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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00142
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: June 21, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00142
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
    Main: Sports
        page 8
    Main continued
        page 9
        page 10
    Main: Classified
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
Full Text

LI.ARY, OF FLORIDA HISTORY
-JI LIBRARY WEST
UlIVERS TY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, F 1. 6


BodyOwa!i k urz

Drowned aivfl TO-BettE
R..ecove ..iS H.ealt

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Draws CroWd
Of 3.O00 ,

Storypage8 8


Monticello


138TH YEAR NO. 47, 50 CENTS


ews

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21, 2006


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


Planners Face Uphill Struggle To



Promote Green Developments


Committee Will Meet

Monday At Chamber-


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Members of the Planning
Commission subcommittee
charged with formulating an
ordinance that encourages con-
servation subdivisions met re-
cently with the idea of com-
pleting their task.
But given the absence of
two key members who were
rewriting important elements
of the 'document (as well as
other questions that arose at
the June 5 meeting), commit-
tee chairman Brad Mueller
scheduled another meeting for
7 p.m. Monday at the Chamber
of Commerce.' -
Conservation subdivisions,
by definition, are environmen-
tally sensitive residential or
mixed-use developments that
aim to protect natural re-
sources and. preserve green
space while accommodating
growth.


One way conservation subdi-
vision do this is by clustering
or concentrating housing units
in a small area to allow for a
larger part of a property to be
dedicated to communal green
space that is permanently pro-
tected.
The subcommittee's task is to
draft an ordinance -- based on
model ordinances from other
communities -- that both pro-
tects and preserves Jefferson
County's wetlands and rural
character.
Such an ordinance would,
among other things, establish
the minimum size that a devel-
opment must be in order to
qualify as a conservation sub-
division; set the minimum
acreage that must be dedicated
to green space in order to qual-
ify as a conservation subdivi-
sion; and create incentives that
encourage developers to em-
brace conservation subdivi-
sions.
* In the latter case, it means


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Though the temperatures-
soared Saturday, those attend-
ing the Watermelon Festival
activities were not daunted by
the increasing heat, as event
coordinators report the big-
gest turnout in recent
memory.
As the day began, the an-
nual FMB breakfast served
some 200 meals.
Shortly afterward, the an-
nual Kiwanis 5-K run took
place beginning in front of the
old High School.
A change in the route sent
185 runners in the opposite
direction from previous years.
years.


Though the parade didn't
begin until 10 a.m., South Jef-
ferson Street was crowded
with spectators awaiting the
parade, long before that time.

Intense Heat |||
Did Not Stop x
Festivities
More than 75 entries were
seen in the parade, which re-
sulted in Gelling's Florist and
Gifts being named the Best
Merchant entry; Martha's
Bouncing Babies, Most Un-
usual.
FMB was awarded, Best
All Around; Olive Baptist
Church, Best Civic group;
Springtime Tallahassee, Spirit
Award; and Kelly and Kelly


that county officials would be
able to give a developer per-
mission to build more homes
than a particular zoning desig-


Properties, Best Theme Deco-
rations.
Spectators received many
different types of items from
the passing units, including
the traditional tossed hard
candies.
Gelling's distributed fresh
cut flowers, and the Health
Department provided mos-
quito repellent, and other
items.
At the conclusion of the pa-
rade, spectators flocked to the
Arts and Crafts vendors.
Among items available
were: jewelry, hand crafted
items; clothing, collectibles;
wood carvings, art works; ice
cold watermelon, and
alligator-kabobs.
More than 6,000 turned out
(SeeFestival Page 2)


density bonus oxr number of
housing units that county offi-
cials would be able to permit
above the zoning designation,


BRAD MUELLER, left, hedds, the subcommittee that is
looking into conservati*j s4divisions. Here, he talks
with Jack Hamilton during a recent Planning Commis-
sion meeting. (News Photo)


nation allows, provided the de-
veloper agrees to dedicate a
larger portion of the property
to green space.
The greater the area set aside
for green space, the higher the


density, up to a point.
For many reasons, the com-
mittee faces an onerous task.
First and foremost, conser-
vation subdivisions are a rela-
tively new concept, especially







.V. -Z.. ,


in largely rural counties such
as Jefferson County, where
open space is still taken for
granted.
The majority of present-day
conservation subdivisions, it
-turns out, are found near large
urban areas, where green space
is at a premium and home buy-
ers are willing to pay extra for
the amenity.
This puts conservation sub-
divisions in the upper echelon
of the housing market, a situa-
tion that may cause advocates
of affordable housing some
heartburn. But that is another
story.
More immediately, it means
that the 'committee must re-
work many of the rules, num-
bers and standards found in the
model ordinances in order to
make the concept adaptable --
and acceptable -- to the local
iruation ..
Therein lies the rub -- reach-
ing consensus on what should
be the minimum standards and
then selling the idea to the
community.
Consider the makeup of the
subcommittee, which is com-
posed of three Planning Com-


Mmmmm, Good!


mission members who
themselves don't see eye-to-
eye on what the standards
should be. Hence, every rec-
ommendation worked out by
the group represents a compro-
mise of divergent views. Call
it democracy in action.
The subcommittee must then
sell these compromises to the.
Planning Commission, and ul-
timately to the County Com-
mission and the public at large.
So far, the subcommittee has
been unable to get its recom-
mendations passed the Plan-
ning Commission.
Take establishment of a mini-
mum dry land lot size and
transfer of wetland credits, two
ideas the subcommittee
brought before the Planning
Commission after, months of
back-and-forth discussions.
The county presently has no
-minimum dry land lot size, so
that the state standard kicks in.
The state standard is half an
acre. Meaning, for. example,
that in an ag-5 zone (one house
per five acres), a developer can
place a house on a five-acre
parcel that is four-and-half
(See Planners Page 2)


.A
.-4 ,'i


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4. '


MICHAEL MAYNARD and Courtney Connell share a refreshing slice of watermelon,
at Festival events Saturday. (News Photo)


Planning Official Resigns


Position Effective Aug. 7


BOB ARREDONDO, center, planning official, was often caught between developers
and those residents wanting controlled growth. Here he discusses an issue with Com-
missioner Junior Tuten, right, and Alan Saucier, a front man for developers. (News
Photo)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Planning Official Bob Arre--
dondo has resigned his posi-
tion with the county. His last
day will be Aug. 7.
Arredondo submitted his let-
ter of resignation to commis-
sioners June 6.
The letter was brief, bland,
and to the point. It informed
commissioners of his decision
to leave, thanked them for the
opportunity to serve the
county, and wished them luck
in recruiting a replacement.


Arredondo was unavailable
for comment Monday and the
two commissioners who were
contacted declined to elaborate


beyond the content of the
letter.
One commissioner expressed
(See Resignation Page 2)


Fireworks On Again


Jerry Boatwright, Vice-
President and Branch Manager
of Farmers and
Merchants Bank reported
Monday, that coordinators are
working diligently to make
this year's fourth of July fire-
works display a reality.
Boatwright said the biggest
hurdle will be the collection
of funds toward the


presentation.

He reported that coordinators
will meet again Wednesday
morning to finalize details.
Donations toward the fire-
works can be made at FMB.
Additional information will
be forthcoming in Friday's
edition of the Monticello
News, Boatwrighrt promised


Watermelon Festival


Draws 6,000 Visitors


I -









PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 21, 2006


FMB WAS named Best All Around Entry in the 2006 Watermelon Festival Parade.


BEST MERCHANT was awarded to Gelling Flowers and Gifts parade entry.


Planners Face
(Continued from Page 1) there is any merit
acres underwater. ler said at the rece
The subcommittee came up He predicted th
with a compromise of 50 per- mendation would
cent of the background be voted down,e
density. Meaning that on that spite the fact tha
same five-acre parcel in the lent opinion on
ag-5 zone, half or 2.5 acres of Commission is no
the property must be dry land as the County Coi
for a dwelling to be penn.ited. "Every property
That recommendation never say that you're
got passed by the Planning their property rig
Commission. said. "The Devel
Neither did the recommenda- would have to be
tion for the transfer of wet- I don't think two
lands credits. missioners have tl
Presently, developers can do it. It probably
transfer housing credits one- of the Planning
for-one from wetlands to up- The subcommitt
lands. Meaning that a this to the point
developer gets full housing want to pursue
credits for land that is virtually Two people may
underwater and that is incapa- for it. It's a losing
ble of being developed by state Still, Mueller
law. bring the issue up
The subcommittee wanted to only to establish
reduce the wetlands credits to stand on the issue
half the background density. of posterity, he sa
Thus, for example, it would re- But even if the
quire 10 acres of wetlands to passed the Plann
get credit for one housing unit sion, it will still
in an ag-5, zone, versus the sold to the Coun
present practice of allowing sion and ultimately
one housing credit per five munity at large.
acres of wetlands in such One question I
zones, raises is how to se
"The majority of the Plan- clustering to tha
ning Commission doesn't feel the population t


Uphill
to it," Muel- ently
nt meeting. posed
at the recom- How
d eventually vince
and that de- ties cc
t "the preva- door tc
the Planning sion tt
ot as political actually
mTmission". county
y owner will space,
taking away for th
hts," Mueller owner
opment Code to the
changed and
county com- O
he stomach to
won't get out (Contir
Commission. surprise
ee has beat resign
that we don't pressed
it anymore. what 1
tbe will vote as the
fight." the res
proposed to
for a vote, if Arm
how planners the co
. For the sake He re
id. Offici
proposals get resign
ing Commis- another
1 have to be Florid
nty Commis- Prio:
ly to the com- the co
17 ye;
Mueller often partme
ell the idea of fairs (
t segment of analyst
hat is inher- planni


Catch it here at the

Monticello News


or Wo&
All t
years
experic
work f
(See R


Fight
wary and adamantly op-
to higher densities.
v, in other words, to con-
residents whose proper-
ould potentially be next
o a high-density subdivi-
hat the higher density is
y good for the overall
Sby ensuring more open
if maybe not so good
ie individual property
whose land is next door
development?


signation
nued from Page 1)
se that Arredondo had
ed. The second ex-
d no knowledge beyond
:he letter stated, insofar
reason or reasons behind
ignation.
edondo came to work for
*unty in November 2002.'
placed former Planning
al Gale Carmoney, who
ed in September to take
er planning job in South
a.
r to coming to work for
unty, Arredondo worked
ars for the Florida De-
ent of Community Af-
DCA) as a management
t. Before that, he was
ng director for the city
odward in Oklahoma.
old, Arredondo had 30
of planning and zoning
ence when he came to,
'or the county, according .
resignation Page 4)


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COLDWELL BANKERS Kelly and Kelly won Best Theme with their float in the parade.


TALLAHASSEE SPRINGTIME won the Spirit Award in the parade. (News Photos)



Festival Draws 6,000 Visitors


(Continued from Page 1)
during the day, Festival Coor-
dinator Mary Frances Gram-
ling reports..
Rodeo Chair Charlie Driver
reports more than 3,000 'peo-
ple in the arena Friday and
Saturday nights, with a
packed house Friday and a
.standing room only on Satur-
'day.
Many stopped to enjoy the
platform events, which in-
cluded a wide variety of en-


tertainment.
Among the entertainment
were: Moondance and the
Mountain Dew Cloggers.
Dale Boatwright won the
seed spitting contest, and Fes-
tival Queen Joanna Cobb out-
distanced Sheriff David
Hobbs.
Entertainment alsoincluded
three numbers sung by Randi
Lynn Goff, music performed
by 2005 Watermelon Queen
Alana Chambers, 1986 Wa-


termelon Queen Angela
Chambers Gray, and 12 year-
old Jacob Gray performing on
the electric guitar. His per-
formance was referred to as
"Mind boggling" for his sheer
talent of making the instru-
.ment sing.
The platform events were
sponsored by FMB in honor
of it'; l Oth anniversary.
As the day drifted into eve-
ning, visitors seemed reluc-
(See Festival Page 4)


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1.







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 21, 2006 PAGE 3

Mark Raciappa Will Mentor Small

Businesses, Coach Franchises


VENDOR Samhain Oscara was in character at the Arts
and Crafts Exhibits during the Watermelon Festival,
Saturday, selling hand crafted wooden swords. (News
Photo)


Body Of Drowned Man


Recovered
FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer
Sheriff David Hobbs re-
ports that the body of 22
year-old Gabriel Hernandez
Jimenze was found at 6:30
a.m. Tuesday, in a wading-
pond located on the Arm-
strong property on Boston
Highway.
The body was transported to
TMH for an autopsy to deter-
mine the cause of death.
Hobbs said a call came
into the office about 4:30 p.m.,
Sunday. He said that wit--
nesses stated that Hemandez-


Tuesday
Jimenze was wading into the
pond, to retrieve a fishing net
he had cast out earlier.
"They said when he got
close to the net, he went un-
der, came back up and tried to
swim, but went back down,
.and they did not see him
come back up," said Hobbs.
The Leon County Sheriffs
Department dive team was
called in and searched the
largest portion of the pond
over the course of about six
hours, but found nothing.
Hobbs noted that the vege-
tation was very thick in the
pond.


One of the world's leading
business coaching franchises,
has opened a branch in Talla-
hassee, offering one to one
business mentoring to small
to medium business owners.
Franchisee Mark Raciappa
felt that the rapid small busi-
ness growth in the Big Bend
area was the perfect opportu-
nity to put hisbusiness expe-
rience to good use.
"After living and working in
Monticello for 13 years)I am
familiar with a large number
of small: to medium busi-
nesses with untapped poten-
tial. I frequent many of these
businesses on a regular basis
and believe that they could
easily build on their present
success," he said.
Business coaching is experi-
encing healthy growth coin-
ciding with the increasing
number of people choosing to
put their entrepreneurial skills
to good use..
Raciappa.feels that business
coaching in an excellent way-
to give Big Bend businesses
an. edge on the competition.
"Competition is fierce with,
80 percent of most small to
medium businesses failing in
the first two to five years of
operation. Theses are stag-
gering figures and indicate the
need for a closer look at the
way business owners are
viewing their enterprise," said
Raciappa.
"Often they are in the thick
of day to day operations and
lack the tirne to take a closer
look at their key business ar-
eas. Little do they know that
what started as a,business has
ended up being a job," he said.
Raciappa is no stranger to
business having had 33 years'
of experience in areas of
Sales, Marketing, Team
Building, and Customer Serv-
ice.


oteX ,(.


"I'love the Monticello/Talla-
hassee area and the best thing
about this business is it allows
me to work in my favorite part
of Florida and get involved in
the local community said Ra-
ciappa.
( "I am thrilled that I will
have the opportunity to run
free seminars in the local area
and get a feel for the unique
'needs of the local business
community,',' he said. "I will
not only be sharing my busi-
ness knowledge but the bene-
fits.of a worldwide business
coaching network and a__
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m5091.129


ance claim.
"The county does not pay
for damage to vehicles from
road hazards, unless it can be
proven that prior notification
of the problem was received
and no action was taken,"
Harvey stated.
He added that the County
Road Department actively re-
pairs potholes on an ongoing
basis,
"Our County Commission-
ers actively seek federal and
state funding for the resurfac-
ing and repairs of our road-
ways," he said.
"Give yourself more driving
time to get where you are go-
ing," Harvey concludes.


*Avoid the urge to, swerve
FRAN HUNT out of the way of a pothole at
Staff Writer the last minute.
You may swerve into the
Following Tropical Storm -*Report major potholes or
Alberto, County Road Depart- road damage to the local road
ment Supervisor David Har- department..
vey provided some driving Motorists who think the
tips for local motorists in all state or local government will
seasons:. nay for damage to their cars


*Drive cautiously in areas
where there are known pot-
holes or on roads where you
have seen damage in the past.
*Keep an eye on traffic pat-
terns. A number of cars that
slow down or move quickly
to other lanes may be a sign,
of major potholes or road
damage ahead.


American Stroke
Association..
A Division of American
Heart Association
Tilme MarM~hes On
For people over age 55, the incidence of
stroke more than doubles in each
successive decade.
Stroke Warning Signs:
* Sudden numbness or weakness in
the face, arm, or leg, especially on
one side of the body.
* Sudden confusion or trouble
speaking or understanding.
* Sudden trouble seeing in one or
both eyes.
* Sudden trouble walking, dizziness,
loss of balance or coordination.


\
\





'.
=
1
I
I
p
*i


Fellow Jefferson County Citizens,


It is not often that a person possesses the level of education,
professionalism, leadership and work ethic that Kirk Reams
does. It is even less frequent that a person with these qualifica-
tions considers public service. If given the opportunity to be the
next Clerk of Court for Jefferson County, we are sure Kirk will
devote 100% of his time and effort to this position. We know this
because as our children's advanced high school mathematics
teacher, Kirk spent countless hours of devotion to his student's
education. In the summers, Kirk would organize tournaments
and other fundraisers that benefited various clubs, organizations
and schools.

Because we have witnessed his work ethic and dedication to any
cause he's undertaken, we are supporting Kirk Reams for Clerk
of Court this fall.

If you will be in the area this weekend, there will be a free
cookout on Saturday, June 24th,from 11, AM until 3 PM in the
pecan grove across from the substation in Waukeenah on High-
way 27. Everyone is welcome to come and join us to meet Kirk
and see first-hand the qualities we know he possesses.


Sincerely,
'Tom & Terri 'Mc'veillandFamily

PAID POLITICAL ADV. BY TOM & TERRI MCNEILL, MONTICELLO WITH CONTENT APPROVED
BY KIRK REAMS, DEMOCRAT FOR CLERK OF COURT


o ,- l. 0 o .l


may be but of luck.
*If you run into a pothole
and suspect damage, pull over
as soon as possible to assess
it.
If you notice damage, record
details of the event and spe-
cific damage, just as you
would in the event of a colli-
- sion with another motorist, in
case you need to file an insur-


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 21, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net


Walk Your Way


To Better Health Opinion & Comment


There's a workout that you
do every day, even if you
don't know it. Of all the ways
to stay fit, walking is the easi-
est, safest and cheapest.
If you've been walking most
of your life, you may be an ex-
pert at it already. It's a natu-
ral movement--no fighting the
way your body was designed
to move--and there's almost no
risk of injury.
You can start with little more
than a good pair of walking
shoes. Best of all, it's an ac-
tivity you can enjoy either by
yourself or together with
friends and family.
Walk expert, Leslie Sansone
has been putting a bounce in
people's steps for the past 25
years.
With her energy and enthusi-
asm, Leslie teaches people of
all ages and shapes how to get
fit, stay fit and feel better
about life, simply by walking.
A one-mile brisk walk burns
almost as many calories as a
one-mile run. Even a moder-
ately paced stroll has health
benefits.
In fact, according to a recent
Harvard University study,
walking as little as an hour a
week, at any pace, reduces risk
of coronary artery disease.
Longer and more vigorous
walking produced a greater
risk reduction. Here are some


Resignation
(Continued from Page 2)
to his resume. He also had a
Master's Degree in regional
and city planning from the
University of Oklahoma.
Arredondo inherited a de-
partment that was still largely
in transition and disarray, fol-
lowing the departure earlier in
2002 of John Durst, who had
been both planning official and
building inspector.
Following Durst's departure,
the department was split into
two departments with separate
heads. Carmoney was just be-
ginning to define the responsi-
bilities of the new office and
had embarked on a major revi-
sion of the Development Code
when he quit.
That job then fell to Arre-
dondo, who finally completed
the massive project only re-
cently. Meanwhile, the plan-
ning department was subjected
to several cutbacks because of
budget shortfalls, at the same
time that its responsibilities
kept increasing due to growth.
The office, moreover, has of-
ten been the focal point of pro-
ponents and opponents of
growth, with the staff often
caught in the crossfire between
what is, what should be, and
the political realities.
At best, the job has proven
difficult: helping craft rules
and regulations that guide the
county's future growth; walk-
ing a fine line between the of-
ten conflicting demands of
growth, property rights and


tips to get the most out of your
walks:
Walk whenever you can.
Park a little further away than
usual, or if you use public
transportation, consider getting
off a stop earlier or later that
you normally would.
If you're only traveling a
short distance, consider walk-
ing the entire way. Where
possible, use the stairs rather
than the elevator or escalator.
Make topography your
friend. Walking uphill burns
more calories tham flat ground
and helps build strength and
stamina.
Surprisingly, walking down-
hill can be harder on your
body that going up, so slow
down and keep your knees
bent.
Hand weights, up to 10 per-
cent of your total weight, can
help you reach your exercise
goal.
Try a walking workout in
your own home. You don't
need a treadmill--any space in
your home where you can take
just a few steps can be as good
as a track.
Simply finding walking pro-
grams that are easy to follow,
can be performed in a small
space and do not require ex-
pensive equipment, and you're
off.


Submitted
conservation; and also playing
to the political realities, as ex-
pressed by the various con-
stituents through the county
commissioners.
Durst fell victim to the de-
mands of the office (He fired
off an emotional e-mail one
day that ultimately led to his
resignation). Carmoney like-
wise resigned in frustration af-
ter a few months, citing for the
record the desire for profes-
sional enhancement as the rea-
son for his departure.
Fairly or unfairly, Arredondo
has been blamed by some for
numerous paperwork snafus in
recent years that have resulted
in costly re-advertisements and
the postponements of several
public hearings.
Most recently, the commis-
sion had to reschedule a public
hearing on two controversial
Comprehensive. Plan amend-
ments because te i quired no-
tification was not mailed on
time.
Despite the fact that the code
requires that the developer
mail out the notices, some in
the community still pointed to
the failure as indicative of the
need for change in the office.


Festival
(Continued from Page 2)
tant to leave, enjoying to the
final minutes of that tradi-
tion in Jefferson County
known as the Watermelon
Festival.


Good, Bad News Debated


Society would be a whole
lot better off if the media did-
n't publish bad news, right?
Wrong.
I have that conversation with
a reader on the average of a
couple of times a month.
I understand the reasoning,
but I don't agree with it. Bad
news doesn't delight me either,
but ignoring unpleasant news
doesn't make it go away.
And bad news is, relative.
What's bad in the eyes of one
person is not bad in the eyes of
another.
What's more, despite what
callers say, the public has an
insatiable craving for bad
news, even sordid news.
Why do you think the tab-
loids found by the supermarket
checkouts rack up sales in the
billions annually? Who is
reading those sensational and,
even gruesome stories?
My own experience in Jef-
ferson County is the two edi-
tions for which we had the
most demand had local mur--
ders as their lead stories.


Publisher's


Notebook


Ron Cichon
Ron Cichon


The callers who complain
about bad news would have
one believe stories about Eagle
Scouts and Girl Scout cookie
sales are what the public really
wants to read about. Trust me,
there's no evidence of that!
The larger issue, of course, is
the public's right to know.
With information we make
intelligent decisions.
Wouldn't it be better for par-
ents of young girls to know
that there's a rapist on the
loose than for them to be un-
aware of that'information?


Yet, stories about rapists
would fall in the 'bad news
category, according to some
callers.
A newspaper worth anything
mirrors the community it
serves. If there are rapes and
murders, then the newspaper
should cover them.
The key to judging a news-
paper is by asking how much
you depend on it? If you can't
depend on your newspaper to
deliver the news to you, good
or bad news, then what do you
need it for?


I have always believed the
highest compliment that can be
paid to a newspaper is that it
prints all the news and does it
fairly without favoring one
side or another in disputes.
Forgotten by callers is their
own bias. It is their lenses that
are clouded by their bias so
they see what's not there and
assume something never stated
or implied.
A very sweet lady visited me
one afternoon to complain
about all the bad news we put
in the paper.
I made her comfortable in
my office and then brought her
the last five editions and asked
her to show me the bad news,
that offended her.
She searched diligently and
after a fashion found one story
that she said "displeased" her.
Well, I asked, what about all
the bad stories? She said, ''I
can't find any."
Ah, reality had overtaken
perception.
You see why this business is
- so much fun?


Iran Issue Needs Resolve


By DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

If you ever were confused'
about what our founding
fathers meant when they used
the words, "separation of
church and state", you need
look no further today than the
Middle East.
In most of the nations
located there that foster the
Islamic religion, the Mullahs
(or religious leaders) are held
in the utmost esteem.
Accordingly, they not only
wield unchecked religious
power and unquestioned
influence over the people, but
more alarmingly they also
serve in the forefront of the
country's political machine.
Very little political action is
taken without the
consideration, or outright
blessing of the head Mullahs.


Iran's situation is even more
dangerous because the Mullahs
actually control the "elected"
government officials and
policies. Absolutely nothing
dare happen in Iran without the
authority of the collective
Mullah council. Combine this
with Iran's new lunatic
president, and every living
person on the face of the earth
had better start paying
attention.
Now if it weren't for the ad-
vent of global terrorism di-
rected at the free world and
especially America and Great
Britain, I probably wouldn't
get too excited about yet an-
other country, Iran, developing
a nuclear weapon.
After all, if they were foolish
enough to send a few such
bombs on rockets toward the
United States, our response
would be to turn their desert
sand into glass via thermonu-


clear energy, and make a park-
ing lot out of their country for
the Middle East.
But, any lack of concern
about Iran actually launching a
nuclear attack against
America, is quickly replaced
by anxiety when considering
what a nuclear weapon could
do to us in the hands of Islamic
terrorists.
The fact that Iran's new
president has openly stated that
one goal is to wipe Israel off
the face of the earth, should be
more than enough to spur all
freedom loving countries into
unified action.
Unfortunately, China and
Russia are pals with Iran via
the oil supply pipeline, so ex-
pecting any realistic help from
the important United Nations
Security Council to derail
Iran's nuclear ambitions, will
never happen.
Fully aware that Iran is a


supporter of global terrorism,
we should be very, very con-
cerned that they will have no
hesitation in providing these
evil doers with nuclear weap-
ons to use against us on our
own soil.
Most frustrating is the arro-
gant "in your face" attitude
they are displaying before the
world and especially the
United States. Like Saddam in
Iraq prior to the Gulf War, Iran
feels that they are untouch-
ables because they firmly have
the Chinese and Russians "in
their back pockets", and they
well do.
What is going on now is an
upscaled version of what Presi-
dent Clinton faced with North
Korea. Clinton, having
opened Pandora's Box by
throwing millions of our tax
dollars at North Korea to avoid
their development of a nuclear
(See Iran Page 5)


Owning Home Made Possible


By CHUCK CLEMONS
USDA Rural Development
Florida State Director

Ensuring that all people, in-
cluding families, elderly and
disabled residents, living in ru-
ral communities have afford-
able and safe housing has been
a top priority of USDA Rural
Development for more than 70
years.
June is National Homeown-
ership Month--a time to reflect
on the important role home-.


ownership plays in American
society, especially in rural
America. For many of us, be-
ing able to go to sleep each
night in a safe and comfortable
home is something we take for
granted. However, this is not
the case for many rural Ameri-
cans.
Homeownership is a bedrock
of the American economy,
helping to increase jobs, boost
demand for goods and services
and build prosperity. How
many times have you consid-
ered homeownership a part of


rural economic development?
The truth is, without
affordable, safe and adequate
housing for rural residents,
economic development will
struggle to succeed. While this
development can mean so
many things, at its foundation
is a community's ability to
provide its residents with de-
cent, safe and affordable hous-
ing.
So far this year, Rural Devel-
opment has invested $1.7 bil-
lion nationwide to help more
that 21,000 families buy a


home. This investment is part
of the reason the homeowner-
ship rate for non-metropolitan
areas is 76.1 -percent compared
to 68.8-percent nationwide.
Rural Development's hous-
ing programs finance new or
improved housing with no
down payment and at favor-
able rates and terms for low-
to-moderate-income families
and individuals who wish to
live in rural areas or communi-
ties.
Both guaranteed and direct
(See Home Page 5)


From Our Photo File


PARENTS were treated to a performance by ACA students in Oct., 1990, when the
girls sang and signed the words to a popular song. From left, Adrienne Walker, Mon-
ica Miller, Rosalind Joyner, Katrina Richardson. Out of frame, was Kelly Brock at
the piano. (News File Photo)


I





























RIDING on the Queen's Float in the Festival Parade are L-R: Joanna Cobb, queen; Ca
sey Handley, first runner-up; Tori Thor, princess pageant first runner-up; Dana Jane
Watt, princess. (News Photo)


Home Ownership


(Continued from Page 4)
homeownersip loans are of-
fered. Under the direct loan
program, individuals or fami-
.lies receive a loan directly
from Rural Development.
Guaranteed loans are made by
other lenders, such as banks or
credit unions,sand nareguaran-

Boyd Staffer
TO Hold Hours
At Library
A member of Congressman
Allen Boyd's staff will visit
Monticello 9:30 to 11:30 a.m..
Wednesday, June 28 at the Li-
brary.
Boyd's staff is trained to as-
sist constituents with a variety
of issues relating to various
federal agencies.
It is important to the Con-
_gressman that his staff be
available for those who are not
able to travel to either his Pan-
ama City or Tallahassee of-
fices.


teed by our agency.
One of the most exciting
housing programs offered by
Rural Development is Self-
Help housing.
Participants, organized in
groups of six to 10 families,'
utilize their own labor to re-
duce the total construction
costs of their homes. These
families not only build their
own homes, but create tight-
knit communities as they.coni-
plete their homes together.
We fund nonprofit groups
who carry out local Self-Help


housing programs, pay
salaries, administrative ex-
penses, and even costs of pur-
,chasing essential equipment.
such as power tools for the
families to use.
In addition to helping with
homeownership, we also have
loans and grants available to
help low-income families and
the elderly make needed house
repairs so that they can remain
in their own home. Rural De-
velopment is committed to the
future of rural communities
.and to helping 'as many people
as possible achieve the Ameri-
can Dream.


estyE for every point of view"
HUGEt SELKTION ofLA PEST BRANQSI

CALL TODAY!
Serving Tallahasse & Walulla
668-4835


Iran
(Continued from Page 4)
1Weapon, has invited new play-
ers like Iran to expect that they
too can use blackmail.
'Ultimatekl. America and the
?' European Union may offer up
billions of dollars on a "kiss
[ and a prayer" that Iran will not
pursue nuclear research. And
just like North Korea, Iran will
laugh all the way to the bank at
'our stupidity for believing that
theN\ wouldd seriously consider
.abandoning their national goal.
I firmly believe in the face of
-the real and serious danger that
faces the United States via nu-
clear %weapons ending up in the
hands of terrorists, swift and
decisive military action to de-
stroy Iran's nuclear facilities
- should clearly be on the table.
Additionally, we should
make our seriousness and re-
solve in this matter crystal
clear to the Iranian leadership
and people, Our warning to
.employ decisive military ac-
tion should include a profound
assurance of our own unwav-
'"ering national unity to do


' American Heart
Association.V

It keeps
more than
memories
Salive.




NOT

ENTER

Great pioneers don't hesitate.
MDA research pursues
every possible avenue.

Muscular Dystrophy Assoclation
.1-800-572-1717


If-


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 21, 2006 PAGE 5


whatever is necessary to pro-
tect out citizens at all costs.
Now, if you are one of those
naive enough to believe that
Iran is working on nuclear fu-


sion simply to create electrical
power, please give me a call
because I know about a bridge
in Brooklyn you may want to
buy.


j


5ElISTER NOW. CALL TODAY.
8 ,; 6.






Spiritual Parenting

What is the most important gift
that you can give to you child?
The Bahai'is of Monticello ask that
you please join us as we discuss this
and other important questions together
in a loving atmosphere of learning.


Thursday, June 22

6 p.m.

Jefferson County Library

Community Room


'I,'z


* i.H( 4' 1 ; t)


PROUDLY SERVING
DISTRICT 10
$66 million of state tax dollars is being returned to District 10
counties in the form of FRDAP Grants, Road Projects, Water
and Wastewater Projects, Beach Restoration, Small County
Courthouses, Historic Preservation and Health & Safety
Projects.
The list includes:
14 Recreation Projects (Parks, River Walks,
Livestock Arena, Campground, Sports Complex)
14 Road Projects (Building, Paving, Resurfacing)
5 Small County Courthouse Renovation Projects
V 5 Wastewater and Stormwater Projects
V 2 Rural Health & Safety Projects

HEALTH CARE
The 2006 Budget contains major funding for our seniors and
children alike. It restores Medicaid coverage for adult hearing
and vision services, and expands the amount of time nursing
home staff can spend with individual patients each day. This
increase will serve to ensure our citizens are properly cared
for in nursing home facilities. The 2006 Legislature extended
the Florida KidCare program to include children ages 1-4 who
were previously ineligible for the program. Low income par-
ents can now purchase high quality health coverage at low
cost, for all of their children.

JUSTICE
The state budget provides funds for the local Sheriff's office to
contract with the Department of Juvenile Justice to administer
a new STAR juvenile program to help our troubled youth.
This program replaces the previous boot camp program
which was eliminated during the 2006 Legislative Session.


2006


LEGISLATIVE

UPDATE
STATE REPRESENTATIVE


WILL S.


KENDRICK

* Public Records:
I sponsored and the Legislature passed House Bill 1563
which gives the Clerks of the Court the authority to
remove confidential information from a published court
record. With this legislation, we protect our citizens from
the potential for invasion of privacy and also limit oppor-
tunities for identity theft.
Oyster Surcharge & Oyster Planting:
I sponsored and the Legislature passed House Bill 1249
which eliminated the "unjust" fifty-cent surcharge placed
on each bag of oysters harvested and sold in Franklin
County. This bill also provides recurring annual funding
for oyster management and restoration.
Education:
Funding public education was a priority for the 2006
Legislature. A combined $31,9 billion was appropriated
for Pre-kindergarten, K-12, community colleges and uni-
versities. District 10 Public Schools received up to 11.7%
increases over last year, and $13.2 million in special facili-
ty funding to complete new school construction.
Statewide Distance Learning:
Funding continues for the horticulture industry assuring
technological and practical advancements. This distance
learning initiative provides training and services and has
a significant impact for the horticulture communities both
in the district and statewide.


Dear Friends:
The 2006 Legislative Session proved to be exciting and challenging.
Legislators were met with many tough.issues and concerns that
thankfully were able to be resolved for the citizens of this great State.
Our citizens, ranging from the youngest to the elderly, will benefit
from an abundance of new revenues made available in this year's
state budget.
Funding highlights for District 10 include:
$13.2 million for new school construction
$43,3 million in Small County Resurface Assistance Programs
$1.5 million for Small, County Courthouses ,
$5.9 million for District 10 water, wastewater and SWIM projects
$2.8 million for FRDAP projects
$2.2 million for Alligator Point Beach Restoration
I want to thank you for allowing me the opportunity to represent you
in the Florida Legislature. Please do not hesitate to contact my
office with any issues and concerns that you may have.,
In your service,

WILL S. KENDRICK
State Representative
District 10
Committees:
Environmental Regulation (Vice Chair)*Agricuture & Environmental Appropriations
"Future of Florida's Families Legislative Budget CommissionJoint Select Committee
on Hurricane Insurance 'Commission on Migrant and Seasonal Labor

HURRICANE
PREPAREDNESS
Noted Weather Channel Hurricane Expert, Dr. Steve Lyons
met with House Members during the 2006 Legislative Session
to bring them up to date on the projections for the 2006 hurri-
cane season. Rep. Kendrick and Dr. Lyons discussed the over
300 miles of District 10 Gulf coastline. Both encourage coastal
and inland citizens to "be prepared" for the 2006 hurricane
season.

To encourage and assist
Florida citizens to prepare
for the hurricane season,
the Legislature established
and provided a 12-day
sales tax-free holiday that
exempts essential items
needed during hurricanes,
such as flashlights, coolers, batteries and generators. A $250
million fund for hurricane mitigation was established to help
Floridians prepare their homes to withstand hurricane
-force winds.


f MMER
fil perfect time for NFCC


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Start June 26
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,pus- Mad[son,. Fla


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PAC-P Ar N T'NT'Ttr'V1 Lb (IFT \ MPIX I ITNV'2r 71-2616


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Lifestyle


served following the service.
The public is invited to at-

BELATED CARD OF
THANKS
"Today is your day and
mine, the only day we have,
the day in which we must play
our part.
What our part may signify is
the great whole we may not;
understand; but we are here to'
play it."
The family of the late Jakie
Thompson would like to take
this day to express its heartfelt
gratitude for whatever part you
played during its time of sor-
row; visits, calls, flowers, and
prayers.
A special thanks to Al Hall
and the Tillman Funeral
Homes Staff; to those who
served and comforted us dur-
ing and after our loss, God's
richest blessing is our prayer
for all of you.
The Mable Thompson Family


"Those who were unable to
attend the dedication service,
can consider this an invitation
to attend Homecoming," said
Bailey.


Appreciation Day

Held At Sr. Center


-m












--- -








BETTY HUDSON, MSW intern, Big Bend Agency for
Health Education Center discusses elder issues with
Harold Murphy, during Senior Appreciation Day. (News
Photo)


Salvation Army Hosts

Children's Camping Trip


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Local children between the--
ages of 7 and 12, gathered at
the One Stop parking lot :on
Monday for a week long
camping trip to *Camp Key-
stone in Starke, FL. '
The Jefferson County Sal-
vation Army is funding this
camping trip in the hopes of
making a bigger and better
A."" "4 .


presence in the community.
Buses from Greater Fellow-
ship MB and Memorial MB
Churches transported the
children, who will return Fri-
day.

Human Relations Coordina-
tor Georgeana Williams, andd
Annie McDuffie are available
to provide additional informa-
tion about volunteering with
the Salvation Army.
Call 997-6311.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Senior Appreciation Day~
was held recently at the Jef-,
ferson Senior Citizen Center,,
sponsored by the Big Bend
Area Health Education
Center, Area Agency on Ag-
ing of North Florida, and the
Department of Elder Affairs.
The purpose of this event
was to honor seniors for their
many accomplishments and
contributions.
Booths were stationed
around the main area of the
Center, manned by FSU
Medical School graduates
and undergraduate students,
offering information and


free items to seniors..
Materials were provided on
topics such as: Cancer Facts
and Your Best Defense
Against Cancer; New Direc-
tions. in Community, Health,
Depression, Senior Moments,
Anxiety, Compulsive Gam-
bling, Elder Care Abuse,
Staying Active, and Getting
Involved; HIV and Seniors,

The freebies included pe-
dometers, notepads, pens,
condoms, cutting boards,
hand fans, and simple screen-
ings were offered, on-site, for
cholesterol.
The turnout for this e'.ent
was greater than anticipated.
Liich was served to those
attending.


Girl Scout Story Time

Set Friday At Library


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Girl Scout Story Time at the
Library takes place 5:30 p.m.
on Friday.
The event will provide an
opportunity for girls, and their
parents, to learn about Girl
Scouts.
Girls entering Kindergarten
through the Third Grade are
encouraged to come dressed
in their favorite pajamas for
the Pajama Contest, and hear
"Once Upon A Time" Girl
Scout stories.
Through Girl Scouts, a girl
creates a circle of friends.


; Girl Scouts see a problem in
the community and fix it, and
take rips to places of interest.
- A membermay direct her
own play, star in her own mu-.
sic video, experience adven-
tures in science and
technology, practice a new
sport, plan a party, protect a
stream, 'design a jewelry col-
lection.
Girl Scouts learn to make
their dreams a reality. They.
learn the secrets of making,
and keeping friends.
For additional information
about the Story Time, contact
Tracy Arnold, at 386-2131..


Your body deserts it!I



Integrated Therapeutic Massage

510-2268
Pamela Radcliffe, Ph.D., LMT, NCTMB
325 John Knox Rd
MA 39889 MM 15277


."Ma


ELIZABETH MESSER collects information and a pe-
dometer from FSU Medical Student Karla Beckford dur-
ing Senior Appreciation Day. (News Photo)


LEVI, DEVIN SINGLETON


First Birthday
Devin Lee Singleton cele-
brated his first birthday Tues-
day, June 20.
He is the son of Mary and
Jeffrey Singleton and has one
brother, Levi Singleion.
Maternal grandparents are
Barbara and Bobby Cook, Sr.,
of Lamont.
Paternal grandparents .are
Ronald Singleton and Linda
McGuire, both of Monticello.


' J 620 York St., P.O. Box 425,
t Monticello, FL. 32344
850-997-5553
Alfonza "Al" Hall William Tillman ~ Vangie Scott
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Where Everybody Gets A Di$count!!
Funeral Financing, Gravesite Restoration, lead onre Cornerstone
Installation-Financing 72 Hour Return on most Insurance Proceeds Per-
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"Where Pharmacy is Phamily"
Home Health Care *Free Blood Pressure
V Gifts *Counseling on Medication
Free Delivery for Prescriptions
166 East Dogwood Monticello 997-3553



193 NW US HWY. 221 GREENVILLE, FL. (850) 948-2840
If you are uninsured, you may
..1i,.11 ,I for our sliding fee program.
Serving Madison, Jefferson & Taylor
Counties since 1984
We accept Medicare, Medicaid &
most insurance plans
Open Mon. Fri. 8-5 walkins welcome, 24hr telephone coverage
North Florida Medical Centers, Inc.



$0 Plan Premium Medicare Advantage Plan Now
Available For Jefferson County Residents
Expands Coverage Over and Beyond Original Medicare
Freedom To See Any Doctor or Hospital that
Accepts Medicare
Call 1-800-561-6490 For More Information
Medicare Plan Finders


"You Can't Be Without It"

Monticello News


A.L, Hall Funeral Directors, Inc.


dba


1 GOSPEL SING,

featuring


.. ONE. ACCORD FROM: PERRY, FL,
FUNDED by the Salvation Army, these children are 7:00 SATURDAY, JUNE 24
headed to Camp Keystone. Standing: Breanna Nelson;
Back, L-R: Kengola Norton, Keith Norton; Front, L-R:7
Gregory Meeks, Tray Nelson, John Brook. (News Photo)
4 Lamont United
Lamont Baptist Celebrates ,7 7
135th Homecoming Sunday : Methodist Church
Lamont Baptist Church will tend. Lamiont, Florida
host its 135th Homecoming, Church Publicity Chairman %V Join us for refreshments after the sing
11 a.m. Sunday. Gerald Bailey thanks all who
Guest speaker is David attended the dedication serv- 4
Solomon and dinner will be ice.


;~-.- ~~-- I- I IIrir I 1A


--


.1? 3


`~""~f' ~~f







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 21, 2006 PAGE 7


h a he a .. ..'.





WOMAN'S CLUB members prepared the Festival Luncheon and orchestrated the
Fashion Show at the Opera House.


MARY FRANCES GRAMLING models
Fashion Show.


and visits with Cissy Boyd and guests at the


FMB STAFF sponsored and served guests at the Fashion Show and Luncheon.


Fashion Show, Luncheon

Draws Sell Out Crowd


ENJOYING the Festival Fashion Show and Luncheon are, from left: Joe Walton and
Olivia Walton, and Grandmother Katrina Guerry.


GLORIA YAUN was among the models at the Fashion Show and Luncheon.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer
The Monticello Woman's
Club and Farmers & Mer-
chants Bank presented this
year's Luncheon and Fashion
Show Thursday, at the Opera
House to a sold out crowd.
More than 130 tickets were
presold. Some 30 tickets
were sold to Red Hat ladies
from a variety of clubs from
the surrounding counties.
Betsy Gray (FMB) Emceed
the Fashion Show.
Clothing and accessories
from Milady's Shop, Snap-
dragon, and Great Adventure
Outfitters were among items
modeled.
Models included: Christi
Beshears, Mary Ellen Given,
Mary Frances Gramling, El-
eanor Hawkins, Kay Martin,
Dawn Stiff, Katrina Walton,
Gloria Yaun, Becky Turner,
Lindsay Davis.
Skeet Joyner modeled men-
swear.
Gray announced ticket num-
bers of door prize winners
throughout the event and
urged attendees to shop lo-
cally.
Prizes were presented by
2006 Festival Queen Joanna


Freedom of
the Press Is

EveryboddysS
Freedbma! 1!,


Cobb, and Princess Dana Jane
Watt.
First Queen Pageant Runner-
up Casey Handley was also
on hand to help out as needed.
Donors to the event
included: FMB, Jan Wad-
sworth, Badcock & More
Home Furnishing Center,
Marty Bishop, Capital City
Bank, Coldwell Banker Kelly
and Kelly Properties, Court-
yard Cafe, Edenfield True
Value Hardware, Gelling's
Flowers and Gifts, Great Ad-
veniture Outfitters, Jackson's
Drug Store, Jefferson Build-
ers Mart & Hardware, Jeffer-
son Farmer's Market, John-
ston's Locker Plant, Malloy's
Nursery, Monticello Florist &
Gifts, Stewart BP Service,
and Total Landscape Supply.


starts July 11
NFCC Madison, Fla

Website: WWW.NFCC.EDU 0
TO REGISTER: "

, l~ill


SKEET JOYNER modeled
Carolyn Wright.


menswear at the show and chats with Ruby Kennedy and


CAITLIN CHILTON enjoys the desserts at the Luncheon and Fashion Show as her
mother, Christi, looks on. (News Photos)


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that saved

lives?


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When you invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
enormous-healthier kids, more active
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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 21,2006


S prts
-POy ^


Rodeo Draws 3,000 Over

Weekend, Most To Date


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Watermelon Festival
Rodeo was a huge success
with the largest crowd to date,
estimated at 3,000 people,
Friday and Saturday com-
bined.
"It was a great crowd, and
much higher .attendance than
normal," said coordinator
Charlie Driver.


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

As Howard Middle and Jef-
ferson County High Schools
will students come together
on one campus, under new
leadership, Principal Juliette
Jackson reports that all stu-
dents are expected to follow
the dress code guidelines be-
low:
At Howard Middle (School
Uniform) the attire for females
includes:
Skirt, skort (shorts with a
skirt look),' pants, Capris, and
knee length shorts. Colors in-
clude: khaki/tan, navy blue,
and black.
The tops will -be orange,
royal blue, or white polo shirts
or blouses with the HMS logo.
Attire for males includes:
pants, and knee length shorts
(colors: khaki/tan, navy blue,


"Everything went really
smooth; the stock was good,
the riders were good, it was
great all the way around.
"There, were a few crowd
pleasing wrecks, but I'm
proud to report, no major in-
juries," said Driver.
He added that both competi-
tors and spectators came from
all around a 100 mile radius.
Between the bull riding, bar-
rel races and team roping
events, many winners were


and black) with a royal blue,
orange or white polo shirt.
Every Monday, all students
will wear a white oxford shirt
with ties for males, and ascots
for females.
Males will also wear belts at
all times.
Students will wear black or
brown closed in shoes to com-
pliment there uniforms.
Tennis shoes are also accept-
able.
Parents may purchase the
uniforms from G-Willie's of
Tallahassee, Creative Stitches,
and Cap It Off Graphics, of
Monticello, or from any de-
partment store, such at Wal-
Mart, JC Penney, Sears,
Target, Goody's and the like,
as long as they are the right
colors.
For additional information,
contact the school at (850)
342-0125.


Sheriff Notes value

Of Youth Ranches
"back to basics" work, study,
DEBBIE SNAPP play, and pray philosophy,
Staff Writer where children learn the ba-
sic values and principles of
Sheriff David Hobbs relates life.
that monetary donations to "Hard work, respect for oth-
the Florida Sheriffs' Youth ers, and quality education are
Ranches will help a young hallmarks of the Youth
boy or girl choose a diploma Ranches.
over delinquency. "Those who hold these val-
These investments could ues rarely end up in the crimi-
be the difference between a nal justice system."
life of crime and a life full of Most of the funding for
potential. these programs comes from
As caring citizens offer fi- charitable gifts.
nancial support, the Youth "Please help us to.reach out
Ranches provide a home, edu- to, our young people. I assure
cation, and love to young you it will make a difference,"
people. Hobbs asks.
Hobbs states: "I believe in For further information,.
the Florida Sheriffs Youth contact Roger Bouchard at
Ranches because of their 386-842-5501.


A"


SLittle League All-Stars To
Play For Championship


: The Monticello Little
Leaguer All-Stars baseball
. team will be playing the best
of two out of three games be-
ginning 6 p.m., Wednesday in
Wakulla, to determine the
District Champions.
The second game for the
All-Stars will be played 4
p.m., Thursday, and if need
be, the third game will be
played at 7 p.m., Thursday.


If the boys win, they will go
on to the State Tournament,
shortly thereafter.
The team includes, Tyler
Jackson, Desmon Smiley,
Shelton Allen, Trent Roberts,
Elliott Capers, Lenorris Foot-'
man and Jared Jackson.
Also, Zaok Steele, Levi
Cobb, Trevon Youman, Brad-
ley Holm, Matt Tuten, and
Alex Gulledge.


Legion Horseshoe Tourney
winners Announced


The Annual American Le-
gion Post Horseshoe Tourna-
ment saw 19 men's teams and
eight women's teams
Saturday.
Prizes were awarded to the
top three teams in the men's
and women's divisions.
In the men's division, the
team of Billy Tulley and Billy
Piggott of Wakulla won first
place.
Demott Anderson and Den-
nis Curry of Monticello won
second place.


Brent Wells and Chris Wells
of Wakulla won third place.
In the women's division,
Ruby Thigpen and Iris Mor-
gan of Tallahassee won first
place.
Kim Eure and Gina Hernan-
dez of Monticello won second
place.
Deb Elliott and Annetta
Peavy of Tallahassee won
third place.
Coaches for the team in-
clude Danny Jackson, John
Cobb and Mike Holm.


named.
In the bull riding competi-
tion, at the conclusion of the
second night, Steven Keighly
won first place and $770.40
with a score of 80;.
Kevin Murphy won second
place and $577.80 with a
score of 76. a
Jimmy Lathero won third
place and $385.20 with a
score of 73.
Max Wilks won fourth
place and $192.60 with a
- score of 67.
In Friday night barrel
racing, Susan Morgan won
first place and $342 with a
time of 14.478 seconds.
Monica Roberts and Rayner
Talor split second and third
place, each awarded $213.75,
for times of 14.867 seconds...
Victoria Sircy y on fifth
place and $85.50 with a time
of 15.017 seconds.
In Saturday night barrel rac-
ing, Susan Morgan took first- ,,
place and $436 with a time of
14.284 seconds.
Ashley Woodward won sec-
ond. place and $327 with a
time of 14.355 seconds.
Wendy Temple won third
place and $218 with a time of
14.710 seconds.
Monica Roberts won fourth
place and $109 with a time of
14.789 seconds.
In Friday night team roping,
Shelton Sands and Chard,
Adger won $680 with a time
of 5.75 seconds.
John Pitts and Dude Setter-
gren won second place with
$510 with a time of 8.03 sec-
onds.
Kennon Buzbee and Jim
Hunter won third place and
$340 with"a time oft8.40 sec-
onds.
Craig Steven and Dude Set-
tergren won, fourth place and
$170 with a time of 9.84 sec-,
onds.
In Saturday night's team rop-
ing, Monty Ledgett and Chad ..
Adgner won first place and
$650 with a time of 6.78 sec-
onds.
Tray Young and Mitchell
Morgan won second place
and $390 with a time of 12.12
seconds.
Joe Morgan and Mitchell
Morgan won third place and
$260 with a time of 12.97
seconds.
Driver reported that young-
sters eight and under, had
much fun also, competing in
the Watermelon Crawl.


RODEO COWBOYS rode this float in the Watermelon Festival Parade. The rodeo drew
record crowds Friday and Saturday nights. (News Photo)


Winners Of Melon Festival


Softball Tourney Reported


FR-N HUNT
Staff Writer

Recreation Director Kevin-
Aman reports the scores from
the recent Watermelon Festi-
val Softball Tournament.
Boland Timber downed 2
and a Cue, 25-15; Bums Vi-
nyl Siding flattened Timber-
land Ford, 20-18;
Snotslingers beat Waukeenah
Fence & Deck, 23-13; and
Moore-Bass Consulting ham-
mered Waukeenah Outlaws,
21-6.
Gibson Products downed
Boland Timber, 21-3; Burns
Vinyl Siding walloped BC
Power Design, 23-13; B & D
Farms defeated the Snotsling-
ers, and won 14-3; and Keen's
BWilding hammered Moore-
Bass Consulting, 18-4.
BC Power Design caged
Waukeenah Fence and Deck,
31-6; Boland Timber fell to the
Waukeenah Outlaws, 20-16;. 2
and a Cue banked Moore-Bass
Consulting, 20-9; Timbdrland
Ford beat the Snotslingers, 18-
13; and Gibson Products edyed
Burns Vinyl Siding, 15-13.

Keen's Building clobbered
B & D Farms, 17-6; Timber-
land Ford sank 2 and a Cue,
28-18; BC Power design
downed Boland Timber, 27-9;
and Burns Vinyl Siding cut
down BC Power Design, 24-
16.
Keen's Building beat Gib-
son Products, 25-10; Gibson
Products hammered Burns


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Vinyl Siding, 19-16; and
Keen's Building, inched by-
Gibson products, 23-21.
By the conclusion of the
tournament, which began at 8
a.m. Saturday morning and
ended at 1:30 a.m., Sunday,
12 competing teams had
played 22 games.
Keen's Building of Live
Oak, won first place; Gibson
Products, a combination team
from Monticello and Talla-

A's Games

Canceled
Sunday

FR AN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello A's base- _
ball team's double-header
slated for Sunday in
Ichuaway, was cancelled.
Coach Jim Norton said
there were not enough local
players available Sunday for
the game, as it was Father's
Day.
"I'm not going to fuss about
it," said Norton. "I figure if
the kids are with their fathers,
celebrating Father's Day, out
having dinner or whatever,
their fathers are definitely do-
ing something right."
The next slated face-off is
against Eufaula, AL 4 p.m.,
Sunday, there.
The A's presently stand 2-7
on the season.

AO
RpEv

-II7122*ww~eerecI


hassee, took second place.
Bums Vinyl Siding, a com-
bination team from Madison
and Tallahassee, won third
place; and BC Power design,
a combination team from
Monticello and Tallahassee
took fourth place.
Some 100 watermelons
were awarded to players dur-
ing the tournament hitting
over-the-fence home runs.
The melons were donated
by Benny Bishop.


OUR LIFELINE
IS TOLL-FREE
Grab the line and
let US help you.

THE VOICE OF HOPE
- 1-800-572-1717



GUE/T ANIMAL/
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J945 MAousen Dn'.-e
ic~r.-Sat9 Am-5 pm.& Su, 1,30-5 pm
(i50) 575-86B4
dv~wdJ,,sseeMu~aumall.


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Officials Report


HMS Dress Code


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 21, 2006 PAGE 9


FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF! Join us for our Grand Opening and
FIND OUT Freceive a FREE ear inspection
.. A N _-- ^,W using the latest video technology,


ay To avoid disappointment,
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This Audiormetriti evaluation will precisely show what you've been missing.
*FREE Video Otoscope Ear Inspection
This show-all picture of your ear canal is displayed on a color T[V monitor,
so you'll see exactly what we see.
AFREE Package of Hearing Aid Batteries
If you now wear a hearing aid, you will receive one free package of hearing aid
batteries. If we test your hearing you will receive another free package.
IFREE In Office Repairs
All in-office hearing aid repairs shall be free... and Factory repairs,
regardless of make or model shall be 50% offi

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As part of our Grand Opening Beltone

Electronics Corporation is offering an additional

$500 Factory Rebate on the CORUS Hearing Aid
-- Bernie Spahalski has been associated with the Health Care
Industry for more than 25 years. Having worked with the Hearing
Impaired for over 5 years, Bernie has the skills and knowledge to
provide you with the best possible hearing solution. Bernie looks
N' .froward'to working with the Monticello Community and invites you
_to .make an appointment today.
S Join us for refreshments & register to win a free
Bernie Spahaiski Digital Hearing Aid during our grand opening


F
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Th mottutdme. nIern eat ae 0vr 5'as l I~~lgDsace 1889842


)
,=


I







PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 21, 2006


Police Lt. Fred Mosley and Sheriff David Hobbs oversee the Parade lineup.


2005 FESTIVAL QUEEN, Alana Chambers rides in this convertible during the p


parade.











Ail


Equity

Welcome Mat is Always

Out at FMB


AtcessLine" from FMB


FMB announces a speedy and convenient home equity line of credit kwil
competitive rates and friendly service, just what you'd expect from FMB

The application process and closing are quick and simple. With FMB's lo
ownership and local management, you'll get a speedy response to your
loan application, and the interest you pay may be full\ tax deductible, so
consult your CPA or tax advisory.

Call or comebyb the nearest FMB location. Remember, the .AccessLir
welcome mat is always out at FMB.


1CCelebrating 100 years
of Banking Service


Farmers &6rMerchan ts Bank
www~finbbank~com e (850) 997-2591-
Tildhlusscc / Nonuccllo / Grten% il~e /Thomis'% ilie
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Tr.s FF.16 A'ee.s'LflOH6.-., 5n~i.T U. 0 Ca .31 C rIeO~j IC,3 c" r.7.'.sp.-.l.:.0 ci
jr a ."'L .J, p Z...,. U.,i'.Ar .'1-.6 l .i O 'T Iv C' .' 1'.CC A 3C..


JOHNSTON'S Locker Plant now serves barbecue, announces this vehicle appearing in
the Festival Parade. (News Photos)


NO RUNNING
Neuromuscular disease can say no inning,
walking even breathing. Help MDA lielp people.

Muscular Dystrophy Association 1-800-57241717


eBusiness program online
Earn a certificate or an associate degree
in eBusiness without leaving home
1.800.342.4325, ext. 3-2347
L North Dakota
State College of Science
www.ndscs.edu
Other online options include:
Computer Information Systems Web Design
Architectural Drafting and Estimating
Health Information Technician (4 options)
Office Administration (2 options)


Business



Directory


BURNETTE PLMBNG R sisters CARROLL HILL AurELECTRIC, INC. Northside Mower and
SELL SERVICE e gis er "Complete Auto Electric Repair Service" Small Engine Repair
Family Owned Since 1902 M i ni-Storage For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Plumbing Repairs ~ Wells Drilled ~ Fixtures-Faucets ~ Pumps 315 Wau Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Replaced 7 Sewer & Water Connections ~ Tanks Replaced ~ 315 Waukeenah Hwy. Repairs for all makes & models.
Water Heater Repairs ~ All Repairs 1/4 Mile off US 19 South Pickup & Delivery Service Available
,JMH 99 5Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd Pickup & Delivery Service Available
997-2535 (on Carro ) 229226-0717 562-2962

Hel yor tLEE FULLER~ OwNER Sister Fay
A Help your community Palm Reader & Advisor
+ when a disaster strikes! MORRIS FULLER PAINTING LLC Are you Unhappy? Worried? Sad?
Become a trained Disaster Have you been Disappointed?
Services Volunteer by contacting Office (850) 671-2286 Give me a call and let me help you.
American the Capital Area Chapter of the Serving Leon County for 50 years
REALTOR Red Cross American Red Cross at 878-6080 Cell (850) 284-6134 We Do Parties! Tarot Cards*Palmn Readings*Astrology
or visit our web site at Call in for 2 free questions!
Licensed by County & City
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 21, 2006 PAGE 11


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


;.- I -' _-- .
The Jefferson County Utility Devel-
opment Committee will meet Fri-
day, June 23, 2006, at 9:00AM at
the Capitol City Travel Center,
Gamble Road, Lloyd, Florida. The
meeting is open to the public.
6/21/06, c
NOTICE FOR LEGAL COUNSEL:
The North Florida Workforce
Development Board, Inc. is issuing
an Invitation to Negotiate for legal
counsel service. North Florida
Workforce Development Board,
Inc. is a non-profit organization, is
the administrative entity for certain
job training and job placement
provisions of the Social Security
Act, Title IV (Excess Temporary
Assistance to Need Families funds)
the federal Workforce Investment
Act of 1998; Chapter 2000-165,
Laws of Florida; et al. Among other
things, North Florida Workforce
Development Board, Inc. is
responsible for the operation of the
Employment Connections offices in
Suwannee, Taylor and Madison

OUR LIFELINE

IS TOLL-FREE

Grab the line and
let us help you.


THE VOICE OF HOPE

1-800-572-1717
m R MuscuarDystrophy
-V AIssatin




How TO KEEP

YOUR KIDS

FREE OF DRUGS.




Rule


-#10.



Dorn't


Preach.

One of the greatest

deterrents to drug use

is simply talking with

your kids. But don't

preach or you'll lose

them. If a conversation

lasts more than five

minutes, you're

preaching. Better to

have lots of five-

minute conversations.

'Kids have short atten-

tion spans and shorter

memories. To learn

more about how to

talk with your kids

about drugs, call for a
free parent's handbook.


1-800-624-0100


counties. Instructions: Parties may
apply by submitting a letter of
interest which Describes their
qualifications to provide
appropriate legal services Contains
a summary of applicable
experiences Provides appropriate
references Indicates their ability to
perform the work; and Contains a
schedule of fees. Submit letter of
interest to: North Florida
Workforce Development Board,
Inc. P.O. Box 267, Madison, FI
32341-0267 by 4:00 p.m. on June 30,
2006. Late submittals will be
disqualified. Facsimile or other
electronic submittals will not be
accepted or considered. North
Florida Workforce Development
Board, Inc. reserves the right to
reject any or all submittals in the
best interest of the North Florida
Workforce Development Board,
Inc. North Florida Workforce
Development Board, Inc. is an equal
opportunity training
provider/employer.
6/9, 6/14, 6/16, 6/21/06, c
The regular scheduled meeting of
the Board of Trustees of Tri-County
Electric Cooperative, Inc. scheduled
for Monday, June 12, 2006 was
canceled and has been reschedule
for Monday, June 26, 2006 7:00
p.m. in the meeting room at the
cooperative's headquarters office
building located at 2862 West US
90, approximately two miles West of
the City of Madison, Florida.
6/21/06, c
NOTICE OF SALE: The District
School Board of Jefferson County
will receive sealed bids on surplus
vehicles in the office of the school
superintendent, Desmond M. Bishop
administration Building, 1490 W.
Washington Street, Monticello, FL
32344, until 3:00 p.m. On Wednes-
day, June 28, 2006. No bid will be
received after that time. Please
mark on envelope, "Surplus Vehicle
Bid." Bids will be tabulated at 3:00
p.m. And presented to the School
Board at the regular board-meeting
on Monday, July 10, 2006 at 6:00
p.m. Please call Willie Carr, Trans-
portation Supervisor at 850-342-
0136 to set up an appointment to
inspect the vehicles. The Board re-
serves the right to reject any or all
bids. Vehicles must be removed
from school board premises within
ten (10) days after bids are awarded.
199.3 IH/TH
IHVBBPLN3PHS24316 DT-360 65
Passenger Bus (As Is) $2,000 mini-
mum; 1982 GMC Cargo Van
2GTDG25H8C453263 (As Is); 1993
Nissan/Sentra
1N4EB31F8PC709911 (As Is); 1992
Ford/Ranger
IFTCRIOA9NIA51701 (As Is)
6/21/06, c

HELP WANTED.
Monticello News Needs Clerical
help for busy administrative
office. Please call Ron Cichon
997-3568.
tfn
The City of Monticello is
accepting applications for the
position of Police Patrol Officer.
This position requires a
minimum of a high school
'diploma and Florida Police
Standards. The successful
candidate must live within 25
miles of Monticello Police
Station. Applicant must
complete a department field
training program within the
first month. The position
requires a background check.
Salary and benefit information
is available upon request.
Submit application and resume
to Monticello Police Dept. 195 S.
Mulberry St. Monticello, FL
32344 by July 5, 2006
EOE/Drug-Free Workplace.
6/16, 21, c

Electric Meter Change-Out
Field Technicians: How would
you like to earn some extra
money during the summer


Now ~- Hiin

A 01Aa I
F~l-im rPatT me







& ehb I iato ene




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Dru F ee oklae :qulOprtnt Epoe


month? Utility Meter Services
is looking for temporary meter
change-out field technicians in
the Monticello area. You must
have a valid Florida driver's
license, pass a pre-employment
drug test and background
check. We will train qualified
individuals. Starting salary will
be $15.00 hr. Please call or
send your resume to
UMS@asplundh.com. UMS -
EOE
6/21-6/30c
Caregiver immediate opening,
caring/responsible, 90/59
highways area, Thursday and
Friday, $55 per day clear. Call
879-8698, 224-4131.
6/21, pd
Accepting applications for
fulltime lumberyard personnel
with. a clean driving record,
knowledgeable of building
materials and customer friendly.
Must be 18 year's or older.
Application may be obtained at
1400 South Jefferson Street,
Monticello.
6/7,tfn c
MAINTENANCE PT 36 Unit
Apt Complex Resume/Apply to
Heritage Manor, 1800 East
Texas Hill Road, Monticello, FL
32344 Fax: 850-997-7288
Phone: 850-997-4727
6/7,9, 14, 16, 21, 23, c
LICENSED THERAPIST #1182
A MASTER'S DEGREE FROM
AN ACCREDITED
UNIVERSITY OR COLLEGE
WITH A MAJOR IN
PSYCHOLOGY, SOCIAL
WORK, COUNSELING OR A
RELATED HUMAN
SERVICES FIELD AND
THREE YEARS OF RELATED
PROFESSIONAL
EXPERIENCE. FLORIDA
LICENSED CLINICAL
SOCIAL WORKER OR
MENTAL HEALTH
COUNSELOR PREFERRED.
MASTER'S LEVEL
THERAPIST #2267
A MINIMUM OF A
MASTER'S DEGREE WITH A
MAJOR IN COUNSELING,
SOCIAL WORK,
PSYCHOLOGY, NURSING,
REHABILITATION, SPECIAL
EDUCATION, HEALTH
EDUCATION, OR A
RELATED HUMAN SERVICE
FIELD AND TWO YEARS OF
PROFESSIONAL
EXPERIENCE IN PROVIDING
SERVICES TO PERSONS
WITH BEHAVIORAL
ILLNESS. SUBSTANCE
ABUSE KNOWLEDGE
PREFERRED. SOME LOCAL
TRAVEL REQUIRED. license
PREFERRED.
For more information and a
complete listing of available
positions:
www.apalacheecenter.org
(850)523-3217 or
1(800)226-2931
.Human Resources
2634-J Capital Circle N.E.,
Tallahassee, FL
Pre-Hire Drug Screen & FDLE
background check
An Equal
Opportunity/Affirmative Action
Employer. Drug Free Workplace.
6/21c
Teacher Positions Available:
Monticello Christian Academy,
Elementary, Middle, High
School, call 997-6048 for details
or submit resume to: MCA,
1590-N. Jefferson St.
Monticello, 32344.
6/2-6/30, c
Janitor/Maintenance: Part time
position. Must' be able to


well as janitor duties. Call
MCA, 997-6048.
6/2-6/30, c
Mechanic-Waukeenah Fertilizer
850-997-4460
tfn, c 6/7
Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn, c


Roosters and laying chickens
$10 each; Goats, female $100
each. Leave message 997-0901
6/21, 23 pd
Crib & Changing Table, $50 for
both. 4x7 rug, $20. 997-2474 or
545-6353.
6/16, 21, pd
Deluxe Vulcan Convection
Oven. Superior Cooking &
baking performance, 40" W x
41 %2 D, $3,000.00. Perfect for
restaurants.
Self-serving Drink Cooler
contains 3 shelves designed to
hold bottles or can drinks $450
perfect for restaurants and
Convenience Stores. 459-2138,
997-4646
6/9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28, 30, pd

FORiRENT, : -
3 BR, 1 '/2 BA house in country.
Call 997-3368
6/21 tfn
Prime downtown office space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980.
11/30, tfn, c
2 Bedroom/1 Bath, Screened-in
porch-Upstairs, Workshop,
Workout Rm., W/D hookup
downstairs. Available July 1.
One year lease, First & last
month, $300 deposit- $575.
997-2845, Sam. US 259, Old
Buzbee Rd., Waukeenah, (No
Pets), Utilities not included.
6/21-6/30p
Jefferson Place Apartments, I &
2 Bedroom, 1468 S. Waukeenah"
St. Office 300 Monticello.
997-6964 Equal Housing
Opportunity.
6/2, tfn, c


Would you like to rent an office
downtown? Call 997-5517 leave
message and phone number.

SERVICES
Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare-Call for an assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
available
1/19, tfn

BUSH CUTTER Lawn Mowing,
bush cutting, tree work, and
pressure washing.
997-4189 6/21-6/30p
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd, 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/11, tfn
Combining Faith and Reason,
Tradition and Tolerance. Christ
Episcopal Church three blocks
N of the courthouse. Sunday
service at 10:30 a.m. 997-4116
6.21, c
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
new menopausal products.
Jackson's Drug Store. tfn


NURSES



LOOKING FOR INNOVATIVE

FLEXIBLE HOURS......


Need more time with family? Want

to return to school? Just ?????


Marshall Health & Rehab Center

has just the opportunity for you.


Call Sue Love, RN
850-584-6334


* Housing Vouchers i

* We accept all vouchers
* 2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
m Pool & Youth Activities

* 5756571 !






Statistics Show People Remember
85% of what they read
and 15% of what they hear


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com






Serious About Sellinq?

List today!


Now Featurinq!






Homes That "Talk Just Sell Faster

Amazing Buy!!! Mixed Use Property 12 plus par-
tially cleared acres on US 19 south land use des-
iqnation permits 4 houses per acre near Dennis'
Trading post only $36,500 per acre

Best Residential Buy in Town!
2 bedroom 1 bath home in great shape with
fenced yard and big family room behind IGA on
Bowman Street Now $76,500-A Talking House

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly wooded
acres Only $36,500

Lloyd Acres 3 bedroom 2 bath split plan with
very nice master suite 1993 Fleetwood on 2.6
acres $76,500-A Talking House

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide
w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks,
pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Country Uvina at it's Best! Comfortable 4 bed-
room 3 bath home on five fenced acres with
guest cottage w/bath, 2 car garage, big shop,
pasture 100 pecan trees and a nice pool Only
$400,000

Fine Homesite Close to Town 12.5 private
acres with big trees and pretty fields perfect for a
fine home $265,000
fine home $265,000 $256,00012.fields,265,000

Just Listed Choice 2.39 acre tract on Shady
Lane near Lake Wooten, South of Old St.
Augustine Rd and east of SR 59 $36,500

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South near
Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 5 acres available on
the east side of town high and dry in quiet loca-
tion with lots of game, 9 year old planted pines,
profit from both appreciating land and growing
pine Only $11,500 per acre

Home Site close to town on West Grooverville
Road only $14,500

Country Livina 2000 double wide 3 bedroom 2
baths, screened porch on a very pretty 1.6 acres
in Lloyd Acres $74,900-A Talking House

Rentals
Pearl Street 2/2 home $1150
Dogwood Street 2/2 home $850
Bowman Street 2/1 rent while waiting for a buyer
$650
Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2/2 MH 5 ac $650
Lloyd Acres 3/2 rent while waiting for buyer $550

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
Simply the Best!











































PEE WEE, aka Stevie, is a blind cat who has been re-
turned to its owner after it wandered away months ago.
(News Photo)


PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 21, 2006


Lost Blind Cat Returned


To Owner 3 Months Later


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

When county resident
Jennifer Haugen's blind cat,
Pee Wee, disappeared, she
never expected to see it again.
Haugen said that Pee Wee
had been outside with her
other two cats, when she left
for work about three months
ago.
Unknown to Haugen, Pee
Wee had apparently wandered
off and found himself on a
nearby landowner's property.
He was turned over to Vet-
erinary Associates, so an at-
tempt could be made to find
the owner, and if not, to try
to find him a special family to
adopt him through the Hu-
mane Society.
Efforts were made to find
the animal's owner, but to no
avail.
He quickly became a favor-
ite, at the shelter, because of
his bubbly personality and his
mannerisms. He was soon


named "Stevie", after Stevie
Wonder.
Haugen said that the miss-
ing cat belonged to her then
two year-old daughter, Brit-
tany.
"She was crying her eyes
out, so after about three
months, we decided to try to
get a dog for her," said
Hague.
Haugen, in a phone call to
the Humane Society, men-
tioning why she wanted a new
dog, she was informed that
the Shelter did indeed, have a
blind cat, housed at Veteri-
nary Associates.
"I couldn't believe it," said
Haugen. "But I didn't want to
get my hopes up. I went
down there, and when they
took me into the back room
and I called his name, when
he responded, I knew it was
him."
Despite the boarding fees
and other expenses that ac-
crued, Haugen was told she
would only be charged the
$70 adoption fee.


"I'm a single mother and I
don't make much money and
can't afford that, so Cheryl
Bautista (shelter caretaker)
told me that I could do some
volunteer work to pay the
bill," said Haugen.
Haugen was grateful to Vet-
erinary Associates, and mem-
bers of the Humane Society
for giving Pee Wee a chance
for life.

'A drunk driver ruined 6soethingi
,precious. AmberApodaca. '.
-Fripnds.Don't Let Friends Drive Drunlk



0, /' v


"I came from the city, and
they wouldn't have had him
for more than two days before
they put him down."
"When he first came up
missing, I didn't stop to think
about trying the Humane So-
ciety," said Haugen.


'You Can't Be Without It'
in State: $45.00
Out of State: $52.00





Get Your Annual
Subscription Today!


Sir James June 21, 2006
Monticello, FL

"News Letter"
As it was addressed in my first news
appearance by print, that my collec-
tion is to bring the past into the present
by painting and drawn works -of the
,visual arts. My collection is based
mostly on the past history of the United
Kingdom and London, England over
the past 1000 years! From the I Oth
century to the 21 st Century.


5i", Uje "Iell jAnw-n
'Rq_,nai,5,5anez -rt Gollzcfion
54- TZeamnb Road
Monfiezllo, fL 32344,
(850) 997-6115


McFadden To Leave Local Healthy Start


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Shena McFadden BSW, Hu-
man Service Counselor and
Coordinator for the Healthy
Start Coalition of Jefferson,
Madison, and Taylor
Counties, is leaving to accept
a position with the Orange
County, Healthy Start Coali-
tion.
She will continue to pursue
her career in social work,
through a new program "Save
Our Babies," which she will
coordinate.
McFadden completed her
Masters in Social Work this
past Spring from Florida
A&M University, and was


McFadden


honored as the "Student So-
cial Worker of the Year," by
the National Association of
Social Workers. "Which was
a big honor," said George
Hinchliffe, executive director
of the Healthy Start Coalition.
She has been employed
with Healthy Start, working
from the Jefferson County
Health Department.
She was also the coordina-
tor for the Racial Disparity
Task Force through the
Health Department.
"She will be sadly missed,"
said Cetta Barnhart, program
director for the Healthy Start
Coalition.


Hinchliffe said of McFad-
den, "The mothers and babies
of Jefferson County will cer-
tainly miss her. She's an ad-
vocate for them.
"She gave the Coalition her
highest level of performance.
She excels in her education
and in her position. We are
very, very proud of her."





1-800-USA-NAVY
wwwnavyjobs.com


7.07 Inches Of Rain Here

In May; Most in District


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Jefferson County led the 14
counties comprising the Su-
wannee River Water Manage-
ment District in rainfall, in
May, with 7.07 inches.
Baker County received the
least rain at 1.17 inches.
Rainfall here in May, 2005
was at 2.60 inches, and the av-
erage rainfall for Jefferson
County in May is 3.94 inches.
Cumulative rainfall for the
past 12 months is 5.25 inches,
compared to the long term av-
erage annual district rainfall of
55.6 inches.
The result is a deficit for the
last 12 months of about 6 per-
cent in the District.
Counties comprising the Dis-
trict include: Alachua, Baker,







1iu


Bradford, Columbia, Dixie,
Gilchrist, Hamilton, Jefferson,
Lafayette, Levy, Madison, Su-
wannee, Taylor, and Union
Counties.
The Aucilla River in
Lamont, was at 46.76 inches,
versus the 49.18 average in
May at this spot.
The District continues to rec-
ommend that water conserva-
tion be an ongoing activity for
all water users.
Water is conserved by using
the minimum amount needed
for specific applications, and
by irrigating lawns, plants and
crops only when necessary,
and in the morning before 10
a.m. and in the evening hours,
after 4 p.m., when lower tem-
perature and wind velocity re-
duce the amount of water lost
to evaporation.


It Works Wonders.


A American
Heart
Association


JAN: AMR~i ICN REVOL[UT1I ONi 'J'ONiii[


(J


Big Bend Hospice thanks all of our "
Home Health Aides
who provide compassionate
care to patients with a
life limiting illness.


Aea/t adaid hands/ mt/o calt.e



tBi Bend

H- (6),,. I
I .- '- '-t :' k?


Yljo~hce Yeafdt '9KMide,
P-LJui-le I -Jmn-1-e 22)