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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00140
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: June 14, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00140
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
        page 9
    Main: Sports
        page 10
    Main continued
        page 11
        page 12
    Main: Classified
        page 13
    Main continued
        page 14
Full Text








New,.
Medicines
Offer Hope

Editorial, Page 4


AY ,OF FLORIDA HISTORY
LIBRARY WEST
iERSITY OF FLORIDA
E.. .LL.E, FL. 32611



Monticello A's
wallop
Hilton 16-6

story, page 10


Grant Targets
W-omen Of
Chlildbearing

Story, Page 12,


Slik Recounts


itn iwraq

Story, Page 14


Wednesday Morning






Monticelo

138TH YEAR NO. 45, 50 CENTS Published Wedn"sdays & Fridays


?NWS
lws

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 2006,


Joanna Cobb Crowned Queen



Casey Handley 1st Runner-Up


OUTGOING Watermelon Queen Alana
melon Festival Queen. (News Photo)


SFRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

SJoanna Cobb was crowned
-2006 Watermelon Festival
Queen Saturday evening.
She was also named Miss
Ii Photogenic, and received a tro-
Pg phy loi Best Talent and Best
A.Evening Gown.
Casey Handley \as named
First Runner-up, and Jandmie
Malloy was naniled Miss Con-
geniali ty.
Opening the pageant, a. a
dance routine to "She's a
Lady", by Tonm Jones, as curon-
testants glided across the
stage, in time to the rh;, thmnic
beat.
Master of Ceremionies, Me-
teorologist Rob Nucatola, of
.Channel 6. kept the audience
.aglhing and entertained with
Chambers crowns Joanna Cobb 2006 Water- hiis, quick wit and hurmi6r. ...
Throughout .the evening,


Cobb:
Best Talent,
Best Gown,
Photogenic


audience games were con-
ducted by Nucatola for vari-
ous door prizes.
Outgoing Queen Alana
Chambers began the talent
portion of the competition,
singing, "I Will Survive."
Nucatola moved and clapped
his hands to the beat, and the
audience followed suit.
As Chambers' routine pro-
gressed, Joe Lueck presented
her with a box of chocolates
as she sang.
SShe nonchalantly tossed the
box aside and continued to


sing.
Lueck returned with a red
teddy bear, and Chambers re-
acted as before.
Undaunted, Lueck ap-
proached once more; this time
on hands and knees with a
rosq clenched in his teeth.
Chambers remained un-
moved and continued to sing.
Finally, Lueck slid across
the stage on his back, holding
a thick roll of cash, towards
Chambers, who this time,
took the money, fanned her-
self, continued her song, and
motioned him away.
The talent portion of the
competition began % uh Cobb
performing a gymnastics style
dance to, "This is how a Heart
Breaks, Nowadays".
Amanda Hunt danced to
"All That Jazz", looking as if
she had just stepped out of the
.movie production of Cihicago,
(See Melon Queen Page 2)


Watt Festival Princess;


Thor First Runner-Up


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The 2006 Watermelon Fes-
tival Princess is Dana Jane
Watt, crowned by Ramsey
Revell, outgoing Festival
Princess, Saturday.
Watt also received the tro-
phies for Best Talent and Best
Evening Gown.
Tori Thor was named first
runner up; and Savannah Wil-
liams was named Miss Con-
geniality.
Opening the pageant was the
dance routine, "Dancing
Queen", followed by the in-
troduction of Master of Cere-


monies, Meteorologist Rob
Nucatola, of Channel Six,
who as usual, kept the event
moving along with his quick
wit.
The program began with
Outgoing Princess Ramsey
Revell playing a classical num-
ber on the piano, followed by
the talent competition.
Each contestant chose to
perform a dance routine for
the talent portion of the event.
Talent competition began
with Thor performing to a
live-mix from the Blues Broth-
ers.
Watt upped the tempo danc-
ing to "Rockin' Robin" by the
Jackson Five.


Williams performed a self-
choreographed piece to "Big
Girls Don't Cry", by Frankie
Valley and the Four Seasons.
Kaitlin Jackson danced to
"You'll Never Walk Alone".
Revell read the questions
during the question/answer
segment of the competition.
Thor said the one place she
would show in Monticello if
she were giving a tour would
be the Courthouse.
"It's an Historic part of the
community which welcomes
visitors from all directions,"
said Thor.
Watt said her favorite
(See Festival Princess Page 2)


CROWNING Dana Jane Watt as 2006 Watermelon Festival Princess,
cess Ramsey Revell. (News Photo)


Activities Of Final Festival Week


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The 56th Watermlon Festi-
val events continue this week,
beginning with the Woman's
Club Luncheon and Fashion
Show, noon Thursday, at the
Opera House.
Ladies and children's fash-
ions will be presented by Mi-
lady's; Snapdragon, and Great
Adventure Outfitters.
The luncheon menu will
feature chicken salad, con-
gealed salad with the usual
complements.
Tickets at $15, are available
at the Chamber of Commerce,
FMB, Milady's Shop and
from members of the
Woman's Club.
Arts and crafts vendors will
begin setting up and selling a
wide variety of wares, food,
snacks and drinks, noon, Fri-
day, continuing throughout
the afternoon, and all day Sat-


urday.
Vendors will be located at
Walnut Street and West Pal-
mer Mill Road and through-
out the downtown area.
The popular Rotary Barbe-
cue begins 4:30 p.m., at the
Opera House.
Tickets are $8 for adults and
$5 for children 12 and under.
The meal will include the
barbecue pork, corn on the
cob, coleslaw, baked beans,
iced tea and dessert.
The event served more than
500 dinners last year and an
even greater number is ex-
pected this year.
The Street Dance begins 7
p.m. on South Water Street,
with the band 19 South.
The rodeo opens 8 p.m. on
Nash Road, and continues 8
p.m. Saturday.
Tickets are $12 for adults,
$6 for children and children
under four years of age are
free.
This year's event will fea-


Rotary Barbecue
Serving hundreds annually, the Rotary Barbecue. is
among the events of the final Festival Week. In the
serving line in this 2005 photo, is from left, Mike Hum-
phrey, Mary Frances Gramling and Ron Cichon. (News
Photo)


ture Charles "Re-ride".
Dowdy, who will put on an
exhibition of professional bull
riding, in which he rides a
bull, backwards.
Large crowds are expected
for the event.
The FMB outdoor breakfast
will kick off Saturday's
events, at 7 a.m.
Tickets are $4 each for a
hearty breakfast.
The Kiwanis annual 5-K
Melon Run begins on South
Water Street, with registration
7-8 a.m. The Run will begin
at 8:15.
Entry fee is $15 the day of
the race.
Awards will be given for
top female and male, overall,
masters, and local finishers,
and the three-deep male and
female from each age group.
The drive-in car show will
be ongoing throughout the
day in the FMB parking lot.
The parade will begin at 10
a.m. on South Jefferson
Street.


Among the entries are: The
Marine Band, Big Bend
Ghost Trackers, antique car
owners, the rodeo, and the
Watermelon Royalty and con-
testants in the Little King and
Queen, the Watermelon Prin-
cess, and the Watermelon
Queen pageants.
The Children's Theater,
slated for 11:30 a.m. and 1
p.m.,at the Opera House has
been canceled.
However, Opera House Di-
rector Jan Ricky vows that
next year's event' will take
place and be even bigger and
better than ever.
Platform events will be
hosted from 11 a.m. until 2
p.m. on South Water Street.
Featured performers will in-
clude the Marine Band and
the Mountain Dew Cloggers.
Winners from the baby con-
test and pageants will also be
on hand.
The Gospel Sing will begin at
(See Final Week Page 2)


is outgoing Prin-


I I -I __ I I I 'I-1 L I :








PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 14, 2006


JOANNA COBB


CASEY HANDLE


Melon
(Continued From Page 1)
complete with short dark wig.
Jamie Malloy recited the
poem, "Winkle" followed by
a line dance routine to "The
Watermelon Crawl."
Casey Handley performed a
hip-hop dance routine to, "A
Walk In My Shoes".
The second portion of the
competition was the question
and answer segment.
Cobb's answer, "If I had my
choice of a time to live, I
would choose the future, be-
cause there would be no dis-
eases such as cancer, because
we would have found cures."
Hunt was asked what she
considered her greatest ac-
complishment to be and why.
She stated, "Everything."
Malloy was asked what she
liked most about living in
Jefferson County. "It's my
home, my family is here and
they have been here for gen-
erations." she replied.
Handley was asked what
one thing she would give to
the person of her choice and.


Queen
why.
Humorously she responded,
"I would give height.to my
brother because he's too
short."
The evening gown compe-
tition followed.
Cobb wore a bright orange
gown, spaghetti strap off the
right shoulder, floor length,
speckled with rhinestones on
the front, and a short train.,
Hunt wore a turquoise
gown, floor length layered in
sequins. The gown featured
spaghetti straps and side-slit,
and short train.
Malloy wore a white floor
length gown, halter straps
over both shoulders, a bustle,
and ruffled hem.
Handley wore a bright red
sequined gown, floor length,
single strap over the left
shoulder with a short train.
The evening concluded with
Chambers crowning Cobb as
Queen, and audience mem-
bers flocking to the stage to
congratulate contestants, of-
fering assorted bouquets, and
the usual photo opportunities.


Festival Princess


KAITLIN JACKSON


TORI THOR


(Continued From Page 1)
hobbi vwas cooking. "It's fun
and I can use my dad as a
guinea pig. He's like "Mikey."
He'll eat anything."
Williams said that if her
house were on fire, the one
thing she would save after as-
suring that her family were
safe. would be photographs
from family vacations.
"The\ hold a lot of wonder-
ful memories," she said.
Jackson said her reason for
entering the pageant was to
hae fun. "I get to meet new
girls my age and I get the op-
portunity to represent this
r.onderful county."
Thor wore a sapphire blue,
strapless gown, the top glis-
tening with sequins, and, he
boitom, sequined throughout.
XWItt w6rf"agoWtr-dfpe --
cock blue, with halter straps,
full-flow ing skirt of scalloped
layers of chiffon decorated
with pearls, beads and
sequins.
Despite technical difficul-
ties disrupting Watt's model-
ing, she carried on
unperturbed prompting Nu-
catola to shout: "Break that
CD!"
Williams wore a deep blue-


green fitted gown with beaded
bodice, with a slit, and
trimmed in beads.
Jackson wore a gown of Wa-
termelon pink. The flowing
A-line organza dress has a'fit-
ted bodice with a satin under-
lay. The bodice was accented
with a pattern of iridescent
beads ,nd sequins.
Revell took her final walk
as Watermelon Princess, and
returned to the stage where
Watt was named the winner,
and crownc_.


Final Week
(Continued From Page 1)
6 p.m., at the Opera House.
Featured singers will in-
clude.The)Brightside Spiritual
Singers, the Angel Band, so-
loist Lucy Quick, the Big
Bend Hospice Music Therapy
Group.
Refreshments will be served
and a love offering will be
taken at the door, to benefit
Big Bend Hospice.
Wrapping up Festival
Events will be the Rodeo at 8
p.m.


NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING
OF MONTICELLO CITY COUNCIL

The Monticello City Council will meet on
Thursday, June 22, 2006 at 5:00 p.m. Items
on the agenda include:

1. A downtown landscaping project grant proposal
2. Workshop to discuss water/sewer rates

The Meeting will be held at City Hall, 245
E. Washington Street, Monticello, Florida


DANA JANE WATT


AMANDA HUNT


JAMIE MALLOY


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Monticello
News

Classifieds


997-3568


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HOME HEALTH NURSES

Thursday, June 22, 2006
7:00 a.m. 9:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.
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Archbold Home Health Services i-. currently hiring rur-es to work
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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 14, 2006 PAGE 3


MATHEW MELVIN AVA CORLEY
0-5 Months 0-5 Months


Baby Contest

Winners Named


FRAIN HUNT
Staff Writer

Winners of the Watermelon-
Festival Baby Contest were
announced during the Little
King and Queen Pageant, Sat-
urday, June 3.
Winners include: 0-5
months-old, girl, Ava Corley,
boy, Matthew Melvin.


6-12 months-old, girl,
Ashlynn Peebles, boy, Gan-
nett Fulford.
One year-olds, girl, An-
-draya Rosas, boy, Juvon
Pettway.
Two year-olds, girl, there
were no entries, boy, Trent
IRabon.


ASHLYNN PEEBLES GANNETT FULFORD JUVON PETTWAY
6-12 Months 6-12 Months 1 Year Old


Four year-olds, girl, Am- -
ber Knowles, boy, Austin
Wheeler.
Spokesperson Leslie Rabon
said there were only 43 en-
tries this year, many less than
in the past.
"I think the reason for that,
is because we held it earlier
this year and it threw some


parents off," said Rabon.
She advised that next year's
baby contest will be held at
the same time as this year, in
the sequence of Festival
Events.
Winners will then be an-
nounced during the Little King
and Queen Pageant during the
first week of June.


Serving as judges for the
Baby Contest were; Christy
Goodman of Perry, Allison
Bishop of Taylor County, and
Jennifer Powell of May-
bourne.
Awards for the winners
were presented during the
Festival Queen Pageants,
Saturday.


Willis Chiropractic Clinic
Serving South Georgia and North Florida Since 1984
Member of
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Over 17 years experience in Peer Review,
-Presently serving as State Chairman
b -= Located across from the Big Oak,
W= 403 North Crawford Street
Dr. Tim Willis Thomasville, Ga.
We are a Family Practice providing care for:
*Automobile Accidents *Worker's Compensation
*Sports Injuries *Neck and Back Pain
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*Shoulder Pain


starts Aug10
in Monticello, Fla.
Mandatory Orientation Aug 3

Website WWW.NFCCEDU
TO REGISTER: SI



If It Happens In
Jefferson County,
You'll Read Ktn The----
Monticello News


ANDRAYA ROSAS
1 Year Old


TRENTON RABON
2 Years Old


.... .. ,.' MIT ....i..R.
TRAVIS WHEELER JUSTIN WHEELER
3 Years Old 4 Years Old

Library Plans Two

Summer Craft Camps


DEBBIE SNAPP !
Staff Writer
Two series of Craft Camps
will be held at the library, this
month, as part of its Reading
Summer Program.
Extension Agent Heidii
Copeland is the camp instruc-
tor.
The Craft Camps will begin
at 10:30 a.m. on the Fridays
of June 16 and 30.
i In keeping with the Library
theme "Book Feast," the craft


camps will center around
books.
At the first camp, Art Feast,
participants will make snippet
fabric pictures.
During the second camp, Sa-
fari Supper, participants will
learn the art of Kente paper
weaving.
To comment about pro-
grams to be added at the
library, contact Linda
Hamedani, director at 342-
0205.


Call for an appointment today (229) 226-5252
We can see you either on the same day or within 24 hours.
Visa/MasterCard Accepted. Most Insurance Accepted. We will file your insurance for you.


AMBER KNOWLES
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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 14, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O: Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net





New Medicines


Offer Hope


Opinion & Comment


According to a report re-
leased by the Pharmaceutical
Research and Manufacturers of
America (PhRMA), more than
900 new medicines are now in
the research and development
pipeline to treat the diseases of
aging.
The new medicines include
146 medicines for heart dis-
ease and stroke and 399 for
cancer. Alzheimer's disease
along could afflict 16 million
people by the middle of this
century; America's research-
based pharmaceutical compa-
nies are currently developing
27 medicines to treat it. Other
medicines now being re-
searched include:
48 for diabetes, of which
half of all cases occur in peo-
ple over age 55. A new,' first-
in-class medicine in develop-
ment has been shown in clini-
cal trials to significantly im-
prove long-term glycemic con-
trol;
20 for osteoporosis, a ma-
jor health threat for an estimate
44 million Americans age 50
and older; and
19 to treat depression,
which affects an estimated 6.5
million Americans 65 and
older;,
17 for Parkinson's disease,
60,000 new cases of which are
diagnosed each year. A nerv-
ous system factor gene therapy
being studied aims to deliver


the growth factor, GDNF, into
the brain to prevent degenera-
tion of nerve cells and the loss
of the neurotransmitter dopa-
mine.
Other medicines in develop-
ment target bladder and kidney
diseases, eye disorders, gastor-
intestinal disorders, osteoar-
thritis pain, prostate disease,
respiratory and lung disorders,
rheumatoid arthritis, skin con-
ditions, age-related macular
degeneration and other condi-
tions of aging.
All of these medicines are ei-
ther now in human clinical
trails or are awaiting the ap-
proval of the Food and Drug
Administration.
"As life expectancy
increases, older Americans
face challenges to their health,
productivity and
independence," said PhRMA
president and CEO Billy
Tauzin.'
"Research-based pharmaceu-
tical companies are actively
searching for treatments and
cures to help patients live
healthier lives as they age."
The Pharmaceutical Re
search and Manufacturers of
America (PhRMA) represents
the country's leading pharma-
ceutical research and biotech-
nology companies, which are
devoted to inventing medicines
that allow patients to live
longer, healthier and more pro-
ductive lives.


Viewing Passing Parade


Sharing ransom thoughts:
I hope the person who vi-
ciously attacked Franklin
Hightower is brought to justice
soon. Anybody who would
beat a 70-year old man with a
wrench needs to be removed
from society for a long time.
Franklin has been a serious,
knowledgeable school board
member and stellar city worker
and I'm glad he's gonna be
okay.
Jack Carswell's Gadsden
Square is taking shape. This
facility, with retail shops and
upstairs apartments, will be an
asset for downtown.
Our Legislative Committee
has done good work for us.
Brainchild of Skeet Joyner, the
group has been lobbying for
Jefferson County over the past
several years. Back'when Al-
len Boyd was in the Legisla-
ture, he told me Jefferson
County had virtually no pres-
ence in the capital while other
counties he represented had
high profiles. Our Legislative
Committee has changed that.
I very much appreciate the
many contributions of Dick
Bailar. This guy is amazing
with smarts and energy and a


Publisher's


Notebook


Ron Cichon


willingness to serve his com-
munity in a variety of ways.
He's one of the stars on the
Legislative Committee.
Hal Bennett is doing some
serious remodeling at John-
ston's Locker Plant. There's a
daily lunch special and dining
facilities inside and outside.

Seems to me heterosexuals
have done a pretty good job of
messing up marriage without
help from gays. The failure
rate of marriage is above 50
percent, and statistics show
more and more people are
avoiding marriage.
There's a huge number of
volunteers who make the an-
nual Watermelon Festival a


success. They're the unsung
heroes of the festival.
Serious campaigning is al-
ready underway in the race for
Clerk of Court. Yard signs are
popping up everywhere.
Kiplinger says we're stuck in
Iraq, painfully caught, with no
real choice but to stay the
course for the next five or 10
years. The cost of persever-
ance will be huge in human
casualties, mounting federal
spending, loss of U.S Prestige
in the world, and in less ability
to deal with other hot spots.
Most recent poll shows 55
percent of Americans think go-
ing to Iraq was a mistake.
President Bush's harshest
criticism of his immigration


plan is coming from his own
party. It will be interesting to
see how this plays out espe-
cially with the midterm elec-
tions looming.
The Festival Bed Race is a
lot of fun drawing a good
crowd each year.
Rotarians will be serving up-
barbecue Friday night. The
club has been cooking and
serving barbecue dinners for
more that 20 years during the
Watermelon Festival. One
year Rotarians fed 1,000 peo-
ple.
Tom Conley will be installed
as Rotary president later this
month succeeding Wild Bill
Beaty.
Nice to see the Getch boys in
town for their parents'
50th wedding anniversary
celebration...Tony de Sercey
was by the office saying nice
things about me. What a
guy!...Lots of people have
called to say they really enjoy
Merry Ann Frisby's Friday
columns...Brian Ashworth is
quite the host at his Sage
Restaurant... Joy of small town
living is to know people every-
where you go.


Theory Lacks Credibility


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
Junel2, 1996
If commissioners have
their way, voters here will de-
cide if game rooms are al-
lowed at Jefferson County
Kennel Club. By a 4-0 vote
Thursday, commissioners
opted to put the issue on the
November election for a straw
ballot.
The spaghetti dinner and
Watermelon Hoedown that
kicked off the first of the three
weeks 46th Annual Water-
melon Festival were both
highly successful, Festival
Chairperson Joy Eveland said
Monday.
As part of their contribution
to the restoration of the court-
house and downtown Monti-
cello, the United Daughters of
the Confederacy volunteered
to clean and fence the Confed-
erate Monument on the court-
house lawn.

TWENTY YEARS AGO
June 11, 1986
The selection of the Water-
melon Festival Queen and
court for 1986 will take place
Friday night at 8 in the Jeffer-
son County High School Audi-
torium.
After months of trying to get
the Department of Environ-
mental Regulations to make a
decision on city sewer im-
provements, the ball is starting


to roll.
According to local mer-
chants, Dad doesn't get as
many gifts on his day as Mom
does on hers.

THIRTY YEARS AGO
June 10, 1976
New Florida Highway Pa-
trol Trooper stationed in Jef-
ferson County is Ken Fortune.
Dr. Virgil Strickland, princi-
pal of Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy, retires from his post June
30th. He has served Aucilla
since Sept. 1974.
Tina Long and Debbie Ehler
have been named recipients of
the scholarships given annu-
ally by the Florida Upsilon
Tau Chapter of Beta Sigma
Phi.

FORTY YEARS AGO
June 10, 1966
Mr. and Mrs. A.N. Watson of
Monticello Nursery attended
the Georgia Nurserymen's
Convention at Jeckyll Island
this week.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
June 10, 1956
Mr. and Mrs. L.F. Raley left
Sunday for a week's vacation
in the mountains. They will
spend the following week at
the beaches.
Jack and Bill Counts are at--
tending Boys' State this week-
end.


By DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist


So what of cavemen and the
Neanderthal man? Not widely
publicized were the results of
DNA testing on the famous
Neanderthal skull.
For years, scientists have
convinced the gullible public
that skeletal remains found in a
cave in France are indeed the
remnants of our biological ape
like ancestors. Well DNA re-
sults proved that there is abso-
lutely no significant humanoid
DNA in the infamous Nean-
derthal Man's skull!!
So it is not human at all, but
an ancient form of ape that did
not jump genetic lines. Never-
theless, the scientific commu-i
nity continues to reference the
Neanderthal Man as a forerun-


ner of the human race, without
challenge.
I get upset every time some
academic scholar digs up an
ancient monkey skull, and it is
instantly given credibility as
another remarkable find of
prehistoric human remains. No
scientific proof is necessary,
just the "observations" of the
learned professor.
I laughed at a documentary
on television where the origi-
'nal discoverer of the Neander-
thal cave and remains was re-
visiting the site. This distin-
guished old gentleman waxed
eloquently about the life styles
of these "early humans".
His presentation, of course,
was filled with "must have
beens", "surely could have
beens" and "undoubtedly
wases". Not a single credible
shred of scientific evidence to


prove any points.

Just imagine, in the places
where they excavated and
found the remains of the Nean-
derthals, a large concentration
of petrified wild flower seeds
was unearthed. From this sim-
ple discovery, the old gentle-
man made the astounding
conclusion that the Neander-
thals placed flowers on the
graves of their dead, thus
"proving conclusively" that the
existence of early human
"emotions".
Well professor, how about
decomposing organic remains
make wonderful fertilizer upon
which wind blown wild flow-
ers seeds could easily growth,
more readily survive and re-
produce in exceptional num-
bers?
That makes a lot more "sci-


entific" sense to me than the
phenomenal leap that prehis-
toric apes purposely growing
flowers on graves! But he is
an "expert" so I am sure that
the vast majority of the view-
ing audience came away from
that presentation convinced
that prehistoric humanoids are
a fact.
Time and further advance-
ments in technology (if not
misused) will draw us closer to
answers regarding man's exis-
tence on this earth. As of
today, evolution remains an
unproven "theory".
To reference evolution or
teach it to students as though it
is a "fact" is categorically
wrong and educationally un-
ethical. Theories are theories
and nothing more until scien-
tifically or otherwise proved
(See Theory Page 12)


New Bill Should Be Vetoed


By JOHN HEDRICK
Panhandle Citizen Coalition

There is a new bill on the
Governor's desk which con-
tains hazardous provisions for
those citizens who live or who
may live in the coastal high
hazard areas of the state. It
would allow more residents to
move into these vulnerable
coastal areas.
The bill, (HB 139) states
evacuation times would deter-


mine whether developers could
add more homes and condo-
miniums along the coast. But
the measure allows developers
that agree to build roads, con-
struct hurricane shelters or
contribute cash to offset their
projects and construct them.
The legislation sets a 12-
hour deadline for counties and
cities to evacuate residents to
shelters. The evacuation would
apply to people who live in
coastal high-hazard areas,
which are susceptible to storm


surge in relatively mild Cate-
gory I storms. The must be
shelter space "reasonably ex-
pected" to accommodate resi-
dents of any new coastal de-
velopment. Counties also
must be able to evacuate vul-
nerable residents out of the
county within 16 hours. If a
proposed development endan-
gers those escape plans, the lo-
cal government would have to
either turn down the project or
extract promises from the de-
veloper to mitigate the harm to


be done.
This bill is more feel good
language from the Legislature
which will put more people in
harm's way. There are no
timetables for construction of
these shelters (and we
shouldn't be putting any shel-
ters in the coastal high hazard
areas in the first place), and the
developers only have to pay
their share for road improve-
ments which would leave them
underfunded and unfinished
(See Bill Should Be Page 12)


From Our Photo File


CHAMBER OF' COMMERCE officers elected in Nov., 1990, include, from left, :Robert
Shepherd, vice-president; Dennis. Forrester, director; Delores Tuten, president;
Cheryl Lepanen, director; Yvonne Mediate, secretary/treasurer. (News File Photo)


la'a I















L ife sty le MONTICELL, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 142006 PAGE 5
_________________________________________ -. .. MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 14, 2006 PAGE 5


Festival Gospel Sing At


Opera House Saturday


CENTRAL CHURCH OF CHRIST recently named Jay Ty-
ree as its new pastor., From Left, Becky and Jay Tyree.


Central Church Of Christ

Names Jav Tvree Pastor


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Pastor Jay Tyree recently as-
sumed his duties at the Cen-
tral Church of Christ, located
at 100 Coopers Pond Rd.
He and his wife, Becky, -
first visited Monticello in
March, when he interviewed
for the position, made avail-
able by the retirement of for-
mer Pastor Wayne Warren.
The Tyrees relate that they
immediately fell in love with
the community and were ea-
ger to become affiliated with
Central Church of Christ.
The Tyrees came to Monti-
cello from northwestern Okla-


homa, where Jay taught
religion at the Northwestern
Oklahoma State University
and preached at the College
Hill Church of Christ.
Becky is currently complet-
ing her degree in Elementary
- Education, and hopes to teach
in the local school system.
The couple has one married
daughter, Elizabeth, who li'Ves
in northwestern Oklahoma.
Bible Study is conducted
10 a.m. Sunday at the
church, and worship service is
at 11 a.m..
Classes are also presented 6
p.m. Sunday, excluding the
first Sunday of the month,
and at 7 p.m. Wednesday.


Coalition To Honor Local

Child Care Providers


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Early Learning Coali-
tion of the Big Bend Region
invites local child advocates,
community volunteers, child-
care owners/operators, and
child care professionals to a
Child Care Provider Appre-
ciation Dinner, "An Evening
with the Stars," 6:30 p.m
Thursday, at the University
Center, building B, 1 Champi-
ons Way, at the FSU Doak
Campbell Stadium, in Talla-


hassee..
Child care providers will
be honored in the Counties of
Jefferson, Gadsden,. Leon,
Liberty, Madison, Taylor, and
Wakulla.
Awards will be presented to
-Dr. Pamela Phelps and Dr. El-
sie Burton for their long term
commitment to the children of
this community.
The Early Learning Coali-
tion staff and award recipients
are working to prepare young
children for success in school.
Contact Rue Luttrell at 385-
0551 to RSVP.


CASEY HANDLEY was crowned ACA May Day Queen,
recently. She was escorted by Matt Poston.


Rev. Wilson M. Hall is the
DEBIE SNAPP founder of the group.
Staff Writer Original members are:
Rev. Hall, LC Williams, Rob-
Among the final events of ert Parker, and Wendell
the, Watermelon Festival, is a Bivens, who travel with the
Gospel Sing, presented by the group.
Jefferson County Big Bend Kelvin Reddick, manager of
Hospice Advisory Board 6 ,the group joined in 1974.
p.m., Saturday, at the Opera Other members include:
House. Charles Greene, Sr., who is
Featured performers in- *'first leader, Calvin Williams,
elude: Brightside Spiritual .,Beniamin Baker, Patrick Red-
Singers; the Angel Band; The" dick, Janiel Baker, and Theo-
Chason's; soloist Lucy Quick; dis Richardson.
and the Big Bend Hospice *' The Brightsides released a
music therapy group, Keepin' 'CD in 2002 titled "Thank You
It Rural Singers, to round out 'Fbr Another Day."
the program. The Angel Band brings a
There is. no admission mixture of traditional and
charge, but donations are ap- nontraditional instruments to
preciated. Proceeds from the company their rich rper-
Sing will benefit Bog Bend o' o g a
toire of gospel and classic
Hospice patient care. country music.
The Brightside Singers Formed 10 years ago, the
originate from Monticello and Angel Band has entertained
began their singing career in .,, audiences in Northern and
1969. -



Humane Society

Notes Response To

Recent Mailings


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Humane Society President--
Caroline Carswell reports that
the mass mailing seeking
new members, to all county
residents last week, has al-
ready begun to show a posi-
tive response.
"We have already received
$600 in pledges and member-
ships," Carswell said Wednes-
day. We want to thank all of
those who have already re-
sponded, and encourage other
county residents to respond
also.
"Together, we can do so
much good for the homeless
animals in the county. The
shelter needs residents' help to
continue helping these ani-
mals."
She urged residents to _e-


spond to the Society flyer
with either, membership dues
($30), or volunteer hours, (30
hours covers membership),
pledge contributions in
monthly, quarterly, or annual
installments, and volunteers
for adoption booths, fund
raising events, foster care,
board of directors, the mem-
bership committee and shelter,
w rkd4ays, .. -- ...-....._
Residents are asked to fill
out the forms and send them
to JCHSI, P.O. Box 559,
Monticello, FL, 32345.
In related news, the shelter
will not be accepting any ad-
ditional animals until June 15
because the shelter is pres-
ently full.
Members will host an adop-
tion booth during the festivi-
ties at the Watermelon Festival
in the hope of freeing up space
for incoming animals.


Your body deserves it!



Integrated Therapeutic Massage

510-2268
Pamela Radcliffe, Ph.D., LMT, NCTMB
325 John Knox Rd
MA 39889 MM 15277







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or $18.99 (King Cut 14 oz.)
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..... ..


Casey Handley
ACA May Queen

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Casey Handley was crowned
the May Day Queen, recently,
at Aucilla Christian Academy.
She was chosen from 14
girls in the senior class.
Handley is the daughter of
Mary Pate and Randall Han-
dley.
Her escort was Matt Poston.



-S. AT "


Central Florida and Southern
Georgia.
They released a Christmas
CD in 2003 'and have just
completed their taping of an
"Old Time Gospel" CD which
includes some of the favorites
they will be performing.
Band members include Rick
Allen, vocals and guitar;
Susie Folsom, vocals and
acoustic/electric bass; Cheryl
Jackson, vocals and guitar;
Jeannie Calhoun, vocals and
percussion; Van Calhoun,
Harmonica; Justin Glenn,
banjo; and Jo McDanield,
autoharp.
Big Bend Hospice's board
certified music therapists have_


BELLAMY


formed the "Keepin' It Rural
Singers" to help raise aware-
ness of the benefits of music
therapy for patients.
Julie Callaham and Jennifer
Jarred, music therapists for
Jefferson County will be
- joined by three of their col-
leagues for this performance
Featured soloists Lucy
Quick began singing at Olive
Baptist Church in Monticello
at the age of five.
She sang with the His Word
Singers for 18 years through-
out North Florida and South
Georgia.
Garry and Joey Chason
from Perry will provide an in-
strumental gospel bluegrass
prelude of music, and Lucy
Quick will sing the opening
song.
The Master of Ceremonies
for the evening will be
FAITH Radio's Scott Beigle.


Bellamy CNA

For Hospice
Local resident Tanya John-
son Bellamy is a Home
Health Aid and Certified
Nursing Assistant for Cove-
nant Hospice.
She visits patients in their
homes or nursing home facili-
ties, providing a wide range
of services to them and their
families during a time when
they need support and com-
passionate care.
She is available at all times
and is willing to help with a
positive attitude and a smile.
"Caring for others is my
goal in life," said Bellamy


A.L. Hall Funeral Directors, Inc.
S dba

i 620 York St., P.O. Box 425,
"' L.-:_ Monticello, FL. 32344 "."
850r997-5553
Alfonza "A"' Hall ~ William Tillman ~ Vangie Scott
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Where Everybody Gets A Di$count!!
Funeral Financing, Gravesite Restoration, Headstone/Cornerstone
Installation-Financing 72 Hour Return on most Insurance Proceeds Per-
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S A








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If you are uninsured, you may
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Serving Madison, Jefferson & Taylor
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We accept Medicare, Medicaid &
most insurance plans


Open Mon. Fri. 8-5 walkins welcome, 24hr telephone coverage
North Florida Medical Centers, Inc.



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Expands Coverage Over and Beyond Original Medicare
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Call 1-800-561-6490 For More Information
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p R T FI NFWAY EB4. 2006


Salute


To


Royalty


~44~


Queen, 1st Runner-Up
CASEY HANDLEY, First Runner-up; Queen, Joanna
Cobb. (News Photos)


Princess, 1st Runner-Up
PRINCESS DANA JANE WATT; First Runner-up,Tori
Thor.


C. Luther Pickels,
C.P.A.
440 W. Washington St.,.Monticello, FL
(850) 997-1765.




1-800-329-7466
(850)997-5988
US 19 AT 1-10 EXIT 225



Gerry Medical Center
555 N. Jefferson St.
For an appointment call (850) 997-2511


URGER Burger King

S- 342-1050
1209 S. Jefferson St., Monticello, FL

Billy Simmons
Backhoe, Hauling and Septic
Contractor & Excavation Contractor
Phone (850)-997-0877
Cell-(850)-509-1465
Insured D.O.H. Lie #SR0971265

A. K. Strickland Golf-Carts
1184 A. Capital Circle NE
Tallahassee, FL
(850) 566-1342



G REE f S
I T EE
Professional Development for home gardeners and
horticulture professionals (850) 997-4088


Badcock
'" riOME IL|" i'RLF ,i -
&more
ALL OCCASIONS
(850) 997-4323
405 So. Jefferson St.
US Hwy. 19 South, Monticello, FL




Construction
Property Management Land Development,


GREAT ADVENTURE
OUTFITTERS
225 N Jefferson St.
Montitello, Fl
(850) 997-5900

Southern Friends
Antiques Collectibles- Custom Framing
235 N. Jefferson St., Monticello, FL (850) 997-2550
Publix Shopping Center, Thomasville, GA,
(229) 227-1500



Jefferson County Library
342-0205


375 South Water St.


John Wilson
Professional Painting Service
342-3288
Licensed and Insured # 4676


Morrow Insurance --
Agency quto-OwersInsurance
380 So. Jefferson St. Life Home ar Business
Monticello, FL
(850) 997-3912


inCz,Jrown
-- & Hardee, P.A. -
Attorneys at Law
1307 S. Jefferson St., Monticello, FL
(850) 997-8181


SAGE
RESTAURANT"
1305 W. Washington St.
(850) 997-2341


Wells Fargo Home Mortgage
Marianne Arbulu
1701 Hermitage Blvd., Suite 101,
Tallahassee, FL 32208
(850) 906-0022

o., East Tallahassee KOA
Ph. (850)-997-3890
Resv. 1-800-KOA-3890
Fax: (850)-997-1509
Located south of Monticello on County Road 259




(850) 933-8167
(850) 509-7914
Lie. & Insured ec13001894

Md Parkway Pines
f Land/Home Packages
Located FL/GA Parkway
Just A Few Miles South Of The Georgia Line On
U.S. 19, Monticello, FL (850) 997-1878



P.S. Art Company
'Custom Contract Framing
(850) 997-8600
Fax (850) 997-8602


Ono~,







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 14, 2006 PAGE 7


Salute


To


Royalty


Little King And Queen
NICOLAS SWICKLEY, Little King, MC Laren Finney, Kenlie Harvey, Little Queen.
(News Photo)


McDonald's
I'm loving' it'.
5185 S. Jefferson St., Monticello, FL
(850) 997-4979

'WAUKEENAH
Fertilizer & Far: SUPPLY INC.
9643 WAUKEENAH HWY., WAUKEENAH, FL
(850) 997-4460


EDENFIELD .HARDWARE
155 No. Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL
(850) 997-2144 Fax (850) 997-4624


Danny's Collisions
&
Customs, LLC
765 E. Washington St.
(850) 997-1500


Hilltop Country Store
(Full Service Deli & Restaurant)
14807 Mahan Dr., Tallahassee, FL
(850) 906-0752


Monticello Printers
&
Office Supplies
(850) 997-3478 Fax (850) 997-6759


SCAP IT OFF
SCREEN PRINTING
< & EMBROIDERY
FOR ALL OCCASIONS
(850) 997-6023


Gene Hall
County Commissioner
(850) 997-0281
email: ghallboard@yahoo.com


PHILIP SEATS
FRAMING
CUSToM HoMES (850) 545-8493
Insured ~Lic.#CGC1505570


MALLOY'S NURSERY
283 7N. Jefferson St.
Monticello, FL
(850) 997-3661


CAMPBELL'S PLUMBING LLC
2369 Dills Rd., Monticello, FL
(850) 997-8136
Mobile (850) 556-1476
CFC 1426846

DLMwUice lo J& ait & GtA, I c.
Flowers and Gifts for all occasions
230 N. Jefferson Street
(850) 997-4342 Fax (850) 997-1404
email: rub6453@aol.com


R. Winston Connell
Realtor
310 So. Jefferson St.
(850) 997- 4780 (850) 997-5252
Mobile: (850) 545-5783

Blue Bird Homes
& Lands, Inc.
1623 W. Washington St., Monticello, FL
(850) 997-1360
Realtors S.W. Ellis, Linda Alexander,
Reginald Ofuani and Sheila Slik

Thomas B. Scott, Sr.
SEPTIC TANK & LAND CLEARING
PH. (850) 997-5536
CELL (850) 933-3620

SBUDD HOME
1 H FURNISHINGSS
MflRIAMN MONTICELLO PERRY LAIKE CITY TOI.AlMHSSEE OUINCY
1317 S. Jefferson St., Monticello, FL
(850) 342-3201


Freddt Pitts Agency Manager
Doug Helms Agent
105 W. Anderson St., Monticello
503 W. Base St., Madison
(850) 973-4071


NESTLEWATE-RS
(850) 997-2100
WWW.MADISONBLUE.ORG


Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
Residential ~ Commercial
Interior ~ Exterior
(850) 997-7467 (850) 544-2917


Sorensen Tire Center
Jeff Sorensen
1300 North Jefferson St.
Montecello, FL
.(850) 997-4689


Brynwood
Center
1656 So. Jefferson St., Monticello, FL
(850) 997-1800
Charmion Holmes, Administrator


SNorth Florida Abstract
& Title Co.
220 So. Cherry St., Monticello, FL
Ph. (850) 997-2670 Fax (850) 997-3412
email: john@northfloridaabstract.com

Frank Spanarelli
AdVa/,CSeI Store Manager
AutoPat1321 S. Jefferson
em rady in ance. Monticello, FL
(850) 997-4444


.Avera-CCark House
Bed& Breakfast
and Public House
580 W. Washington St., Monticello, FL
(850) 997-5007








PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 14, 2006

Haunted Tour, Ghost

Hunt Set Saturday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Big Bend Ghost Track--
ers will offer one of its
haunted tours of Monticello 8
p.m. Saturday beginning in
front of the Chamber of Com-
merce. (
"After the festivities of the
Watermelon Festival, the Big
Bend Ghost Trackers invite
those who are not faint of
heart for an eerie and spine-
tingling haunted tour," said
BBGT Founder Betty Davis.
Though members will not be


in period clothing, the tour
will be led by lantern light
and Davis guarantees that ap-
pearances will be made by
both Dr. Palmer and John
Perkins.
Tickets are $10 for adults
and $5 for children.
A ghost hunt in the old
1827 Cemetery will also be
available for $10 per person.
BBGT will also have their
new T-shirts that say, "Got
ghosts?" on the front and
"Monticello, FL does" on the
back; and their ghost photog-
raphy CD, which teaches peo-
ple how to photograph ghosts._


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FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on TV.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

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Catch it here at the

Monticello News
..I.Now


Join Us For watermelon Parade Day


S IN DOWNTOWN MONTICELLO

SATURDAY& SLUNDAY BREAKFAST BLIFFET
S6:00 A.M..- 11:00 A.M.................. 5.98

I SUNDAi LUNCH BlUFFET '
11:30 A.M. 2:00 M.................... 7.45 .

S. ATLIRDAY LUNCH BUFFET .
11:30 A.M. 2:00 P.M................. 7.45

y [j WEEK-DA LUNCH BUFFET
11:00 A.M. -2:00 ................... 6.95

"1 LARGE PARTIES WELCOME I
AT OUR SATURDAi BREAKFAST AND LUNCHEON
" BUFFET STARTING AT 6:00 .A.M.


The Water We Drink (2005)
I F i- Lamont Water System
We are pleased to announce that our drinking water meets
."-.-"f all federal and state requirements.
mmma
We're pleased to present to you this year's Annual Water Quality Report. This report is designed to inform you
about the quality water and services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a
safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually
improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to ensuring the
quality of your water. Our water source is ground water from one well. The well draws from the Floridan
Aquifer. Because of the excellent quality of our water, the only treatment required is chlorine for disinfection
purposes.

The FDEP conducted a statewide assessment ofpublic drinking water systems in 2004. This system was not
assessed at that time. DEP is in the process of conducting a source water assessment on this system. This
assessment will identify and assess any potential sources of contamination in the vicinity ofyour water supply.
A SWA report for this system will be available at the DEP SWAPP web site: www.dep.state./f. us/swapp. by
December 31, 2006.

If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact Bob Cooper at
(850) 997-0314. We encourage our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. Ifyou want to
learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings. They are held on the first Thursday of each
month at 7pm, 395 Watermill Road.

Lamont Water System routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and
State laws, rules, and regulations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on the results of our
monitoring for the period of January 1 to December 31, 2005. Data.obtained before January 1, 2005, and
presented in this report are from the most recent testing done in accordance with the laws, rules, and
regulations.

In the table below, you may find unfamiliar terms and abbreviations. To help you better understand these
terms we've provided the following definitions:

Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.
MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there
is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Picocurie per liter (pCi/L) measure of the radioactivity in water.


The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds,
reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves
naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting
from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
(A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants,
septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
(B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from
urban stormwater runoff industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production,
mining, or farming.
(C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban
stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
(D) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-
products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban
stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
(E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production
and mining activities.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations, which limit the amount of
certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for
public health.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some
contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk.
More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the
Environmental Protection Agency's Sdfe'Drinkihg'Watdr H6tline at 1-800-426-4791'.

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.
Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have
undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and
infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water
from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection
by Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water
Hotline (800-426-4791),.

We at Lamont Water System would like you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water
treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to insuring the quality ofyour water. If
you have any questions or concerns about the information provided, please feel free to call any of the numbers
listed.


"ND means not detected and indicates that the substance was not found by laboratory analysis.

Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) one part by weight ofanalyte to 1 million parts by
weight of the water sample.

Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (pg/l) one part by weight ofanalyte to 1 billion parts by
weight of the water sample.
Maximum residual disinfectant level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water.
There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Maximum residual disinfectant level goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which
there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to
control microbial contaminants.

2005 TEST RESULTS TABLE
** Results in the Level Detected column fd" radiological contaminants, inorganic contaminants, synthetic organic contaminants including pesticides
and herbicides, and volatile organic contaminants are the highest average at any of the sampling points or the highest detected level at any sampling
point, depending on the sampling frequency.
Contaminant and Unit of Dates of sampling MCL Violation Level Range of MCLG MCL Likely Source of
Measurement (mo./yr.) Y/N Detected Results Contamination
Radiological Contaminants
Alphaemitters(pCi) Dec-03, Mar, Jun, 1-2Erosion of natural
Alpha emitters (pCi/1)- Ju l-04 N 1.2 (avg) 0.1-2.9 0 15 deposits
Radium 226 or combined Dec-03, Mar, Jun, N 0.63 (avg) 0.1-1 0 5 Erosion of natural
radium (pCi/1) Jul-04 N 0.63 (avg) 0.1-1 0 5 deposits
Inorganic Contaminants
Discharge from steel
Chromium (ppb) May-02 N 7.2 N/A 100 100. and pulp mills; erosion
of natural deposits
Erosion of natural
deposits; water additive
Fluoride (ppm) May-02 N N 0.349 N/A 4 4.0 which promotes strong
fertilizer and aluminum
factories
Runoff from fertilizer
use; leaching from
Nitrate (as Nitrogen) (ppm) Jun-05 N 0.309 N/A 10 10 septic tanks, sewage;
erosion of natural
deposits
Sodium (ppm) May-02 N 3.06 N/A N/A 160 Salt water intrusion,
Volatile Organic Contaminants
Ethylbenzene (ppb) Dec-0 ar, Jun N 0.45 (avg) ND-0.96 700 700 Deishr ie es
Jul-04 petroleum refineries
Discharge from
Xylenes (ppm) Dec-03, Mar, Jun, N 1.52 (avg) ND-6.1 10 10 dispetroleum factories;cal
Jul-04 discharge from chemical
factories
TTHMs and Stage 1 Disinfectant/Disinfection By-Product (D/DBP) Parameters
For the following parameters monitored under Stage 1 D/DBP regulations, the level detected is the highest annual average (running annual average -
RAA) of the quarterly averages for Chlorine or the annual average of the quarterly averages for Haloacetic Acids, and/or TTHM. Range of Results
is the range of results (lowest to highest) at the individual sampling sites.
Contaminant and Dates of MCL Level Range MCLG or MCL or
Unit of sampling Violation Detected of MRDLG MRDL Likely Source of Contamination
Measurement (mo./yr.) Y/N Results
Chlorine(ppm) Jan-Dec N .A= 035-1.1 MRDL MRDL = 4.0 Water additive used to control microbes
TTHM [Total
trihalomethanes] Jul-04 N 11 N/A N/A MCL= 80 By-product of drinking water disinfection
(ppb)
U*


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IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY

DIAL 911








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 14, 2006 PAGE 9


ATTENTION

The Monticello Local Planning Agency
meeting scheduled for June 13th at 7:00 p.m.
has been postponed due to threat of inclement
weather, and has been re-scheduled for
Wednesday, June 21st at 7:00 p.m.


MMER

fedt time for NFCC


New Classes


-du


It Works Wonders.



American
Heart
Association


The Water We Drink (2005)
IJefferson Communities Water System, Inc.

='llSl We are pleased to announce that our drinking water meets
-"" all federal and state requirements.

We're pleased to present to you this year's Annual Water Quality Report. This report is designed to inform you
about the quality water and services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a
safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually
improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to ensuring the
quality of your water. Our water source is ground water from two wells. The wells draw from the Floridan
Aquifer. Because of the excellent quality of our water, the only treatment required is chlorine for disinfection
purposes.

The Department of Environmental Protection has performed a Source Water Assessment on our system and a
search of the data sources indicated no potential sources of contamination near our wells. The assessment
results are available on the FDEP Source Water Assessment and Protection Program website at
www. dep. state. fl. us/swapp.

Ifyou have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact Bob Cooper at
(850) 997-0314. We encourage our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. Ifyou want to
learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings. They are held on the first Thursday of each
month at 7pm, 395 Watermill Road.

Jefferson Communities Water System routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to ,
federal and State laws, rules, and regulations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on the
results of our monitoring for the period of January 1 to December 31, 2005. Data obtained before January 1,
2005, and presented in this report are from the most recent testing done in accordance with the laws, rules,
and regulations.

In the table below, you may find unfamiliar terms and abbreviations. To help you better understand these
terms we've provided the following definitions:

Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.
MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there
is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other
requirements that a water system must follow.

Picocurie per liter (pCi/L) measure of the radioactivity in water.

"ND" means not detected and indicates that the substance was not found by laboraibry analysis.

Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) one part by weight of analyte to 1 million parts by
weight of the water sample.


Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (,ug/l) one part by weight ofanalyte to 1 billion parts by
weight of the water sample.

Maximum residual disinfectant level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water.
There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Maximum residual disinfectant level goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which
there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to
control microbial contaminants.

2005 TEST RESULTS TABLE



** Results in the Level Detected column for radiological contaminants, inorganic contaminants, synthetic organic contaminants including pesticides
and herbicides, and volatile organic contaminants are the highest average at any of the sampling points or the highest detected level at any sampling
point, depending on the sampling frequency.


Contaminant and Unit of
Measurement


Dates of sampling
(mojyr.)


MCL Violation Level Range of MCLG MCL Likely Source of
Y/N s MCLG MCL Likely Source of
D et cted I Results Contamination


Radiological Contaminants
Alpha emitters (pCi/l) Jul 04-Jun-05 N 1.025 ND-2.7 0 15 Erosion of natural
(avg) deposits
Radium 226 or combined Erosion of natural
radium (pCi/1) deposits
Inorganic Contaminants
Discharge of drilling
Barium (ppm) Apr & Jun 02 N 0.0069 0.006- 2 2 wastes; discharge from
0.0069 metal refineries; erosion
of natural deposits
Discharge from steel
Chromium (ppb) Apr & Jun.02 N 7.5 5.9-7.5 100 100 and pulp mimills; erosion
of natural deposits
Erosion of natural
deposits; water additive
Fluoride (ppm) Apr & Jun 02 N 0.405 ND-0.405 4 4.0 which promotes stron
teeth; discharge from
fertilizer and aluminum
factories
Pollution from mining
Nickel (ppb) Apr&Jun02 N 2.5 1.2-2.5 N/A 100 and refining operations.,
Nickel (ppb) Apr& Jun 02 2.5 1.22.5 N/A 100 Natural occurrence in
soil.
Runoff from fertilizer
use; leaching from
Nitrate (as Nitrogen) (ppm) Jul 05 N 0.463 0.379-0.463 10 10 septic tanks, sewage;
erosion of natural
deposits
Discharge from
petroleum and metal
Selenium (ppb) Apr & Jun 02 N 3.9 ND-3.9 50 50 refineries; erosion of
natural deposits;
discharge from mines
Sodium (ppm) Apr & Jun 02 N 3.56 3.55-3.56 N/A 160 er intrusion,
leaching from soil "


TTHMIs and Stage I Disinfectant/Disinfection By-Product (D/DBP) Parameters
F.r Ihe k-.llk.A ri e pi er>r i-e r nored anudei Stage I D DBP iegulaii.:.r,. ihe le.el detecd15t is the higl-et .,nuril aerje irumrinng annual 3erage
RAA olf he qu.nerl, I erj.ge I '.f Chkc.rnie r the.anrtr .il avreoge .fihe quaiefl, j'.erjget; f:."a HIloaceric Aid; ir, .r T-rTHMI Rainge ol Reult.; ;
the range oflr jui i I,0 ei. Ie., hsghe ;II j the nd ,dutal .ariplnrg Ser
Contaminant and Datei of MCL Range NICL
Unit of sampling liulaioq Leed of Likel) Source of Contamination
Measurement (mojyr.) Y/N Dete Results ILG MRDL
Chlonne ppmi Jan-De,. N R.AA= 1-1 2 M RDLG MN1RDL = W.aer .drin.e ued iu control m.rcbe
TTHM [Total .236-
trihalomethanes] Jul05 N 3.1 3. 8 NA MCL = 80 By-product of drinking water disinfection
(ppb)
C a U No. of
Contaminant and Unit Dates of AL 90th sampling AL
ofMeasurement sampling Violation Percentile sites .. MCLG (Action Likely Source of Contamination
.(moJyr.) N Result exceeding Level)
(me > I r .) the AL
Lead and Copper (Tap afterr )
S1.3 1.3 ,Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion
Copper(tap water) Jun-Sep N 0.167 0 of5 1.3 1.3 of natural deposits; leaching from wood ,
(ppi)05. preservatives
1Leid i iap ter jun-sep N I f Cco.rr, :.n ofl household plumbirng ):eiT.;, efo:,.or,
(ppb) 05 I of natural deposits

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds,
reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves
naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting
from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:
(A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants,
septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
(B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from
urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production,
mining, or farming.
(C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban
stormwater runoff and residential uses.
(D) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-
products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban
stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
(E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production
and mining activities.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations, which limit the amount of
certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for
public health.

Drinking water, including bottled. water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some
contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk.
More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the


Environmental Protection Agency's Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.
Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have
undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and
infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water
from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection
by Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water
Hotline (800-426-4791).


We at Jefferson Communities Water System would like you to understand the efforts we make to continually
improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to insuring the
quality of your water. If you have any questions or concerns about the information provided, please feel free
to call any of the numbers listed.
1-- ----- i__..___________________


I


)f you are pregnant mid
looiking for an alteniative,
please call our attorney
MichaelJ. Costantino
fbn-.741051
1-866-603-5078
Press: I


SUPPORT




-ISEARCHN,


_I I


~~xl~uunrrm~mn~~rrrunlw~~












PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 14, 2006


S rts
* _f JI^Jfr I


.1


ISeminole Club Golf


Tournament Winners


TOP PLAYERS for the Bishop Farm T-Ball team were, from left, Theo Mack,
proved Player; Kean Thomas, Most Valuable Player; and Cami Young, Sport
Award. (News Photo)


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Annual Jefferson
County Seminole Club Golf
Tournament, saw, 41 golfers.
vying for first place.
Andy. Johnston, Mark
Bryan, Clay Cantley, and,
Larry Sno\w took first place.


osmnshI-
smanship


The second and third place
winners both shot a 57, so a.
playoff determined that the.
team of John Smith, Larry
Register, Jerry Kelly and Tim
Hew in, took second place.
Dan Phelps, Bobby Plaines,
Jeff Purrington and Steve
Schofield, both of FSU, won
third place. ,


Monticello 'A'S

Wallop Hilton 16-6
MAe 4 Il


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Monticello A's base--
ball team now stands 2-7 on
the season after clobbering
Hilton, 16-6, Sunday.
"I think we're finally starting
to. turn around," said Coach
Jim Norton. "We were pitch-
ing good. had outstanding de-
fense and %we hit really\ well, I
just hope we can stay on this
trend."
Norton added that the A's
only committed one error.
"That is a big turnaround,"
said Norton.
"Hilton didn't score a run
after the second inning, when
we shut them down.
On the mound, Lance Nealy
pitched the first three innings,
gave up three hits, six runs,,
four walks and struck out one
batter.
Reggie Norton pitched four
innings.. gae up one hit, no
runs. walked one and struck
out four.


ROTARY T-BALL winners at the Park Spring Sports Award Ceremony are, L-R: Na-
talie Sorensen, sportsmanship; John Thomas Walker, sportsmanship; Kelly Horne,
most valuable. (News Photo) ,


James Wesle\ rounded out
the game pitching the final
two innings. ga\e up no runs,
one walk and struck out five.
At the plate. Robbie Cam-
bric went two for five. with
three runs and one triple.
Ronzo Wade %went three for,
four. two runs and one'
double.
James Wesley went three
for five, scored one run, three
doubles and four RBI.
Tommy Johnson went two
for five, three runs, one dou-
ble, five RBI.
Kelvin Norton scored two
runs and Reggie Norton, Joe
Jones, Ron Graham, Lance,
Nealy and Curtis Hightower
each scored one run.
The A's face Ichuaway, 3
p.m., Sunday in a double-
header, there.
Norton concluded that with
the recent performance of the
A's, that he was looking for-
ward to a very competitive
game.
".We're definitely headed; in
-a positive direction," hetsaidi-i'1


Legion Horseshoe
Tournament Set.At Park


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


For further information, con-
tact Malloy at 997-5297.


Also playing in the' tourna- -
imerit from FSU were Rob
Wilson and Randy Oravetz.
Brian Searcy won the long
drive and was awarded an
umbrella.
Clay Cantley won the piut-
ting contest and was awarded,
a golf cap.
Todd Thigpen won closest
to the pin and was awarded
\\ith a putter.
Banquet guest speaker was
Rob Wilson, FSU sports in-
formation:, director, who, is:
said to have many great sto-
ries about Seminole athletics.
S The tournament and ban-
quet are the primary fundrais-
ing events for the Seminole
Club to provide $500 scholar-
ships to Jefferson County stu-
defits who plan to attend FSU
and past recipients who have
maintained high scholastic
standards at the university.
The club awarded ,seven,
scholarships in 2005..
Some of the funds \\ ill also
go to the Seminole Boosters
for a silver chief membership.
There are 25 scholarship
sponsors for 2006. __ --
These include: Antique
Week. Friedel and Dick Bai-
lar, Capital City Bank, Carrie
Ann & Co., C & F Fencing.
R. Winston Connell, Realtor,
Curry Financial Corp.; Fanta-
sia Enterprises, Radio Shack.
Farmers and Merchants Bank,
and Thomas Hogle, CPA
Jefferson Builders Mart,
Edward Jones Investments,
Kelly and Kelly Properties
Coldwell Banker, Geoff and
Pat Monge, Mdrris
Petroleum.
Morri'\ Insuranice, 6Noi-'a
Florida Abstracft& Title ,'Paf-
ford Oil Conipany, Riley Pal-'
mer Construction Company,
Price Vincent Contractors,
Dick Sauer, builder, State
Farm Insurance, Westbrook'
, Realty and William Timber.


Melon Festival Softball

Tourney Winners Told


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Recreation Director Kevin _
Aman reports the results of
the Watermelon Festival Soft-
ball Tournament, held Satur-
day.
The tournament began at 8
a.m. and continued until 1:30
a.m. Sunday morning, result-


ing in a total of 23 games.
Keen's Building of Live
Oak, won first place; Gibson
Products, a combination team
from Monticello and Talla-
hassee, took second place.
Bum's Vinyl Siding, a
combination team from Madi-
son and Tallahassee, won
third place; and BC Power
Design, a combination team
from Monticello and Tallahas-


"You Can't Be Without It"
Monticello News


DIVf


IN!


see, took fourth place. .
C. J. Bean of Keen's Build-
ing. was MVP.
"There was a really good
crowd throughout the entire
tournament, and some 100 wa-
termelons were awarded to
those hitting over-the-fence
home runs ," Aman said.
The melons were donated by '
Benny Bishop.
There were 12 teams comrn-
peting including; Gibson
products, 2 and a Cue, Boland
Timber, Burns Vinyl Siding,
Timberland, BC Power De-,
sign (last year'ssecond place
winner), B & D Farms,
Snotslingers, Waukeenah
Fence & Deck, Waukeenah
Outlaws, Moore-Bass Con-
suiting, and Keen's Building. i
I Aman reported that addi-
tional information, including
scores and game statistics will ,-
be forthcoming.


The American Legion Post-
49 will host its annual horse-
shoe tournament, at the Rec-
reation Park, Saturday.
The event is open to both
men and women.
The entry fee is $20 per
team, limit of 36 teams, and
prizes will be awarded to win-
ners.
Sign-up is 1-2 p.m., Satur-
day. The tournament is
scheduled to begin at approxi-
mately 2 p.m.
Wayne Malloy is coordinat-
ing the tournament.
'A drunk drive ruined sorifiethin'
,precious. Amber Apodaca.
Fripnds-.Don't Let Frionda Drive Drunk.


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NOTICE OF VACANCY ON CITY
LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY

The Monticello City Council is, seeking to fill a
vacancy on.the Local Planning Agency. The voluntary
position is open for city residents. Experience or
knowledge in planning, construction or architecture -
would be helpful: The Board Member must be
available for monthly evening meeting.

A letter of interest, outlining experience and.
knowledge, should be submitted to City Clerk Emily
Anderson, 245 S. Mulberry Street, Monticello, Florida


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Grant Targets women


Of Child Bearing Age


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Healthy Start Coalition of--
Jefferson, Madison, and Tay-
lor Counties, Inc., a commu-
nity based non profit
organization dedicated to the
improvement of health for
pregnant women and infants,
has received a $149,782 State
Grant.
The new funding will pro-
vide preconception education
and counseling services, to
women of child bearing age.
David Driggers of the
Farmer's and Merchant's
Bank, who serves as a Direc-
tor and Vice President of the
Coalition states that "We are
proud to have been selected to
implement this very important
health initiative for women
and look forward to a great
success in our county."
The services provided will
be targeted at women's health
issues that would negatively
impact subsequent pregnan-
cies and births.
Currently, Jefferson; Madi-
son, and Taylor counties are
experiencing a high rate of
babies with low birth weights
and a very high rate of infant
death, particularly in the Afri-
can American community.
Jefferson County is experi-
encing an infant death rate 77
percent greater than the state
average for all births, with
more than 12 infant deaths
per 1,000 live births, statistics
show.
In the African American
community in Jefferson
County the infant death rate is
almost 31 infant deaths per
1,000 births or more than 3.3
times greater than the state-
wide average death rate for all
births.
The percentage of African
American low birth weight
babies is more than double
;he state average for all births,
with 17 percent of babies be-
ing born with a weight less
than five pounds eight
ounces.
Recent efforts have concen-
trated on getting women into,
prenatal care early on.
Despite the efforts of
County Health Department to
facilitate early entry into pre-
natal care, the county's birth
outcomes have not signifi-
. cantly improved.
Many of the causes of the_


poor birth, outcomes are re-
lated to women's health prior
to their pregnancy.
After conception, most fetal
-development, including the
central nervous system,
hearts, limbs, eyes, and hear-
ing occurs within the first ten
weeks.
Most women don't enter
prenatal care until the elev-
enth week of their pregnancy.
This project, which is slated
to span the next three years
will seek to improve the over-
all health status of women, in
order to promote positive
birth outcomes.
The Healthy Start Coalition
will partner with the County
Health Department, as well as
with the Northwest Division
of the March of Dimes, local
churches and other interested
groups, to reach as many
women of child bearing age
as possible.
Kim Barnhill, Administrator
of the County Health Depart-
ment states that she and the
staff of the County Health
Department are committed to
improving the health of all
women in this county but es-
pecially those of childbearing
age.
"This grant will allow us to
focus on the promotions of
healthy behaviors to posi-
tively impact the health status
indicators associated with in-
fant mortality and low birth
weight babies," she siad.
The grant will fund one full
time counselor/educator at the
Health Department.
Grant activities will include
counseling, education, and re-
ferrals for women's health is-
sues. related to diet and
exercise, targeting nutrition
and obesity; medication and
drugs; home environment.
It will also target safety and
environmental hazards; life-
style, alcohol, tobacco, and
illegal drug use; medical .his-
tory, identification of risks re-
sulting from personal and
family medical histories; ge-
netics; and general women's
health issues.
The grant will be adminis-
tered by the Healthy Start
Coalition and evaluated, by
Les Beitsch, M.D., of the
Florida State University Col-
lege of medicine.
Services are anticipated to
begin in early July 2006.
Anyone interested in obtain-
ing more information may


call George Hinchliffe, Ex-
ecutive Director of the
Healthy Start Coalition of Jef-
ferson, Madison, and Taylor
Counties, Inc. at 948-2741 in
Greenville.


Monticello News
'You Can't Be Without It'

In State: $45.00
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Office 850-838-3727
Cell 850-843-3123


Law enforcement officials
continue to investigate the
beating and robbery of promi-
nent resident Franklin High-
tower.
MPD Chief David Frisby
reported Friday morning that
both MPD and the Sheriffs
Department were working in
earnest to solve the case.
"We're still in the process of
interviewing witnesses and
possible suspects," said
Frisby. "We will continue
following up on any and all
leads."
Investigator Chip Springer
added that officers are await-
ing the results from evidence
sent to the crime lab for
analysis.
Voncile Hightower reported
Monday that her husband,'
Franklin was still recuperat-
ing from the attack, in which
he was beaten about the
head, and required 42
stitches.
"He's still stiff and sore,
having trouble with his back,
but he's taking his medicine,"
said Hightower.
"He felt well enough Mon-
day morning, that I brought
him down to get a new
driver's license, which was
stolen during the robbery,"
she said.
Hightower is scheduled to
have the stitches removed
Tuesday, though Voncile're-
ports that doctors have no
idea of when he will be able
to return to work.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 14,2006 PAGE 11
. .. .. =, I I II... '


HSLFE

E.- SAVER


When was.

the last

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307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL 32303 (904) 414-0844


The Jefferson County Recycling Program accepts
the following items for recycling.

All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size)., milk jug4, water bottles;
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, oat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, et. ,

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center' located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and.
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?



Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

i*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
,contents) ,

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.



Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.




The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable. items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the :City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson,fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


When you invest in our community
through United 'Way, the returns are
enormous-healthier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. It's a dividend that builds a
' strong community.


Investigation Ongoing

In Hightower Beating









PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 14, 2006


Fish in Diet Boosts Health


Eating more fish is good for
your health. That's the finding
of research conducted by the
Harvard Center for Risk
Analysis (HCRS) at the Har-
vard School of Public Health.
The study, "A Quantitative
Analysis of the Risks -and
Benefits Associated the
Changes in Fish
Consumption," analyzed the
potential impact of consumer
reactions to federal advisories
that warn about the effects of
mercury exposure from fish.
Advisories could be misinter-
preted and keep people from
eating fish and seafood.
On average, Americans con-
sume less than half'the weekly
intake of fish recommended by
the federal government, in part


due to fears of mercury expo-
sure.
However, the immense
health benefits of fish and sea-
food far outweigh the minute
risk of mercury consumed fish.
"Fish are an excellent source
of omega-3 fatty acids, which
may protect against coronary
heart disease and stroke, and
are thought to aid in the neuro-
logical development of unborn
babies," said Joshua Cohen,
lead author and senior research
associate at HCRA.
"If that information gets lost
in how the public perceives
this issue, then people may in-
appropriately curtail fish con-
sumption and increase their
risk for adverse health out-
comes."


Since the body cannot manu-
facture omega-3 fatty acids,
people rely on fish to provide
this essential compound.
Eating less fish was also
linked to a significant increase_
in the risk of heart disease and
stroke.
The study concluded that
pregnant women, who are at
far greater risk for mercury ex-.
posure, could increase the cog-
nitive development benefits for
their unborn child by eating
the recommended servings of
fish per week and choosing
from a variety of fish and sea-
food low in mercury.
The benefit from fish con-
sumption during pregnancy
could amount to an increase in
IQ level for the newborn.


"There is no debate within
the scientific community that
the fatty acids in fish are es-
sential for human health.
Study after study demonstrates
that from birth to old age,
omega-3 fatty acids confer im-
portant health benefits, from
optimal brain function and re-
duced risk of heart attach
stroke to improved eye
health," said Joyce Nettleton,
D.Sc., R.D., author of
"Omega-3 Fatty Acids and
Health.
"Fish is a healthful food for
people of all ages."
Clear messages resulting
from studies such as this en-
courage people to continue to
enjoy fish and seafood as part
of a healthy diet.


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Bill Should Be Vetoed


(Continued From Page 4)
for years; this would result in
evacuation times being in-
creased.
A lot of lives and property
are needlessly being put at
stake as much as if you took a
gun out, aimed it and pulled
the trigger. The Governor
doesn't need to make this a
part of his legacy-he should
veto this dangerous legislation
and people need to let him
hear about it.
The bill is also a back door
to weakening .comprehensive
plans and to be able to increase
density here and there. It's
just not good planning either.
Regarding other proposed
legislation, on the positive
side, for the first time in 10
years, the Legislature passed
the Environmental Resource
Permitting bill (HB 7163)
which makes the Florida Pan-
handle subject to the same
stormwater and wetlands per-


Theory
(Continued From Page 4)
conclusively. Only then can
they be scientifically factual.
Evolution is a long way from
that reality.
Ultimately, if evolution is
ever accepted as factual, then
who is to say that it wasn't and
isn't part of God's overall plan
anyway? After all, in the Bible
God said, "Let the earth bring
forth the living creature after
its kind" and He also makes
reference to making man from
the soil of the earth.
So who is to say if and how
much evolution played a role
in God's divine sketch for
man. When we die, we are all
going to know. I chose to walk
with God. The atheist and ag-
nostics among us must accept
that choosing wrong and any
subsequent consequences are
irreversible once they die.
Sometimes the "learned" are
truly blind.


mitting that the rest of the state
uses. The bill isn't perfect-it
still will take until January
2008 to phase in the isolated
wetlands permitting and there
is no guaranteed monies be-
yond this year, but this bill is
better than no bill and the
Governor has promised to sign
it into law. The provisions
will be no ,weaker than any
other Water Management Dis-
trict's program and local pro-
grams will not be pre-empted
by this bill.

In related measure, the Leg-,
islature did not pass a bill dele-
gating to the Department of
Environmental Protection
(DEP) the small scale wetlands
permitting done currently by
the Army Corps of Engineers.
As lax as the Corps has been,
DEP hasn't yet seen a permit it
didn't grant and the more strin-
gent federal role is welcome.
Likewise, it is important so-
called Incentive or Perform-
ance Based Permitting didn't
move because this would both
haye Wvakkened, DEP s ability
to enforce existing, standards
and also would have given re-
lief to repeat violators.

The next bill veto candidate
is HB 683 dealing with Devel-
opments Regional Impact
(DRI), DRI's in many catego-
ries have been unnecessarily
eliminated. One of the most
glaring is to exempt boat mari-
nas, dry storage and wet slips
from the DRI process, which is
meant to identify environ-
mental and other regional im-
pacts. The best the Legislature
did was "encourage", not re-
quire, local governments to use
Boat Siting Facility Plan
guidelines when building MA-
RINAs, dry storage or wet
slips. If the bill allowed to
stand, local comp plans will
now be even more important
players in growth decisions on
many major projects and fa-
cilities.


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Healthy foods.
Compassionate
choices. These
are valuable
lessons to
teach our kids.
Why not start
at dinnertime?
Choose healthy
vegetarian
foods like
colorful pasta
salad, bean
burritos, or
peach
smoothies.
Tonight, make
it vegetarian.
Do it for
someone you
love.
Alice Walker
AUTHOi


WE TAKE THE
DCNT5 OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


www.floridakidcare.org
TTY 1-877-316-8748
sponsored by the Florida Department of Health


Monticello

News


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STATE OF FLORIDA DEPART-
MENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
PROTECTION NOTICE OF IN-
TENT TO ISSUt PERMIT I.D.
Number 0650001-007-AC The De-
partment of Environmental Protec-
tion gives notice of its intent to issue
a facility wide construction permit
to K&M Energy, LLC to modify the
permit so that it matches the pro:
posed operations of the Jefferson
Plant located at 423 Old Drifton
Road in Monticello, Jefferson
County. K&M Energy, LLC pur-
chased the Jefferson facility from
Jefferson Power, LLC on June 28,
2005. This facility-wide air con-
struction permit will modify the
permit so that it matches the pro-
posed operations of K&M Energy,
while limiting operational hours and
carbon monoxide (CO) emissions to
operate .below the prevention of sig-
nificant deterioration (PSD) thresh-
old of 250 tons per year. The
estimated potential emissions from
this facility will be 235 tons per year
of CO, 213 tons per year of nitrogen
oxides (NOx), 86.9 tons per year of
particulate matter (PM), 10.8 tons
per year of sulfur dioxide (SO02),
and 7.4 tons per year of volatile or-
ganic compounds (VOC). A person
whose substantial interests are af-
fected by the Department's pro-
posed permitting decision may
petition for an administrative pro-
ceeding (hearing) in accordance
with Section 120.57, Florida Stat-
utes. The petition must contain the
information set forth below and
must be filed (received) in the Office


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 14,2006 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$i.00 <
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


of General Counsel of 'the Depart-
ment at 3900 Commonwealth Boule-
vard, Tallahassee, Florida
32399-3000, within 14 days of publi-
cation of this notice. Petitioner shall
mail a copy of the petition to the ap-
plicant at the address indicated
above at the time of filing. Failure
to file a petition within this time pe-
riod shall constitute a waiver of any
right such person may have to re-
quest an administrative determina-
tion (hearing) under Section 120.57,
Florida Statutes. The petition shall
contain the following information;
(a) The; name, address, and tele-
phone number of each petitioner,-
the applicant's name and address,
the Department Permit File Number
and the county in which the project
is proposed; (b) A statement of how
and when each petitioner received
notice of the Department's action or
proposed action; (c) A statement of
how each petitioner's substantial in-
terests are affected by the Depart-
ment's action or proposed action;
(d) A statement of the material facts
disputed by petitioner, if any; (e) A
Department's action or proposed
action; (f) A statement of which
rules or statutes petitioner contends
require reversal or modification of
the Department's action or pro-
posed action ang (g) A statement of
the relief sought by petitioner, stat-
ing precisely the action petitioner
contends require reversal or modifi-
cation of the Department's action or
proposed action If a petition is
filed, the administrative hearing
process is designed to formulate
agency action. Accordingly, the De-
partment's final action may be dif-
ferent from the position taken by it
in this Notice. Persons whose sub-
stantial interests will be'affected by
any decision of the Department with
regard to the application have the
right to petition to become a party
to the proceeding. The petition
must conform to the requirements
specified above and be filed (re-
ceived) within 14 days of publica-
tion of this notice in the Office of
General Counsel at the above ad-
dress of the Department. Failure to
petition within the allowed time
frame constitutes-a waiver of any
right such person has to request a
hearing under Section 120.57, Flor-
ida Staiuies. and to paricip.ale a .1
party to this proceeding. -n s-ub-
sequent inler'ention "ill onl) be at
the approval of the presiding officer
upon motion filed pursuant to Rule
28-5.207, F.A.C. The application is
available for public inspection dur-
ing normal business hours, 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through
Friday, except for legal holidays, at
the Northwest District, 160 Govern-
ment Center, Pensacola, Florida.
NOTICE FOR LEGAL COUNSEL:
The North Florida Workforce
Development Board, Inc. is issuing
an Invitation to Negotiate for legal
counsel service. North Florida
Workforce Development Board,
Inc. is a non-profit organization, is
the administrative entity for certain
job training and job placement
provisions of the Social Security
Act, Title IV (Excess Temporary
Assistance to Need Families funds)
the federal Workforce Investment
Act of 1998; Chapter 2000-165,
Laws of Florida; et al. Among other
things, North Florida Workforce
Development Board, Inc. is
responsible for the operation of.the
Employment Connections offices in
Suwannee, Taylor and Madison
counties. Instructions: Parties may
apply by submitting a letter of
interest which Describes their
qualifications to provide


appropriate legal services Contains
a summary of applicable
experiences Provides appropriate
references Indicates their ability to
perform the work; and Contains a
schedule of fees. Submit letter of
interest to:- North Florida
Workforce Development Board,
Inc. P.O. Box 267, Madison, FI
32341-0267 by 4:00 p.m. on June 30,
2006. Late submittals will be
disqualified. Facsimile or other
electronic submittals will not be
accepted or considered. North
Florida Workforce Development
Board, Inc. reserves the right to
reject any or all submittals in the
best interest of the North Florida
Workforce Development Board,
Inc. North Florida Workforce
Development Board, Inc. is an equal
opportunity training
provider/employer.
6/9, 6/14, 6/16, 6/21/06, c
The Jefferson .County Planning
Commission subcommittee will meet
to discuss subdivisions on June 26,
2006 at 7:00 p.m. at the Monticello
Chamber of Commerce, 420 W.
Washington Street, Monticello, FL'
32344. The meeting may be
continued as necessary. From the
Florida "Government in the
Sunshine Manual", page 36,
paragraph c: Each board,
commission, or agency of this stafe
or of anyL political subdivision,
thereof shall include in the notice of
any meeting or hearing, if notice of
meeting or hearing is required, of
such board, commission or agency
conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the
board, agency or commission with
respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or hearing; he or she
will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such
purpose he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings, is made which record
includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be
based. For information contact the
Jefferson County Planning
Department at 445 West Palmer
Mill Road, Monticello, FL 32344,
telephone 850-342-0223.
6/14/06, c
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING:
The District Board of Trustees of
North Florida Community College
will hold it regular monthly meeting
Tuesday, June 20, 2006 at 5:30 p.m.
in the NFCC Student Center
Lakeside Room, NFCC, 325 NW
Turner Davis Dr., Madison, FL. A '
copy of the agenda may be obtained
by writing: NFCC, Office of the
President, 325 NW Turner Davis
Dr., Madison, FL 32340. For
disability-related accommodations,
contact the NFCC Office of College
Advancement, 850-973-1653. NFCC
is an equal access/equal opportunity
employer.
6/14/06, c

HELYNANT)ED
The Head Start Program is
accepting applications for
Teachers, Teacher Assistant,
and Cook Assistant for the
Jefferson County Center. Call
201-2050 for additional
'information. Applications can
be picked up at 309 Office Plaza
Drive, Tallahassee. Deadline for
submitting applications is
Wednesday, June 21, 2006 at 5
p.m. EOE
6/9, 6/14, c
Caregiver in Lloyd area,
caring/responsible, 8 a.m. 7


Housing Vouchers

* We accept all vouchers
S 2/2 $615 3/2 $715 N4/2 $895n $50 dep. ,
* Pool & Youth Activities

* 5756571 M1

Sr p


p.m., M-F, FT/PT, $50 per day.
Call 879-8698, 224-4131
6/14, 16, pd
Accepting applications for
fulltimel lumberyard personnel
with a clean driving record,
knowledgeable of building
materials and customer friendly.
Must be 18 year's or older.
Application may be obtained at
1400 South Jefferson Street,
Monticello.
6/7,tfn c
MAINTENANCE PT 36 Unit
Apt Complex Resume/Apply to
Heritage Manor, 1800 East
Texas Hill Road, Monticello, FL
32344 Fax: 850-997-7288
Phone: 850-997-4727
6/7,9, 14, 16, 21, 23, c
Cook & Housekeeper needed
in Boston, Ga. area. Experience
& references required. Full-time
with benefits. Must have trans-
portation. Please call Cheryl at
863-797-3526.
6/7, 9,14, 16, c
Teacher Positions Available:
Monticello Christian Academy,
Elementary, Middle, High
School, call 997-6048 for details
or submit resume to: MCA,
1590-N. Jefferson St.
Monticello, 32344.
6/2-6/30, c
Janitor/Maintenance: Part time
position. Must be able to
perform some maintenance as
well as janitor duties. Call
MCA, 997-6048.
6/2-6/30, c
Mechanic Waukeeriah Fertilizer
850-997-4460
tfn, c 6/7
Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn, c


$10 each; Goats, female $100
each. Leave message 997-0901
6/14, 16, pd
Deluxe'' Vulcan Conv ection
Oven. Superior Cooking &
baking performance, 40" W x
41 '/2 D,' $3,000 perfect for
restaurants.
Self-serving Drink Cooler
contains 3 shelves designed to-
hold bottles or can drinks $450
perfect for restaurants and
convenience stores. 459-2138,
997-4646.
6/9, 14, 16, 21, 23, 28, 30, pd


Would you like to rent an office
downtown? Call 997-5517%letave
message and phone nuniblw.
5/12, tfn, c


- 11iC UUwntILUwnl Ull 3jvs
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980.
11/30, tfn, c
Charming Country Cottage.
Perfect for quiet single or
mature couple. 251-0760
6/14, c
Rent together or separate.
Hangar lot on private airstrip.
Remodeled 2/1 Mobile Home on
1 ac. NE Jeff. County. Pets OK
997-4647
6/9, tfn, c
Cute and Comfy 2 bedroom, 1
bath. Walk to Library, Church,'
Downtown. $750,251-0760
6/14, c
Jefferson Place Apartments, 1 &
2 Bedroom, 1468 S. Waukeenah '
St. Office 300 Monticello.
997-6964 Equal Housing
Opportunity.


Health Care Equipment
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for a assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
available
1/19, tfn


Backhoe Service: driveways,
roads, ditches, tree & shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten 997-3116, 933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Painting Professional Int./Ext,
call Edith or Harvey for free
estimate, prices can't be beat!
342-1330.
5/24, 26, 31, 6/2, 7, 9, 14, 16, c
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd, 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/11, tfn
Ours is a "seeker friendly"
church. We believe that God
will meet us wherever we are on
our spiritual journey. Christ
Episcopal Church three blocks
- N -of the courthouse" Sundai
service at o10:30 a.m. 997-4116
6/14, c
4 STAR DOG CARE- Board
your small dog in my home. NO
CAGES! 24/7 companionship,
References Available. Call THE
ENCHANTED DOG HOUSE.
997-2515
6/14, 16, pd
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
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PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 14,2006





S....

(' Ale
" "".-' -
.l.


.SCOTT SLIK, engineer assistant, second class, served in the Navy for 10 years.
rently he oversees reconstruction in the heart of Baghad, Iraq.


Scott Slik Relates His


Experiences In iraq


Max Bilinski Recognized


For Prison Ministry

DEBBIE SNAPP

IS.i.. 7


Local resident Max Bilinski
received special recognition
recently for his volunteer
work on behalf of the Florida
Department of Corrections
(DOC).
The appreciation banquet at
the Blue Springs Conference
Center in Marianna on June 2
honored Bilinski and 14 other
. nominees from Region I.
Bilinski said he humbly ac-
cepted the Region I Volunteer
of the Year 2005 plaque
awarded to him "in apprecia-
tion of his faithful volunteer
service in prison ministry
work at the Jefferson County
Correctional Institute".
Every Sunday afternoon for
10 years now. Bilinski has as-
sisted Head Chaplain Joseph
Schwab as a lay minister and
has filled in for Schwab when
the latter was absent.
"He has gained the respect
of the staff and the inmates
Cur who see him as an honest man
dedicated to helping the .in-
mates in their journey% with
God." DOC Region I Direc-
tor Wendel Whitehurst said of
Bilinski.
Bilinski averages two hours
each week at the institution.
ttn.-ancn-, tI r t ho 1 e.i- : '


MAX BILINSKI has served in Prison Ministry with Rev.
Joseph Schwab, head chaplain, for ten years. (News
Photo)


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

County resident Scott Silk
'ho has been in Baghdad
Iraq in the heart of the city foi
the past month, close to Sad-
dam Husain's palace, -recently
shared his expereinces via
satellite telephone.
"I've been in Saddam's pal-
ace many times. It's
enormous." said Slik. ,"There
is.a lot of fine gold detailing
throughout the palace, marble
floors, crystal chandeliers and
fountains.
Saddam also provided-hi:
children with their own pal
aces, but, he didn't do as gooc
a job taking care of hi:
people.
"He was taking from then
so he and his family could
live a fat life."
Slik (EA-2, Engineer's Assis
tant Second Class), 'who ha
served in the Navy since th
summer of 1996, is present:
working in support of the U1
Arm, JASG, which is at
tached to the Naval Construe
tion Mobile Patrol-40.
"It's been busy and interest
ing," said Slik. "I'm working
6-7 days per week, 12 hours
day, and, I'm on call 24 hour
per day, seven days per week
"Ultimately, my entire pla
toon, works for the Multina
tional Force Iraq," said Slik ,
"We have built there
schools, a medical clinic, re
paved roads, resurfacing
sewers and repaired power
systems, among other
things."


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Big Bend Hospice will host
a Father's Day Remembrance
Service, for local- and area
families 6 p.m., Thursday, in
the- grassy area between the
Elaine Bartelt Center and
Hospice House, located at
1723 Mahan Center Boule-
vard, Tallahassee.
"The service offers a special
time of remembrance for any-
one who has lost their father,"
said Catherine Arnold, Jeffer-
son County's community rela-
tions representative for Big
Bend Hospice.
"Father's Day can be a diffi-
cult holiday, particularly if it
is the first Father's Day fol-
lowing the loss of your dad,


atte nance at the ser ice. <
He said that he is one of "Usually,' e expect to live
many military personnel from on a cot in a ltent, in the field, lby showing up on a regu-
m ny -lar basis, it tells the prisoners
all over the world including but I'n in, a trailer, sur- that I careI" Bilinski said. "It
that I care, Bilinski said. "It
Portugal, Italy, and Korea, 'rounded b\ sand bags and brings the, ut of
%who are %working on the re- thick, high concrete walls." brings them ou, 1
construction efforts. He added that he misses his themsele, mking them
S n children, twins Tre% yn and, more relaxed and open to talk
r "We teach the locals how to ,ln ste D to and communicate with.
- dowhatneeds to be done Nikita, and stepdaughter Dan- c te
Y : oversee e projects inspect ielle, extensively. Teemorecomfortable
oversee the projects, inspect with me,., and e% en know my
a them, hand them over to the "Shorth after I was de-
o plowed, my twins celebrated na. ,
government, arid. move on to
- the next project." their fourth birthday." he said: :Bilinski said he helps the in-
s i "We tend to miss a lot of im- mates understand that it's not
. Slik described how he re- portant dates over here. I'm God's fault that they are in
latest to the Iraqi workers and spending a lot of time just prison
the current dangers to the counting the days until I see
Iraqi's working in the recon- them again." F r 28 years Bilinski taught
struction effort. Slik does not know when he at the Jefferson Connty High
- "We're getting a closer view- will. be able to return to the School, followed by 11 years-
s of the locals, and the Iraqi US. of employment at the Jeffer-
- culture, more so than you see "I'm supposed to be home by' son County Club, where he
I on the neo s, he added. Christmas,. but it could be continues to help out when
"I'm learning to speak Iraqi, February or later. needed.
n and the Iraqis are learning to "This is a phenomenal city n
. speak English. Often we com- and country and after it is re- Bilinski will have been mar-
-miunicate using charades." built, it will be an amazing ried to his wife, Sharon, for
He said that workers are .country. .42 years come July, The two
- hearing the constant gunfire "I hope to go back to Iraq have three children.
s and mortar rounds, but he in about ten years and see the He is a members of the Ki-
e didn't feel; any immediate- people again that I have met wans Club and of the St.
Y danger. a this time around," he con- Margaret's Catholic Church.
"I'm a lot safer than they eluded..
- (Iraqi workers) are, they are
the ones being targeted," said
Slik. 1U
- One of the major differ- .G.tedCommunity RFeerwood, NC Preview Property
g ences in the American and M.oinntain Lots with Views of NC, VA, TN on June 4, 10, 1 I,
a Iraqi cultures that Slik noted aning On St
rs was the educational system.
r. a"They have schools for tod-
a- dlers, elementary, and high
a- school students, much as we
do, but all of their schools are
-e segregated by sex at all
e- levels."
g, Hie described hi living r s' m i m ma m ai i m
er quarters and food as outstand-
er ing, nothing like having to eat .


the MREs.


I


as it is one more reminder that
. your father, or brother, or un-
cle is no. longer with you,"
Arnold remarked.
This time for reflection will
allow those attending to re-
member their fathers in a spe-
cial candle lighting service
and find comfort and joy in.
their memories.
The Service will feature
music, reflection, and prayer
and is open to the public at no
charge.
Following the service, light
refreshments will be served.
Big Bend Hospice grief and
loss counselors are available
to provide information and

support to anyone in Jefferson
County who is grieving.
Contact Becky Allen at
878-5310 for more informa-
tion.


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