
pose their efforts on behalf of
average Floridians.
As a former educator, Rep.
Richardson was particularly
critical of the lack of attention
on the part of Republicans to
the state's educational needs,
Hawkins reports.
He said that Floridians are
more and more aware of the
need for a change in admini-
stration, and that there is great
enthusiasm for Democratic
candidates.
He urged the audience to get
active in the upcoming guber-
natorial election.,
At the conclusion of the
meeting, candidates for public
office, Kirk Reams, Brenda
Sorensen, Shirley Washington,:
Gene Hall, Beverly Sloan and
Tom Vogelgesang, introduced
themselves to the group.


BOBBY PLAINES, and daughter Mallory ready to ride in the Festival parade.




NOTICE

EMILY ANDERSON. CLERK/TREASURER FOR THE CITY OF MONTICELLO,
FLORIDA, HEREBY GIVES NOTICE REGARDING THE
2006 MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS:

OFFICES AND VACANCIES TO BE FILLED:
CITY COUNCIL GROUP 1
CITY COUNCIL GROUP 2

QUALIFYING DATES:
JULY 17, 2006 12:00 NOON THROUGH
JULY 21, 2006 12:00 NOON

ELECTION DATES:
First Primary 09/05/06
General Election 11/07/06

.PERSONS SEEKING TO QUALIFY SHALL DO SO AT THE OFFICE OF THE
S JEFFERSON COUNTY SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS,
380.N\EST DOG WOOD STREET., / ,.
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA :


City Police Report New


Leads In Hightower Attack


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


New leads continue to sur-
face for law officials investi-
gating the recent armed
robbery and battery of promi-
nent citizen, Franklin High-
tower.
MPD Investigator Chip
Springer said Wednesday
morning, "We just got a new
lead today, that leads in an
entirely different direction
than where we were going
with the investigation ."
He added that the lead point
the finger at a different sus-
pect in the case.
"I'm meeting with Crime
Stoppers this morning to get
them involved," said
Springer. He assured that law
enforcement officials will
continue to press on until the
'case is closed.
Crime stoppers is the organi-
zation which offers up to a
$1,000 reward for informa-
tion leading to an arrest and
conviction in any given case.
Hightower said Wednesday
morning that he felt much
better than he has in almost


three weeks ago.
"I still have scars and still
have problems with the center
of my back, but everything
else is all healed. I thank God
every day, I wasn't maimed or
killed and that I'm feeling bet-
ter.
"I felt like a train ran over
me for that first week or two."
said Hightower. "I'm defi-
nitely ready to go back to
work, maybe as soon as next
week or by the end of the
month."


Budget
(Continued from Page 1)
that is projected to come into
the county's coffers from fees,
taxes and other revenue
sources.
In the end, commissioners,
must balance the expenditures
and the income.
No matter how much com-
missioners trim and cut back
each year, however, the overall
budget has a tendency to con-
tinue ballooning, a trend not
likely to be reversed any time
soon, if ever.


"I don't want to rush into it,
if returning to work is going
to do any permanent
damage," he added.
Hightower was robbed and
beaten early the morning of
June 2, when he reported for
work at the City Barn, located
at 200 East York Street, at 5
a.m.
Anyone with information
concerning the case, is asked
to call MPD at 342-0150 or
the Sheriffs Office at 997-
2023.


Help Florida's
marine animals
survive!
Keep litter out of our water-
ways. Recycle plastics and
fishing line. Boat safely.

myfwc.org/psm


R ED H I LL S

2006 Southern Living and Progressive Farmer"

IDEA HOUSE & FARMSTEAD

d-i-- | "Ever imagined living on your own farm? Now you can,just
eight miles from downtown Tallahassee in a place where life
---''"' -. is not governed by a clock, but by the sun, the moon and the
"N ,. /-' 11 changes in seasons.Visit the extraordinary Idea House &
'5 "., .. "- ] WHITEFENCE
S Farmstead and see what it's like to live at WhiteFence Farms
S. A a Florida address jar all seasons.

The Idea House & Farmstead is located at 3400 Williams Road, Tallahassee, FL 32311.
Open House June 10 October 1 11 am to 5 pm Wed. Sat. and 1 to 5 pm on Sun.
Open House July 4th weekend and Labor Day. Admission is $5, children under 12 are admitted at no charge.
For more information call 1.888.253.3223 or visit JOE.com [ Keyword: Idea House
For WhiteFence Farms Real Estate Information Call 866.JOE.LAND.
JL
"-1
Tallahassee Memorial A portion (f the proceeds will benefit the Tallahassee Memorial Auxiliary.
Auxiliary

IF YOU DON'T KNOW JOE, YOU DON'T KNOW FLORIDA. STJO E'

0 2006 The St. Joe Company. "JOE," "St. Joe" "WhiteFence Farms" and the "Taking Flighit" designs are ser.n marks of The St Joe Company. The
Information shown, attached or contained herein is believed accurate but is not warranted or guaranteed, is subject to errors, omissions and changes
without notice and should be independently verified. The availability and pricing of St. Joe property (through any ol its affiliates or subsidiaries) is also
olmi'f subject to change without notice. Access to this property is prohibited wiliout the express consent of St. Joe or its agent. Void where prohibited by law. Equal
Housing Opportunity. "Southern hUng" Is a registered trademark of Southern Living, Inc. "Progressive Farmer" is a registered trademark of Progressive Farmer,
Inc. Tour dates and hours are subject to change without notce.


Disaster Readiness


Exhibit Drew Many











Officials Publish


4 JCHS Dress Code


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

School officials report the
dress code for Jefferson
County High School, for the
2006-2007 School Year.
JCHS and HMS will come
together on one campus under
new leadership, and all stu-
dents are expected to observe
the dress code guidelines out-
lined below.


LeROY COLLINS, candi
date for the Republicar
U.S. Senate nomination,
was hosted last weekend,
at the home of Ron and
Pat Smith, where he met
local voters.


Refuge House
Plans Town
Meeting

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Refuge House will host a
Town Hall Meeting Noon to
1p.m. Thursday, June 29 at
the Library, in the Conference
room.
The meeting will consist of
an interactive discussion on
the "State of Domestic Vio-
lence in Jefferson County."
The goal for this meeting is
to get feedback on questions
such as:
Is Refuge House doing an
effective job of informing the
community of the free serv-
ices available to then?
What could be done better?
What organizations should
they/could they partner with?
What has been accomplished
this past year?
Refuge House has gained
71 new clients and has added
support groups at the Jeffer-
son Senior Center for adult
victims of childhood sexual
abuse.
And, another group at Mon-
ticello New Life for underage
girls, covers dating violence,
self esteem, changing behav-
ior, and childhood abuse top-
ics.
Dessie Harvey, director and
counselor of the County Ref-
uge House says her goal is to
continually improve the qual-
ity and quantity of the out-
reach services provided by
Refuge House.
Participants are asked to
bring a Brown Bag Lunch to
the meeting.


Attire for females:
Dresses, skirts, and shorts
must be below fingertip length,
or longer. Fashion cut gar-
ments will not be allowed.
Jeans/pants are to have no
holes.
Biking shorts, aerobic shorts,
and Daisy Dukes shorts are in-
appropriate wear.
Females may not wear net or
see through clothing, tank
tops, halter tops, low cut tops
that reveal cleavage, or tops


Landowners To Meet,

Learn About New

Cost Sharing Program


County Forester Mike
Humprhey reports that the Di-
vision of Forestry is offering
a new Southern Pine Beetle
Prevention Cost Share Pro---
gram.
Humphrey encourages lo-
cal landowners to attend a
meeting in his office from 4
to 6 p.m. Monday, to obtain
information sheets and apply
for cost sharing before fund-
ing is depleted.
The location of the meeting
- is 2334 South Jefferson Street
at the fire tower, 342-0238.
The goal of the program is
to minimize Southern Pine
Beetle damage in Florida by
helping forest landowners re-
duce the susceptibility of their
oine stands to this destructive
insect pest.
Forest management


Green spaces
(Continued from Page 1)
the density, or the planning of-
ficial deems it appropriate, the
issue will be referred. to the
Planning and County commis-
sions for a full review

Housing Boom
(Continued from Page 1)
parcel just south of Holly Hills
and west of the old high school
and the former stockyard.
Added to the other 147 acres
that Monticello Plantations,
LLC, already owns on the
southwest part of town, it
brings the developer's total
holdings to 420 acres.
The terms of an agreement
worked between the city and
the developer limits the num-
ber of residential units that can
be constructed on the property
to 450.
Monticello Plantations, LLC,
also has plans to construct an
upscale subdivision on the
property.


practices, such as thinning
and prescribed burning, can
improve the health of the pine
stands and decrease the likeli-
hood of developing Southern
Pine Beetle infestation.
The new, program offers up
to 50 percent cost reimburse-
ment for pre-commercial thin-
ning and prescribed burning
treatments, and a fixed rate,
$50 per-acre incentive pay-
ment for landowners conduct-
ing a first pulpwood thinning.
Qualified landowners may
apply for one approved prac-
tice per state fiscal year.
The minimum size tract is
10 acres and funding requests
may not exceed $10,000.





1480 W. Washington
Now Serving
Dine-In
Take Out
BAR-B-QUE
Everyday Specials $5.50',
Open
Mon. Fri. 8-6
Sat. 8-5
997-5622
...... ..... ...... I.... .... ...... ....... ... .. . .. .. .


which expose the midriff.
Attire shall not illustrate, en-
hance, or depict tobacco, alco-
hol, drugs, nor have racial, sa-
tanic, gang related, sexually
suggestive, obscene, or violent
messages.
Shoes will be worn at all
times. Females shall wear
shoes that will not be a hazard,
and that have a protective sole
(no flip-flops, slippers, or bed-
room shoes allowed).
Heels should be covered and
not flapping.
Attire for males:
Pants or knee length shorts
with a belt at all times to keep
-pants above the waist.
Pants intentionally worn be-
low the waist so as to expose
underwear and/or buttocks
will be treated as indecent ex-
posure, which is a suspendible
offense.
Wearing long shirts will not
compensate for low hanging
pants. This, policy will be
strictly enforced.
Hats and caps or any other
head gear are not to be worn
inside any building.
Do rags, bandanas, stocking
caps, and the like, are not per-
mitted on campus. Clothing
and backpacks that advertise
alcoholic beverages, tobacco,
or drugs, will not be permitted.
Inappropriate pictures or
symbols, and lewd, profane, or
suggestive language on cloth-
ing or other possessions are to-
tally prohibited.
Dress or tennis shoes should
be worn at all times.
GUE -T A/IIMAL

ARE HERE
African Mega Animals:
Crested Porcupines and
Spurred Tortoises

/low until mid-feptember


TAIJIASEE MUSEUM

McnnSat 9 AM 4P M S Sun 1 30- -
(850) 575-8684
www.tal~AsiSeemrflum ors ,t


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 23, 2006 PAGE 3

Re-elect
FRED SHOFNER
for
Jefferson County School Board
District 3
I have worked to be worthy of your trust.
I ask for your support, your prayers, and
your vote for another term.
Political advertisement. Paid for & approved by Fred Shofner,
Jefferson County School Boadrd District 3




JACKSON?S RARE DOOR


Cherry Street




SEAFOOD DINNER



Thurs., Fri., & Sat.

Evenings

Open 5pm to 8pm

997-3133 __


FLORIDA S
ROI
Relax...yo
still work
State Tarn









Tommy Sur
425 S Jeffer:
Monticello,
Bus: 850-99






P03i236F. 06/


Progress Energy

People. Performance. Excellence.


TfATE EMPLOYEES DROP BY A GOOD NEIGHBOR TODAY AND
LLOVER YOUR DROP.
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Fire Rescue Eyes increase


(Continued from Page 1)
The grant, should the de-
partment get it, comes with
strings attached, as does the
commissioner's permission.
In the case of the grant, the
county must commit to fund
the six positions in full after
the five-year-life of the grant.
Not only that, but the county
must assume an ever-
increasing share of the funding
'for the six positions from the
very first year.
Total cost of funding the six
positions is figured to be
$268,000 annually. That
means that the county must
ante $37,000 in the first year,
$49,000 in the second,
$129,000 in the third,
$186,000 in the fourth, and the
full $268,000 in the fifth year
and thereafter.
"I'm concerned about the
obligation," said Commis-
sioner Junior Tuten, express-
ing the general sediment of the
board.
Hence the board's stipula-
tion: Matthews could apply for
the federal money, so long as
he understood that if local offi-
cials determined that the
county could not afford the ob-
ligation, the application would
be withdrawn.
In the matter of the budget
request, Matthews has a long
ways to go to convince com-
missioners that they should ap-


prove a $125,000 increase to
his budget to fund the six addi-
tional positions.


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 23, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
WAPublisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Skin Cancer


Screening Tour


Opinion & Comment


More than one million
people will be diagnosed with
skin cancer this year.
Moreover, the incidence of
skin cancer is on the rise,
making early detection and
treatment more critical than
ever.
.To raise awareness and en-
courage regular skin examina-
tions with a dermatologist,
Doak Dermatologics, a leading
specialty pharmaceutical com-
pany, and The- Skin Cancer
Foundation have joined forces.
on an innovative public service
campaign called The Skin
Cancer Screening Tour.
A 38-foot, custom-built Mo-
bile Diagnosis vehicle (Mdv)
is traveling across the country
offering the public free skin
cancer examinations by local,
board-certified dermatologists
in more than 20 cities.
The Tour kicked off in early
March at Fisherman's Wharf
in San Francisco and has trav-
eled to Los Angeles before
heading to Phoenix, Dallas,
Houston and Tampa, so far.
The Skin Cancer Screening
tour is already making a differ-
ence. Dermatologists volun-
teering at the Mdv have
conducted more than 1,000 pa-
tient examinations while look-
ing for four primary forms of
skin cancer or precancerous
skin conditions.
So, far, the doctors have
identified incidences of these
conditions in a number of peo-
ple, including:
271 with Actinic Keratosis


(AK) AK affects 1.3 million
people annually. AK is the
most common type of precan-
cerous skin lesion. If left un-
treated, AK can lead to
Squamous Cell Caricinoma.
24 with Squamous Cell
Carcinoma (SCC) SCC is a
form of skin cancer that affects
200,000 Americans each year;
SCC's can metastasize
(spread) quickly.
111 with Basal Cell Carci-
noma (BCC) BCC is a com-
mon form of skin cancer,
affecting more than 800,000
Americans annually. Chronic
exposure to sunlight is most
often the cause of BCC, which
occurs most frequently on ex-
posed parts of the body.
I"* 11 with Melanoma- Mela-
noma is the most serious form
of skin cancer and has in-
creased more rapidly than any
other form of skin cancer dur-
ing the past 10 years.
By 2010, the number of
Americans with melanomas is
projected to rise 1 in 50. If
melanoma is diagnosed and re-
moved early, it is almost 100
percent curable.
"We're very proud of the re-
sults The Skin Cancer Screen-
ing Tour has achieved so far,"
says Daniel Glassman, presi-
dent and CEO of Bradley
Pharmaceuticals, Inc., the par-
ent company of Doak Derma-
tologics. "We hope this
program will encourage those
at risk for skin cancer to be
aware of the need to visit a
dermatologist regularly."


Cosby Targets Personal

Choice, Responsibility


By REX M. ROGERS
Columnist

Bill Cosby has been pulling
no punches about what he
considers poor choices and
lack of personal responsibility
among low income black
individuals.
As commentator Clarence
Page says, Cosby's choice of
words is harsh ("We've got
these knuckleheads walking
around who don't learn'
English...In neighborhoods
that most of us grew up in,
parenting is not going
on...These people are fighting
hard to be ignorant."), he does-
n't have all the answers, and
he doesn't have all the facts.
But Cosby is at least speaking
up.
Cosby is right in at least one
thing destructive forces
working against black families
and black self-reliance are as
much about each individual's
values and choices as they are
about community opposition,
politics, or racism. The same
can be said for destructive
forces among whites, Asians,
Hispanics, and any other hy-


phenated American.
The point is not to claim na-
ively that racism doesn't exist
or to heap all the blame and
burden upon the backs of the
poor and disadvantaged.
Clearly racism does exist, and
clearly many individuals can-
not make it on their own.
They need help. There's noth-
ing wrong or inconsistent
about exercising compassion
even as one calls for more per-
sonal responsibility.
Neither is the answer to turn-
ing around individuals and
even entire'communities found
solely in government help pro-
grams, more money, or point-
ing fingers everywhere but at
the individuals making the
choices. People are born in to
very bad situations. People are
hurt by limited education, pov-
erty, broken families, and a
host of other social
pathologies. All of these nega-
tive circumstances take a toll.
But people are still
responsible.
Black or white, Asian, His-
panic, or new immigrant peo-
ple are free agents. Their lives
are determined by their values
(See Crosby Page 5)


_Short Takes & Other Notions


By MERRY ANN FRISBY


When you get a bit older,
you become comfortable
enough to explore the things
you really want to do. You
become comfortable and self
confident enough to disregard
how you might look doing
things. "

The President of Japan re-
cently came to America. He
looked like a middle-aged gen-
tleman and he had rather long
flowing, hair for a head of
state. It cracked me up to read
in the paper that he is a huge
Elvis fan. I will bet he has
sung at a karaoke night. Presi-
dent Bush took him to Grace-
land.

I admire someone who fol-
lows his heart. A friend,
George Hook and his wife
keep miniature ponies. Mimi


Van Scoter develops worm
beds. My. sister-in-law reha-
bilitates squirrels and 'pos-
~ sums. I.won't reveal her name
or she might have to go into
the witness protection
program. Isn't it wonderful
that we are so different?
When I was young, we
measured most activities by
how "cool" they appeared to
others. I was in college and
searching for some really off--
beat (but cool) hobby. I -de-
cided to try archery, and
signed up for a college class.
The college did not have
light bows for girls and heavy
bows for boys, they settled on
medium bows for everyone. I
listened carefully and tried

hard to learn the stances and
pulls, but the bow was pretty
hard for me to control.

At. one point, the instructor
asked us to take a proper arch-
ery stance and hold that posi-


tion. His aim was to take a
Polaroid of each student.
Looking at the photos pro-

vided us with the visual aid to
correct our performance. I
was at the end of the line, but I
figured that would give me'
time to fine-tune my hold. I
was ready!

As the photo sessions
dragged on, my arm got more
and more tired and sore. I held
my stance! I was ready! By
the time the instructor got, to
me, my arm was shaking.' I
wanted to make a really good
impression so I stood up
straighter and pulled my bow--
string a little tighter. That is
when my poor shaking wrist
snapped towards me releasing
the bow instead of the string.


I suffered no lasting effects if
you do not count class A-I
embarrassment. The entire
class was completely silent for
about 30 seconds before they
broke into howls of laughter. i
SI 'was zero on the cool-o-
.meter! Days later, I had a
stripe-bruise down my face
like a skunk. The instructor
told me. not to come back'to
the class. He passed me with-
out my being there. Maybe I
should have gone to Graeeland
instead.
Monticello is tolerant of peo-
ple who do not look cool or
care if they look cool. I do not.
want to live in a planned place
where the developer dictates
what kind of mailbox is ac-
ceptable, and the activities are
directed.
This community accepts and


The bow smacked into my welcomes the eclectic and the
face making a perfect bruise original. As we grow, we must
from my hairline to my chin. I continue to encourage this
thought my nose was broken kind of tolerance if we wish to
but that was only my dignity. retain out uniqueness.


Nation Challenged Abroad


By DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

Some sixty years ago, the
very mention that the United
States was thinking about
moving an element of its At-
lantic or Pacific naval fleet
into the regional waters off the
coast of a country with whom
we were having a disagree-
ment, stopped the nonsense
and produced immediate and
positive results.
The sheer power of our mili-
tary combined with the will,
and determination of the
American people behind such
actions, was enough to effect
positive change without any
military confrontation or blood
shed.


Today, although we are even
more powerful and capable,
every little third world, oxcart
nation seems to be able to
"stick their finger in our eye",
without a second thought or
any fear of significant
reprisals.
While our military, industry
and technology has grown
stronger and has far out paced
all other countries in the
world, our prestige and ability
to influence rogue nations to
discontinue their errant behav-
ior, is virtually nonexistent.
Not to mention the likes of
"our friends" France and Ger-
many to look down noses at
us.
So what has happened to
cause this frustrating situation.
- In my opinion there is no one


factor, but a combination of
events that together have cre-
ated the environment that fos-
ters defiance and disdain.
First out inability to over-
whelm and defeat an ill trained
and equipped backward guer-
illa army in Vietnam, proved
to the world that we were not
only far from being invincible,
but revealed significant cracks
in our armor that have allowed
other nations to exploit out na-
tional weaknesses ever since.
Secondly, a shift in the na-
tional concept and very nature
of patriotism spearheaded by
'young Americans primarily of
college age, challenged the
"rubber stamp" approval rou-
tinely given by average citi-
zens to governmental action.


Challenging authority be-
came the watch word among
the younger generation in the
1960's.
-- Then on the world stage,
there was our total failure in
Somalia that most Americans
have come to understand via
the popular movie "Blackhawk
Down". Our "cut and run" ac-
tions there, when the lifting
got tough, has only embold-
,ened other Third World na-
tions to look upon the United
States as a group of weak
willed and spineless country-
men, only interested in their
own self indulgences.
Along the way, the ugly
millstone of "political correct-
(See Nations Page 5)


Clean Water Major Issue


By LINDA YOUNG
Director, Clean Water
Network of Florida

The Florida governor's race
is heading into crunch time.
Political ads and headlines will
start heating up this summer,
just like the water that fuels
hurricanes and algae blooms.
Many issues are in play in the
campaigns. But think about it:
What's more important than
clean water?
Blue waves, clear lakes,


springs and rivers are the geese
that lay Florida's golden eggs;
the reason we're the top tourist
Destination in the world; and
the gift that makes our cash
registers ring. Without clean
water, we're nothing.
We need a governor who
will stand up for clean water -
not someone who will repay
big-bucks corporate campaign
contributors by letting them
use our public waters as a pri-
vate sewer.
This election, we have a
chance to elect a "clean water"


governor. Who is it? We don't
know yet. That's why our
grassroots group, Clean Water
Network of Florida, is giving
Floridians an opportunity to
take a simple step to pin down
each candidate's position on
water policy. Everyone can
participate for the cost of five
postcard stamps. Floridians
are sending postcards to each
of the top four candidates: Jim
Davis and Rod Smith on the
Democratic ticket; and Charlie
Crist and Tom Gallagher on
the Republican ticket. The


cards ask the candidates to
commit, in writing, whether
.they will do four specific
things to clean up our waters:
1. Work diligently to reduce
and eliminate mercury and
dioxin releases that end up
in the fish we eat;
2. Support a moratorium on
any permits to add nutri-
ents in polluted waters;
3. Champion a movement to
stop destroying the wet-
lands that protect us from
(See Clean Water Page 5)


From Our Photo File


lrmrIM.E -In"
IN NOV., 1990, then Commissioner Mordaunt Bishop found the Court's ruling to staff
the jail with an additional correctional officers, "philosophically" displeasing. From
left, Ray Convery, court reporter, Bishop, Buck Bird, county attorney. (News File
Photo)


I












MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI, JUNE 23, 2006 PAGE 5


Letter



Citizen


Not Col


For July

Dear Editor:
I was very disappointed to
read in the June 16th edition
that the July 4th Fireworks
Celebration will not he held
this year because the Chamber
of Commerce decided that
"they would no longer be re-
sponsible for collecting funds
for the celebration."
This celebration has been a
part of the July 4th festivities
in Jefferson County for many
years.
It is as important to local
families as the Watermelon
Festival and other activities
that the Chamber supports.
It is family oriented with
wholesome activities, includ-
ing horseshoes, cakewalks,
family picnics and the like,
and should be preserved as
part of who we are in Jefferson
County.
This event is one of the few
gatherings of county residents
where everyone comes to-
gether. Where else during the
year can you bring your chil-
dren to hear the reading of
some or our nation's most pre-
cious documents, or a prayer
offered for our country and
city in the name of our Ldrd
and Savior Jesus Christ?
Certainly not at some of the
more recent "uptown" gather-
ings in Monticello.


Dear Editor:
SWe have a 'smart supetinien-
dfen t '" '. .
1 Nbtdoily have the grades im-
proved under Superintendent
Barker, but the dress code will
improve the appearance of the
students.
Pride of self is called "Dress
for Success." Each student
brings his/her own individual-
ity to his/her clothes just by
the fact that he/she is an indi-
vidual.
It's character and personality


Dear Editor:
The Monticello Police Depart-
ment would like to extend a
sincere Thank You to the con-
gregation of the First Method-
ist Church of Monticello, and
to Pastor David Hodges for
opening the church to the com-
munity during the Watermelon
Festival.
Providing the restrooms,
cool air, and resting area in the


rsf Nation Challenged
S0 (Continued from Page 4) Lt is painfully clear that it is
ness" worked very well to far more important to look
weaken out national moral "tolerant" today and search for
coLa m e n ts C h a urage, while completely de- a "middle ground" rather than
Lam ents Cham be railing our political process advance a logical and rational
From the local level all the way position that makes sense and
Ile ct in g F u n d s through congress to the White corrects problems.

Decisions by our various It is no wonder, therefore,
r 4 t h F ire w o rk s elected representatives and that the leadership of danger-
SF i e w o k,. public officials must first pass ous nations like North Korea
Also, we must consider the development, along with Hu- all political correctness tests and Iran are not only willing to
Also, we must consider the development, along with Hu- before an, favorable consid- challenge us openly, in the
alternatives if we do not have a man Resources development ration can be given world arena, but make outra-
lshow. fr all citizens." eration can be given, world arena, but make' outra-
local fireworks show. for all citizens. Accordingly, the result is a geous demands while they be-
Do you want to travel to I also know that the Cham-, political paralysis" or the total rate our nation, our people and
some other city where the ber is not performing this serv- inability for lawmakers and our values.
sense of community and fam- ice only for the fireworks other government and public
ily oriented fun no longer ex- show. They do collect money .. -
i fo ote e t tt officials to do what they know To our detriment and poten-
ists? for other events throughout the I* -
The Chamber's web site does year. isthe right things for America. tial future demise, they full
The Chamber's web site does year. *


say F"ourtn of July FireworKs
Show." The Chamber helps
raise funds to cover the cost of
the annual fireworks display.
Noted as one of the best in
North Florida, the display is
manufactured and put on by a
locally owned fireworks com-
pany.
I understand that the Cham-
ber was really just a central lo-
cation where people could
send their donations towards
the fireworks show.
I think this is an appropriate
service provided by the Cham-
ber because they also advertise
on their web site "The Cham-
ber of Commerce is an organi-
zation built around people
working together to build a
healthy economy, and to im-
prove the quality of life in our
community.
"The members of the Cham-
ber support business and indi-
viduals who desire to see our
county grow, to promote tour-
ism, conduct special commu-
nity events, economic


The nChamoers raae rair
advertisement states: "Make
checks payable to the Chamber
of Commerce."
At the Watermelon Festival,
if you want to send in a food
booth application, it directs
you to "send your fee made
payable to the Chamber of
Commerce."
Please do not misunderstand
me. I am not bashing the
Chamber of Commerce. I
really do appreciate the many
different and positive things
the Chamber does for our
community.
I know some of the people
associated with the Chamber
personally, and they are fine
people.
What I don't understand is
why they decided at the last
minute to withdraw their par-
ticipation in collecting money
to pay for the fireworks show.
If they do not want to partici-
pate in the future, that's fine,
but it should have been an-
nounced well before this time
of year, to give others a chance
to ensure this important tradi-
tion continues.
I believe Bullock's Fire-
works are to be applauded for
their efforts to consistently put
on a spectacular show every
Fourth of July.
It takes weeks of preparation
and at least a day andqMhalf to
set up the fireworks at the
park.
We should understand and
appreciate that the Bullocks
have always done whatever
was necessary to put on this
event for u, and now we want
them to can ,as the streets to
raise money to pay themselves.
Something does not seem
right in this scenario.
I read with renewed hope in
Wednesday's edition of the
Monticello News that Mr.
Jerry Boatwright, VP of FMB,
and others have graciously
volunteered to take over the re-
sponsibility of making sure the
funds are raised to continue
this wonderful and unique
celebration of our country's
Declaration of Independence.
Since the Chamber of Com-
merce will not provide this
service to the community this
year, I pray that other civic
minded business men and
women of Jefferson County
will intercede and join Mr.
Boatwright on behalf of the lo-
cal people and move forward
tro collect the necessary funds
to put this fireworks show on
July Fourth.
I have faith that Mr. Bullock
and the employees of Bullock's
Fireworks can overcome this
delay and still put on the cali-
ber of show that they have
come to be known for.
Thank you.
Jeffery Canady


that count. Truly, each student
can now be judged for
himself/herself alone, not
based upon a look alike current
fashion trend from heaven
knows what city in LaLa Land.
Watch out, Florida. Jeffer-
son County is now a force to
be reckoned with.
Pretty soon people will be
moving to Monticello just to
enroll their kids in our school
system.
Janet Reaves


sanctuary, was a great asset to
the Festival.
Because of this generosity,
heat related illnesses were
probably prevented on one of
the hottest days of the year, al-
lowing everyone to better en-
joy the festival.
I know the people in the
community are grateful to you
as well.
Chief David Frisby


~hi~

~.
,.
Ii
j *


REP WILL KENDRICK maintains high visibility during
the Watermelon Festival Parade, as he rides in the bed
of this truck. (News Photo)


MELON Royalty, Queen Jo-
anna Cobb, Princess Dana
Jane Watt. (News Photo)


Abroad
well know that today they can
always count on those factions
in the United States eager to
make political points, work to
undermine our national will
and/or sell out our country
simply to support and advance
some selfish agenda.


Unless we as a people are
willing to look beyond the end
of our selfish noses and once
again foster that national unity
and pride that made this coun-
try great, Thomas Jefferson's
prediction that a free republic
can probably only last four
hundred years, will become a
reality.


Clean Water Major Issue


(Continued from Page 4)
storm surges;
4. Abandon the flawed Im-
paired Waters Rule -
which the U.S.. Environ-
mental Protection Agency
ruled illegal and that the
state is using to avoid
making polluters clean up.
Over 4,000 cards have al-
ready been printed for the can-
didates. Smith, Crist, Gal-
lagher, and Davis are supposed
to send the card back to you; if
they don't, you'll know which
candidates don't share your
concerns. As the candidates
receive thousands of cards,
they'll see that this is a top is-
sue for all of us. You send
Clean Water Network a card,
too, so we can keep track and
inform voters.

Clean water isn't a partisan
issue. I travel throughout the
state, talking to citizens of all
kinds who are blindsided by
the rapid decline of their local


waters: algae blooms, dead
fish, manatees, dolphins and
sea turtles washing ashore,
dead zones on the ocean floor,
blighted reefs, sick lakes, and
cloudy springs. These people -
from airboat clubs to school-
children; from League of
Women Voters chapters to
Scuba and fishing clubs are
desperate for environmental
leadership out of Tallahassee.
Stories about gross water
pollution will hit the news
right about the tim-e that people
head to the water for summer
vacation. Just like last
summer, they'll be confronted
with slimy algae and closed
beaches due to sewage
bacteria. It happened last year,
and it will happen this year.
Look around: Polluted Lake
Okeechobee water is flowing
out of the Caloosahatchee and
St. Lucie Rivers, choking estu-
aries on both coasts that were
clean and full of fish 15 years
ago. The St. John's River, a
Florida treasure, is already get-


ting algae blooms, which is
very early in the year for that
to be happening. These aren't
inevitable events: they are the
result of lax regulation in Tal-
lahassee.

In the case of The St. Johns,
citizens watching the slimy al-
gae bloom form are outraged
because an agency of the gov-
ernor the Department of En-
vironmental Protection has
just announced weaker stan-
dards that will allow a million
more pounds of nitrogen to go
into the river every year. A
million pounds! Why" The
DEP is pushing for weak stan-
dards for our waters all over
the state, and they have until
January when the new gover-
nor comes in to further
weaken water quality rules.
How can the state be weaken-
ing standards' at a time like
this? What can we do about
it? 'Help us find our "clean
water" governor and then
vote for change.


Cosby Targets Responsibility


and the choices they make
based upon those values. They
can exercise their moral will,
apply their talent, learn, work
and contribute, and demon-
strate basic values like honesty
and reliability. Individuals
who choose not to learn, who
choose delinquency and crime,
who choose sexual promiscu-
ity, who choose anger and bel-
ligerence, who choose
laziness, who choose
amorality, always pay price.


Cosby is right: Poor and dis-
advantaged black Americans
(and I would say any other ra-
cial or ethnic subgroup) need
to work harder to construct
their own future and hold
themselves accountable to
proven value choices.
Clarence Page is correct:
"Black America needs to look
not for what's right or what's
left but to what works in our
drive to liberate those who
have been left behind by the
civil rights revolution."


In other works, it's not about
race. It's not about power,
politics, or ideology. It's
about values. This is not a
"conservative thing." It's a
time-tested, religiously sup-
ported, common sense thing.
Rex M. Rogers, who holds a
Ph.D. in political science from
the University of Cincinnati, is
a syndicated newspaper col-
umnist in almost 100 newspa-
pers and president of
Cornerstone University, Grand
Rapids, Mich.


Young Artist Jessie Brown

Exhibits At Jefferson Arts,


Resident Jessie Brown is a
17 year old senior at Florida
High School in Tallahassee,
and a local artist, displaying
her work at the Jefferson Arts
Inc.
She included a new piece to
her collection last week for
the Members Show during the
Watermelon Festival.
Some of the recent shows
she has entered include the
Show and Sell during the
Tour. of Homes this past
Spring;
The LaMoyne Art Founda-
tion's High School Show in
Tallahassee, at which she
earned an Award of Merit;
The Winterfest Art Show at
the State Building in Talla-
hassee, where she took First
place;
The Regional Latin-themed
competition, in which she
won First Place, and in the
State Latin-themed competi-
tion, she took Second Place.
Brown has been around ar-
tistic influences as long as she
can remember. Her artwork
has been influenced by her
mother's love for plants.
Her current artistic concen-
tration is on flowers, espe-
cially focusing on color and
composition.
Brown is dual enrolled at
FSU where she is taking an
Art History course. She is
pursuing a major in Architec-


ture, and a possible minor in
Art, or Art History.
She is employed at Gellings


Floral Designs, also at Brack-
enChase Builders in Tallahas-
see.


JESSIE BROWN exhibits her art work at Jefferson Arts
during the recent Members Show. (News Photo)


Resident Praises School

Superintendent Barker


Chief Thanks Pastor For

Open Church During Festival


I









PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 23, 2006



Lifestyle


Summer Events At


Boys, Girls Club


Misty Burch Will


Marry Tres Bishop


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Summer Student Rota-
tion Schedule for the Monti-
cello Boys and Girls Club
will run through July 27.
Teams One, Two, Three,
and Four rotate classes hourly
at the Club, with breakfast
and lunch in the Jefferson
Elementary School Cafeteria.
The Teams are divided by
grades, such as: Team One,
(Pre-K and First Grade);
Team Two, (2nd grade) Team
Three, (3rd grade) Team
Four (4th grade and up.)
The classes offered in the

PoSt 49
Honors

Hrynciw,

Shofner

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Outgoing Commander Fred
Shofner and Adjutant John
Hrynciw were presented Cer-
tificates of Appreciation by
American Legion Post 49 by
newly elected Commander
Ron Slik, for their continuous
hard work on behalf of the
Post, at the June meeting.
Partly through their efforts,
Post 49 has been cited by the
State Department of the
American Legion for it's 100
percent membership drive for
the past four years in a row.
While at the District III
Constitutional Convention in
Lake City, recently, Slik was
elected to the post of Vice
Commander of District III.
American Legion Post 49
and Ladies Auxiliary will
meet again at 6:30 p.m. Tues-,
day, July 11 for dinner and a
business meeting.


summer programs include:
Academic: Reading, Lan-
guage Arts, Math, and Sci-
ence; Enrichment: arts, crafts,
and games;
Technology: computer lab;
and the Physical Education
Program (PEP) fitness and
recreation, which includes a
daily walk on the newly con-
structed bike trail.
A Career Hour is held in the
afternoon. Community lead-
ers have been invited to come
in to speak to the children. "
A movie and snacks are of-
fered to the children while
they wait for their parents to
pick them at the end of the
day.


Ron Slik Also Post Past President


NEWLY ELECTED Post Commander Ron Slik presents outgoing Post Commander
Fred Shofner, and Adjutant John Hrynciw with certificates of appreciation for their
efforts on behalf of Post 49. L-R: Slik, Shofner, Hrynciw.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Misty Lynn Burch of Hol-
mes County, FL. and Des-
mond (Tres) Bishop of
Monticello, will be married
6:30 p.m. Saturday, Septem-
ber 2, 2006 at the First Baptist
Church of Monticello.
All family and friends are
welcome to witness this
event.
The Reception will follow
the wedding at Malloy's Nurs-
ery.
The bride-to-be is the
daughter of Karen and Daniel
Burch of Holmes County, and
the late Kathy Register of
Slocomb, AL.
She graduated from Florida
State University with her
Masters Degree in Special
Education.
She recently finished her


First Birthday
Devin Lee Singleton cele-
brated his first birthday Tues-
day, June 20.
He is the son of Mary and
Jeffrey Singleton and has one
brother, Levi Singleton.
Maternal grandparents are
Barbara and Bobby Cook, Sr.,
and Versie Cook) of La-
mont.
Paternal grandparents are
Ronald Singleton and Linda
McGuire, both of Monticello.


OUR LIFELINE

IS TOLL-FREE

Grab the line and,,
let us help you.


THE VOICE OF HOPE
1-800-572-1717
S MuscularDystrophy
--- X1^ Association


second year of teaching stu-
dents with disabilities and
will be returning in the Fall to
teach in Brevard County.
The Groom-to-be is the son
of Debra and Desmond
(Marc) Bishop of Monticello.
He graduated from the Uni-
versity of Florida with his de-
gree in Industrial and Systems
Engineering.
He is presently working at
Rockwell Collins in Mel-
bourne as an Engineer, and is
pursuing his MBA at the Flor-
ida Institute of Technology.
Following the wedding, the
couple will reside in Palm
Bay, FL.


Central
Church of
Christ
US 19 South at
Coopers Pond Rd

Feed
Your
Faith and
Your
Worries
will starve
to death.

Sunday!
10 AM Bible
School
11AM Worship
Hour
6 PM Evening '
Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible
Study.


Homes Of Mourning


Dr. Albert Alexander
Dr. Albert A. "Champ" Al-
exander 1936-2006.
A Tallahassee icon, Dr. Al-
bert A. "Champ" Alexander,
died on June 12, 2006, in Hart-
ford, Connecticut. He was
born on October 27, 1936, to
the late Willie and Inez Ross-
Alexander. He was raised by
his great-aunt, the late Clyde
"Nanny" Wilson and his great-
uncle, the late Albert Wilson
of Tallahassee.
"Champ" was educated in
the Leon County school sys-
tem attending the old Griffin
School and Florida A&M High
School. An exemplary role
model, family member and
friend of practically everyone
who ever live in Tallahassee
and surrounding areas,
"Champ" excelled in both aca-
demic and athletic excellence,
earning him the local and
statewide nickname of
"Champ." Tallahasseans of
"yesteryear" will forever re-
member "Champ" for the most
memorable and exciting sea-
son in FAMU High football
history, the battle of the 1955-
1956 Citywide Championship
between FAMU High and Lin-
coln High. Upon high school
graduation in 1956, "Champ"
earned a Bachelor of Science
Degree in Health and Physical


Education from Florida A&M
University in 1962 and taught
and coached at Howard Acad-
emy High School in Monti-
cello, Florida, and Southwest
Elementary School in Talla-
hassee.
In 1956, "Champ" left Talla-
hassee for Boston, Massachu-
setts, to attend Boston
University, where he received
his Ph.D. in Health and Educa-
tion in 1969. He completed
post-doctoral studies at Har-
vard University and taught as
an adjunct professor at Har-
vard and Boston Universities.
He served for more than 30-
years (1969-1999) as an ad-
ministrator for the Connecticut
Department of Education. Dur-
ing long tenure, he served in
numerous capacities, including
working for the Office of Edu-
cation Equity. After
retirement, he worked as an
educational consultant for the
State of Connecticut.
He leaves behind to mourn
his death, his wife Nancy
Tyson-Alexander of North
Coventry, CT.; his stepmother,
Willie Mae Alexander of Tal-
lahassee, FL.; two sisters, Oil-
lie Dell Parrish (George) of
Monticello and Dorothy A.
Washington (Rollie) of Upper
Marboro, MD.; three brothers
Shella Alexander (Jessie) of


Upper Marlboro, MD., Dr.
Robert L. Alexander (Janessa)
of Mitchellville, MD; and
Avon Alexander (Mildred) of
Tallahassee, FL; eldest niece,
Juanita .Crumity and 15 other
nieces and nephews; 19 great
nieces and nephews; one great
great nephew; a close circle of
friends, David "DJ" Brown,
Tallahassee; Carol Wright,
Manchester, CT; Johnny Lee
Tyson, Americus, GA; Jessie
Cozart, Tallahassee and a host
of other grieving relatives,
classmates, and friends. He is
preceded in death by a sister,
the late Mae Eva Garner Wil-
son, St. Petersburg, and a
brother, the late Willie B. Al-
exander of Tallahassee.
Memorial service will be
held on Saturday, June 24,
2006 at Philadelphia Primitive
Baptist Church, 840 W. Dunn
Street, Tallahassee, Fl. Profes-
sional services provided, by
Branch Street Funeral Home,
Monticello. In lieu of flowers,
memorial contributions to sup-
port Dr. Alexander's favorite
charities should be sent to the
Dr. Albert A. Alexander Me-
morial Fund c/o Citizens Bank,
354 Broad Street, CT 232,
Manchester, CT 06040.

Hattie Mae Crumity
Hattie Mae Crumity, age 89
of Monticello died Wednesday
at TMH,
Crumity was a native of Jef-


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Monticello all her life. She was
a housewife and a member of
M.B. Church.
Mrs. Crumity is survived by
her seven sons Dilworth Cru-
mity Jr. And Wardell Crumity
of Monticello, James Lee Cru-
mity and Jack Crumity of
Riviera Beach, Douglas
(Elijah) Crumity of Rosalyn,
PA. William (Sharon)
Crumity; Atlantic City, NJ.
And Oscar (Theola) Crumity
of Tallahassee, six grand chil-
dren and 4 great grands A
host of cousins nephews,
nieces and sorrowing friends.
Funeral service will be Sat-
urday, June 24, 2006 at 2 p.m.
At Memorial MB Church.
Moderator JB Duval, interment
will follow at Texas Hill
Cemetery. Pallbearers are
sons, grandsons, and nephews.
Honorary pallbearers are dea-
cons of Memorial MB Church.

Branch Street Funeral Home
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Scenes


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 23, 2006 PAGE 7




From Festival


CONGRESSMAN Allen Boyd rides on this tractor, PRINCESS Dana Jane Watt takes
OUTGOING Queen Alana Chambers takes her final walk driven by his wife Cissy. cess with her Father, Richard.
with her Father Chuck. drven hs wfe Cssy


TIM PEARY and his horse and buggy were among parade participants.


her first walk as Prin-


ANTIQUE CARS line the street during the Festival Parade, Saturday.


d Church News Notes


JROTC Color Guard marched in the Festival Parade.


Community
Action Agency
Sets Meeting
Capital Area Community
Action Agency, Inc., a private,
non profit agency serving low
income residents of Jefferson,
Leon, Gadsden, Calhoun,
Franklin, Gulf, and Liberty
counties, will hold its Board
meeting and 2006-07 Budget
Workshop, 7 pm Tuesday at
309 Office Plaza,Drive, Talla-
hassee.
The meeting is open to the
public.
-


I1-8OO-.JSA-NAVXT
,wwwnavyjobs-.comi


HELPING at the Fashion Show and Luncheon were front
to back, Princess Dana Jane Watt, Queen Joanna Cobb,
First Queen Pageant Runner-Up Casey Handley,
Amanda Ouzts, Peggy Thrasher. (News Photos)


The Sons of Allen of New
Bethel AME Church will hold
their annual scholarship wor-
ship service, 11 a.m. Sunday,
Speaker is Minister Martha
Jean Wilson, of Fellowship
MB Church, Monticello.
***
Stewards and Trustees of
New Bethel AME Church will
observe their anniversary 3.
p.m. Sunday. Speakers are
Rev. James E. Harvey, Pastor
of Holy Light MB Church, Ha-
Vana, and Rebecca MB
Church, Thomasville.

New Bethel AME Church, in
conjunction with Elizabeth
MB Church, and Second Har-
vest Food Bank, will distribute
food to the needy, 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. Saturday at New Bethel


Elizabeth Suto.
Killed by a drunk driver
on February 27,1994, on Bell Blvd.
in Cedar Park, Texas.
If you don't stop yourfriend
from driving drunk, who will?


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Church. Contact Essie Norton
at 997-5683 for additional in-
fomiat on. .

Friendship MB Church will
hold an appreciation program
for Assoc. Pastor Minister
Cassandra Brockman 3 p.m.,
Sunday. Guest speaker is Min-
ister Rebecca Ross.

Shiloh AME Church In Au-
-cilla, ,wNill hold its 38th Home-
coming Celebration 11 a.m.
Sunday. Speaker is Rev.
Franklin Pompey of Tallahas-
see. Mt Olive PB Church will
provide songs of praise.
***


American Stroke
Association-
HA

rime Marches On
For people over age 55, the incidence of
stroke more than doubles in each
successive decade.

Stroke Warning Signs:
* Sudden numbness or weakness in
the face, arm, or leg, especially on
one side of the body.
* Sudden confusion or trouble
speaking or understanding.
* Sudden trouble seeing in one or
both eyes.
* Sudden trouble walking, dizziness,
loss of balance or coordination.


F9 .. --


\









PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 23, 2006


S rts


Kiwallis Melon Run


Winners Announced


DAN NENNSTIEL was the top local male runner in the Melon Run with a time ol
21:36.


NATHAN HASKINS was the top overall winner in the Watermelon Festival Melon Run,
with a time of 17:36. (News Photos)


FMB Golf Tourney


Set Over Weekend


The 41st annual Farmers
and Merchants Bank Water-.
melon Festival Golf Tourna-
ment, will be hosted at the
Country Club, this weekend.
The event kicks off with the
Past champions Shoot-out, 1
-p.m., Friday.
During the past champions
shoot-out, one player will be
eliminated per hole until one
man is left standing to be de-
clared the champion of past
champions.
Golfers tee off, 8 a.m. and 1
--p.m., Saturday, and at 9 a.m.
and 2 p.m., Sunday.
A total of 96 golfers will
shoot it out during the two-
day event.
Golfers and their wives will
enjoy a barbecue with all of
the trimmings, 7-9 p.m., Sat-
urday at the Country Club.
Tournament winners will
-- have their names engraved on


the plaque of champions that
hangs in the Country Club
trophy room.













S (No matter how much
of it you have left.,
Fair skin, light eyes dnd a tendency
,.to burn in the sun, also put you at a'
h higher risk.So,'examine your skin
-e.lar,. Ifyou find anything
unusual..see your dermatologist.


The winner of last year's
tournament was Mike Grant.
The winner of last year's past
champions shoot-out was
David Jackson.


Members from the Monti-
cello and St. Phillips Boy's
and Girl's Clubs were partici-
pated in the Lady Seminole
Basketball Day Camp at FSU,
during the week of May 29
through June 2.
Members participated in
basketball drills ,.
Each camp attendee re-
ceived a free camp T-shirt, a
camp basketball, and various
Lady Seminole memorabilia.
Youth attending included:
Jordan Hastings, Cydney
Hastings, Charlene Austin,
Brionna Jones, Emily Howell,
Kashayla Barrington, Porsha
Guy, Kyyah Massey, Jazlynn
Pead, Samiria Martin, and
Hartamika Davis.
Monticello Boy's and Girl's
Club member Porsha Guy,
said of the camp, "It was so
much fun. I wish I could do


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Of the 185 runners \\ho pre-
registered for Saturday morn-
ing's Kiwanis Melon Run,
170 crossed the finish line.
Spokesman Rob. Mazer.
' said, "It was the biggest turn-
out in about five years."
He added that the route of
the race 'was changed this
year because coordinators
wanted to "Better showcase
Monticello."
Nathan Haskins was the
overall male winner with
17:36.
Heather Bailey was the over-
all female winner with 20:57.
Todd Smoot with 18:07,
was top male Masters (over
40.
Representative Loranne
Ausley was top female in the
Masters.
Dan Nennstiel with 21:36,
was top local male winner.
Tanya Patton with 27:18.
was top local female.
In the male 10 and under
age group. Vincent Dewgh,
first place; David Guhl, sec-
ond; and Carson Nennstiel,
third.
There were no female run-
ners in this age group.
In the male 10-14 age
group, James Tailer, first
place; Cody Neveis, second;
and Jacob Gray, third.
In the female 10-14 age
group, Christine Joost, first
place; Caren Parisan, second;
and Erin Fraser, third place.
In the male 15-19 age
group, Sammy Palmer. first
pfai6e; '"r6ger Michard,
Ssecond4tid, Brad Givens,
third.
In the female. 15-19 age
group, Whitney Blackburn,
first place; Michaela


this everyday and play basket-
ball."
Several scholarships were
provided to the Jefferson
County Boy's and Girl's Clubs
from local area churches, to
make attending the camp pos-
sible.
Spokesman James Mercado
said the Boy's and Girl's Club
thanks the local churches
which donated the scholar-
ships.
These included Mercy In-
dustries, Calvary Chapel,
Every Nation, Wildwood,
Four Oaks, First Baptist,
Christian Heritage, and Bethel
AME.
Anyone wishing to become
a member of the Boy's and
Girl's Club can contact Mer-
cado at 519-1200 or by e-mail
at jmercado@bgcbb.org.


second; and Don, Foulke,
third. a
In the female 50-54 age
group, Nancy Palmer, first
place; Sue Kelly, second; and
Jackie McDaniel, third.
In the male 55-59 age group,
Dennis Hitchens, first place;
Al Cooksey, second; and Neal
Forsman, third.
In the female 55-59 age
group, Nancy Widner, first
place; Mary Stutzman,
second; and Dawn Brown,
third,-
The top runners in the male
60-64 age group, Nick
Nichols, first place; Guy An-
glin, second and Joe Dexter,
third.
The top male runners in the
over 65 age group were; Ar-
thui Ward, first place; Dennis
Wuth, second; Jere Moore,
third.
In the over 65 age group,
Josephine Newton, first place.
Roccanti, second; and Anna
Cramer, third.
In. the male 20-24 age
group, Andrew Brook, first
place; Clark Evans, second;
and Daniel Claiborne, third.
In the 20-24 age group,
Crystal Walling, first place;
and Courtney Whitlock, sec-
ond place.
Top males in the 25-29 age
group were: Ryan Chambers,
first place; and Kenny Derick-
son, second.
In the female 25-29 age
group, Meggin Vantook won
first place.


In the male 30-34 age group,
Andrew Pope, first place;
Ronald Thomas, second; and
Keith Cooksey, third.
In the female 30-34 age
group, Shelby Hannah, first
place; April Doubrava, sec-
ond; and Christine Stakely,
third.
In the male 35-39 age
group, Jack McDermott, first
place; John Matthews,
second; and Chad Johnson,
third.
In the female 35-39 age
group, Lisa Unger, first place;
Toma Wilkerson, second; and
Sherrie Peavy, third.
In the male 40-44 age
group, Guy Bevis, first place;
Mike. Martinez, second; and
Jamie Welborn, third.
In the female 40-44 age
group, Lynn Powell, first
place; Sandra Canada,
second; and Robin Safly,
third.
In the male 45-49 age
group, Tim Unger, first place;
Tilton Wright, second; and
Chuck Davis, third.
In the female age 45-49
group, Rhonda Kenyon, first
place; Fran McLear, second;
and Jacquie Myers, third.
In the male 50-54 age
group, Jerry McDaniel first
place;. Shelton Ansley,
Sponsors for the event in-
clude: Merrill Lynche, Mor-
row Insurance, Steve Walker
Realty


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 23, 2006 PAGE 9

Tennis Tourney


PICTURED from left: Charlene Austin, Brionna Jones, Davis, Coach White, Coach Johnson, Associate Head
Emily Howell, Kashayla Barrington, Porsha Guy, Kyyah Coach Close, and Ms. Mobley.
Massey, Jazlynn Pead, Samiria Martin, Hartamika


Kicks Off
The Watermelon Festival
tennis tournament will be
hosted beginning at 8 a.m.,
Saturday.
Because of the large number
of teams involved this year, ,
28 compared to 14 last year,
all six county tennis courts at
both the Country Club and
Recreation Park, will be in
use. throughout the tgurna-
ment. '
The event will kick off 7 .
p.m., Friday, with a fast-serve
contest.
Trophies will be awarded-
for first place finisheIrs in both
the men's anrdwomen's divi-
sions of the competition.


Saturday
During the last contest,
there were no women com-
petitors.
However, the fast serve of
Mark Wirick, 104 mph, was
declared the victor.
All proceeds will benefit the
Tennis Association.
S. Spokesperson Trisha Wirick
*said 28 mixed doubles teams
will be vying for first and sec-
ond place trophies, as well as
consolation trophies, in divi-
sions 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0.
She concluded that there
will many local favorites
competing, as well as players
from Tallahassee, and coordi-
nators were very excited.


Cal Ripkin All-Stars End


Season In 2 Tournaments


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The County Cal Ripkin All-
Star baseball league recently
played in two tournaments.
Coach Danny Jackson said
the first game of the Rag Shirt
tournament in Woodville,
June 1, was an extra-inning
thriller against the host team
from Woodville.
Outstanding pitching by
Trent Roberts held Woodville
to a single run.,
Ladarian Smiley scored the
winning run from second base
after a single from shortstop
Elliott Capers, for the 2-1 vic-
tory.
The next day, the All-Stats
found themselves behind Me-
ridian Park, 4-9 after only
four innings.,
S. The All-Stars rallied for a
14-9 victory behind home
runs by Capers, Smiley, and
outfielder/third baseman Shel-
ton Allen.
The first loss of the.season.-
came at the hands of Tom


Brown Park of Tallahassee, 2,-
6.
The All-Stars were then
eliminated from the tourna-
ment in a 5-6 nail-biting loss
to Winthrup of Tallahassee.
The Thomasville All-Stars
were the winners of the tour-
nament and carried Monti-
cello native Connor Bennett
on their starting roster at sec-
ond base.
The All-Stars then traveled
to Wakulla for the Cal Ripkin
District Tournament, June 16-
18.
With too many errors in the
field, and not enough offen-
sive firepower, the All-Stars
were defeated 2-7, by the host
team, to send Jefferson to the
losers bracket.
The All-Stars battled their
way back into contention with
a hard-fought 2-1 victory over
the Perry All-Stars.
Smiley hit a two-run homer
to start the game. Jackson said
that was all the runs he would
.peed as. bis stellar. pitcl)inr,
performance held Perry at bay


and secured the win.
In the second game of the
day in the losers bracket, the
All-Stars played, an error-
filled game and handed the
Madison All-Stars a 9-5 win
ending the season for Jeffer-
son.
Other All-Stars include Alex
Gulledge, catcher,: Zack
Steele, first baseman, Tyler
Jackson, second baseman,, Ja-
red Jackson, left-fielder,
Bradley Holm, left-fielder,
Matt Tuten, right-fielder, Levi.
Cobb, right-fielder, and Le-
norris Footman,
center-fielder.
Coaches Jackson, John Cobb
and Mike Holm are proud of
the hard work and effort the
players gave for the season.



A 'IRFORC
*.111vE


JEFFERSON COUNTY ALL-STARS


44 i/ 1

-1 ji-1.A u Jj~


Girls State Representative


Relates Her Experiences


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Legion Post 49 Ladies Aux-
iliary sponsored Christina Ha-
malian to attend Girls State
this year at the Capitol.
The week-long Girls State
is comprised of House and
Senate sessions, combined
with meeting elected officials
and local dignitaries.
The program teaches inter-
ested high school girls re-
sponsible citizenship by al-
lowing them to learn how
state and local government
operates.
Through a letter, Hamalian
thanked the Legion Post 49
and Auxiliary for affording
her the opportunity to attend,
and informed them about her
busy week.
She wrote: "I was unaware
of what to expect, and I
admit, I was overwhelmed by
all the work I had to do before
getting to Tallahassee.'
She said that Girls State has


S



SP Sv



iw


taught her how to become a
better, more concerned
citizen.
It helped her to become
more informed, especially
since she will turn 18 in a few
months and will become eligi-
ble to vote in upcoming elec-,
tions.
During the week, she
learned what to look for in a
candidate, about new laws,
and she now has a better un-
derstanding of government.
During her week, she was
elected one of six councilman
of her given city, and a mem-
ber of the House of Represen-
tatives of her given county.
'As a councilman she was to
make sure everyone in her
city kept their rooms clean.
She says being a Represen-
tative "Rocks,V' as she loves a
good debate, and can be very
opinionated!
"I definitely could see my-
self being in the Florida
House of Representatives af-
ter establishing a career," she,


The name and image of Sparky' are registered trademarks of he National Fire Protection Association, Quincy MA.


adds.
While in the House, Gover-
nor Jeb Bush and Lt. Gover-
nor Toni Jennings came to
speak to the girls.

Hamalian said that it was
interesting to hear Jennings
talk about how she made it to
different levels in
government, many times be-
ing the first female to achieve
the position.

As a Nationalist she.
learned how things worked in
a party, about writing bills
and the process of getting one
passed, and how it takes a
majority vote to pass a bill.
"My plan has always been
to major in Law and minor in
Chemistry, and to become a
lawyer, and then maybe a
judge.
"Now I am aware of how to
become an active citizen in
Florida and our nation."


The First Step







To Any
Buying
Decision


Monticello

News

Classified s


997-3568


Sales Service Parts Rental


I HELPIIN Y7t
0n-61 GET THE JOB DONE

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Equipment Tallahassee/Midway
-,"--"'-*-" Exit 192 at 1-10 & US 90
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ULfitlMIER MOSQUITO REDUCriON. Oui or .Jv Innriel t

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PROECNGOUR HEALTH & PROPERTY IS OUR S ipN- EVERY

'' -


TAKE THE KEYS.

CALL A CAB.

TAKE A STAND, __ __ __ __ _

. .i I I. I '


bit~t







PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 23, 2006


Ever Get A Pol Smashed!


I J N DON 'T[I II


GREHOS GAE AS ACAR.

Proecio Agency andt .S DprmetoEeg.1


eBusiness program online
Earn a certificate or an 3s5ociaie degree
in eBusiness tiuhoue leading home
1.800.342.4325; ext. 3-2347
North Dakota
State College of Science
www.ndscs.edu
Othe r onlne opnons inchde
CompuTer d"rrmahicn S items Web Deijgn
Arclutectural Draf~r and Eriul maung
Health infcrmanin Tehmenan k4- opu onsI
Office Admmstralrmon (2cpilc.nl:'


CASHNOW Asseen
FOR STRUCTURED SElILEMENTS, on T V.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794 7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Stmructured Settlements!

IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY
DIAL 911


B BU SINESS



DIRECTORY,
J-- ,: ^^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^^^^

^^ ; [ ^ .^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^


Portable Toilets
Billy Simmons Septic
850-509-1465 cell
850-997-0877 home '
Clean Portables for construction sites,
4 family reunions, parties
: Events and Types'


DOUG'S TREE & LAWN
SERVICE


Trimming ,
Mowing.
Removal
Maintenance


O Stump Grinding
0 Aerial Device
0 Bush Hogging


Your Local Professional Painters
Interior Exterior.B "ER2B DR D S
'Lk;& Tn' "676
l Law'n &Landscaing
"m' " I l "
N a Mention This Ad & receive
I A 10% Discount
11025 East Mahan ---- 877-4550--
S11025-East Mahan 877-4550,


997-0039 Lic. insured d


B & M Tractor ServicePCA-ROLLHILLA'TEL CTRC, INC
Specializingin Food Plots, Bush Hoping, Realtor Tim Peary CARROLL LL AUTO LECTRIC, INC. LA H IUTA traig
Liming & Fertilizing, Spraying, and Fencing
S. 50-997-4340. Complete Auto Electic Repair Service" Larichiuta
See all our listings) .. .e, Llo6yd. FL 32337
www.TimPea"y.com *..imerock
Brad McLeod '-Simply the Besf -Clav
Cell: (850) 210-2942 Mack McLeod Simply the Best! ',
Cell: (850) 545-2325 Cell: (850) 510-0 RealtorTim Peary Sells ReaEstate! Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd. SandS 9 -6788
Home: (850) 997-1451 S Home: (850) 997-3091233 Simply the Best (on aoi 229-226-0717 oi
,0534 South Sdt Rd. Ldont, F. 32336 Simply the Best! (onCarroll'Hill) 229-226-0717'7 &'ibpSoil


Register 's Mini-Storage

315 Waukeenah Hwy.
(1/4 Mile Off US 19 South)

997-2535


Septic Tank & Land Clearing
Complete Septic Service & Repair
Lot Preparing & Land Clearing
Thomas B. Scott, Sr.
Rt 1 Box 137

ph:997-5536 cell: 933-3620

*Lot Cleaning *Driveways *Dig Ponds *Road
Building *Culvert Installation *Fill Dirt
*Limerock *Gravel
Billy Simmons, Owner
Backhoe and Hauling Septic TanksContractor &
Excavation Contractor
Phone: (850) 997-0877
Cell: (850) 509-1465
Imnsured D.O.H. Lie. #SR0971265
Visa & Mastercard Accepted!


1-10 CHEVRON
Marlboro $3.04 pack, $8.80
3-pack,. $26.99 carton + tax
305 $1.59 pack, $4.47 3-pack
14.00 carton + tax
Morgan's Chewing Tobacco
$1.96 pack, $5.55 3 packs,
$21.42 carton +Tax
Swisher Sweet Honey Flavored
King Cigars 2 for $.69
Bring this ad, receive a
Free 20 oz. Fountain Drink
with any purchase
WE ACCEPT ALL MANUFACTURERS
COUPONS

A 5 gi ISI *NOFMaILETEL CORP.


-ALARMUSYSTEMS
A 9TENTION TELEPVoNESsmms
Busm5ss OwNEs DATA NETWORK^^^ SSS
^SHO EEEsas^^^^^


Residential & Commercial uic.# eg #1507547

YEAGER CONTRACTING CO. INC.
CUSTOM HOMES



PH: 997-2296 CELL: 508-2383


Appliance Repairs:
Washers, Dryers, Stoves,
Refrigerators.
Owned'& Operated by Andy Rudd
997-5648
Leave Message


THURMAN TRACTOR SERVICE
-\ \ MOWING- HARROWING~
FoOD PLOTS
LIC. & INS.
James Thurman, LLC
850-997-5211
850-545-0139


j WE GO THE F.\7tR. AiL E FOR YOU!1
1 997-6500
WHEN YouNEED To SOLVE COMPUTER PROBLEMS.
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY ONSITE SERVICE
*Diagnosis Repair *Upgrades *Installations *Consultations
'Tutorials *Removal of Viruses, Adware, Spywate


Call for quality work
45 Years In The Trade
Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
850-997-7467 ~ 850-544-2917
*Residential ~ Commercial *Interior ~ Exterior


MR. MERCHANT
THIS SPACE
COULD BE
YOURS FOR
ONLY $10.00


MR. MERCHANT
THIS SPACE
COULD BE
YOURS FOR
ONLY $10.00


The PecoitbIor/'s
WaIlrehouse, LLC


260 N.
cherryy


Street


Furnishing & Accessories


Custom Mowing
Specializing In Small Lots
(850) 997-2170



TONYY de SERCEY
Light Harrowing & Grading


Tyrone Davi
Sales Manager


Opening 1-800-572-1717 MR. MERCHANT
www.mdausa.org
the door ww.mdausaTHIS SPACE
tO hope. Sm COULD BE Keaton Tire Repair
S hope COULDBE "Service Is Our Business on and off the Road"
Call our -9. ShopC o
lifline YOURS FOR EDD KEATON 850-997-0903 Sho
TRAVIS KEATON 850-264-6871 Cell
It'S toll-free. ONLY $10.00 54 Capps Hwy 850-997-0937 Fax
SNLYLamont, FL 32336 850-997-5443 Home


I Ultimate

Ui age Auto

877-7222
Very large selection to choose from
All trade-ins are welcome
Best rates as low as 4.5%
Free warranty on every vehicle sold
as D (ROT, AD (RINT
S iT DOE1NT MATEP


Calm i


.80.







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 23, 2006 PA

To Place Your Ad




997-3568


WGE 11



CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00 '
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING:
The Jefferson County Planning
Commission will review and make a
decision to approve or not approve
a minor residential subdivision
application for approximately 13.38
acres off of Cardinal Lane parcel
number 18-1N-4E-0113-00C-0120.
Interested parties may present their
concerns at the Jefferson County
Planning Commission meeting on
July 13, 2006 at 7:00 p.m., or as
soon thereafter as such matter may
be heard, in the courtroom of the
Jefferson County Courthouse
located at the intersection of U.S.
Highway 19 and US Highway 90 in
Monticello, Florida 32344. From the



DIVI IN!












Dive into MDA, and
learn more about
summer kids' camps,
family support groups,
and life-saving research.



Muscular
Dystrophy Association
S Jerry Lewis, National Chairman
1-800-572-1717
0 www.mdausa.org


Florida "Government in the
Sunshine Manual?', page 36,
paragraph c: Each board,
commission or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision
thereof shall include in the notice of
any meeting or hearing, if notice of
meeting or hearing is required of
such board, commission, or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the
board agency or commission with
respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she
will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she: may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings, is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to hb
based. Prior to the meeting
interested persons may contact the
Jefferson County Planning and
Building Department at
850-342-0223 or write the
Department at 445 West Palmer
Mill Road, Monticello, FL 32344
and provide comments. The
development proposal may be
reviewed during business hours at
the Department office.
6/23/06, c
NOTICE OF LAND
DEVELOPMENT CODE
PROPOSED CHANGE: Jefferson
County Commission will have a
public hearing on the following
proposed land development code
change on July 20, 2006 at 6:00
p.m., or as soon thereafter as such
matter may be heard, in the
courtroom of the Jefferson County
courthouse located at the
intersection of U.S. High a) 90 and
19. The meeting may be continued
as necessary. JEFFERSON
COUNTY, FLORIDA BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
ORDINANCE NO. AN
ORDINANCE OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY FLORIDA, PROVIDING
FOR FINDINGS OF FACT;
PROVIDING FOR PURPOSE;
AMENDING THE LAND
DEVELOPMENT CODE
SECTION 9.02.07, NOTICE
REQUIREMENTS; CHANGING
NOTICE REQUIREMENTS
RELATING TO THE NOTICE BY
MAIL; PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILITY; PROVIDING
FOR CONFLICT; PROVIDING
FOR INCORPORATION INTO
THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN;
PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY;
AND PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE. Information
concerning the proposed change
may 'be reviewed at the Jefferson
County Planning Department, 445
West Palmer Mill Road, Monticello,
FL 32344, telephone 850-342-0223.
From the Florida "Government in
the Sunshine Manual", page 36,
paragraph c: Each board,
commission or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision
thereof shall include in the notice of
any meeting or hearing, if notice of
meeting or hearing is required of
such board, commission, or agency,,
conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the
board agency or commission with
respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing, he or she
will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings, is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be
based.
6/23/06, c
~-
H .... -......
Therapists wanted-Licensed
SLPS in Miami-Dade and
Broward counties. Bilingual a
plus. Per diem & F/T.
Bilinguals Inc. Child & Parent
Services. (866) 696-0999 x122
www.bilingualsinc.com
6/23 fcan
Accepting applications for
full-time lumberyard personnel
with a clean driving record,
knowledgeable of building
material and customer friendly.
Must be 18 years or older.
Application may be obtained at
1400 South Jefferson Street,
Monticello
6/7, tfn, c
Mechanic Waukeenah
Fertilizer. 850-997-4460
6/7, tfn,c


IWant home most weekends with
more pay! Run Heartland's


I Florida Regional! $.42/mile
company drivers $1.22 for
I Operators! 12 month OTR



, Housing Vouchers o

* We accept all vouchers
* 2/2 $615 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep. '
* Pool & Youth Activities

[] 5756571
AIUIIIUEUIII7IUW


required. Heartland Express
(800) 441-4953
www.heartlandexpress.com
6/23 fcan

Electric Meter Change-Out
Field Technicians: How would
you like to earn some extra
money during the summer
month? Utility Meter Services
is looking for temporary meter.
change-out field technicians in
the Monticello area. You must
have a valid Florida driver's
license, pass a pre-employment
drug test and background
check. We will train qualified
individuals. Starting salary will
be $15.00 hr. Send your
resume to, UMS@asplundh.com.
UMS EOE
6/21-6/30c
MAINTENANCE- PT 36 Unit
Apt Complex Resume/Apply to
Heritage Manor, 1800 East
Texas Hill Road, Monticello, FL
32344 fax: 850-997-7288 Phone:
850-997-4727
6/7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, c
TEACHER POSITIONS
AVAILABLE: Monticello
Christian Academy Elementary,
Middle, High School call
997-6048 for details or submit
resume to: MCA, 1590 N.
Jefferson St. Monticello, 32344.
6/2-30, c
JANITOR/MAINTENANCE:
Part time position. Must be able
to perform some maintenance as
well as janitor duties. Call
MCA, 997-6048
6/2-30, c
Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn

BSINE1S.S


ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE
Do you earn $800/day? 30
machines, free candy. All for
$9,995. (888)629-9968
B02000033. Call us: We will not
be undersold,.
6/23 fcan
Vending Route: Snack, All
Drinks, All Brands.. Great
Equipment, Great Support!
Financing Available With $6K
Down. Call Tom: (954)
971-9301
6/23 fcan

GARAGE SALE
ROYAL MINI STORAGE:
997-1480 Saturday 24th, From 8
am till 1:00 p.m., 2084 S.
Jefferson St.
6/23, c

FOR SALE
Roosters and Laying Chickens
$10 each; Goats, female $100
each. Leave message. 997-0901
6/23, pd
4 person paddle boat good
shape. $150, 997-6499
6/23, pd
Deluxe Vulcan Convection Oven
superior cooking & baking
performance, 40W" x 41 I/2"D
$3000.00 perfect for restaurants.
Self Serving Drink Cooler
contains 3 shelves designed to
hold bottles or can drinks $450
perfect for restaurants and
convenient stores. 459-2138,
997-4646
6/9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28, 30, pd

FOR RENT
Jefferson Place Apartments, 1
and 2 bedroom, 1468 S.
Waukeenah St. Office 300
Monticello. 997-6964 (Equal
Housing Opportunity.
tfn, c


Suiiun uowntown ofiice space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980.
11/30 tfn, c
3 BR, 1-1/2 Bath, house in
country. Call 997-3368.
6/21 tfn c
2 Bedroom/I Bath, Screened-in
porch-Upstairs, Workshop,
Workout Rm., W/D hookup
downstairs. Available July 1.
One year lease, First & last
month, $300 deposit- $575 a
monlh. 997-2845 Sam, US 259,
144 Old Buzbee Rd, Waukeenah
(No pets) Utilities not.included.
6/21-6/30p
'Roommate Wanted. Nice, !Big
Home on 4 acres, 15 minutes to
Tallahassee. $340. 997-2422
6/23, 28, pd
Cute, roomy, convenient. 2 BR,
IB. Walk to library, stores,
more. $725. 251-0760
6/23, c

REAL ESTATE"
Would you like to rent an office
downtown? Call 997-5517 leave
message and phone number.
5/12, tfn
HANDYMAN SPECIAL: 3
bedroom 3 V2 bath, 2150 sq. ft.
Needs Drywall, Painting &
Siding AR\ $250,000 Ask
$130,000. (850) 997-3271
k/23, 28, 30, pd ,
A great find, coming soon. 3
BR, I B. 1064 S. Water.
251-0760
6/23, c
-:VA Mountains 5 acres with
frontage on very large pristine
creek, very private, excellent
fishing,, canoeing, good access,
near New River Trail State
Park, $39,500. Owner (866)
789-8535 www.mountainsof
VA.com
6/23 fcan
Eufaula, AL Waterfront V2 to 3
'acres from the 40's. Gated with
Planned clubhouse, docks, and
$boat ramp. 2 hours from
'Atlanta & the coast. Rolling
terrain, beautiful hardwoods.
(8660 882-1107
6/23 fcan
SERVICES .
Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
new menopausal products.
Jackson's drug store.
5/12 tfn
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary, Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quick responses.
6/22, tfn
Peters Satellite -- Your Satellite
Dish dealer. We offer
equipment, installation, repair,
parts, and prompt service. We
also offer Go-Karts, utility
trailers and lawn mowers.
Located at: 1150 Old Lloyd
Road, Monticello, Fla.
850-997-3377
1/25, tfn, c
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
NOW AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn
BUSH CUTTER Lawn Mowing,
bush cutting, tree work, and
pressure washing.
997-4189 6/21-6/30p


SABOR REAL ESTATE

MARK VOLLERTSEN *
"R Realtor -
Sales Associate

850-997-1691 or 850-459-4864
You Name It I'll Fi'r It, Ready To Sell It, It's Sold!
Residential ~ Commercial~
Mobile Homes W/Land ~ Acreage




Statistics Show People Remember
85% of what they read
and 15% of what they hear


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com

Serious About Sellinq?
List today!





Homes That "Talk' Just Sell Faster

Amazinq Buy!!! Mixed Use Property 12
plus partially cleared acres on US 19 south
land use designation permits 4 houses per
acre near Dennis' Trading post only $36,500
per acre

Best Residential Buy in Town!
2 bedroom 1 bath home in great shape with '
fenced yard and big family room behind IGA
on Bowman Street Now $76,500-A Talking
House

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly
wooded acres Only $36,500

Lloyd Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath split plan
with very nice master suite .1993 Fleetwood
on 2.6 acres $76,500-A Talking House

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big double-
wide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in re-
mote, oaks, pond, north of Greenville only
$329,000

Country Livinq at it's Best! Comfortable 4
bedroom 3 bath home on five fenced acres
with guest cottage w/bath, 2 car garage, big
shop, pasture 100 pecan trees and a nice
pool Only $400,000

Fine Homesite Close to Town 12.5 private
acres with big trees and pretty fields perfect
for a fine home $265,000

Just Listed Choice 2.39 acre tract on
Shady Lane near Lake Wooten, South of Old
St. Augustine Rd and east of SR 59 $36,500

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 5 acres available
on the east side of town high and dry in quiet
location with lots of game, 9 year old planted
pines, profit from both appreciating land and
growing pine Only $11,500 per acre

Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500

Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900-A
Talking House
Rentals
Dogwood Street 2/2 home $850
Bowman Street 2/1 rent while waiting for a buyer
$650
Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2/2 MH 5 ac $650
Lloyd Acres 3/2 rent while waiting for buyer $550
Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
Simply the Best!
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


Monticello


News



Get Your

Annual

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'You Can't Be

Without It'


I


Now Hiring
CNAs Risk Manager
orw
Full-Time or Part-Time
Sign-On Bonuses


Clinical'Liaison RN or LPN, Full-Time

RI'sk Man- ager RN Only, Full-Time, Mon-Fri.



Marshall Health

&.Rehabilitation Center

1-850-584-6334
207 Marshall Drive Perry, Fl. 32347
Drug Free Workplace, Equal Opportunity Employer








PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 23, 2006


OUR LIFELINE
IS TOLL-FREE
II )Grabithe line and
let us elp you.


THE VOICE OF HOPE.
1-800-572-1717
--- k .lllwDtv


SERVING LINE at the Rotary Barbecue, from left, Mary Frances Graml
Golden, Ron Cichon, Wesley Scoles and Don Taylor.




Rotary Barbecue Serves


520 At Festival Event


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer'

The Rotary Barbecue was -
deemed successful with ap-
proximately 475-520 meals
served, and approximately
$1,800 raised to go toward
club scholarships for area
youth.
Rotary Treasurer Fred
Golden said the number of
meals served and funds
raised, is about the same as it
has been for the past two
years.
We're always looking to im-
prove the barbecue, yet con-
tinue to provide a great meal
to the public," said Golden.
"At least we're staying consis-
tent, the numbers aren't de-
creasing, and that's good."
It takes much work and


planning from many to make
the ever-popular annual bar-
becue the success it continue-
s to be, he said.
Preparations for the meal of
barbecue pork, fresh corn on
the cob, secret recipe baked
beans, coleslaw, bread, wide
variety of deserts and refresh-
ing iced tea, begin bright and
early the morning of the
event.
It takes a total of about 20
people of Team Rotary be-
hind the scenes to prepare the
large quantity of food that is
required.
Golden said they begin at 7
a.m., first husking, cleaning
and cooking of the corn.
The meat is cooked, cut,
chopped and seasoned, and
later in the day, the coleslaw
is prepared from scratch.
The homemade desserts are


Green Institute To

Hold Potting Party


provided by spouses of club
members and female mem-
bers.


HANDLING ticket sales at the Rotary Barbecue are
from left Dr. Len Dodson, and Charter Member Bill
Douglas. (News Photos)


I
r


.' -3 ~ i



..4'


'4 .,.


GALE ALLBRITTON, left, and Judi Persons attended an organizational meeting Tues-
dayof a Green Industies' newly organized group, Friends of Green Industries Insti-
tute. (News Photo)


HELP YOUR DOCTOR

HELP YOU
IN THREE EASY STEPS.
When you have a chronic illness,
there are steps you can take to
support your health care team, and
help them do their very best for you.
Ask questions.
rt,eres no Iailen may to
understand your symptoms, your
treatment, your dos and don't.
Remember, your doctor, nurses, and
therapists all work for you. They're
there to listen and answer your
questions.
Educate yourself.
Read-up on your illness and your
medicines. Your library and the
Internet are great sources. Smart
patients stop acting like patients-
and become partners in their health
care treatment.
Network with others.
Whatever your illness, there are
others out there, just like you. In
fact, it's assured there's a national
agency to help people with your
condition. Groups like the National
Osteoporosis Foundation and the
American Cancer Society can put
you in touch with people who ,
know what you're going through.
Ask your providers who to call.
It's your health.
You call the'shots.


NATIONAL HEALTH COUNCIL
For assistance or more information, visit
www.NationalHealthCounciil.org or write the
National Health Council at 1730 'M" Street NW,
Suite 500, Washington,-DC 20036-450A.
This message made possible by an educational grant
from the Pfizer Health Literacy Initiative.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

. The community is invited to
attend a "Potting Party" 9 a.m.
Wednesday, at Green Institute
hosted by the Friends Of
Green Industries Institute
(FOGII.)
Those attending will be
potting seedlings, dividing
and re-potting some large
plants, and generally having a
good time.
Snacks and cold drinks will
be on hand all morning.
Each worker will take home
a plant of his, or her, choice.
Contact Judi Persons at
997-4088 ext. 21 or
judi@greenindustries.org to
RSVP.
"Even if folks can only
come for an hour, your
attendance is welcome," says
Persons. "The more the
merrier," she adds.
It's going to be messy work,
so everyone should wear
"grubbies" and bring garden
gloves, if you wish to
participate.
Tools and insect repellent,
along with food and drinks,
will be provided by the group.
FOGII is a local group, in
the process of organizing and


Cal 1-800-438-5383 to learn more.
Or visit us at http://ndep.nih.gov


w rla"A


A joint program of
the National
Institutes of Health
and the Centers for
Disease Control
and Prevention.


seeking members.
The community is urged to
join now and help to get this
group underway.
The purpose.for FOGII is:
*To provide educational
opportunities and resources to
the community;
*To foster and support small
business interests and
promote partnerships between
Green Industries Institute and
local businesses to provide a
greater variety of plant
materials for local sales;
*To be a link for the ex-
chanige of ideas and informa-
tion for agricultural and envi-
ronmental entities and for in-
terested individuals;

*To coordinate projects that
benefit .the community at
large.


F r ee-domof

th~e Press, us,

Every~bciy/

Free~dbm!'!il


My granddaughter means the
world to me. So I'm controlling
my diabetes. That means I keep
my blood sugar close to normal by
watching what I eat and walking
every day. I always take my
medicine and test my blood sugar.
With my diabetes under control,
I feel a lot better and have more
energy. Best of all, I'm going to
be around for my family... for
my friends... for life.
Contact Bonnie Mathis at the
Jefferson County Health
Department for local diabetes
information at 342-0170.

Control your
diabetes.
JiOLlfe


If It Happens In Jefferson County, You'll Read It In The

MONTICELLO NEWS

You Can't Be Without It


How TO KEEP

YOUR KIDS

FREE OF DRUGS.


Rule


#10.


Don't

Preach.

One of the greatest
deterrents to drug use
is simply talking with
your kids. But don't
preach or you'll lose
them. If a conversation
lasts more than five
minutes, you're
preaching. Better to
have lots of five-
minute conversations.
'Kids have short atten-
tion spans and shorter
memories. To learn
more about how to
talk with your kids
about drugs, call for a
free parent's handbook.


1-800-624-0100


Job Opportunity Available
Growing Ford dealership is looking for a Sparkling personality to join our staff. Need to be highly
motivated and a dependable team player that is capable of multitasking. Must enjoy working with people,
as this position will require interacting with both the public and other staff members. Primary
responsibilities will be to assist customer before and after purchases, cashiering, answering incoming calls
and assisting rental car customers. Accounting and computer experience a plus. This job offers an
excellent pay plan with a great benefits package. Timberland Ford is an equal opportunity employer and
a drug free work place. Pay will be based on experience. Call 800-763-4589 Ext. 102 to make an
appointment to interview. Resumes may also be sent to Ronya@timberlandford.com.


I contrlmy iI'llbearounI I


A UBICSEVCEOFTHSPULIATO


Pro