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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00141
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: June 16, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00141
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
    Main: Sports
        page 8
    Main continued
        page 9
        page 10
    Main: Classified
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
Full Text

LIBRARY OF'FLORIDA HISTORY
4C4 LIBRARY WEST
UNIv:JRVITY OF FLORIDA
GAXNESV1LLE, ,FL. 3261


Practice
Storm safety
Awareness

Editorial, Page 4


Healthy Start
Prenatal Group
Feted A-, a

Story, Photos, Pagle 7


Letchworth.
Mounds
Upgrading-

Story, Photos, Page 9


County Cets
$200,000 For
Horse Arena

Story, Page 12 -


': Friday Morning D


Monticello


13R8TH YE1AR NO. 46. 50 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


FRIDAY, JUNE 16, 2006


J School Report Cards:



I JES, C; HMS, B; JCHS, F


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


The School District received-
word Wednesday morping that
J Howard Middle School earned
a "B" on the State School Re-
port, card, up from "C" last
year.
This is the first time since
S' schools began receiving State
,. Report cards, in the 2000-"
1 2001 school year, that 'any
school in the District earned a
i "B."
Jefferson Elementary School
earned a grade of "C," up from
"F," in 2005.
Jefferson County High
School dropped to "F," from
Depart-' "D," last year.
After the DOE conference
call, Superintendent Phil
Barker said: "We are all so ex-
./


storm Provides Neeced

Rain; No Serious Problems


JES 2 Points From 'B'

JCHS 4 Points From 'D'


cited, as it is the first "B"
we've ever earned.
"This is a tribute to Juliette's.
(Jackson, HMS Principal)
leadership, and with her as
JCHS, Principal also, next year,
I feel confident the score will
improve."
Upon learning the grade for
HMS, Jackson said: "This
grade can be attributed to stu-
dents who want to learn; par-
ents who want the best for
their children; teachers pas-
sionate about teaching, District
leadership, and a supportive
community."
Barker noted that the "C"
& .

.... H KS


grade of JES was two points
short of a "B." "We are
Pleased about that," he said.
"We are greatly disappointed
that the high school slipped
from a 'D' to an 'F,' and we
have already begun to address
the situation."
Commenting about the
above, Director of School .Im-
provement, Sherry Heyen, re-
ports:
jth6 has made steady pro-
gress this year, rising to a "C"
from an "F," because of school
leadership, staff development,
curriculum change, and using
student data '(stressing areas in
which students are weak) to



3
31iii^


make decisions for instruction.
Also, quality and committed
teachers, putting students first,
parent support, and the faculty
pulling together as a team.
Heyen said that with JES
only two points from a "B,"
concentrating on the above
should improve the school
grade next year.
-HMS has also made steady
progress and rose from a "C"
last year to a "B" this year, the
first school in the district ever
to do so.
Heyen attributed the success
to school leadership, teacher
commitment and passion, em-
bracing change, staff training,
emphasis on curriculum/skills,
parent support, and using stu-
dent data to make instructional
decisions., with students the
first priority.
(See Grades Page 2)


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Despite the heavy rains-
Tuesday, both the City and
County reported no serious
problems.
Though tropical storm warn-
ings, high wind advisories
were posted, and a tornado
watch issued at approximately
2 a.m., residents suffered no
substantial damage.
With Emergency manage-
ment Director Carol Ellerbee
unavailable for comment,
Staff Assistant Robert Harrell
reported that the storm was
not that bad here.
"We only got 3.38 inches of
rain here at the office, but I'm
pretty sure there were heavier
rain amounts through the
county," he said. "I got about
four inches at my place."
Channel 6 Meteorologist
Rob Nucatola reported that
rain amounts in the area were
from two and a half to six and
a half inches.


"We were fortunate," said
Harrell. "There were some
reports of downed trees, but
they were quickly cut and re-
moved."


Downed
Trees Cut
Quickly, B
Removed

He added that there was
only one power outage re-
ported, which lasted approxi-
mately one and a half hours.
"Only about 30-40 people had
to do without power for a brief
time," he said.
"We did get a report early
this morning that power was
out in the Bishop Woods
area, "he said Wednesday.
. "Our biggest worry about
this storm was flash flooding
in the southern portion of the
county."
He said that a voluntary


evacuation was issued, but a
mandatory evacuation was
not, "As far as we know no
one did evacuate" he added.
_"The shelter was on standby,
but no one ever went there."
He added, that one conse-
quence of heavy rains was the
effect they caused to some
dirt roads in the county. "I'm
sure there are a lot of them
that are pretty mushy," said
Harrell.
City Superintendent Don
Anderson said there were no
problems in the city.
"We didn't have any roads
under water or road closings
that I know of," said Ander-
son. "I'm sure that some of
the city dirt roads are pretty
muddy and bumpy and some
people may have thought they
had too much rain standing in
their yards this morning
(Wednesday), but there are no
problems to report.
County Road Department
Superintendent David Harvey
was not available for com-
(See Storm Provides Page 2)


THIS sign in front of Edenfield's Hardware reflects the sentiments of county resi-
dents, during the recent rains. MacKenzie Wirick stands alongside the sign. (News
Photo)


No July 4th Fireworks


.. ..' :- .. .. .. '

THIS VEHICLE slid from the center of the Deerwood Boulevard into a ditch, when
heavy rains, Tuesday, made mush of the dirt road. (News Photo)


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

A patriotic tradition here, for
some 20 years, the July
Fourth Fireworks Celebration
will not be held this year.
While Wallace "Bubba"
Bullock, of Bullock's Fire-
works, was unavailable, his
wife, Diane, reported that the
primary reason for no fire-
works, was "primarily short
notice."


She said that at last month's
meeting of the Chamber of
Commerce, it was decided
that the Chamber would no
longer be responsible for col-
lecting funds for the celebra-
tion.
"They said that we had to
collect the funds for the
show," said Bullock. "We told
them that we don't have time
to collect funds, coordinate
the displays and make the fire
works, in just one month."
Bullock added that if


funds were forthcoming, Bul-
locks Fireworks could create a
show.
Chamber President Marga-
ret Levings said that the
Chamber had decided that it
would not take care of the
collection of funds, but they
would, however, coordinate
the food, vendors and enter-
tainment for the day-long
event.
"We decided to let the Pyro
Works people (the Bullocks)
(See No Fireworks Page 2)


PHIL BARKER, superintendent, listens in as the
ment of Education reports the 2005-2006
School Grades. (News Photo)

-' -' I


I







^ 1


I ^-~---- -I~--- ~``-' '~' ~`i lIllI I I I I I I I I' I I I I I r 9 I ,,


Ail











Grades
(Continued From Page 1)
JCHS is in the process of re-
inventing itself. The focus
next year will be on correct
placement of students, aca-
demics first, teacher/staff train-
ing, parental involvement,
higher expectations for
students/teachers, and overall
raising the bar for student
achievement.
The high school was four
points from maintaining its
"D" grade of last year.
Points awarded by the State
for achievement at each
school, and the corresponding
grades are: JES, 378 points,
"C;" HMS, 393 points, "B;".
and JCHS, 276 points "F."'

American Heart
Associatin'on. '
Fightinfg Heart Osea ,e ,'
anld lroke-,

It keeps
More than
Imemones
r alive.


NOTICE OF VACANCY ON CITY
LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY

.The Monticello City Council is seeking to fill a
vacancy on the Local Planning Agency. The voluntary
position is open for city residents. Experience or
knowledge in planning, construction or architecture
would be helpful. The Board Member must be
available for monthly evening meeting.

A letter of interest, outlining experience and
knowledge, should be submitted to City Clerk Emily
Anderson, 245 S. Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida
by June 30, 2006.


S:


Tommrn Surles Agem
425 5SjeffetonU SiTeeI '
Montcek., FL 32344 .
Bui 50.'i'a7- 2 "2' 8 "



IKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR STATE FARM ISTHERE.o
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PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 16, 2006 .-



A-Building Gets $347,000



For Continued Restoration


0 A


possible to complete the work
with a couple of more grants.
Given the rising costs of con-
struction materials, however, it
may take longer to accomplish
the goal. And the final cost
will also be higher than origi-
nally thought, he said.
"I can remember when it was
going to cost $1 million to ac-
complish the restoration,"
McRae said. "Now, it will
probably be closer to $3 mil-
lion when we're completed."
He said it Will be up to the
School Board to decide how
the building will be used, once
the renovation/restoration pro-
ject is completed.
Uses suggested to the School
Board thus far include a mu-
seum for the display of local
and traveling exhibits; a hall of
fame for local athletes, mili-
tary personnel, politicians,
etc.; and a district school ad-
ministration building.
McRae said now was a good
time for people to take a tour
of the interior of the building,
if they wanted to see what it
looked like in its earlier stages.
"You can see the old resist-
ers," McRae said. "You can
also see where they bricked up
the old windows-in 1915 to
add the two wings."
Anyone wishing to take a
tour of the building should call
McRae at 997-2116.
The A-Building holds the
distinction of being the first
brick school building built in
Florida and is also one of the
oldest still standing in the
country.
The building was con-
structed in 1852, from bricks
made on 'the George Taylor
Plantationiby slave labor.' The
construction was financed by
money raised by a community
effort led by the Masons and
Oddfellows.
In 1889, the Jefferson
County School Board took
control of what was then
known as the Jefferson Acad-
emy by appropriating $2,000.
Shortly thereafter, the school
was renamed the Jefferson
Collegiate Institute.
In 1915, the building was
upgraded with the addition of
wings on either end and large
Doric columns on the north
entrance. About this time, the
school became known as Mon-
ticello High.
The name change to Jeffer-
son County High School oc-
curred in 1950, when all the
white high schools in the
county were consolidated into
one location. The school re-
mained a viable learning insti-
tution until 1991, when it was
deemed unsafe for occupancy.


'!


" -. .. -" 3 :, ..


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


The group working to reno--
vate and restore the A-
Building at the old high school
got good news in the last legis-
lative session.
It happened that the Legisla-
ture allocated -- and the gover-
nor approved in the budget --
$347,622 for the continued
renovation and restoration of
the historic building.
Bill McRae, a member of
the A-Building Renovation
and Restoration Committee
(ABRC), said last week that
the money will be used to en-
sure the protection of the
building and to further the
renovation/restoration effort,
which has been going on for
about six years now.
He said the largest portion of
the new funding will go to in-
stall a fire suppression sprin-
kler system in the building.
"The recent and unfortunate
burning of a newly restored
ante-bellum home has made us
vividly aware of the need to
ensure protection against such
a disaster," the committee
wrote the Legislature in its
funding request. "Considera-
tion was given to the fact that
this building is unoccupied and
highly accessible. It is the gen-
eral feeling that installation of
a sprinkler system at this phase
is advisable."
McRae said the remainder of
the money will be used to re-
pair and replace some of the
water-damaged and deterio-
rated floor joists.
Two earlier state: grants, one
in 2000 and the second in 2002
cycle, totaled about $700,000,
according to McRae. The two
grants allowed for the stabili-
zation of the building, the re--
moval of asbestos from the
interior, and the undertaking of
cosmetic enhancements to the
exterior, among other things.
"The removal of the asbestos
was an expensive and tedious
undertaking," McRae said.
"We did the exterior work so
that the public could see that
progress was being made."
In 2002, the renovation/res-
toration project received an ad-
ditional $660,000 from the
federal government, thanks to
the work of Congressman Al-
len Boyd.
That federal money allowed
for the installation of a new
slate roof and the realignment
of the roofing structures,
among other things.
McRae estimates the pro-
ject is about 50 percent com-
plete. He thinks it should be


BUILDING 'A' was built by slave labor in 1852 and used until 1991 when it was deter-
mined unsafe for occupancy. More than $1M has been spent on restoration since
then. (News Photo)


FLORIDA STATE EMPLOYEES DROP BY A GOOD NEIGHBOR TODAY AND
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,' i ,
Relax.. you've earnedit. But rs make sufe .your retirement savings
still .work'hard,for you. A-k mre t.:,da\ hov to move your D.R-QPE.to a.
State Farme Traditional IRA. WE LIVE WHERE YOU LIVE'.
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It could happen to any one of
us. And if it did, wouldn't you
pray for someone to help you
put your life back together.
We're here for Sara Miller for
as long as it takes.


Volunteers
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(Continued From Page 1)
ment, however, residents in
Aucilla Shores reported that
the roads were nearly impass-
able Wednesday morning.
Reportedly, Tuesday after-
noon, the red clay section of
the subdivision's main road,
Deerwood Blvd., had to be
closed and residents were
forced to take a detour through
back roads because as many as
six cars had slid off into the
ditch.


NO Fireworks
(Continued From Page 1)
collect the funds," said Lev-
ings. "It's a lot easier for one
organization to take care of
collecting, rather than the
funds going to several differ-
ent places.
"The Chamber will always
be supportive of the fireworks
show and we're going to do
our part, but we are not going
to be involved with collecting
the funds for the show," Lev-
ings restated.


"The rain was so badly
needed," said Harrell. "Luck-
ily the ground was so dry, it
soaked most of the water up
immediately in most places."
"At least my lawn wasn't
crunching under my feet this
morning," he said.
Local watermelon growers
Benny Bishop and Steve
Walker, III, were unavailable
for comment, nor was Exten-
sion Agent Larry Halsey, but it
seems fair to say that the much
needed rain was a blessing for
crops, plants and lawns
throughout the county.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 16, 2006 PAGE 3


Farmers' Market Continues



Growing Quietly, Steadily


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Some businesses start out
with a splash and then quietly
fade away within months or a
year.
Others start with little or no
fanfare, take hold firmly, and
grow quietly and steadily, de-
pending on the quality of their
products and their customer
service to carry their message.
Jefferson Farmers Market on
the corner of Railroad and East
Washington streets is of the
latter kind.
What started out as a simple,
one-main fruit-and-vegetable
stand 16 years ago is today a,
thriving small business that


STAFFING the Farmers' Market are, from left: Ed
Strickland, Greta Johnson and Brenda Bautista. (News
Photo)



Sprint To Eliminate

Aerial Cables, Poles
He said his company would
LAZARO ALEMANffriter try to do as much of the work
SenioStaffWriter as possible after business
hours, to keep disruptions at a
Expect to see fewer utility minimum.
poles and aerial cables in the- He also promised to coordi-


downtown district and other
parts of the city.
Gary Sands, a representative
of Sprint, informed the City
Council last week that his
company will be replacing its,
aerial cables with underground
cables in certain parts of the
city.
Affected areas include
downtown and along Pearl
and Dogwood streets, with the
upgrade ultimately terminating
at the Progress Energy power
plant on Quail Drive.
"The reason (for the replace-
ment) is that we're having is-
sues with the circuits that go to
the Progress Energy installa-
tion," Sands said. "The old ca-
bles are causing problems with
the circuit.

"Also, we want to get the ca-
bles out of the air and installed
under the sidewalk."
"Visually, it will look
better," he added.
Many of the cables report-
edly date from the 1950s and
early 1960s. Some of the ca-
bles also contained lead, ac-
cording to Sands.

He said he didn't expect the
exchange of the cables would
cause service interruptions. If
service interruptions did occur,
Sands said, they would only-
last a matter of minutes.


nate the work schedule with
City Superintendent Don An-
derson and Police Chief David
Frisby to keep the disruptions
to a minimum.
Sands said wherever -
possible, poles will be re-
moved, except in cases where
the poles are shared or belong
to the electric company. He es-
timated that as much as 90 per-
cent of the poles would be
eliminated, especially in the
downtown area.
As for city residents, Sands
said it would be up to each
homeowner to decide if the ca-
ble that went to their house
was aerial or underground.
It will be up to each cus-
tomer if they want to keep the
aerial service or if they want
underground service," Sands
said.
City Attorney Bruce Lein-
back expressed the only con-
cern. He wanted to make sure
that the city was held
harmless, should a liability oc-
cur because of the work.
. Sands assured him that such
an indemnity clause was in the'
original contract signed by the
city and the telephone com-
pany. Just the same, Leinback
said he would review the con-
tract, for the sake of making
absolutely sure the city was
covered.


,employs up to five full-and-
part-time employees during the
height of the season and that
carries a wide variety of fresh
-fruits and vegetables, as well
as frozen foods, herbs, flower-
ing plants, pecans and fire-
wood.
"I've added a lot of retail
space," owner and operator Ed
Strickland says. "It's doubled
the size of the place at least.
I've also added the big truck
and there's still the pickup
truck."
Not to mention the addition
of such equipment as a forklift
and a nut de-shelling and
cracking machine.
Then there's the green can-
vass awnings and other, cos-
metic improvements that he


JCHS Class Of 1986

Plans 20th. Reunion


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High-
School Class of 1986 will
celebrate its 20th Class Reun-
ion June 29 July 2, 2006 at
Willow Pond in Monticello.
The committee has planned
a number of fun events.
On Friday, June 30, the
class will host Casino, Vegas
Fun Night, with lots of food,
fun, and dancing.
On Saturday, July 1, from
noon to 2 p.m., a family pic-
nic is scheduled, followed by
Western Night Social Hour
beginning at 6 p.m.
On Sunday, July 2, the class
will observe a church service
where the guest speakers will
be classmates who are minis-
ters.


The reunion is open to only
Class of 1986 graduates and
JCHS Class of 1986 class
sponsors (speakers.)
On-site registration is avail-
able.
For those wishing to pre-
register, make checks for
$100 payable in the amount to
JCHS Class of 1986 and mail
to Glyndell Presley, 990
S.Tung Street, Monticello.
For more information about
the reunion contact the fol-
lowing committee members.
Presley, 997-6712; Rusty
Hamrick, at 1-800-874-3571;
"We are looking forward to
a large turnout," said Dr. An-
gela Massey, class president.
"Many of our classmates
have, been together since kin-
dergarten. We are really ex-
*,cited about the opportunity to
rekindle our friendships."


County Community

Coalition TO Meet


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Com-
munity Coalition will meet
9:30 a.m. Tuesday, June 27,
at the'Library.
Guest speaker is Dorothy
Inman-Johnson with the Capi-
tal Area Community Action
Agency.
This agency sponsors vital
programs for its clients and
instructs them on how to ac-
cess the services available.
This Healthy Start Coalition
provides a forum for social
service providers that serve
pregnant women, children,


families, and the aging adults.
The purpose of the meeting
is to network, share informa-
tion, and facilitate referrals.
Information regarding up-
coming events, new services,
and how to access services
are shared.
The group uses this forum
to solve client related issues,
match the appropriate re-
sources to .the client needs,
and identify barriers to care
for the identified population.
The forum is also used to
develop strategies and action
steps to address identified
community issues that impact
services to pregnant women,
children, families, and aging
adults.


made to the historic building,
once a gasoline station, to
spiff it up.
Strickland will tell you it all
started in the late 80s, when he
used to haul pecans and water-
melons to flea markets and
fruit-and-vegetable stands in
south Florida.
He got the idea that if small
fruit-and-vegetable operations
could make it in South Florida,
maybe they could make it here
also. Then too, he kept en-
countering local people who
were shopping for produce at
the farmers markets in Tho-
masville and Tallahassee.
At the time, there was a fel-
low who used to sell mustards,
collards and other greens spo-
__radically on the comer of Rail-
road and Washington Streets,
Strickland says.'
Deciding that the location
made a good place for a fruit
and vegetable stand, he rented
the property in 1990 and pur--
chased it in 1994 or 95.
"The rent was going up
every year," he offers as the
reason for the purchase.
At the time, Strickland pretty
much ran the stand alone, with
what little help his wife,
Tammy, could give him eve-
nings and weekends.
"It was just me back then,"
Strickland says. "I'd get up two
or three times a week at 4:30
in the morning and go to the
farmers market in Tallahassee


to get the stuff before I opened
up.
"Actually, I -still do that.
Twice a week I go to Tallahas-
see. The market there opens at
4 a.m. and I'm usually there by
5:30 a.m. Three times a week I
go to the Thomasville farmers
auction, which is held at 2 p.m.
"In the summer I go to
Atlanta. It depends on what
time of year it is. It's all very
seasonal. The produce moves
up and down the country with
the weather."
One big difference now is
that Strickland has employees
who mind the, store while he's
away.
"I've been blessed with good
help," he says. "I've had a few
that were washouts. But over-
all, the majority have been
good employees "
Does he see the operation
getting bigger, especially as
the county's population grows.
Strickland doesn't know. He
takes it one day at a time, he
says.
"It's getting close to the end
of my mental capacity," he
says in self deprecation.
At the same time, he adds,
"I'll do whatever it takes."
Judging from his track re-
cord, don't be surprise if the
market keeps growing and im-
proving.
Market hours are 8 a.m. to 6
p.m. weekdays and 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. Saturday.


Foreign Students Seek

Local Host Families


Pacific Intercultural Ex-
change (PIE) is seeking local
caring families to host high
school students, from various
countries for the 2006-2007
school year.
.Local families are encour-
aged to consider showing one
of these foreign teens what
American generosity is all
about.
Students from many coun-
tries have been staying with
families throughout the United
States since August, and are
now a new group of interna-
tional neighbors who would
like to add a little more to the
community and leave in June
with American passion, pride,
and a sense of values.
There is no such thing as
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A TOUCH OF
HEALTH
Massage Therapy
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850-566-0010
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typical host families. Single
parents, retired .individuals,
those with small children,
teens, or without children, all
can experience hosting an ex-
change student.
Interested parties are encour-
aged to contact PIE at 877-
534-3144. l -L,, __

I Choose
a health
insurance plan
that keeps YOU
in Mind
Call 850-997-9981
tc find our nmcre
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BOARD CERTIFIED CIVIL TRIAL ATTORNEY

IAN BROWN

CARY A. "BO HARDEE, III












PERSONAL INJURY & WRONGFUL DEATH

(850) 997-8181
1307 S. JEFFERSON STREET
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
THE HIRING OF A LAWYER IS AN IMPORTANT DECISION THAT SHOULD NOT BE BASED SOLELY UPON ADVERTISE-
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This offer is applicable to vehicles with less than 15,000 miles and no older than the current model
year, plus three prior model years. Take advantage of this offer to refinance a vehicle purchased and
financed elsewhere.
If the vehicle averages 30 MPG* or greater, you qualify for this special discounted Green Rate. For example, if
your personal initial rate is 5.65% APR for 24 months, then your discounted Green Rate will be 4.65% APR!** This
coupon offer is good until October 31, 2006. This discount cannot be combined with any other discount offers.


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 16, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




Practice Storm


Safety Awareness Opinion & comment


Youi can protect yourself and
your family in the event of the
hurricanes, tornadoes, floods
and lightning storms that kill
and injure thousands every
year if you're knowledgeable
about electrical safety during
and after weather disasters.
"After severe weather is
gone, electrical hazards can
still cause deaths and
injuries,"noted Brett Brenner,
The Electrical Safety Founda-
tion International (ESFI) presi-
dent.
ESFI warns consumers to be-
ware of electrical dangers as-
sociated with downed power
lines, portable electric genera-
tors and electrical wiring or
appliances that have been wet.
These precautions can help:
Use care when stepping into
flooded areas--whether indoors
4 or out. Submerged outlets,
electrical cords, and downed
power lines can energize
water, posing a lethal trap. ,
Stay away from downed
power lines and anything
touching them.
If you see someone who is
in contact with a downed
power line, do not touch the
person. You could become the
next victim. Call 911.
Do not drive over downed
power lines.
Have electricians install
portable electric generators to
ensure they meet local electri-
cal codes and are properly_



Character

But It's Lac

By REX ROGERS
Columnist


Very few articles I have
read about an alleged rape pos-
sibly involving members of the
Duke University lacrosse team
have mentioned the words
"right" or "wrong,"
"character," or "morality."
Instead, we're being treated
to a steady diet of references to
race, class, patterns of mascu-
line power over women,
wealth, and entitlement. Per-
haps any or all of these vari-
ables are involved in this case,
but one thing is certain, char-
acter, or the lack of it, is cer-
tainly involved.
When young men act out ex-
cessive macho scenarios they
are demonstrating the imma-
turity of their character. When
coaches wink at exceptional
athletes' moral misadventures
it's a matter of weak character.
When student athletes hammer
themselves into drunken obliv-
ion it's about misguided char-'
acter.
When women willingly par-
ticipate in paid erotic dancing
they evidence cracks in their
character. When women and
men place themselves in sexu-
ally charged situations it's all
about limited character.
If a student athlete's charac-


grounded. Improperly in
stalled generators can "back.
feed" along power lines am
electrocute crews working tc
restore power.
Keep the generator dry. Dc
not operate it in enclosed or
partially enclosed areas. Gen.
erators produce deadly carbon
monoxide.
Do not overload a generator
follow the manufacturer's in
structions carefully.
Use a ground fault circuit in
terrupter (GFCI) to help pre
vent electrocutions.
Do not use electrical wiring
or equipment that has beei
wet. Contact a qualified serv
ice repair dealer to recondition
electrical equipment; a li
censed electrician can inspec
electrical systems.
To avoid lightning strikes
stay indoors and away front
windows during storms.
.* During electrical storms, dc
not use corded telephones ex
cept for emergencies.
Avoid contact with water
and plumbing during electric
storms.
If outdoors during electric
storms, move to a low point
Stay away from metal items.
Don't forget pets during
thunderstorms. Doghouses an
not safe 'from lightning
Chained animals can easily be
come victims of lightning
strikes.



Counts

;king
ter is well established, he or
she will not participate in ethi-
cally, morally, or legally ques-
tiopable activities.
Wholesome character con-
siders race, class, and wealth
simply interesting variations in
the human universe, not
sources of ego, intolerance, or
bigotry.

Individuals with mature
moral character will not harm
others of the opposite sex, nor
will they look at life through
the lens of entitlement. People
with character just don't act
that way, and they don't re-
quire more laws, police offi-
cers, campus speech or
behavior codes, or sensitivity
training to know how to live
above reproach.


Short Takes & Other Notions
SShort Takes & Other Notions


.By MERRY ANN FRISBY

Do you remember when -
your children were pre-teens'"
Both boys and girls had ears,,
teeth and feet that were too big
for the rest of their bodies. At"
that age, pre-teens are ganglN


plan for apartments upstairs in
that building is a wonderful
idea.
Anyone living there will
have a great view of down-
town Monticello. The draw-
ings are attractive and I look
forward to the completed pro-
ject.


and awkard. Monticello looks In addition, I see gas tanks
like that to me right now. The being ripped from the ground
profile of the town is changing at the Chevron station next to
rapidly. '" -e Police Departmnent.' Any
one know what is happening
Many new things going on', there? iThat is a\ pretty good lo-
around town. The Jack cation for any new business.
Carswell/Riley Palmer build- Until last week I drove by
ing near the dry cleaners is go-' Green Industries and won-
ing up quickly. It looks odd to dered "What do they do up
see a new two story building, there?" A number of other
only because I am not used to people have asked me that
that skyline. I think that the question too. So I jumped at'


the invitation to a tour -of
Green Industries.
It is a lovely landscaped, 65
acres. There are several green-
houses and a mission that in-
volves plants and growing
things.
They have a thriving on-line
teaching program, teaching
horticultural students on the
computers. However, this 65
acre garden spot is under util-
ized. Green Industries is
asking our community "What
should we do with this land?"
Several suggestion are; farm-
ers market, fall festival, and
the propagation of indoor
plants. I know they welcome
your' ideas also. Call them if
you have any.


I just heard about a change
that might be scary. As I write
this, we have just been placed
under a hurricane watch.
Looks like at best we will have
25-30 MPH winds and if the
storm moves any closer, much
higher winds could blow.
Our friends from Wakulla
County just called and the wa-
ter is already coming up in
their yard. They will be eyacu-
atinpg this,etening and,coming
to our home. ,
-" tet us all have a' good
thought for the collective "we"
and do as much as we can to
be prepared. I want good
change to come to Monticello
but not at the hands of Tropi-
-cal Storm Alberto!


Is Cheap Labor Cheap?


- By DENNIS FOGGY
g Columnist

Whenever we hear a discus-
sion about illegal immigration,
the subject of cheap labor for
jobs Americans will not take,
always surfaces. So how accu-
rate is this concept of illegal
immigration as cheap labor?
r In my Opinion, cheap labor is
- purely a one way street in fa-
- vor of the businesses that em-
ploy these law breakers and
- pocket big profits. It certainly
I isn't "cheap labor" for we the
I American tax payers! Let's
t take an objective (or maybe I
r should i say, a
"comprehensive") look at the
cost of illegal immigration.
Assume that an illegal alien
is willing to take a job in the
r hot sun picking fruit at six dol-
lars an hour. He will be forced


to file an annual income tax
statement only if his employer
issues him an official W-2.
No big deal! If he has a wife
and a few kids, he will owe no
tax and actually qualify for an
"earned income credit" of up
to $3,200 free. If his employer
is paying him "under, the
table", then he will not file and
will pay no income tax.
Additionally, he qualifies in
most, if not all states, for sec-
tion eight housing, subsidized
.,rent and food stamps. With his
-minimal income, he and his
-family also qualify and take
advantage of no deductible and
no co-pay health care, or can
simply show up at any emer-
gency room for free care.
Due to the family's low in-
come, the children will all re-
ceive free taxpayer provided
breakfast and lunches at their


'Cane Season


By CHRIS FLOYD
Amercan Red Cross


Character matters. We Hurricanes are nature's most
learned that watching the O.J. severe .storms. High winds,
Simpson trial, when we heard clouds, and rain move around
about Kobe Bryant's Colorado the calm center, the eye of the
"consensual sex," when we hurricane. Next to the eye are
grieved at what happened at the strongest winds, which
Abu Grhaib, and when we dis- make up the eye wall.
covered a few businessmen's These winds swirl around the
greed could hurt the pension eye in a counter-clockwise
plans of hundreds of thousands motion at speeds anywhere
of people and put thousands of /from 74 to 200 mph.
others out of work. Hurricane Season runs from
Recovering a respect for June 1 November 30, with
character in all parts of our/ August, September and Octo-
culture is, today, a near crisis ber as the busiest months of
need. the season. In the summer and


late fall, the air over the ocean
warms up considerably, picks
up moisture and begins to
move in a circular motion,
forming a tropical depression.
If the wind speed accelerates
above 39 mph, it becomes a
tropical storm and is given a
name. When the winds reach
74 mph, the storm becomes a
hurricane.
A striking hurricane creates
* four major hazards: storm
surge, high winds, tornadoes,
and heavy rains...
* Storm surge is a rise in the
sea level caused by strong
winds. It effects both coastal
and inland areas.


school, where they may also
have bilingual teachers and
books. At the least, there will
always be teachers who must
complete English as a second
language courses with their
own money and on their own*
time, to .remain qualified and
certified to teach.
If he becomes blind or other-
wise disabled, he will qualify
for Social Security Income,
even if he paid nothing into the
system. There is also current
legislation in Congress to al-
low illegal aliens to receive
Social Security benefits and
Medicare, even if they, or their
employers on their behalf, did
not pay into the system.
We compassionate American
taxpayers, through our polit-
cal representatives generosity
with our tax dollars, provide
-him with Spanish language


signs, voting ballots and other
official and informative
printed material in his native
Spanish language. /
He can't be harassed or sued,
but in some states has the right
to sue you. Although he is
clearly a law breaker, local po-
lice officers and sheriff depu-
ties can not ask him if he is an
alien, and subsequently arrest
him or do anything to him, nor
can you as an apartment renter
broach similar "screening"
questions.
When the "intangible" bene-
fits are added up, this "Cheap"
labor starts looking like $30 or
$40 an hour, while hard work-
ing American citizens are
lucky to realize six bucks an
hour left after paying taxes,
bills and all of his.
Then there is the question of
-(See Is Cheap Page 5)


Underway
High winds from 74 to 200 coastal areas, generally within
mph, take down trees, houses 36 hours. Everyone in the area
and anything else in the covered by the watch should
storm's path. listen for further advisories
Tornadoes are often spawned and be prepared to act
by hurricanes. If this occurs, promptly if a hurricane warn-
seek shelter immediately in an ing or evacuation is issued.
interior bathroom or small hall, A hurricane warning is is-
preferably below ground level, sued when hurricane winds of
Flooding caused by the tor- 74 mph or higher, or a combi-
rential rains can occur in both nation of dangerously high wa-
coastal and inland areas. Resi- ter and very rough seas, are ex-
dents of storm-prone areas pected in a specific coastal
should purchase flood insur- area within 24 hours. When a
ance (which is not provided for hurricane warning is issued, all
in a homeowner's policy), precautions should be com-
A hurricane watch is issued pleted immediately. If the hur-
when a hurricane or hurricane ricane's path is unusual or er-
_-conditions pose a threat to (See 'Cane Season Page 5)


From Our Photo File

' ,


MONTICELLO FAMILY MEDICINE held an Open House in Oct, 1990. From left, Dr.
Tom James, resident family physician, Duncan Moore TMH CEO; Dale Boatwright,
then vice-president of former First National Bank, Ron Brafford, TMH vice-president.
TMH built thelocal facility as part of its physician assistance program. (News File
Photo)


~







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 16, 2006 PAGE 5


How To Choose Voluntary

Pre-Kindergarten Provider,


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Parents are encouraged to -
sign up now before their Vol-
untary Pre-K provider of
choice fills all of its VPK
spaces.
For help in choosing a VPK
provider that's right for your
four year old, call the Early
Learning Coalition Resource
and Referral toll-free number
1-866-973-9030 to schedule
an appointment to obtain your
VPK certificate.
Registrants will be pro-
vided with a complete listing
of all the VPK providers in
the Coalition's seven county
area, including Jefferson
County. _
To obtain a VPK certificate
applicants must provide:


proof that the child will be
four years old on or before
September 1, 2006; and proof
of Florida residency, such as a
drivers license, utility bill,
and/or checkbook.
VPK is free regardless of
family income.
Families must go in person
to get their certificates.
To help make an informed
choice:
*Make a customized list of
schools to look into. You may-
choose a provider in your
county, but there's no geo-
graphical limit on school
choice.
*Look up inspection records.
Go online at:
www.dcf.state.fl.us/childcare
and click on "Provider
Search."
Agency records show any


Is Cheap Labor C
(Continued FromPage4) I don't know what those
who is paying for the signifi- guys in the Senate in Washing-
cant impact of increased crime ton, D.C. or the White House
and incarceration of illegal ali- are smoking with their deplor-
ens in this country. If you are able "comprehensive immigra-
a taxpayer, go ahead and take a. tion plan"! It is pure folly to
shot at answering this one on believe that such a bureau-


your own.


--cratic concept could ever be


'cane Season Underway


(Continued From Page 4)
ratic,; the warning may be is-
sued only a few hours before,
the beginning of hurricane
conditions.
Stay informed of atmos-
pheric behavior by listening to
NOAA Weather Radio.
.NOAA Weather Radio broad-
casts National Weather Service
warnings, watches, forecasts
and other hazard information
24 hours a day. It is provided
'i(A"euo[i, service by the'De-
partment of Commiie~di's"Na-
'tional Oceanic. and Atmos-
pheric Administration.' The
NOAA Weather Radio Net-
work has more than 425 sta--


tions in the 50 states and near
adjacent coastal Waters.
Weather service personnel use
information from Doppler ra-
dar, storm spotters, state and
- local officials, satellites and
other sources to issue
warnings.
These watches and warnings
are broadcast over local
NOAA Weather Radio stations
and also are retransmitted by
many local radio and televi-
sion stations. With this infor-
mation, local emergency man-
agement and public' safety
officials can' act i ate '' local
warning systems to alert com-
munities of an impending
weather threat.


HMS Students, Staff To
Visit Busch Gardens Tues.


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Howard Middle School stu-
dents and staff will travel to
Busch Gardens Tuesday morn-
ing.


time to leave for the trip.
Funds for the trip will come
from the incentive award pro-
vided by the State for earning
the "B" grade.
.0Re t~s

-A


health and safety violations; if
applicable, for each provider.
*Visit the school., Arbor
E&T will give you a checklist
which you can take with you
-on "no-notice" visits to at
least three schools.
Currently there is no state
rating system for the quality
of classroom instruction, leav-
ing that crucial judgment up
to parents.
*Spend half an hour watch-
ing the teachers in action, see
if the children appear happy
and engaged in the.
curriculum.
*Check out the classroom
walls to see what the children
are learning and ask about the
discipline policy.
S *Compare schedules. Each
VPK program is unique and '


heap?
monitored, enforced or re-
motely successful. Seal off the
border completely first and
then let's talk about a "com-
prehensive" immigration plan.
Quite frankly, this is what
happens in a free republic
when elected officials are more
focused on reelection and vote
'getting than problem solving
for America. Their selfishness
in this regard clearly first and
their constituents and what is
right for America a distant sec-
ond.
Let's hope and pray that the
U.S. House of Representatives,
(our last remaining hope), has
the courage to "dig in its
heels" regarding comprehen-
sive immigration and tough ac-
tions against illegal alien law
breakers.,
With eighty percent or more
of Americans voters demand-
ing' border- security first a8fi
then separate actions to reali.'-
tically deal with; illegal aliens
second, this should, and would
be, a slam dunk if it weren't
for that pesky political crony-
ism.
Today, politics and party
loyalty always seems to trump
what is good for this country.


Monticello News
'You,,Can't Be Without It'
In State: $45.00
Out of State: $52.00


Watermelon Festival


ROTARY BARBECUE

4:30 to 8 p.m. Friday

Monticello Opera House

FEATURING I
DELICIOUS BARBECUE PORK

CORN ON THE COB

BAKED BEANS

ICED TEA

DESSERT



ADULTS $8- CHILDREN UNDER 12 $5


although the 2006-07 school
year begins in August, there
are many options available.
Some VPK provider can
start later in the year; some


offer classes Monday through
Friday; and hours can be three
or six depending on the loca-
tion.
Many VPK schedules mir-


ror the public school system's
schedule of holidays,.
Parents can opt for a sum-
mer session of VPK before
the child enters kindergarten.


The times demand experience.

The job demands experience.

And you should too.




Dear Citizens of Jefferson County,


On November 7, 2006 you will have an
opportunity to elect a new Clerk of Circuit
Court for Jefferson County and I would like
to ask each of you for your consideration
and your vote as a candidate for this office.
"'. ~
The Clerk's office is the center of operations
for all county government. It cannot be
emphasized enough the importance of
the Clerk's office and its role in good local
government. It is critically important that
our new Clerk have financial ,accounting
and management experience.


My four years of hands-on experience as
DeputyClerk in the Jefferson CountyClerk's
Office and my twelve years experience in
financial accounting Will ensure an efficient ~-'
transition of leadership when the current
Clerk of Courts steps down. My experience
at being the owner of a successful tax & accounting business, a wife.and mother of four
daughters and civic leader will ensure effective management of the Clerk's Office once I
am elected.

I look forward to meeting you and discussing the issues during the course of this campaign
and I ask each of you for your vote on November 7th.


Sincerely,


Brend
Cand


BRENDA

ia Sorensen FOR SORENSEN
lidate for Clerk of the Circuit Court CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
i ,,approve by Brenda no affiliationfor, of Circuit Co .
Political advertisemnt, Paid for aind approved'y Brenda S,-,ren:er, no'party affiliation; for Clerk of Circuit Cotjrt-. .. .


Your donation will be greatly appreciated
to support Big Bend Hospice


SProceeds will support the care of Big Bend Hospice patients
and families In Jefferson County
Call Big Bend Hospice 997-2827 or 878-5310 x 528 for more info


.A Se or tk. Good Lithe


GOSPEL SING

presented by Jefferson County's Big Bend Hiospice AdvisorW Council


SATUWDAV,
JUNE 17, 2006
6:00 PM
Monticello Opera House
Downtown Monticello, Florida
US 90 at the
Courthouse Circle


2nd Annual Watermelon Festival Gospel Sing
Great Gospel Music Featuring:


Big Bend
Hospice














PAGE 6, MONTICELLu, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 16, 2006


Lifestyle


4-HERS enjoyed their lunch break at the Jubilee Wildlife Outdoor Recreation Day
Camp, Friday. L-R: Gabe Starling, Michael Starling, Wesley Boland, and Jesse Mat-
thews. (News Photo)


Hl-omI rilf Mnuirninn Church News
-- --w .wMu .uL


Fannie Cuyler
Fannie Cuyler age 92 of 960
Lemon St., Monticello Fl died
Friday, June 9, 2006 at Jeffer-
-son Nursing Home. Ms. Cuyler
was a native of Jefferson
County. She was a housewife
and a member of Sweetfield
Missionary Baptist Church,
Lloyd.
She is survived by
one daughter Rebecca Foot-
man, Monticello; four sons;
George Cuyler, Leroy Cuyler,
Dosber Cuyler, Johnny Cuyler,
(14) fourteen grandchildren
(41) forty-one great grandchil-
dren and (27) twenty-seven
great great grandchildren and a
host of nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will, be Sat-
urday, June 17, at Sweet- ... .
field Church wTh Re%. B"n
Radnsofi otticiarln2. Ilteridenti
will of-t% at Springfield
Cemetery, Lloyd. Pallbearers
are Alphonso Footman, Sr.,
Maurice Benjamin, Jean
Miller, LaShon Miller, Robert
Miller, Jr., and Herbert Griffin.
Honorary pallbearers are
George Cuyler, Leroy Cuyler,
Dosber Cuyler and Johnny
Cuyler. Branch Street Funeral
Home is handling arrange-
ments,(850) 997-2024.


IN MEMORY OF
Bragg Anthony Turner
Died June 19, 2005
"The sun, the wind, the
moon, the stars, will forever
be around,
Reminding us of the love
we shared,
And the peace Bragg fi-
nally found.'
Your Loving Family,
Mom, Dad, Sisters,
and Brother


Marvin R. Kimbrell, Jr.
Marvin's life on earth ended
May 30, 2006 in Pensacola. He
was born in Charlotte, N.C.,
the son of Marvin R. Kimbrell,
Sr. and Isabel Kirkpatrick
Kimbrell. He was an active
Boy Scott and was at the time
the youngest in the U.S. to at-
tain the rank of Eagle Scout.
He attended Duke University
in 1935 36, and graduated
from Clemson in 1941 with a
Bachelors in Engineering.
Marvin spent summers and
off years working at Duke
Power Co. where his father
was an outstanding electrical
.engineer and distinguished in
high voltage transmission line
design. Marvin developed a
love for electrical power op-

S Up"on' c6llee 2radfiato6l he
--joined- --Westinghouse and
worked in electrical equipment
sales. He then joined the Navy
in June 1942 and served in the
Bureau of Ships, Washington,
D.C. and later in California. at
Mare Island and Hunter Point
with duties in submarine con-
struction and ship repair. He
was discharged from the Navy
in 1945 with the rank of Lieu-
tenant.
t- While serving in
Washington, he met Jane Kirk,
daughter of Major General
Norman and Ann Duryea Kirk.
They were married February,
1944 and were happily united
for 62 years. Their two chil-
dren are Jane Kimbrell Davis
(See Homes Page 7)


Mt. Ararat AME Church in
Waukeenah will hold a Fa-
ther's Day Program, "From
Boys To Men," 11 a.m. Sun-
day. Rev. Ted Houston is the.
speaker. Dinner will be served.

Greater Elizabeth MB
Church will celebrate its an-
nual 'Homecoming, 11 a.m.
Guest Minister is Rev. Alvin
Ford and music is by Ford
Chapel Young Adult Choir
Dinner will be served.

New Bethel AME Church
will hold a Father's Day Serv-:
ice 11 a.m. Sunday, coordi-
nated by the daughters of
Sarah, and Sister Angela Cum-
ings.
Elder Carl Joseph is the
speaker with the Gospel Tru-
Tones of Madison, providing
"the 'music. '

Union Bethel AME Church,
in the Bolen Community, will
hold a Father's Day Program
11 a.m. Sunday.


1480 W. Washington
Now Serving
Dine-In
Take Out
BAR-B-QUE
Everyday Specials $5.50
Open
Mon. Fri. 8-6
Sat. 8-5


4-Hers Attend

Wildlife Day camp
At camp, 60 campers
DEBBIE SNAPP learned how to appreciate
Staff Writer nature and the environment,
and to enjoy the outdoors
A group of local 4-I- mem- through demonstrations and
bears and counselors joined hands-on activities.
with Leon County 4-Hers. re- 4-Hers learned the proper
cently for a week of outdoor use and care of a rifle; how to
fun and learning during the set animal traps; how to han-
4-H Wildlife and Outdoor dle a bowand.arrow; and
Recreation Day Camp held at took a break from their
Camp Jubilee, at the Jubilee strenuous learning for a game
Plantation in Tallahassee. __- of dodge ball.


Spiritual Fitness


Theme Of VBS


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Greater Fellowship MB
Church will conduct its An-
nual Vacation Bible School 6
p.m. 8 pm. Monday June
26, through Friday, June 30.
Refreshments will be served
daily from 5 p.m..- 5:45 p.m.
The VBS theme this year is
"Let's Get Fit with Jesus,"
with special emphasis on
"Spiritual Fitness for the
Heart and Soul."
Participants of all ages,
nursery school through adults
will be led on a fun-filled dis-
covery of the five Biblical
components that emphasize,
the benefits of spiritual
fitness.
These include Speech, Con-
duct, Love, Faith, and Purity.
The event will also stress


that the major program
needed to get fit is one that
helps us develop a wholesome
relationship % ith God.
Each night, students will ex-
plore a different Bible lesson,
which will be complemented
with an array of craft activi-
ties.
A Certificate of Attendance
will be given to all partici-
pants.
,The culminating, activity
S ill be a closing program in
which all classes will demon-
,strate how "fit" they have be-
come having attended this
exciting event.
All books and supplies will
be provided at no cost to the
participant.
Everyone is welcome to
join in on this event.
For. further information con-
tact Patricia Hall at 933-8736,
or Almeda Lane at 997-1991.


Monticello Vineyard and Winery
t ::Ladrbird Organics 294-9463

1211 Waukeenah Hvwy.,
Monticello, FL. 32344
Hours: Sat, Sun, & Mon. 8 6
Call for an appointment 997-7224.


Where You Buy a Dinner Entree and Your
Second Entree is Half Price!
Mon-Thurs 5 to 6 pm
Don't wait for a special occasion
to enjoy Nino's Restaurant! X C.


878-8141 2 miles East of the Super
SWal-Mart on Apalachee Pkwy.


Of,


RES TAURANT


997-5622


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possible that a tiny little
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person so completely
that there simply want '
any room for any other
thought..." Sophie Schol l
SINCE 1934





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They also participated in
traditional camp activities
such as swimming, campfires,
learning and singing campfire
songs, and crafts.
On Friday, the campers en-
joyed sno-cones while com-
petitions were held.
An Awards Ceremony was
held with all the campers
earning recognition and to-
kens.
Through all of this, the
campers are taught leadership,
communication, respect, re-
sponsibility, and most impor-
tantly team work.
This camp was sponsored
by the Jefferson and Leon
county 4-H Clubs to enhance
and excite the minds and well
being of children, to chal-
lenge them mentally and
physically, and to benefit the
overall child now and through
his adult years.


Sunday School
Convention
Planned
The Jefferson County Sun-
day School Convention under
the leadership of Rev. Ben
Ransom, Jr., president, will
convene 7:30-9:30 p.m. NMon-
day through Frida), June 19-
23 at Greater Fellowship MB,
Church with Rev. Dr. Melvin
Roberts, pastor, and Deacon-
Steve Hall, superintendent of
Sunday School.
The officers and members
extend an invitation to all area
Sunday Schools, pastors, as-
sociate ministers, church offi-
cers, choirs, ushers, and entire
church families to worship
with them during this one-
week session.


Central
Church of
Christ
US 19 South at
Coopers Pond Rd

Celebrate
His
Presence
iW/ith those
who long
for His
coming

Sunday:
10 AM Bible
School
11 AM Worship
Hour
6 PM Evening
Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible
Study


OPEN HOUSE FOR

HOME HEALTH NURSE,

Thursday, June 22, 2006
7:00 a.m. 9:00 a.m.

4:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.
Archbold HomeCare Center Community Room
2705 E. Pinetree Blvd., at the intersection of
Pineirce Boulevard & Remington Avenue t |

Archbold Home Health Services is currently hiring nurses to work
in the tollo\ mng counties in Georgia Brooks, Colquitt, Grady,
Slitchell and Thomas.; and in Florida lefferson, Leon and Nladison.


s




f 70


e .t et" L ome fnd out about our excellent benefits, educational
S, opportunities, salaries, work schedules, and more!

Refreslunents Door Prizes

For more information, call 229-228-2747 or 229-228-2713.


SNo. 3


Scott & Sancdy NfVagy
Sc t ,'" /^


1Invite
ACC'Tfieir friencCs
To Their WedcCing,
June z8tfi, 1:00 p.m.
At 111 Ehler Dr.
No Gifts Please


-- IL


_ II_


Dine efo r DarkSpecals Ae Ba~ckku


.


33


0 WE %IF: won M. son









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 16, 2006 PAGE 7


Healthy Start Hosts


Group Prenatal Party


the expectant mom near the
DEBBIE SNAPP end of her pregnancy provid-
Staff Writer ing additional information on
the process of labor then as-
The Healthy Start Coalition- sists the mom and family dur-


GUESTS at the Healthy Start Coalition Prenatal Party held at the.Health Department,
last week, are, L-R: Portia Jones and Ezekiel, Kimberly Walker and Kimiriya, Veron-
ica Johnson and Anaisia.


CETTA BARNHART, program coordinator, displays scrapbooks made by participants
at the Group Prenatal Party of Healthy Start Coalition. (News Photos)


iHomes Of
T(@lftThaed From Page6i'
ot"Fr6fiicello and tJ.aI s Kirk
Kimbrell and wife Betty of
Shelburne, Nova Scotia.
Grandsons are Ryan Kirk
Davis and wife Linda of Jack-
sonville, and Matthew C.
Davis, DVM, of Monticello.
Following Navy service,
Marvin joined General Electric
and entered into the field of
electrical power substation de-
sign and'sales in Baltimore and
later in New Orleans. In 1960
the Kimbrell's moved to
Pensacola, where Marvin
opened a one-man office for
GE to meet the equipment
needs of Gulf Power Co. and
other nearby operations. He re-
tired 1982 after many years of
enjoyable business associa-
tions.
Marvin was a member of
First Presbyterian Church, hav-
ing served in most every ca-
pacity possible, except
minister. He and Jane served
for 12 years as leaders eof the
Church Couples Club. He was
a member of the Downtown
Rotary where he was a Paul
Harris Fellow and a past presi-
dent. Marvin and Jane moved
to Azalea Trace in 1995 where
they have many friends. He
was preceded in death by his
brother Robert Walker Kim-
brell and his wife Joy.
A memorial service will be
held Saturday, June 17 at 2
p.m. in Pensacola.

Leroy M. Reece
Leroy M. Reece, 84 of 660
Wirrick St. Monticello died
June 8th at Tallahassee Memo-
rial Regional Medical Center.
Reece was a native of Monti-
cello and lived in New York
for 54 years.
He was a retired custodian
and a VFW veteran of the
United States Army and a
steward of Bethel A.M.E.
Church of Monticello.
He is survived by his loving
wife, Portia Reece, two de-
voted children, Monique
Reece of Monticello and
Duane Reece Sr. of Tallahas-
see, devoted nieces, Marielle
and Jacqueline Howell of New
York, devoted nephews Victor


Mourning
- and Jolhr,,, Howellof Atlanta,,
Jeffrey 'Jerome and ent of
New York, one sister-in-law
Yvonne Howell of New York,
two brother-in-laws Bobby and
Billy Law, eight grandchildren
and a host of family and
friends.
Funeral services will be June
17th at Bethel A.M.E. Church
of Monticello with Rev. Helen
Johnson officiating. Interment
will follow at Robinson City
Cemetery. Pallbearers the
sons. Honorary pallbearers are
Stewards of Bethel A.M.E.
Church. Branch Street Funeral
Home in charge of arrange-
ments

Joseph M cCloud
Joseph "Joe" McCloud, age
85 died Monday, June 12 in
-Tallahassee.
The service will be at 10:30
a.m. Saturday, June 17 at
Greater Fellowship M.B.C.,
Monticello with burial at
Springfield Cemetery, Monti-
cello. Family will receive
friends (viewing) from 2:00
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Friday,
June 16, 2006 at Tillman Fu-
---neral Home.
Joseph McCloud an ordained
deacon at Mt. Sinai Missionary
Baptist Church. He was also a
retired custodian with the Jef-
ferson School District. He was
a native of Leon County and
had lived in Monticello for
many years. He was a U.S.
Army veteran, having served
honorably during W.W. II. He
-was also a member of the
Soringfield Pallbearers Lodge.
Among those left to mourn
are his son Joseph (Annie)
McCloud, Jr. of Wichita, Kan-
sas; daughters, Kathy M. Elli-
ott and Patrice McCloud both
of Tallahassee and Karen M.
Hoffman of Jacksonville, FL;


Fr eedb mmof

the Prew, Is

Eve~rybody/ $

Freelon ,'!


brothers, Phillip (Edith)
McCloud, Tallahassee and
Junious (Vera) McCloud, S at-
dic. Washington and a sisr
Samaritha Lockett of Philadel-
phia, PA, 12 grandchildren and
three great grandchildren.
Preceding Deacon McCloud
in death were his wife, Mae-
bell McCloud and three daugh-
ters, Patricia McCloud, Ruthie
M. Costen and Gwendolyn M.
Harris.


of Jefferson, Madison, 'and
Taylor counties recently con-
cluded their third class .of the
Group Prenatal Care Program
here.
A group prenatal party was
held at the Health Department
for the participants of all three
groups, their babies, and
guests, after the class.
A meal and desserts were
prepared and delivered for the
group party, by members of
the Christ Episcopal Church.
Door prizes of diapers, blan-'
kets, and wet wipes were
awarded to lucky ticket hold-
ers.
Bags of baby clothing were
distributed to those in need.
The Program, funded by The
Blue Foundation of Healthy
Florida, was implemented two
years ago to address the high
infant mortality rate, and the
low birth weight in the Afri-
can American community in,
Jefferson County.
Some of the benefits of par-
ticipating in the class include
free dental care services to
offset the chances of preterm
labor due to infection in the
mouth, an opportunity to
scrapbook, transportation to
prenatal services, and free
Doula services.
Scrapbooks are collected up
after each class. They contain
photos of the participant dur-
ing her pregnancy.
The scrapbooks were given
to the participants after the
group party. The books were
shared during the party.
Most of the participants re-
ceive their prenatal services
through the Health Depart-
ment and delivery services
through the Tallahassee Me-
morial Hospital's Residency
Program.
The True Blue Doula Pro-
gram sponsored by the Ounce
of Prevention Fund of Florida
provides a Doula which is a
professional who offers sup-
port to women and families
during the childbearing years,
to each participate.
A Birth Doula meets with


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The Renaissance Galle^ry, has twonew

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Renaiss~a~nce Gallrill be open for


ing the labor process provid-
ing continuous physical, emo-
tional, and information sup-
port.
A Postpartum Doula sup-
ports families in the adjust-
ment period during the new-
borns first weeks of life by
educating new moms. on baby
care, allowing mom to get
*some rest, doing light baby
laundry, writing out thank
you cards and birth announce-
ments, helping with sibling
adjustments and many other
tasks.
The staff providing the
Doulas services are trained
and certified, or pending cer-
tification through DONA In-
ternational
Both the Group Prenatal and


the True Blue Doula Pro-
grams are open for
enrollment.
The Group Prenatal Care
Program is available to expe-
rienced or new moms who ex-
pect to give birth between
mid October and December.
The Doula Program is open
and available to any and all
expectant moms in Jefferson,
Madison, and Taylor counties
regardless of income status.
While the Doula services
may be free to most, there
may be a fee based on house-
hold income to continue the
support of the Program.
For more information about
either of these programs, or to
register for the upcoming
class to be held June 28, con-
tact Cetta Barnhart, program
director, at the Healthy Start
Coalition of Jefferson, Madi-
son, and Taylor counties at
948-2741.


Elizabeth Baptist Church

VBS Begins Monday


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Come trek north with the-
Elizabeth Baptist Church to
the Arctic Edge, where "Ad-
venture Meets Courage," dur-
ing its Vacation Bible School.
Classes are 6 to 9 p.m.,
nightly, June 19-23
This year, Vacation Bible
School will test the imaginary
limits of the Arctic Zone's fro-
zen frontier as the participants
hike across the vast tundra,

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kayak among the islands of
the Inside Passage, jump
aboard a helicopter.
Students will learn about
Biblical people who were
pushed to the edge and learn
how to can gain courage to
follow Jesus in the everyday
challenges of life.
The VBS is designed for
children from the age of three,
to those just completing the
sixth grade.
For more information call
Tricia Joiner, VBS Director at
997-0974.







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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 16, 2006


Sports


Large Crowds Expected


At Melon Festival Rodeo


i J "



.i~ ;


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer,

The Watermelon Festival-
,,Rodeo will be held at 8 p.m.,
Friday and Saturday nights on
Nash Road.
Event Coordinator Charlie
Driver said larger crowds than
in previous years are ex-
-pected ,and the program for
kith t hi rh. i, fillp- fA i+ nnnr-


"We, have more. competi-
tors than we've ever had," he
said.
There are 15 girl barrel rid-
ers scheduled, along with 20
team ropers, and 24 profes-
sional bull riders each night.
Bull riders registered for the
rodeo include: Dexter Hem-
don, of Bonifay, one of the
top bull riders in the
southeast; Kevin Murphy, of
BIA-le, k A. J T hnn Rio-


oin it~Is ,1 Iis tIU c LU tdapa- JciaK- e.y, ;jr, juon Otiiaii an g-
ity with competitors. gins of Pavo, GA, one of the



I Register For Melon

Run Through Saturday


M'6~


,KIWANIS Coach Pitch team award winners include: from,left, Bradley Vollertsen,
iSportsmanship; Greg Meeks, Most Improved; Zach Lunn,. Sportsmanship; Gage
Sparks, Most Valuable.


10-14, 15-19, 20-24, 25-29,
FRAN HUNT 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49,
Staff Writer 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, and 65
and older.
Entry forms and fees con--- For further information con-
tinue to be accepted for the tact race coordinator Ferd
2006 Ki%%anis 5-K Melon Naughton at 99"-3912 -or
Run, through 7-8 a.m. Satur- Larry Halsey at 342-0187 or
day. the Chamber at 997-5552.


The fee for registration the
day of the race is $15.


Last year's run, was a first
_in reported history, in that a


woman, Saraii ) Iocter-
Awards will be given for Williams, won the race with
top male and' female overall, 18:07.
masters, and local finishers, 'Last year's race also saw
and the three-deep male and 143 cross the finish line, in-
female in each age group. eluding 94 year-old Rosalee
There are, 13 groups for run-, Myers and 80 year-old Char-
ners, they include; under 10, les'Yates


No Church League

Softball Set This Year


CAPITAL CITY BANK T-Ball Champions received their awards at the
tion Park Spring Sports Awards Ceremony. (News Photos)


All-Stars

TO Play

-In Tourney

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Cal Ripkin Little
League All-Stars. consisting
-,of 13 boys, will represent the
'County next weekend in the
- district tournament.
I The tournament will be
j played in Wakulla and con-
elude up the season for the
All-Stars.
Players include: Tyler Jack-
son, Desmon Smiley, Shelton
Allen, Trent Roberts, Elliott
Capers, Lenorris Footman and
Jared Jackson.
Also, Zack Steele, Levi
Cobb, Trevon Youman, Brad-
ley Holm, Matt Tuten, and
Alex Gulledge.
Coaches for the team are
Danny Jackson, John Cobb
and Mike Holm.


Great pioneers don't hesitate.
MDA research pursues
every possible avenue.
ADR
Muscular Dystrophy Association
1-800-572-1717


annual Recrea-


4 i~;


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

As it now stands, there will -
be no Church League softball
action this year.
Past coordinator Nick Flynt
said he can not continue to do
all of the required leg work
and paying an average of at
least half of the league.dues,
which barely cover expenses.
"I'm not going to do it this
year and I haven't been able
to find anyone to take it over
yet," he stated.
Anyone interested in taking
*over the league may contact
Flynt at 251-0483, for infor-
mation.

Help your community
when a disaster strikes!
Become a trained Disaster
Services Volunteer by contacting
the Capital Area Chapter of .the
American Red Cross at 878-6080
or ,visit ,our web site at
www.tallytown.com/redcross.


+
American
Red Cross


The church league softball
games have been a county.tta-
dition for at least the la-i eight
years, said Flynt.
The season begins in June
and continues through July.
Some 6-12 teams have par-
ticipated in the league in the
past, with each team averag-
ing 1-2 games per week, or 6-
10 games throughout the
season.


top bull riding contenders in
the country; and Jimmy Lath-
ers, who is in the second
standing in, the southeastern
cities; along with many other
eastern top riders.
Driver said that local favor-
ites would include the Mor-
gans, and Monica Roberts,
"We've got some of the best
county hands coming out to
compete," said Driver.
"Jefferson County has some
real good hands here."
He added that during the
course of both nights, the Wa-
termelon Festival Queen, Jo-
anna Cobb, and her court,
would be present during the
competition.
During the two-day event,
special events are planned for
the children.
As an added attraction this
year, bull rider Charles "Re-
ride" Dowdy, will put on an
exhibition of professional bull
riding, in which he rides a
bull, backwards.
Driver said that after not
holding the rodeo last year, he
received a large quantity of
calls from people wanting to
know. why it was not held and
requesting that it be brought
back by popular demand.
When the rodeo was con-
ducted last, in 2004, approxi-
mately 3,500 people attended
the annual event.
Tuesday morning, Driver
added, "It looks like we won't
have any rain. We're getting
it all over with ahead of time,
so we will be in great shape."
Tickets are $12 for adults,
$6 for children and children
under four Nebrs old are free.
For further information, con-
tactDrn er at 997-471i3.
A drunk drer ruinr.ed something
Precious. Amber Apodaca
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Letchworth Mounds



Continues Upgrading


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Visitors to the Letchworth-
Mounds in Jefferson County
should get a better feel for the
historical and archaeological
significance of the place in the
future.
Within the next year or so,
the park service plans to build
a visitors center on the site,
complete with artifacts, exhib-
its and interpretative literature
that describes the lives and his-
tory of the area's early inhabi-
tants.
The money for the enhance-
ments comes compliments of
the Florida Legislature, which
in the last session appropriated
$400,000 for the improvement
of the archaeologically signifi-
cant site.
Barry Burch is parks man-
ager for the Letchworth and
Lake Jackson mounds. He said
last week that the plan is to
make the site more accessible
and appealing to visitors, as
well as to area school children.
"We're working with the
Department of State to do edu-
cational programs," Burch
said. "We will be bringing
school kids to the site so that
they can learn about the Indi-
ans and the other early inhabi-
tants. We'll do interpretative
programs, where they get to
sift for artifacts and things like
that."
Part of the improvements
also call for the clearing of the
brush and vegetation on the
large mound and in the sur-
rounding area. The idea is to
get the mound and the sur-
rounding area to look much as
it did in the days of the early
inhabitants.
"Our intent is to open it up,
so that you can see the main
mound and the several other
liounids in the area," Burch
said. "We want to restore it to
what it was when there were
Native Americans here."
Also, in the event of a tor-
nado, hurricane or other natu-
ral disaster, it will not do as
much damage to the mounds if
the trees are absent, he said.
The planned improvements
add to the amenities already on
the site. These include a paved
parking lot, public bathrooms,
a pavilion with picnic tables,
an information kiosk, a well-
defined trail that includes a
boardwalk on the south end of
the mound, and interpretative
displays along the trail.
The park last year acquired
an additional 107 acres of sur-
rounding land, which brings
the park property to near 200
acres now. Burch said the lat-
est acquisition ensures the pro-
tection of several smaller
'mounds in the area.
He said the Letchworth
Mounds gets about 10,000
visitors a year, which isn't a
large amount compared with
the 100,000 or more people
that annually visit other state
parks. But he believes the
planned improvements will in-
crease the number of visitors
dramatically.
"When the visitor center
goes in, these numbers will go
up drastically," Burch said. "I
think it will bring a good eco-
nomic benefit to Jefferson
County."
He said more archaeological
research is also planned at the
site in the future.
Standing 46 feet high, the
Letchworth Mound is the larg-
est known Indian mound in
Florida and one of the largest
in the Southeast. It is believed
to have been constructed be-
fore or during the Weedon Is-
land cultural period, which
flourished between 200 and
800 A.D.
Based on artifacts found in
the area, archaeologists specu-
late that the mounds were oc-


EXPECT more educational programs to be conducted at the Mounds, where the pub-
lic can learn more about the early inhabitants


S parts of Florida and best examples of Weedon Is-
ern parts o Floriland artifacts have been found.
neighboring states. The culture land artifacts hav been found.
is best known,'for its animal The mounds are believed to
is best knon have served religious and cere-
and human effigies on its cere- have served religious and cere-
monial purposes, hence their
monial pottery, which is con- sacredness to Native Ameri-
sidered the most impressive in
North America. cans.
The Letchworth Mounds is
The culture gets its name Just off US 90, on the south
from an island near St. Peters- side, near the Leon County
burg, FL, where the first and line.


LETCHWORTH MOUNDS, a State Archaelogical Site is
continually improving, with some $400,000 recently al-
located for the process. (News Photos)


cupied from the Paleoindian to
historic times, a period span-
ning more than 10,000 years.
The Weedon Island culture is
supposed to have been en-
demic to the central and north-


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 16, 2006 PAGE 9

DIGITAL
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Attention
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I. 4,' : J fi. sj w '





PROTECT PEOPLE, PETS, AND PROPERTY Wl
DIXON MOSQUITO MANAGEMENT.

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programs are e'\'ided to the public on a non dJscrniinaiory basis."




Happy Father's Day


FSU STUDENTS excavate around the Mounds as part of the research in progress at
the site. .







PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 16, 2006


OUR LiFELINE
IS TOLL-FREE
Grab lte lineand
let us help you.

THE VOICE OF HOPE
1-800--572-1717


The North Florida Workforce
Development Board, Inc. is issuing
an Invitation to Negotiate for legal
counsel service. North Florida
Workforce Development Board,
Inc. is a non-profit organization, is
the administrative entity for certain
job training and job placement
provisions of the Social Security
Act, Title IV (Excess Temporary
Assistance to Need Families funds)


the federal Workforce Investment
Act of 1998; Chapter 2000-165,
Laws of Florida; et al. Among other
things, North Florida Workforce
Development Board, Inc. is
responsible for the operation of the
Employment Connections offices in
Suwannee, Taylor and Madison
counties. Instructions: Parties may
apply by submitting a letter of
interest which Describes their
qualifications to provide
appropriate legal services Contains
a summary of applicable
experiences Provides appropriate;
references Indicates their ability to
perform the work; and Contains a.
schedule of fees. Submit letter of
interest to: North Florida
Workforce Development Board,
Inc. P.O. Box 267, Madison, Fl
32341-0267 by 4:00 p.m. on June 30,.
2006. Late submittals, will be-
disqualified. Facsimile or other
electronic submittals will not be
accepted or considered. North
Florida Workforce 'Development
Board, Inc. reserves the right to
reject any or all submittals in the
best interest of the North Florida
,Workforce Development Board,
Inc. North Florida Workforce
Development Board, Inc. is an equal,
opportunity training


provider/employer.
6/9, 6/14, 6/16, 6/21/06, c


Caregiver- Immediate opening,
'caring/responsible, 90/59 high-
ways area, Thursdays and Fri-
days, $55 clear per day,
879-8698, 224-4131.
Therapists wanted-Licensed
SLPS in Miami-Dade and
Broward counties. Bilingual a
plus. Per diem & F/T.
Bilinguals Inc. Child & Parent
Services. (866) 696-0999 x122
www.bilingualsinc.com
6/16 fcan
Accepting applications for
full-time lumberyard personnel
with a clean driving record,
knowledgeable of building
material and customer friendly.
Must be. 18 years or older.
Application may be obtained at
1400 South Jefferson Street,
Monticello
6/7, tfn, c
Mechanic Waukeenah
Fertilizer. 850-997-4460
6/7, tfn,c


Want home most weekends with
more pay! Run Heartland's
Florida Regional! $.42/mile
company drivers $1.22 for
Operators! 12 month OTR
required. Heartland Express
(800) 441-4953
www.heartlandexpress.com
6/16 fcan
The City of Monticello is
accepting applications for the
position of Police Patrol Officer.
This position requires a
minimum of a high school
diploma and Florida Police
Standards. The successful
candidate must live within 25
miles of Monticello Police
Station. Applicant must
complete a department field
training program within the
first month. The position
requires a background check.
Salary and benefit information
is available upon request.
Submit application and resume
to Monticello Police Dept. 195 S.
Mulberry St. Monticello, FL
32344 by July 5, 2006
EOE/Drug-Free Workplace.
6/16, 21, c


Cook & Housekeeper needed
in Boston, Ga. area. Experience
& references required. Full-time


with benefits. Must
transportation. Please
Cheryl at 863-797-3526
6/7, 9, 14, 16, pd


have
call


MAINTENANCE- PT 36 Unit
Apt Complex Resume/Apply to

Questions,
Anyone?
Get the answers you can
trust about government
programs, benefits, and
services from the Federal
Consumer Information
Center.
Just call toll-free:
1-800-FED-INFO
(That's 1-800-333-4636)
Mon-Fri 8am-8pm ET
Or visit
www.pueblo.gsa.gov/call
U.S. General Services Administration


BUSINESS




DIRECTORY


Portable Toilets DOUG'S TREE & LAWN .
Billy Simmons Septic SERVICE Register's Mini-Storage. Iol Ifl
850-509-1465 cell o Trimming o Stump Grinding 315 Waukeenah Hwy. Lawn & Landscaping
850-997-0877 home 0 Mowing .Aerial Device r-----------------I
Clean Portables for construction sites, 0 Removal Bush Hogging (1/4 Mile Off US 19 South) Mention This Ad & receive
family reunions, parties 0 Maintenance -- A 10% Discount --
Events and Types 997-0039 Lic. & nsured 997-2535 11025East Mahan -877-4550.


B & M Tractor Service CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC INC. LTA
Specializing in Food Plots, Bush Ho ing, Realtor TimPearA Craig
Liming & Fertilizing, Spraying, and Fencing Realtor T Peary
'850-997-4340 "Complete Auto Electric Repair Service" Larichiuta
See all ourlistings) J O --'- Lloyd, FL32337

www.TimPeary.com ime rock .
Birad'McLod .. ... Sim ply the B est! ". *^ *. .r, ..... ?Ctay I !. "
Cefl: (850) 210-2942 Mack McLeod S py t s t ?i. -
Ce 50452325 H(850) Realtor Tm Peary Sells Real Estate! .TThomasville Road 115 Albany Rd. .Sand .-.__997-67 8
Hoe: (8534 South Salt Rd, Lam-145 Home: FL 850 997-3023 Sim ply the Bestarroll Hill) 229-226-0717
10534 Souh Salt Rd, Lamnont, FL. 3236 Simply the Best! F(n0Carroll.Hill) 229-226-0717 "Thp Soil


Your Local Professional Painters
Interior ~ Exterior
Lic. & Ins. #4676







Septic Tank & Land Clearing
Complete Septic Service & Repair
Lot Preparing & Land Clearing
Thomas B. Scott; Sr.
Rt 1 Box 137
Lamont, FL 32366
ph:997-5536 cell: 933-3620"


1-10 CHEVRON
Marlboro $3.04 pack, $8.80
3-pack, $26.99 carton + tax
305 $1.59 pack, $4.47 3-pack
14.00 carton + tax
Morgan's Chewing Tobacco
$1.96 pack, $5.55 3 packs,
$21.42 carton +Tax
Swisher Sweet Honey Flavored
King Cigars 2 for $.69
Bring this ad, receive a
Free 20 oz. Fountain Drink
with any purchase
WE ACCEPT ALL MANUFACTURERS
COUPONS


Residential & Commercial Lic.# egc #1507547

YEAGER CONTRACTING CO. INC.
CUSTOM HOMES




PH: 997-2296 CELL: 508-2383


Appliance Repairs:
Washers, Dryers, Stoves,
Refrigerators.
Owned & Operated by Andy Rudd
S. 997-5648
Leave Message


WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!
I 997-6500
WHEN You NEED To SOLVE COMPUTER PROBLEMS.
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY ONSITE SERVICE
*Diagnosis Repair *Upgrades *Installations *Consultations
'Tutorials *Removal of Viruses, Adware, Spywate


Call for quality work
45 Years In The Trade
Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
850-997-7467 ~ 850-544-2917
*Residential ~ Commercial *Interior ~ Exterior


THURMAN TRACTOR SERVICE
SHOWING ~ HARROWING ~
FOOD PLOTS
SLIC. & INS.

James Thurman, LLC
850-997-5211
850-545-0139


Sister Fay
Palm Reader & Advisor
Are you Unhappy? Worried? Sad?
Have you been Disappointed?
Give me a call and let me help you.
Serving Leon County for 50 years
We Do Parties! Tarot Cards*Palm Readings*Astrology
Call in for 2 free questions!
Licensed by County & City
Mon.-Fri 10am-8pm, Sun 1-5pm, 1729 Mahan Drive
(850)878-9327,


Custom Mowing
Specializing In Small Lots
(850) 997-2170
Si- ( ir cr ;T
S-^M^^A- 1f


_ _ _nerry street '-t l*
1SITONY de SERCEY
C 5 9F urnishing & Accessories Light Harrowing & Grading


Opening
the door
to hope
Call our
lifeline.
It's toll-free.


1-80(Y-572-.1717
www.mdausa.org



Muscular Dystrophy
Association


MR. MERCHANT

THIS SPACE

COULD BE

YOURS FOR

ONLY $10.00:


Tyrone Davis A
ales Manager


:3 ultimate

Iage Auto

I 877-7222

Very large selection to choose from
All trade-ins are welcome
Best rates as low as 4.5%
Free warranty on every vehicle sold


or rag
n!


Keaton Tire Repair
"Service Is Our Business on and off the Road"


EDD KEATON
TRAVIS KEATON
'54 Capps Hwy
Lamont, FL 32336 .


850-997-0903 Shop
850-264-6871 Cell
850-997-0937 Fax
850-997-5443 Home


.T00D ([DIST W (PENT,


- N m

hape Te ltmae ai


to ~/ :~Q1~; ~ -


Monticello


News


You Can Count On

Us To Find The

Source!!


__=


I :


p


t'-p









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 16, 2006 PAGE 11


To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED

Your Community Shopping Center
L .- -


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00 < -
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


HELP WANTED
Heritage Manor, 1800 East
Texas Hill Road, Monticello, FL
32344 fax: 850-997-7288 Phone:
850-997-4727
6/7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23, c
TEACHER POSITIONS
AVAILABLE: Monticello
Christian Academy Elementary,
Middle, High School call
997-6048 for details or submit
resume to: MCA, 1590 N.
Jefferson St. Monticello, 32344.
6/2-30, c
JANITOR/MAINTENANCE:
Part time position. Must be able
to perform some maintenance as
well as janitor duties. Call
MCA, 997-6048
6/2-30, c
Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4-
1/25, tfn
REAL ESTATE
Would you like to rent an office
downtown? Call 997-5517 leave
message and phone number.
5/12, tfn
Mountain Property! Interested
in buying property in the Blue
Ridge Mountains of NC? Call
Active Realty today at (800)
979-5556 or visit our web site at
www.ActiveRealtyNC.com
6/16 fcan
Buyers Market Coastal North
Carolina 95-100% LTV
Financing. Call CCL Inc. Realty
(800) 224-5020
6/16 fcan
Tennesseee grand opening!
Swan Ridge Lake Resort, a
private gated community with
both lake-view and


REAL STATE,^
mountain-view home sites. Lots
starting at $29,900 Call today
931-243-4871
6/16, fcan
GEORGIA BLAIRSVILLE in
the North Georgia Mountains.
Land, homes, commercial and
investment "Everything We
Touch Turns To Sold" Jane Bar
Realty. 706-745-2261,
6/16, fcan
VA Mountains 5 acres with
frontage on very large pristine
creek, very private, excellent
fishing, canoeing, good access,
near New River Trail State
Park, $39,500. Owner (866)
789-8535 www.mountainsof
VA.com
6/16 fcan
Eufaula, AL Waterfront /2 to 3
acres from the 40's. Gated with
Planned clubhouse, docks, and
boat ramp. 2 hours from
Atlanta & the coast. Rolling
terrain, beautiful hardwoods.
(8660 882-1107
6/16 fcan
FOR RENT,
Prime downtown office space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980.
11/30 tfn, c
Cute, roomy, convenient. 2 BR,
IB. Walk to library, stores,
more. $725. 251-0760
6/16, c
Country cottage. Renovated and
ready. Perfect for quiet,
nature-loving single or couple.
* $600. 251-0760.
6/16, c
A great find, coming soon. 3
BR, 1 B. 1064 S. Water.


* Housing Vouchers 1
0
a We accept all vouchers .
I 2/2 $615 -~ 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 $50 dep.
- Pool & Youth Activities .

* 5756571 ii
IEEE NlR aa i sMan ME':e

























Pecan Hill

Subdivision


HISTORIC MONTICELLO CITY SUBDIVISION
CLOSE TO DOWNTOWN AND SHOPPING
OFFERING AFFORDABLE QUALITY HOMES
WITH SPACIOUS CHARM AND ELEGANCE
AND ENTRANCE TO CITY BIKE TRAIL

START 1550 +/-SF
Starting at $189,900

JACKSON 1675 +/- SF
Starting at $199,900

GRIFFIN 1820 +/- SF
Starting at $209,900

STARTING CONSTRUCTION
ON ALL THREE MODELS,
TAKING RESERVATIONS

VIRGINIA G. BLOW

850-509-1844
COLDWELL BANKER
KELLY AND KELLY PROPERTIES
EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDEDLY OWNED AND OPERATED


SABOR REAL ESTATE


6/16, c
Jefferson Place Apartments, 1
and 2 bedroom, 1468 S.
Waukeenah St. Office 300
Monticello. 997-6964 (Equal
Housing Opportunity.


Roosters and Laying Chickens
$10 each; Goats, female $100
each. Leave message. 997-0901
6/16, pd
Crib and changing table, $50
for both. 4'x7' Rug, $20.
997-2474 or 545-6353.
6/16, 21 pd
Deluxe Vulcan Convection Oven
superior cooking & baking
performance, 40W" x 41 1/2"D
$3000.00 perfect for restaurants.
Self Serving Drink. Cooler
contains 3 shelves designed to
hold bottles or can drinks $450.,
perfect for restaurants and
convenient stores. 459-2138,
997-4646
6/9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28, 30, pd

BUSIn),SS; ;:,:
OPPO tNITIES .
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE
Do you earn $800/day? 30
machines, free candy. All for
$9,995. (888)629-9968
B02000033. Call us: We will not
be undersold.
6/16 fcan


Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
new menopausal products.
Jackson's drug store.
5/12 tfn


Painting Professionals Int./E
call Edith or Harvey for fi
estimate, prices can't be be
342-1330.
5/24, 26, 31, 6/2, 7, 9, 14, 16, c


Ext.
ree
at!


Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tIII
Appliance Repairs:- washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
4 STAR DOG CARE Board your
small dog in my home. NO CAGES!
24/7 companionship and TLC, air
conditioned, References available.
Call THE ENCHANTED
DOGHOUSE 997-2515.
6/14, 16 pd
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quick responses.
6/22, tfn
Peters Satellite -- Your Satellite,
Dish dealer. We offer
equipment, installation, repair,
parts, and prompt service. We
also offer Go-Karts, utility
trailers and lawn mowers.
Located at: 1150 Old Lloyd
Road, Monticello, Fla.
850-997-3377


Vending Route: Snack, All 1/25, tfn, c
Drinks, All Brands. Great Home Health Care Equipment -
Equipment, Great Support! Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Financing Available With $6K Medicare Call for assessment
Down. Call Tom: (954) of your needs. 997-3553. UPS-
971-9301 NOW AVAILABLE
6/16 fcan 1/19-tfn

*2.5 acres in NE area of County, private dirt
m'road, mobile homes o.k., rolling hills terrain,
,large merchantable timber just $10,000 per r
acre, $1,250 down for qualified customers _
W*6.42 acres, East on U.S. 90, pond, well, septic,
Shomesite, nature at its best, only $14,900 per'
acre $4,783 down for qualified customers ,
W*3000 sq. ft. building, restaurant, market, of-W
fice, business, gold mine, Greenville, at I.S. 90'
.and S.R. 221, available July 1st, $1,500.00 perW
Month W
S Lynette C. Sirmon, Realtor Associate, N
R. Winston Connell, Realtor '
850-933-6363 mobile or after hours 850-948-5000




OPEN HOUSE

SATURDAY 1 PM 3 PM

JUNE 17, 2006

VIRGINIA G BLOW.

850-509-1844

$975,000
295 Valley View Trail

Secluded mini plantation

Southern Living Home

73 +h/ Acres

$235,000

210 W. Seminole Ave.

Beautiful remodeled city home

with landscaped gardens,

THE HOMES BELOW HAVE SHIPP FUNDING
AVAILABLE FOR QUALIFIED BUYERS

$129,900
650 York St. & 535 N. Wirick St.
Two remodeled city homes.
York offers beautiful hardwood floors and gas
fireplace. Wirick offers large corner lot, new
shingles, paint, carpet and hardwood floors.
$99,900
460 Marvin St.
Like new renovated city home, owner
financing or lease option available.
$89,900
470 Marvin St.
Like new renovated city home, owner
financing or lease option available.
COLDWELL BANKER
KELLY AND KELLY PROPERTIES
EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPEERATED


MARK VOLLERTSEN
Realtor


Sales Associate
850-997-1691 or 850-459-4864
You Name It I'll Find IJ, Ready To Sell It, It's Sold!
Residential ~ Commercial~
Mobile Homes w/Land ~ Acreage


Statistics Show People Remember
85% of what they read
and 15% of what they hear,


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com


Serious About
Selling?
List today!


Amazinq Buy!!! Mixed Use Property
12 plus partially cleared acres on US 19
south land use designation permits 4 houses
per acre near Dennis' Trading post only
$36,500 per acre

Best Residential Buy in Town!
2 bedroom 1 bath home in great shapewith
fenced yard and big family room behind IGA
on Bowman Street Now $76,500

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly
wooded acres Only $36,500

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big double-
wide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in re-
mote, oaks, pond, north of Greenville only
$329,000

Just Listed! Beautiful Homesite Close to
Town
12. 59 beautiful acres on the Waukeenah
Highway near town, big trees, nice fields,
nice and private, perfect for a nice home
$265,000

Peary Does It Aqain! SOLD-Building
lots Town on Morris Road call for details
$10,000 to $40,000

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 5 acres available
on the east side of town high and dry in quiet
location with lots of game, 9 year old planted
pines, profit from both appreciating land and
growing pine Only $11,500 per acre

Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500

Peary Does It Aqain! Christmas Acres
Sold -3 bedroom 2 bath mobile home on 3 acres
with a big deck, carport and a workshop $96,000

Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bed-
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PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., JUNE 16, 2006


County Gets $200,000



TO Build Horse Arena


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

It will be a while before the
public sees all the elements of
a multiple-use agricultural
complex/park that some com-
munity leaders envision for a
20-acre tract just southeast of
the Green Institute property off
US 90 West.
But the first element of that
vision -- a livestock and horse
arena -- is about to become re-
ality.
The Legislature in the last
session appropriated $200,000
for construction of the struc-
ture, alohg with bleachers, a
half-mile long riding and
walking trail, picnic tables and


restroom facilities, among
other amenities.
Of course, the rising costs of
construction materials during
the long lead time to get the
grant awarded means that the
original cost estimates may be
a little off. It's to say, the
$200,000 will likely not ac-
complish all that was origi-
nally intended.
Evens so, it will make for a
beginning. And the county can
always apply for subsequent
grants to complete the project,
according to Extension Office
Director Larry Halsey, who
has been spearheading the pro-
ject.
The arena is to be con-
structed on property that is 3.5
miles west of town, at the site


of the former University of
Florida IFAS (Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sci-
ences) Research and Education
Center.
When the center was
moved to Gadsden County a
few years back, UF leased 62
acres of the property to the
Green Institute and 20 acres to
the county. The county's acre-
age, on the southeast corner of
the property, was formerly a
pecan orchard used for re-
search purposes. The property
also includes a collection of
landscape vines and a small
muscadine vineyard.
Ever since the county ac-
quired the property, Halsey --
along with county officials and
the legislative lobbying com-
mittee -- has been pursuing
state funding for construction


of an agricultural multiplex
and a livestock and horse arena
on the 20 acres.
The effort to acquire the
funding for the agricultural
multiplex has been unsuccess-
ful thus far. But the request for
the livestock and horse arena
finally passed legislative mus-
ter in the last session.
The facility is intended for
the use of local, district and
state 4-H clubs and other
youth-related horse events. It's
also expected that the facility
will provide "a modest eco-
nomic multiplier from expen-
ditures made by out-of-county
participants in horse events."'
"Horse shows typically are
two-day, weekend events," the
project sponsors say. "And
horse enthusiasts tend to travel
to participate in or to view,


them. Over 200,000 'urban-
residents' in the
Tallahassee/Leon County area
are discovering the charm of
rural Jefferson County.
"The proposed arena is ex-
pected to attract visitors as
well as provide recreational
opportunities for local resi-
dents. Those visitors will pro-
vide a needed economic multi-
plier in food, fuel, lodging and
other purchases.
"Purchases made for live-
stock, such as hay and other
feeds; boarding, tack and vet-
erinary services will benefit lo-
cal vendors and provide a
modest economic and employ-
ment multiplier as well."
As for the frequent users of
the arena, it's expected these
will be "youths in 4-H horse
events and groups such as the


Jefferson County Horsemen's
Association, that do not have a
public access facilities within
the county," the project spon-
sors say.
They paint a picture of Jeffer-
son County as a rural, tradi-
tional community that is in
transition to becoming an ur-
ban "bedroom community",
but whose residents still retain
a strong interest in equestrian-
based recreation. For
evidence, they point to the
large number of five and 10-
acre horse farms across the
county.
What's more, the arena -- on
the western side of the county
where the urban-fringe/resi-
dential development is taking
place -- "assures preserved,
open green space and recrea-
tional opportunities for new-
comers and long-term
residents, many of them poor,"
they argue.
Taylor and Hamilton coun-
ties have constructed similar
arenas in recent times.
The extension office, with
assistance from the county re
creation department, will man-
age the property.


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