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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00138
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: June 7, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00138
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
    Main: Sports
        page 8
    Main continued
        page 9
        page 10
    Main: Classified
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
Full Text









FMB, Big Bend
Hospice Win
Bed Races

See Story, Photo, Page 3


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA-
GAV I:WSVTTT.T1', T.. "^" T.


Spring Sports
Program Honors
Participants

see Story, Page 8


New Program
Makes Salute
To US Police

See Editorial, Page 4


Retired Teachers
.Attend Annual

conference

Story, Page 12


Wednesday Morning






Monticello


13RTH VRA1RNO.l43.50CE'NTTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


wES

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7,2006


Hightower Beaten,Robbed


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Law enforcement officials
on Monday were still looking
for a suspect in the armed
robbery and beating early Fri-
day morning of a prominent
community member.
School Board member and
city employee Franklin High-
tower was recuperating at.
home Monday, following his
severe beating Friday.
According, to Hightower,
with whom the News spoke
,early Monda., he arrived for
work at the City Bam at 200
East York Street at approxi-
mately 5 a.m., his usual start-


incident Occurred Early

Friday On East York St.


HIGHTOWER


ing time.
Hightower said when he ar-
rived the building was dark
and the.perpetrator ambushed
him from behind once he en-
tered.
"It was dark, and when I
flipped on the lights, they did-
n't come on," Hightower said.
"He came up from behind me
and hit me on the top of the
head. I grabbed him, we went
do% n to the floor, and, ended
up outside the door.".
Hightower said that the sus-
pect struck him over the head
several more times during the


struggle % ith what police say,
was a blunt object. The re-
peated blows resulted in
Hilhto\.er's head being split
and requiring a total of,42
stitches. ,
The assailant then held a
pistol to Hightower's head
,and robbed him of his. wallet,-
which contained an undis-
closed amount of money,
along with other personal,
items. The suspect next
jumped in Hightower's city
truck and fled the scene.;
i Sheriffs deputies found the
vehicle a short time after the


Attack
SHighto\ermean\hile,was
transported to Tallahassee
Memorial Hospital, where he
Sas treated for his injuries.
!He '%as released later' that
evening.
The Monticello Police De-
partment (MPD) describes the
suspect as a thin, black male,
appro\miatel\ 5' 10" tall and
;weighing between 115 and
125 pounds The suspect was
wearing a white shirt and
baseball cap of unkno.v. n
color at the time of the attack.
"I'm going to have to change
my it'fesn le a bit," Hightower
said Monday. "I'm going to
be out for a while, but I'm do-
ing okay for having been


beaten up and robbed.
"The good Lord was oi. my
side," he added. "I. wasn't
shot."
Hightower has worked for
the city for near 20 years
and has served on the School
Board for 14 years. Prior to
his :city employment, he was
district manager for the Wal-
green's drugstore chain for 25
years, from which position he
retired.
This is the second armed
robbery in four months that
has taken place on East York
Street,
Anyone with information
on the case is asked to call the
MPD at 342-0150 or the
Sheriffs Office at 997-2023.


Chamber Dinner

Kicks Off Festival


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The 56th Watermelon Festi-.
val Kickoff Dinner, spon-
sored by the Chamber of
Commerce, formally opened
the 2006 festival events
Thursday night.
The program began at 6 p.m.
with a welcome and introduc-
tory remarks by Chamber Di-
rector and Festival Co-Chair
Mary Frances Gramling and
her co-chair, Nichole Honcell.
Gramling announced the-
program booklet's cover win-
ner, Alex Gulledge, a sixth
grader at Aucilla Christian
Academy (ACA).
Second place went to
Wendy Yang, a 5th grader at
ACA; and Third Place went
to Skyler Hanna, a 6th grader
at ACA.
Gramling also introduced
the Junior Miss and' Queen
Pageant Contestants and
Gretchen and Troy Avera,
this year's Parade Marshals.
Gramling once again en-
courage everyone to be a part


of the festival by getting in-
volved, volunteering, and pur-"
chasing a souvenir T-shirt,
hat, and lapel pin.
"With everyone's participa-
tion, this can and will be an-
other successful festival
year," she said.
The dinner consisted of
grilled chicken and comple-
ments, served by members of
the chamber, with a table of
homemade desserts set up for
diners to' choose their own
special treat.
Selling chance tickets for the
dozen or so door prizes, all,
donated by local businesses
and persons, were the festival
pageant contestants.
/ Sunnie Sorensen won the
grand prize, a color television
set donated by Buddy's Home
Furnishing.
Mary Ann Van Kleunen and
Ruby Whitson sold copies of
the Jefferson Senior Center's
cookbook, titled Recipes &
Memories, What's Cookin' in
Monticello.
Music, enjoyed by all in the
garden area .of the Opera
(See Dinner Page 6)


RIA WHEELER holds the basket of flowers she won as a
door prize at the Watermelon Festival kickoff dinner
Thursday night. See additional photos, page 7. (News
Photo)


Little Queen,


Ttng Named


KENLIE HARVEY AND NICOLAS SWICKLEY take their
first walk as the Little King, and Queen on Saturday
night. See additional photos, page 2. (News Photo)


County TO Erect Radio

Tower In Wacissa Area


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

County commissioners last
week gave Fire Rescue Chief
Mark Matthews permission to
pursue the installation of a
communications tower in the
Wacissa area.
The tower, which would rest
on Division of Forestry (DOF)
property, would be county
owned.
Matthews said although the
tower was not absolutely nec-
essary at present -- the depart-
ment shares space on the
DOF's tower -- he was think-
ing ahead.
"Forestry may decide to take
down their tower in the future
and we would then have to


look elsewhere for a place," he
said;
What's more, his department
-presently had the money in the
budget.
"The total cost is $21,000,"
Matthews said. "We have
$15,000 left over from a radio
grant. So I'm asking to use
$6,000 from the budget. There
is no immediate need for the
tower. But if a problem hap-
pens later, it will be much
more expensive."
Too, if the Sheriffs Depart-
ment ever had to remove its
antenna from its tower in the
Wacissa area, it could relocate
the antenna on the county-
owned tower.
The question arose whether
the tower would be needed,
(See Radio Page 3)


FRAN HUNT,,
Staff Writer

The Little King and Queen
Pageant on Saturday night re-
sulted in much applause, many
laughs, and Kenlie Harvey be-
ing crowned Little Queen and
Nicolas Swickley, Little King.

Much entertainment was
provided for the full-house
crowd. The evening began
with a welcome and the intro-
duction of Mistress of Cere-
monies Lauren Finney,, the
evening news anchor for
Channel 27.
The 16 contestants started
the evening with the perform-
ance of a cute little number
danced to the song "All-Star"
by Smashmouth.
Finney then introduced each
of the three judges; Christy
Goodman, of Perry; Allison*
Bishop, of Taylor County;
and Jennifer Powell, of May-
bourne.
Finney also introduced audi-
tor Maurie Beggs.
2005 Little King and Queen
Donnie Kinsey and Carly
Joiner next performed to the
country music number, "The
Watermelon Crawl". The two
moved in perfect time to a
dance number that combined
line dancing and 50s' dancing.
2005 Watermelon Princess
Ramsey Revell performed a
piano number by Bach, after
which 2005 Watermelon
Queen Alana Chambers sang
"Angel", by Sarah McGlaug-
lan.
The 16 youngsters donned
elegant formal wear, with the
boys dressed as little gentle-
men and the girls outfitted in
lace and frills.
The question-and-answer
segment produced some of
the cutest answers
imaginable.
Dylan Brumbley was asked,
"Who's is your favorite per-
soL"? His answer, "My little
sister, Tristan, because she
doesn't boss me around like
my big brother."
Megan Schofill said she



wanted to be president when
she grew up. The reason: "I
want to boss people around."
Elizabeth Hightower was
asked what she wanted to be
when she grew up? Her an-
swer,. "A teenager."

Harvey,
Swickley
Are New

Royalty

When Kenlie Harvey was
asked what her favorite ani-
mal was, she responded, "My
dog, Alan Jackson, because he
fell out of the back of my
dad's truck and hit his head
and he doesn't chew on my
toys anymore."
Chelsea Scarborough an-
swered two questions quite
creatively. She was asked
what her favorite color was
and why? She responded,
"Green, because it's the color
of money and Dad says
women spend a lot of
money."
She was asked what she
wanted to be when she grew
up? Her response, "I want to
be president because we need
a lady running this country."
Quinton Thomas was asked
what his favorite color was?
He answered, "Blonde, be-
cause my dad says blondes
have a lot (greatly empha-
sized) more fun."
Sarah Hall also came up
with a couple of very creative
answers. She was asked, "her
favorite animal and why, and
what was her favorite color
and why?"
She responded, "Frogs are
my favorite animal because I
might kiss one some day and
find my prince. My favorite
color is green because it's the
color of money and I like to
spend money and I'm not old
enough for a credit card."
The final tally of votes de-
termined that Chelsea Scar-
borough was the Little Queen
first-runner up; Megan
Schofill was the Little Queen


^-----I--~I~ ~-' --~I- I- .. r I I ii I ,= I _I'


1-15 1 irl I ZAKIN". '#J, Z)U 1


^,/^^/.


ei








PAGE 2. MONTICELLO. (FL). NEWS. WED., JUNE 7, 2006


LITTLE QUEEN AND COURT --From left, Kenlie Harvey, quen; Summer Eades, third
runner-up; and Chelsea Scarborough, first runner-up. Megan Schofill, second runner-'
up, not pictured. (News Photo)


LITTLE KING AND COURT -- From left, Dylan Brumbley, third runner-up; Mark Pre-
vatt, second runner-up;.Quinton Thomas, first runner-up; and Nicolas Swickley, king.
(News Photo)


VYING for the Little King and Queen title are contestants -- From left, Kenlie Harvey,
Kayla Burns, Nicolas Swickley and Chelsea Scarborough. (News Photo)
f 64


CONTESTANTS for Little King and Queen -- From left, Peyton She
mas, Emily Knowles and Sarah Hall. (News Photo)


ly, Quinton Tho-
raly, Quinton Tho-


MORE contestants for Little King and Queen -- From left, Elizabeth Hightower, Abigail
Morgan, Summer Eades and Ria Wheeler. (News Photo)


&


Aw"


AND YET more contestants for Little King and Queen -- From left, Mark Prevatt, Me-
gan Schofill, Sara McElveen and Dylan Bumbley. (News Photo)







Celebration


starts JulY 11
NFCC Madison, Fla

Website: WWW.NFCC.EDU LJO'U
TO REGISTER: MI

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THE JEFFERSON COUNTY
SCHOOL BOARD

Announces the regular school board meeting to which
the public is invited. The meeting will be held at the
Desmond M. Bishop Administration Building on
Monday, June 12, 2006 at 6:00 p.m.

Agendas may be picked up atthe district office at
1490 W. Washington Street, Monticello, FL. Monday
through Thursday between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m. A copy of the school board packet \\ill be
available for review at the district office.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 7, 2006 PAGE 3


L. Gary Wright, president
and CEO of Farmers & Mer-
chants Bank, announces the
addition of W. Theo Proctor
III to the FMB Board of Direc-
tors.
| Proctor is a graduate of Leon
High School and Florida State
University, where he received
his BA degree in business
management. He has. served in
numerous positions with the
Proctor automobile
dealerships, including both
management and non-


management.
His present role involves
strategic planning and business
development for the organiza-
tion, real estate and facility
management.
Proctor will be actively in-
volved with the FMB Board of
Director in setting the future
direction of the bank.
FMB operates eight branches
in Tallahassee, Monticello and
, Greenville, FL, and Thomas-
ville, GA.


FMB, Big Bend Hospice



SAre Bed Race winners


' FRAN HUNT
I Staff Writer


THE FMB TEAM gets ready for the bed race Thursday
night. Pushers, from left, are Jason Felix and Clay Dod-
son. Rider is Diane Payne. (News Photo)


Howard Middle School

Reports Honor Roll


Howard Middle School re-
ports the Academic Honor
Roll and final average for the
2005=2006 school year.
In grade six:
On the "A" honor roll is
Emily Howell.
On the A/B roll are: Brandon
Hill, Denzel Whitfield, Simone
Williams, Trevon Youman.
With a GPA of 3.0 are: Al-
exus .Chambers, Emanuel Finn,
Brionna Jones, Lanesiya Mas-_
sey, .and Shanice Young.


In grade seven:
On the A/B roll are: Gerrold
Austin, Jasmine Graham, Bria
Heard, Sara MacDonald,
Brandi Massey. ,
With a GPA of 3.0 are Yas-
mine Crawford and Aranthza
Fenimore.
In grade eight:
On the A/B roll are: Paris
Littlejohn, Lena Odom, Am-
ber Weinrich.
With a GPA of 3.0 are: Har-
old Ingram, Susan Marlowe,
Darisa Nealy, LaAshle Norton.


Five teams ran their hearts-
out Thursday during the Fifth
Annual Watermelon Festival
Bed Race, with several heats
resulting in the Farmers and
Merchants Bank team
emerging as the victor and
new owner of the coveted
"Bragging Rights" trophy.
A monetary award of $125
was also awarded to FMB's
charity of choice, Big Bend
Hospice.
The Best Dressed Bed
Award went to Robert Ashley
Framing for its Watermelon
bed, with its sheets colored
the same as the interior of a
watermelon, complete with
seeds, and the outer area,
headboard, footboard and side
rails decorated in green to
resemble the rind.
In the first heat, Big Bend
Hospice -- consisting of
pushers Greg Cummings and
Barry Graham and rider Julie
Conley (complete with
oversized sunglasses and their-
bed sporting colorful
pinwheels at each point of the
headboard) -- faced off
against United Way, with
pushers Bobby Plaines and
Ray Hughes and rider Karen
Frazee.,
Sheriff David Hobbs, serv-
ing as the official starter of
the races, had the opponents
carefully line up at the pedes-


trian crosswalk located at
West Washington Street and
Mulberry streets. He raised
.his arms into the air and
bolted them downward as he
said, "Ready, set, go!"
United Way shot out from
the start like a-bolt of light-
ning. In the turnaround on
West Palmer Mill Road, Big
Bend Hospice pushers -- us-
ing their feet on the head-
board lower rail for balance --
pulled back on the headboard,
resulting in a wheelie being
popped and an easy turn
around. The crowd cheered,
clapped and hbwled in reac-
tion to their stunt work.
Coming back to the finish
line, United Way was way
ahead. But Big Bend Hospice
rapidly closed the gap, kick-
ing it into overdrive and pass-
ing the other team just inches
before the finish line to win
the race.
In the second heat, Kiwanis
-- with pushers Rob Mazer
and Phil. Barker and rider
Brenda Sorensen -- faced off
against Robert Ashley Fram-
ing's "Savage Seeds", with
pushers Danny Morris and
Chris Hubert and rider Paige
Thurman.
It was a case of the rainbow
bed squaring off against the
watermelon bed.
And, they're offl
The race was close all the
way to the turnaround, after
which Robert Ashley Framing
threw a rear tire and the bed
veered off into the curb.


Little King, Queen Event


(Continued From Page 1)
second-runner up; and Sum-
mer Eades was the Little
Queen third-runner up.
The Little King first-runner
up was Quinton Thomas; the
Little King second-runner up
was Mark Prevatt; and the
Little King third-runner up:
, wasDylan Brumbley..
Other awards included
Sarah Hall, friendliest little
queen; Elizabeth Hightower,


best queen eyes; Peyton
Shealy, most helpful little
queen; and Kayla Burns, the
most stylish little queen.
Also, Emily Knowles, best
little queen dancer; Ria
Wheeler, best little queen
smile; Sara McElveen, little
queen funniest; Abigail Mor-
gan, best little queen hair;
Kenlie Harvey, best evening
gown; and Nicholas
Swickley, best evening wear.


And
The
neck,


they're offl
teams ran neck and
but in the turnaround,


Kiwanis easily won the-
race, but the Savage Seeds
weren't going to quit.
Morris and Hubert picked up
the rear of the bed, held it up
and finished the race with the
bed tail in the air and Thur-
man clasping the thrown tire
in her hands.
In the third heat, FMB --
with pushers Jason Felix and
Clay Dodson and rider Diane
Payne (dressed as a money
bag and the bed decorated in
Monopoly money) -- ran
against Big Bend Hospice.
"Ready, set, go!" Hobbs
said.
The teams were evenly
matched for the competition.
Half way back to the finish
line, however, Big Bend Hos-
pice threw a front tire, veered
over the curb and was out of
the race. FMB took the win,
crossing the ribbon unop-
posed.
FMB faced off against Ki-
wanis for the championship in
the fourth heat.


~I -~
A-


Radio Tower In Wacissa


(Continued From Page 1),
should the county decide to
join the statewide 800. mega-
hertz radio system. It was
pointed out, however, that the
800 megahertz system was ex-
pensive, extremely compli-
cated and long-term in the
implementation, should the
county decide to join it.
Besides, the 800 megahertz
system was not fail proof.
Should the county have it and
the system failed, the county-


owned tower,could serve as a
backup system.
Commissioners approved the
measure unanimously.


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Proctor Joins FMB

Board Of Directors


SUMMER


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Kiwanis was penalized and
held for 10 seconds after the
bed struck one of the cones in
the turnaround.
Though the Kiwanis were
penalized the 10 seconds, the
team closed the gap, inching
closer to FMB.
As FMB neared the finish
line, Dodson apparently en-
tangled.his feet from the rapid
movement .and the bed
crashed to the pavement.
Felix quickly straightened
the bed and finished the race
as the lone pusher.
Because the rules require
that each team have two push-
ers, the decision went to the
judges, who determined that
FMB indeed had claim to the
victory.
In the end, Big Bend Hos-
pice, although it was elimi-
nated, also came out winners.
They were awarded the
money, and FMB the trophy.









PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 7, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
SAPublisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays.- Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net
nammammm II k am .-:.u:. .


Program Salutes-...-


American Police Opinion & comment


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law enforcement officers to tell
their own stories why they
chose the profession and how
they made a difference," says
NLEOMF chairman Craig W.
Floyd.
For a processing fee, an offi-
cer, family member,, partner,
department or grateful citizen
can register a deserving law
enforcement professional.
Registration includes the of-
ficer's name and photo, agen-
cies served awards received,
professional history, special-
ized training, organization
membership, personal memo-
ries and links to departments in
which the officer served.'
In many families, law en-
forcement service spans sev-


eral generations.
The Roll Call has a unique
feature that will allow all fam-
ily members whose records ex-
ist in the registry to link to
their relatives and add new
family members as their fam-
ily's service continues.
The Roll Call will also in-
clude K-9 and mounted offi-
cers valuable four-legged
partners, who officers say also
deserve to be remembered and
honored. In the case of K-9
and mounted officers, their en-
tries will include an image of
the animal officer, basic bio-
graphical information, agen-
cies served, awards. received
and personal memories from
the officers) with whom they
served.
The Roll Call will be avail-
able to the public in the Na-
- tional Law Enforcement
Museum. It will be equipped
with powerful search tools that
let visitors learn about individ-
ual officers or departments.
Users can search for officers
by name; learn who served in
which department; locate de-
partment contact information,
department history .and awards
received; and view photos.
"The Roll Call will give
agencies a forum to share with
the American public their
unique history and accom-
_plishments," says Floyd.


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
June 5, 1996
It will now be up to the
County Commission to decide
if low-stakes poker and black-
jack will be allowed at the Jef-
ferson County Kennel Club.
James Thompson announced
Thursday he will seek the Dis-
trict 3 County Commission
seat. This will be Thompson's
third run at the office.
A Leon County man was
listed in critical condition in
Tallahassee Memorial Re-
gional Medical Center on Fri-
day, after having been shot by
a woman here.
The 46th Annual Water-
melon Festival gets underway
Thursday with the kickoff din-
ner, scheduled 4:30-11p.m. at
the Presbyterian Fellowship
Hall.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
June 4, 1986
Commissioners are eyeing
the possibility of levying a one
cent optional sales tax to bene-
fit the criminal justice system
in Jefferson County.
Cental, in cooperation with
the Public Service Commis-
sion (PSC), is currently in the
process of conducting a series
of tests that will determine the
need for extended service in
Jefferson County. Extended
service will mean dialing di-
rect to Tallahassee without
long distance charges.
Competition is stiff among


local watermelon growers each
year to se who will be the first
to ship out a load of melons.

THIRTY YEARS AGO
June 3, 1976
Miriam Snelgrove, a student
at North Florida Junior
College, has been named to
Who's Who in American Jun-
ior Colleges. She is the daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Snelgrove.
The first edition of the long-
awaited History of Jefferson
County will be off the press
and in the County June 10. Dr.
Jerrell H. Shofner, award-
winning historian and author
of the county history, will be
present to autograph copies of
his current book.
FORTY YEARS AGO
June 3, 1966
Twenty-five piano students of
Mrs. Clyde Sauls played in a
recital Sunday afternoon be-
fore about one hundred parents
and friends at the Woman's
Club on East Pearl Street.
Alan Counts was host of a
dinner last Tuesday evening at
the home of his parents, Mr.
and Mrs. John M. Counts, on
East Pearl Street.

FIFTY YEARS AGO
June 1 1956
Miss Amelia Alexander has
been awarded the General
Scholarship for the preparation
of teachers for Jefferson
County.


Society Strange, Confusing


Society has become so con-
voluted, I admit there is much
I don't understand.
I don't understand cell phone
rudeness. Do people yakking
on their cell phones in restau-
rants, theater lobbies, grocery
stores or doctors' offices fail to
understand they are being rude
to others around them?
I don't understand body
piercing. And, how about all
the tattoos on young people?
I don't understand baggy
pants with underwear on dis-
play. What is that?
I don't understand how a
"conservative" President can
run up huge federal deficits.
I don't understand how a
decorated combat veteran like
Congressman Jack Murtha can
be called a coward because he
advocates pulling our troops
out of harm's way and letting
Iraqi soldiers deal with insur-
gents.
I don't understand people
who are so selfish they worry
that some poor person in New


Publisher's |


Notebook





Ron Cichon


Orleans will get something
from the government.

I don't understand why these
same folks think it's quite
'(okay for the government via
the Coast Guard to rescue
wealthy folks from their cap-
sized boats.

I don't understand people of
faith allowing political hacks
to use them to further a politi-
cal agenda.
I don't understand why more
local folks don't attend events


IIt~


at the Opera House.
I don't understand why
there isn't more moral outrage
over the death of a 14.year-old
boy in a boot camp.

I don't understand young-
people who want to "hang out"
instead of work while resent-
ing the success of those who
do work.

I don't understand anybody
saying they "can't lose
weight." To my knowledge no-
body stuffs food in our months


over our objections.
I don't understand folks
needing to be mad at some-
thing or somebody.
-I don't understand fathers
who are too busy with their
own pursuits to be dads to
their kids.
I don't understand parents
* who let little kids virtually run
the house.,
I don't understand parents,
l who make excuses for their
children who break the law.
I don't understand why nor-
mally very nice people engage
in road rage.
I don't understand .anybody
not respecting Old Glory.
I don't understand those
folks who interrupt military fu-
nerals to make political state-
ments.
I don't understand why en-
forcing border security wasn't
high on the Administration's
to do list after 9/11.
.Maybe you're having trouble
'understanding this stuff too!


Evolution Debate Rages


By DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

I should find myself in a dia- '
metrically opposed position on
this issue. Holding a college
degree in Science, having been
a public school science teacher
and simultaneously being a
Christian should create a
strange union of thought on
this subject. Surprisingly, I
have easily reconciled the dif-
ferences between my academic
knowledge and religious be-
liefs.
What of the "theory" of evo-
lution? A significant body of
the scientific community
firmly believes that evolution
of the species over millions of


years has created the vast di-
versification of life on earth.
Simply speaking, they believe
that in earth's prehistoric "pri-
mordial pool" the exact chemi-
,cal elements existed and were
formed into the first living cell
via a cataclysmic .sequence of
natural events.
From that single "living" cell
sprang forth new and more di-
versified forms of life through
mutation of primitive DNA
(deoxyribonucleic acid, the
blueprint of life in all living
cells).
Over millions of years and
trillions of mutations, their the-
ory is that all life on earth to-
day has that single cell as its
origin. Theories are nothing
more than educated guesses


for lack of substantial conclu-.
sive evidence to prove or sup-
port actual facts.
On the opposite side is the
body of religious believers
who conclude a superior being
called "God", with no begin-
ning and no end, created eve-
rything in existence, to include
all life on earth. One could ar-
gue that without substantial
conclusive evidence, religion
is also a theory.
Like' the evolutionist who
have their bone fragments and
fossils, religious believers have
their dead sea scrolls and other
written historical documenta-
tions upon which to build their'
conclusions.
As the world becomes more!
technically proficient, frequent:


forays into unanswered ques-
tions about both evolution and
religion have increased. In the
case of evolution, inevitably
the argument has to rest on the
concept that "over time"
enough random mutations of
DNA will make all things pos-
sible.
That (in and of itself) is not
an acceptable scientific
method or concept. If it were
so simple, one would have to
argue that given millions of
years and trillions of events,
tornados going through an
Alabama junkyard would have
to eventually assemble an F-16
fighter aircraft on the other
side.
Now if that sounds ridicu-
(See Evolution Page 5)


Literacy Focus important


Her childhood admiration of
a day care teacher and her col-
lege summers spent working at
a young children's day camp
inspired Kimberly Oliver to
become an educator.
Since then, Oliver a kinder-
garten teacher at Broad Acres
Elementary School in Silver
Springs, M.D., has devoted her
life to building on these expe-
riences, especially the one-on-
one relationship forged be-
tween that special teacher and
herself.
Oliver's community focus,
teamwork with other teachers
and desire to see all students
succeed are just a few of the
reasons that she was named
2006 National Teacher of the


Year. an achievement for
which she was recently hon-
ored by President George W.
Bush at a White House cere-
mony.
"I adore working with chil-
dren," Oliver said. "This expe-
rience helped to shape many of
my beliefs about what children
can do if someone believes in
them. I knew then that I
wanted to motivate and inspire
the neediest students whom
many have written off just be-
cause of the circumstances
they were born into."
In her six years at Broad
Acres, she has helped create
and implement several pro-
grams to ensure consistency in
curriculum, instruction and as-


sessment throughout the
school.
As a result, her school made
improvements on local, state
and national tests, and in 2001
was the number one school in
her school system for percent-
age increase in test scores. In
2003, 2004 and 2005 they
met or exceeded all require-
ments of the No Child Left Be-
hind Act of 2001.
To promote literacy through-
out her community, Oliver
helps sponsor "Books and
Supper Night," a quarterly
event that allows families to
visit the school and check out
books from the library. They
read together, receive free
books to continue family read-


ing time at home and enjoy a
communal dinner where they
interact with and get to know
their neighbors.
Working with colleagues,
Oliver has also written and re-
ceived grants to purchase elec-
tronic learning systems, tape
players and books in English
and Spanish to send home with
students, taking the burden off
of parents who struggle with
language barriers or illiteracy.
The National' Teacher of the
Year Program focuses public
attention on teaching excel-
lence and is the oldest and
most prestigious awards pro-
gram for teachers.
The program, sponsored by
(See Literacy Page 5)


From Our Photo File


ROAD PAVING CREWS put the finishing touches on the paving of Dump Street in the
winter of 1993, completing the first phase of a $3 million plus countrywide project
undertaken with a bond issue. (News Photo)


I I


r










Summer Book Club

To Begin At Library


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Library Summer Book -
Club will read from the book
"Star Girl", by Jerry Spinelli.
The ,club meets 3-4 p.m.
Thursday, beginning June 15


and continuing through July
13.
"Star Girl" tells the story of
Leo Borlock, and the new girl
that comes to Mica High
School and steals his heart.
Stargirl Caraway is any-
thing but normal.
The students at Mica High


Evolution Debate Rages


(Continued From Page 4)
lous to you, then the trillion
random mutation argument:
simply using time as the pri-.
mary factor, should raise equal[
speculation.
Anyone who has spent a
minimal amount of time learn-
ing biology knows that "muta-
tions" are normally not good
things. Effectively, mutations
in a living organism predomi-
nantly are to the disadvantage:
of the species' very existence.
Two top and well respected
American DNA researchers
and experts appeared on a na-
tional television talk show.
They were invited because of'
their latest published scientific
research regarding DNA dupli-
cation.
In essence, they agreed that
in order for a single cell to
have eventually mutated into a,.
trillion-cell human organism
would mathematically take
over forty trillion positive mu-
tations without a single flaw to
derail or kill the species along
the wav.
The commentator exclaimed,
"Are you telling us that some-
one had to put this DNA to-
gether?", to which they
replied, "You can .draw your
own conclusions, but we are-
categorically stating that ran-
dom perfect DNA mutations to


achieve higher level organisms;
is clearly not a scientific:-
mathematical possibility".
So what of humans and apes
as cousins?' Be sure to look for,
"Evolution Part Two" coming
soon.

Correction
The length of time Tom La-
Motte has been in residence,
here was misstated in a Let-
ter to the Editor appearing in
the May 31 edition of, the.
Monticello News.
LaMotte has lived in the
county eight years


have no individual identity,
because they all conform to
the same standards, so they
don't know how to interact
with Star Girl, as an individ-
ual. "
At first, they find her
unique personality rare and
intriguing, and she becomes
the most popular girl in
school.
But as they continue watch-
ing her come to school in
strange clothes, strumming
her ukulele and singing happy
birthday to people in the cafe-
teria, they grow weary of her
ways and begin to shun her.
Hillari Kimble, a popular
girl who won't accept Stargirl
unless she changes herself to
be like the rest of them.
Leo is torn with the decision
of whether to give up his
friends and reputation to be"
with the girl he loves or to
stay with the crowd and risk
losing her.
He tries to make Star Girl
"normal", and ultimately ends
up losing his chance with his,
first love.
The Library Summer Read-
ing Programs are open to all
and here is no cost involved.


KIRK REAMS
4 4


FOR


CLERK OF COURT



oOver the past twenty years, I have worked

With Clerks of Court all over this state and,
nation. As such, I believe Kirk Reams pos-,

sesses the combination of education and&

work ethic to be an excellent Clerk of Court,
4
ofor his native county.


"If in the area, please meet with Kirk at his,

cookout:
, ,






June 10, 2006

11 a.m.

Lamont Recreation Park





SSincerely, 4




David W. Collins, Lawyer +
4 PAID POLITICAL ADV. BY DAVID COLLINS, MONTICELLO WITH CONTENT APPROVED BY
/ KIRK REAMS, DEMOCRAT FOR CLERK OF COURT ,


Literacy
i~(ontinued From Page 4)
ING in partnership with Schol-
arship Inc., is a project of the
Council of Chief State School
.Officers (CCSSO).
"We believe in the impor-
tance of honoring excellence
in education and want to help
*recognize those teachers who
make a difference in the lives
of children everyday," said
Rhonda Mims, president of the
ING Foundation.
We also believe it is impor-
tant to support the entire edu-
cation system, and give back
in various ways to teachers,
children, and organizations
through volunteer efforts,
grants and sponsorships."
A committee of representa-
tives from 14 national educa-
tion organizations chooses the
National Teacher of the Year
from among the State Teachers .
f ,the Year,


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 7, 2006 PAGE 5



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the following items for recycling:

All 'plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jug,, water bottles,'
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers,, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?



'Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
:contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.



Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.




The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.


Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-018.4.


The Jefferson County Recyclinq Procram


accents


0
















PAGE 6. MONTICELLO. (FL), NEWS. WED.. JUNE 7, 2006


Lifestyle


----~-I------ -\--ii1 --, I


Williams Recognized

For Job Performance


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Dorothy Williams, a native
of Aucilla and graduate of
Jefferson County High
School, received special rec-
ognition in May as Employee
of the Year at Medical Central
of Central Georgia in Macon.
I Williams is a nurse on the
ward for kidney patients, the
floor where she received the
special recognition.
She has been employed with
the hospital for five years,
with three and a half of those
years working as a RN.
Some of the comments
made about Williams when


she received the recognition
included: "She's dedicated;
she's a great team worker;
she's loving and caring for
other people and a great nurse
in charge of her floor."
Williams is a graduate of
State University of Georgia in
Macon.
She says that she has always
wanted to be a nurse, because
she loves people and taking
care of them.
She says she also puts God
first in her life, because she
knows that with Him being
first, nothing can go wrong.
Williams is the daughter of
David Williams and Rose
Mary Williams, both of Mon-
ticello.


A.


WILLIAMS

DQers Group

TO Meet

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The DOers Diabetes Sup--
port Group Will meet
12:15-12:45 p.m., Thursday
at the Health Department.
Attendees will learn to play
"Food Pyramid Bingo."

Spokesperson Bonnie
Mathis said it is a low-fat
high-fun nutrition game and
prizes will be awarded.
Learn proper food serving
sizes and bring a .friend
along," said Mathis.
For more information con-
tact Mathis at 342-0170 ex.
1301.


Rec. Park Board
To Meet June 13
The Recreation Park Advi-
soryBoard will meet 6 p.m.
1 Tuesday, June 13, at the Rec-.
reation Pjrk.
For further information, con-
tact Director Kevin Aman at
342-0240.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Camellia Garden Circle -
will meet 2 p.m. Sunday, at
the home of Isabelle de Ser-
cey to hear a program on Gar-
dening Tips.
Members are asked to share
their experiences and have an
opportunity to ask questions.
Members are asked to bring
their choice of refreshments
to share.
De Sercey will .also report


about her experiences at the
National Garden Club Con-
vention in Orlando, and on
the Florida Federation of Gar-
den Clubs 80th Convention
also in Orlando.
The Camellia Circle will
continue to meet monthly
through the summer months. -
For information about at-
tending this or any of the Gar-
den Circles contact
Monticello Garden Club
President Dianne Braren at
997-3729.


Homes Of Mourning


Rev. Raymond L.
Dale, Sr.
Rev. Raymond L. Dale, Sr.,
age 93, died Friday June 2,
2006, in Lake Eustis Care Cen-_
ter, Eustis, Florida.
Services will be Wednesday,
June 7, 2006 at 2:00 p.m. At
Beggs Funeral Home Monti-
cello Chapel, 482 East Dog-
wood Street, with burial at
Evergreen Cemetery in Green-
ville. Visitation will be 1 hour
prior to the service June 7,
2006, at the Beggs Funeral
Home Monticello Chapel.
Rev. Dale was born in Knox
Co., Indiana and has lived in
Monticello since 2005. He was
a retired minister from the
Church of The Nazarene.
He is survived by his daugh-
ter Wilma Jean Smith of Lees-
burg, three sons Hubert Dale
of Leesburg, Larry Dale of-
Melbourne and Raymond L.
Dale, Jr. Of Lawrenceville,
Ind. One brother Charles Dale
of Kannapolis, N.C., grand-
children and seven great
grandchildren.
Richard Darnell Hoover
Richard Darnell Hoover, age
72 died away Saturday, June 3,
2006, in Monticello, Florida.
Services will be Wednesday,
June 7, 2006 at 11:00 a.m. At
the First United Methodist
Church in Monticello. Visita-
tion was Tuesday, June 6,
2006, 6-8 p.m. At Beggs Fu-
neral Home Monticello
Chapel, in Monticello. Inter-
ment will be in Blakley, Geor-
gia. In Lieu of flowers


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donations may be made to the
Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Ma-
han Center Blvd., Tallahassee,
Florida 32308-5428 in his
name.
Richard was born in Helena,
GA. and was an insurance
salesman with AIG and Gen-
eral Accident Insurance Com-
panies. He was a member of
the First United Methodist
Church in Monticello and a
member of the American Le-
gion Post #49 in Monticello.
Richard is survived by his
wife Betty Joyce Melton Hoo-
ver, two daughters Carol Sue
Woods (John) of Dublin, Ohio,
Tonya Gonzales (Frank) of
Ruskin, two sons Richard
"Rick" Hoover (Kim) of St.
Petersburg, Glenn Hoover
(Anna) of Woodstock, Ga.
And three grandchildren Jesse
Woods, Mollie Woods and
.Chad Southall.


MDA covers America with the
most complete range of
services for people affected
by neuromuscular diseases.

Muscular Dystrophy Association
Jerry Lewis, National Chairman
1-800-572-1717


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Family and Consumer Sci-
ences Extension Agent Heidi
Copeland relates that while no
one can resist a bright sunny
day, precautions should be
taken.
"Spending time in the-sun is
not only fun, it is good for
you," said Copeland. "The
body manufactures its own
Vitamin D from a bit of sun-
shine, however, everyone can
get too much of a good thing
and learning to take precau-
tions now can prevent damage
in the future," Copeland said.
She added that studies sug-
gest that young people get 80
percent of their lifetime sun
exposure in the first 18 years
of their life.
"It's good to know your
ABCs when it comes to sun
exposure," said Copeland.
The ABCs are:
A, for away. Look for
- shade in the. middle of the
day. Limit your exposure to


New Birth
Elliott Arnold Cheshire was-
born 8:55 a.m. Monday, May
'22, at Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital (TMH) Women's Pa-
vilion to Lisa and Everett
Cheshire, also the parents of
10-year-old Ashley Lorraine
Cheshire.
Elliott Arnold weighed
eight pounds, six ounces and
measured 20.25 inches in
length.
His maternal grandparents
are Delores and Ronnie
, Spears, of Crawfordville, FL.
His paternal grandparents
are Carolyn and Ellis Chesh-
ire and the late Peggy Chesh-
ire, of Monticello.


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the sun in the hottest part of_
the day.
Practice the shadow rule.
When your shadow is shorter
than you are, the sun is high
in the sky, and the ultraviolet
rays are very strong.
B, for block. Encourage
the use of sunscreen and other
protective measures. Use a
sunscreen of at least 15 SPF
(sun protection factor) and ap-
ply according to the
directions:
C, for cover up. Wear pro-
tective clothing. Start with a
hat and sunglasses and end
with socks and shoes.
S, 'for speaking out. Re-
mind your family and friends_

If It Happens In 7
Jefferson County,
You'll Read It In The
Monticello News

S -,'' K -


N5.


Agent Copeland Tells

ABCs Of Sunning


k 5K 'ik Stz k


A.L. Hall Funeral Directors, Inc. .
dba
Trzmavi Fu4ipraie Homte/
S620 York St., P.O. Box 425,
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to use good sun protection--
practices.


Dinner
(Continued From Page 1)
House, was provididc by
Jimmy Gillis.
Businesses donating door
prizes for the event were
Southern Friends Antiques,
Jackson's Drugstore, Eden-
field True Value Hardware,
Gelling's Flowers and Gifts,
Monticello Florist and Gifts,
and Great Adventure Outfit-
ters.

Help your. community
when a disaster strikes!
Become a trained Disaster
Services Volunteer by contacting
the Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross at 8"8-60,18'
or visit our web site at-
www.tallytown.com/redcross.
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Red Cross



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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 7,2006 PAGE 7
Patterson IiIm W


A., I v.i_..

SELLING the Senior Citizens' cook book, titled "Reci- SERVING dinner to diners at the chamber's kickoff din-
pes and Memories" are, from left, Ruby Whitson and ner Thursday night are, from left, Commissioner Skeet
Mary Ann Van Kleunen. (News Photo) Joyner and. Chamber President Margaret Levings.
S(News Photo) American Stroke

.. .. a B i ...' i A Division of American
*Heart Association


For people over age 55, the incidence of
stroke,more than doubles in each
successive decade.
Stroke Warning Signs:
* Sudden numbness or weakness in
the face, arm, or leg, especially on
one side of the body.:
* Sudden confusion or trouble
speaking or understanding.
* Sudden trouble seeing in one or
both eyes.
* Sudden trouble walking, dizziness,
loss of balance or coordination.


ENJOYING the desserts at the Watermelon Kickoff Dinner on Thursday night are,
from left, Jon Michael Slowick, Christopher Slowick and Skylar Dickey. (News Photo)


Electric Company Offers

Energy Conservation Tips


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

With summer heating up,-
Progress Energy is offering
energy efficiency tips for resi-
dents.
Set your thermostat on the
highest comfortable setting.
If you're leaving for the day,
turn it up a couple of degrees.
Do not turn your cooling sys-
tem off unless you'll be gone
for an extended period of
time. Cooling systems work
best when they maintain a
steady temperature, instead of
making large adjustments.
Consider installing a pro-
. grammable thermostat to' ad-
just the temperature automati-
cally and maximize your en-
ergy savings.
Change your filters
monthly. Dirty filters can in-
crease operating costs by 20
percent. Do not block regis-
ters and return vents with fur-
niture or drapes.
Use ceiling and portable
fans to keep air circulating.
Close blinds, drapes and
shades during the hottest part
of the day. This keeps the
sun's rays from heating your
house.
Plant shade trees on the
sunny side of the house or
building to provide natural
shading.


When was

the last

time you

made an

investment

that saved

lives?


Because humid air holds
more heat, take lukewarm
showers and baths and run the
bathroom exhaust fan to re-
duce humidity in your home.
Use your microwave or
countertop appliances for-


cooking instead of the oven or
stove.
Make sure your home is
properly insulated. Progress
Energy recommends R-30 in-
sulaion for the ceilings, R-19
for 'the flobr and R-16 for
outside walls.


Heat~rok],

Briefs
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She is the daughter of Jo-
seph Brown and the late Vir-
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attended Jefferson County
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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 7, 2006


Sports


~XVI
. .. .............. ... ... .... .-
'.. '.' -.; ., I


I ,." 4 1' .


OE ACA AWARD for Male Academic Athlete. of the Year went to two players this
year. The two, from left, are Casey Gunnels and Ben Grantham. Coach Ray Hughes on
extreme left. (News Photo)


prir S orts program


RecognaresPartic ts,


',FRAN HUNT
:StaffWr iter

Many: young athletes ke-7 -
..,ceived awards during the an-
nual Spring Sports,, Awards
,.Program.
Named, Athletes ofthe Year
,,,were Kelly Home and Don-
nie Xinsey in T-ball, Brook-
lyn McGlamory, Carlie
Barber, and Huntev- Handley
'in coach pitch; Averie Jones
and Kelli Evans in' softball;
and Trent Roberts 4Cal Rip-
kin.
Coaches of the Year were
"Edwin Kinsey, Ross Hannam,
.Matt Hutchenson znd Diane
r, ,Boatwright in T-ball; Mike
,.,.Holm, Mary Pate Handley,
Campbell and CaseN
Handle in coach pirch; Jane[
-,Jones, Travis Lewis and Lori
'.'Dix in softball; and Kevin
-'Home and Tonya Roberts in


I lum,


Program



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Off M L. King Drive near the Armory
SVilIL
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Please pre-register by calling
SOOTHWEST GEORGIA DIALYSis at (229) 228-2726.


creenville Beats
Kings, Barely

FRAN HUNT'
Staff Writer

Greenville squeaked by the--
Kings, of the South 21-20 in
softball action Sunday after-
noon.
Kelvin Jone,; and S. Scab-
rooks both went three fbr
five, with Seabrooks also.
smacking out a home run.'.
Demetrius Hicks and Nick
Russell both went four for
four; 0. C. Sloan went four
for four with a home run;
Johnny Rivers went three for
four with a home run'; Davis
P.. and Joe Andrew both went
three for four; James Edwards
Went one for four; Monterious
went, two for three;
.and K. Jay went two for four.


United States

N A V,..y


1,800-USA-NAVY
.www.navyjO`bsx'OM'


FRAN HUNT
I;Staff Writer

Thirteen boys have 'been
''named. to represent Jefferson
County in the DistrictTourna-
ment as the Cal Rip.kin All-
$tars,
The tournament is tehta-
',tively set for June 16-18 in
Makulla.


starts Aug 10
in Monticello, Fla.
Mandatory Orientation Aug 3

Website: WWW.NFCC.PU
TO REGE Wom


TRAN HUNT
"Staff Writer

The Lady Diamonds : softball
team downed' Greenville 19-
10 on Sunday-
Keandra Seabrooks went
five for five, with five RBI
and a home run.
Valerie Robertson and Nikki
Cooks both went, four, for
five, both with two RBI; Lisa
Crumitie went four for four,
with three' RBI; and Kidra
Thompson went three for
four, six RBI.
Tonya Young went threefor
three, one RBI; Letita Fead,
went two for four with one
FBI; Kista Hill went two:for
four, with three.RBI; Shericka
,Parrish, and 'Barbara Jean Cru-
mitie both went two for three;
Fannie Mae Fead went two
for three, with two RBI; and
Siplin and Ashley Allen
,both went two for two.
Scabrooks was named the
-,garrie's MVP.
Assistant coach Kelvin
Jones said Thompson pitched


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RECE IVI NG' awards for, ACA JV football From, left, Casey Anderson, defensive
pfaye, r; Matt 'Bishop, Most Valuable Player;.,qnd Luke Whitmer, most, iniproved player.
(News Photo)


i
-

.81: .'7 .~P~


John ThomasWalker and-Na-
talie Sorensen, sportsmanship.,
For the Hiram Masonic
Lodge team, awafds went to
John Bums and Denijay Max-
well, MVP; D. J. Wilkinsbri,
and, Carlie Barber,
sp ortsmanship.
For -the team Monticello
M illing, awards went. to Shel-
ton Allen and Ladariarf
Smile', MVP-, Bradley Holm,
MIP; and Revonte Robinson,
sportsmanship.
For the' team" Jatksoh's
Dug Store, awards went to
amiria Martin, MVP; Janese
Banks, MIP; and Tiffany KAI-
nin,, sportsmanship.
For the team Jefferson
Builders Mart, awards went to
Ian Haselden, MVP; Cannon
.Raodle,'_* NIIP: and Sarah
Riley, sportsmanship.
For theteam State Farm In-
surance, awards went to
Ricky Finlayson, MVP;
Brooklyn McGlamory, MIP;
and Winston Lee, sportsman-
ship.
For the'team Jefferson Farm-
ers; -Market, awards. went to
Jared Jackson,, MVP; Trevon
Yo.urnan; MIP; and Jay Fin-
layson, sportsmanship.
For the team Capital City
Bank, awards went to Tyler
Hutchen'sen, MVP; Joe Wal-
ton, MIP; and Sarah Hall,
sportsmanship.
For the team C & F Fenc-
mg, awards went to TY
Chance, Casey Dernott,
Brandon Holm and Douglas
Gulledge, MVP;.Brian Bow-
man, MIP; and Shawn Blue,
sportsmanship.
For' the team of Joyner's
Travel Center, awards went to
Averie Jones,. MVP; Ya'tyra
Howard, MIP; and Sunnie
Sorensen, sportsmanship.
For the Farmers and Mer-
chants Bank team, awards
went to Trent Roberts, MVP;
Lenorris Footman, MIP; and
KeShawn Francis, sportsman-
ship.


CAI Ripkin.
'team Awards for the' ki-'
wanis wen(to Gage Sparks,
N W-P; Greg Meeks, Most Im-
proved Player (MIP); 'arid
Bradley Vollertsen and Zack
Lui, sportsnmnship award.
For ilie team of Bishop
Farms, award s went.to Kean,
Thoma I s, MVP; Theo, Mack,
MIP;. Cami Young, sports-
manship.
For the Chicken De.lite
tearn, awards -went to Christo-
pher Miller, MVP; Stephen
Roberts 'and Robert Counts,
MIP; and Nick Matthews,
sportsmanship.
For the Williams Timber
team, awards went to Tyler
Jackson, MVP; Zack Steele,
MIP; and Levi Cobb, sports-
-at' ship.
For the team Rotary,, awards
went to Kelly Home, MVP;
Peyton Collins, MIP; and


ACA AWARDS for weightlifting went to, from le "ft, Jason


'The All-Stars are Tyler
'Jackson'. Desmon Smiley,
Shelton Allen, Trent Roberts,
Elliott Capers, Lenorris Foot-
man and Jared Jackson.
Also, Zack Steele, Levi
Cobb, Trevon Yournan, Brad-
ley Holm, Matt Tuten, and
A u
lex G Iledge.
Coaches for the team are
Danny J ackson, John Cobb
and Mike Holm. '


a good -game for the Lady--
Diamonds'. -
The ladies will play Mayo at
.4 p.m. Sunday, away.
Coach Roosevelt Jones said
he was looking for a good,
match-up in Sunday's game.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE7,2006 PAGE 9
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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 7, 2006


Expert Gives Advice How



TO Handle Flag Properly


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

For local residents planning
to fly the US Flag for the-
229th Birthday of/the Ameri-
can Flag on June 14, known
as Flag Day, following are
some helpful tips for the
proper handling of the flag.


On June 14, 1777, the Con-
tinental Congress adapted a
flag that "Shall be 13 stripes,
alternate red and white, with a
union of 13 stars of white on
a blue field, representing a
new constellation."
The flag was first hoisted at
sea by John Paul Jones on the
Ranger on July 4, 1777, and it
was first displayed on land


during the Battle of Fort Stan-
wix in New York on August
3, 1777.
In 1794, two new states
joined the union, thus the flag
was expanded to 15 stars and
15 stripes.
In 1818, the union consisted
of 20 states, so Congress
passed a law limiting the flag
. to 13 stripes and decreed that


a star would be added for
each new state that joined the
union.
Navy Captain Sam C. Reid
was instrumental in advising
Congress to- adapt the flag
standards:
In 1818, President James'
Monroe ordered that the stars
be placed in four equal, paral-
lel rows of five stars each.


major credit reporting agen-
cies, Experian, TransUnion,
and Equifax.
Parents should consider
checking their, children's s
credit reports every year, es-
peciall, if they suspect their
personal information has been
compromised.
Ordering an annual credit
card report for your child in-
creases the likelihood that you
will uncover child identity
theft in a time\ fashion. If
no credit accounts have been
established in your child's
name, the credit agencies will
inform you that, your child
Does not have a credit report.
A new federal law will
make free credit reports avail-
able to residents of Southeast-
ern states, effective June 1.
The law provides for a grad-
ual roll-out of this benefit;
West Coast consumers were
the first to gain access.
Parents who discover evi-
dence of child identity theft.
should immediately report
fraudulent activity to one. of
the three major credit report-
ing agencies and ask that a
fraud alert be placed on the
child's credit record. Parents
should also contact any credi-
tors listed in the child's credit
report and file a police report.
It is vital for parents of
child victims to understand,
the seriousness- of this ;crime
and take action promptly.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Family and Consumer Sci--
ences Extension Agent Heidi
Copeland recently shared in-
formation that she discovered
from the University of Florida
warning parents of child iden-
tity theft.
Identity theft is not just for '
adults. Offenses against chil-
dren are on the rise, and a UF
consunrrer education expert
says the problem can actually
be worse for younger victims.
Many parents don't realize
that child identity theft exists,
which means the crime often,
goes undetected for years.
Parents need to know how to
recognize child identity theft
because early discovery can
greatly reduce the impact on
victims.
If the crime, is reported
promptly, the thief has less
time to run up debt, and
authorities have a better
chance of finding evidence.
For children under 18, the
number of identity theft com-
plaints reported to the US
Federal Trade Commission-
increased by more, than. half-
between 2003 and 2004, from
about 6,400 cases to 9,800.
At the time, the percentage
of child victims among all
identity theft cases increased
'from three to four percent.
In some respects, .identity
thieves treat personal data
from children and adults the
same way. Most often, they
use stolen information to con-
duct fraudulent financial
transactions, though they
sometimes use it to obtain
government documents such


as driver's licenses, or give it
to the police when stopped or
charged with a crime.
But when it comes to credit
card fraud, child identity theft
differs in an important
respect: Thieves necessarily
create ne%% credit accounts for
child victims, whereas most
cases, of adult identitO theft
involves existing accounts.
.That can make the crime
worse for child victims..
According to the 2003 FTC
Survey, victims of new ac-
count fraud spend four times,
as much time and almost five
times as much money clearing
their records compared with
victims who had only existing
accounts accessed.
Victims of new account
fraud are also far more. likely
to encounter other problems,
such as denial of credit, loss
of utility or phone service,
and criminal investigation.
Safeguarding a child's iden-
tity requires many precautions
that parents should take for
themselves, but with a few
twists .
,Preschool age children are
unlikely to be approached by
scammers, so parents must
bare the burden of protecting
documents and other informa-
tion. Parents should avoid
carrying their child's Social
Security card and should
complain if their child's
school uses Social Security
numbers to identify students.
For older children, the
popularity of personal com-
puters in homes and schools
creates a risk that they will be
victimized by Internet scams
such as "phishing".
Even bright children who
are computer-savvy may not


understand the dangers of be-
ing too free with their per-
sonal information.
It is recommended that par-
ents, monitor their children's
Internet use, talk to their kids
about identity theft, and tell
them what information "he,
should and should not share
with others.
Parents should also monitor
incoming mail for children of
all ages because credit card
offers and even debt collec-.
tion notices can. indicate
credit activity is, taking place.
already.
Getting a. credit card offer
addressed to' your child does
not necessarily\ mean there's a
problem If you have opened
a bank account or a frequent,
flyer card in your child's
,name, your child may receive
mass mailings from credit af-
filiates.
Parents should call the com-
pany that has the child's infor-
mation and see if they're on a
marketing list.
Receiving debt collection
notices in your child's name is
a much more serious indica-.
tion that your child's informa-
tion is being misused, and
warrants checking the child's
credit report with the three_


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Fleet's Spanish Training Program
Dr. Anita Fleet
Cajl 681-7792 for information
r F-mail: FleetSpan (a aol.comi http:'/fleetspan.com


President William H. Taft,_
in 1912, issued executive or-
ders establishing portions of
the flag and arrangement of
the stars in six horizontal
rows of eight stars each, the
single point of each star to
point upward.
Until 1912, there had been
no official rules designating
the arrangement of the stars
or the measurements of the
flag.
In 1959, President Dwight
D. Eisenhower -- with the ad-
mission of the fiftieth state --
ordered the stars arranged in
nine horizontal rows, five
rows of six stars and four
rows of five stars. It has been
the same flag since July 4,
1960.
Flag decoration.; and insig-
nia of all kinds use color to
give special meaning to a flag
or decoration, according to
VFW Post 251 Commander
John Nelson.
Red is for ,valor and zeal;
white is for hope and cleanli-
ness of life; and blue, the
color of heaven, is for rever-
ence. and loyalty. Also, the
stars are an ancient symbol of
the heavens.
The way that the American
Flag should be- honored and
treated is not a law, but rather
a code that has been. devel-
oped over the years, Nelson'
said.
"It is the standard that each
one of us should kn.o and
follow," Nelson said.
The basic customs:
Display the flag from sun-
rise to sunset, except when il-
luminated.
Hoist the flag briskly,
lower ceremoniously.
Do not fly the flag in in-
clement weather, except when
using all-weather flags.
Display every day at pub-
lic institutions such as schools
or fire departments.
If a group of flags are ar-
ranged in a .straight line or
semicircle, no flag should be
-above or to the right of, or on
the same level, as the U. 'S.
Flag.
If the flag is horizontal or


- vertical against a wall, the un- "
ion should be uppermost and
to the flag's own right, your
left when viewing it.
If suspended over a street,
it shall be vertical with the
union to the north or east, de-
pending on which way the
street runs.
"You'll have to learn your
geography and map 'reading
to do it right," Nelson said.
If on a speaker's platform,
it should be above and behind
the speaker.
On special occasions, the
flag may be flown at half-
staff. That is done by raising
the flag all the way to the top
of the pole and lowering it
half way down.
The president of the
United States and governors
of the state are the only indi-
viduals who can say when the
flag will be placed at half-
staff and for whom.
The flag is always at half-
staff on Memorial Day, until
noon, then raised to the top .of
the pole.

It is also flown at half-staff
from sunrise to sunset on
Peace Officers Memorial
Day, May 15; National Ko-
rean Armistice Day, July 27;
Patriot'Day, Sept. 11; and Na-
tional Pearl Harbor Remem-
brance Day, Dec. 7.

The U. S. Flag should
never be flown as a drapery
and never fastened, drawn
back or up in folds. It should
always be allowed to fall free.
When a flag is raised,, low-
ered, or is passing in a.parade
or review, everyone present
except military personnel
should face the flag and put
his or her hand over their-
heart. Men remove their hats,
and military personnel salute.

When a flag is used on a
casket, its union should be
over.the deceased's left shoul-
der.. The casket .-hould be
carried foot first. The flag
should not be lowered into the
grave or be allowed to touch
the ground.


ILN AUCTIOLNb


IGated Community Fleetwood, NC
. Mountain Lots with Views of NC, VA,
'i.900.Finandng On Spot


TN


Preview Property
on June 4, 10, 11,
17.& 18h .....


As seen

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on T.V.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


/" 100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
"vFOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Paint Work Frame Straightening


WE TAKE THE
DCNTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


""r~q'(lcocated bh~hind L2nqdale Auto M'E


Business




Directory


BURNETTE PLUMBING& .
WELL SERVICE
Family Owned Since 1902
Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled ~ Fixtures-Faucets Pumps
Replaced ~ Sewer & Water Connections ~ Tanks Replaced ~
Water Heater Repairs- All Repairs

CaIdItret ate lme


Register's

Mini-Storage
315 Waukeenah Hwy.
1/4 Mile off US 19 South

997-2535


CARROLL HILL AUTO.ELECTRIC, INC.

"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service"




Thomasville Road 115 Albany, Rd.
(on Canolli ill) 229-226-0717


Northside Mower and

Small Engine Repair
For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Repairs for all makes & models. .
Pickup & Delivery Service Available
562-2962


CUMMING'S APPLIANCES D iLEE FULLER ~ OWNER MR. MERCHANT

850-997-7468 H Man MORRIS FULLER PAINTING LL C THHI SPACE
850-997-5132 Office (850) 671-2286 COULD BE

90 DAY WARRANTY ONALL APPLIANCES YCell (850) 281YOURS FOR
CHRISTOPHER CUMMINGS OWNER 8366 Guerry Lane, Tallihassee, FL 32317
Lic. & Insured ONLY $10.00


Child Identity Theft:



A Growing Problem.


)LI~------


alli








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 7, 2006 PAGE 11


To Place Your Ad




997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday-.$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


POSEIDON
(PG13)
Fri.-Thurs. 1:40 4:30 7:35 10:05


DA VINCI CODE
(PG13)
Fri. Thurs. 12:00 3:15 6:30 9:45



X-MEN 3
(PG13)
Fri. -Thurs. 12:30 2:50 5:15 7:45
10:15
NO PASSES


OVER THE HEDGE
(PG)
Fri.-Thurs. 12:15 2:30 5:00 7:30 -
9:30


RV (PG)
Fri. 1:10 4:25 7:25 9:40



MISSION IMPOSSIBLE 3
(PG13)
Fri. Thurs. 1:15 4:30 7:20 -
10:00


BREAK UP (PG 13)
Fri. Thurs. 1:10 4:15 7:10 -
9:50


LEGALS
IN accordance with FL Statue:
Public Auction July 1, 2006 @
10:00a.m. 1991 Ford Vin#
IFMDU32X6MUE39604; 1991 Toyt
Vin# 1NXAE94AIMZ224854; July
8, 2006 @ 10:00 a.m. 1999 Chev.
VIn# 2G1WW12MXX929683; 1983
Buick Vin# IG4AM69A5DH860146;
To be sold as is for towing &
storage charges., Conditions and
Terms at Auction. Dave's Towing -
7261 East Washington St.
Monticello, FL 32344 (850)
342-1480
6/7/06, c
The Jefferson County Board of
County Commissioners will hold a
Special Session on June 8, 2006, at
2:00 p.m., at the Jefferson County
Public Library 375 South Water
Street, Monticello, Florida to
discuss personnel issues. .Danny
Monroe III, Chairman
6/7/06, c
HELP WANTED
Monticello News Needs Clerical
help for busy administrative
office. Please call Ron Cichon
997-3568.
tfn
Accepting applications, for,
fulltime lumberyard personnel
with a clean driving .record,
knowledgeable of building
materials and customer friendly.
Must be 18 year's or older.
Application may be obtained at
1400 South Jefferson Street,
Monticello.
6/7, c
MAINTENANCE PT 36 Unit
Apt Complex Resume/Apply to
Heritage Manor, 1800 East
Texas Hill Road, Monticello, FL
32344 Fax: 850-997-7288
Phone: 850-997-4727
6/7, c-
Cook & Housekeeper needed
in Boston, Ga. area. Experience
& references required. Full-time
with benefits. Must have trans-
portation. Please call
Cheryl at 863-797-3526.
6/7, 9, 14, 16, c


me
bok


DIrivers & Contractors: Ho
through the week! Drop & Ho
Loads! Great Pay/Benel


NURSES



LOOKING FOR INNOVATIVE

FLEXIBLE HOURS......


Need more time with family? Want

to return to school? Just ?????


Marshall Health & Rehab Center

has just the opportunity for you


Call Sue Love, RN
850-584-6334


HE L PrWfED Z

CDL-A, 3 years exp.
browntrucking.com
770-344-2028
6/7, 9, c
Teacher Positions Available:
Monticello Christian Academy,
Elementary, Middle, High
School, call 997-6048 for details
or submit resume to: MCA,
1590-N. Jefferson St.
Monticello, 32344.
6/2-6/30, c
Janitor/Maintenance: Part time
position. Must be able to
perform some maintenance as
well as janitor duties. Call
MCA, 997-6048.
6/2-6/30, c
Mechanic Waukeenah Fertilizer
850-997-4460
tfn, c 6/7
Nursery Laborer, Full-time,
must have own transportation.
Contact Mr. Nichols at Ox Lake
Tree Farm, 585 Lott Rd.
997-4018
5/31, 6/2, 7, 9, c
- DRILLERS HELPERS No
experience needed. Some travel
required. Great pay and
benefits. Career Opportunity.
EOE & Drug Free
800-487-9665.
5/31, 6/2, 7,9, c
Cashier,'available to work shift
work aid weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn, c
GARAGE SALE
Yard Sale Friday and Saturday
June 10th 8 am until, 1525 E.
Pearl St. Boys Clothes, Small
Girl Clothes 342-1486
6/7, 9, pd
Rain Delay From Last Week
287 Nash Rd. near I-10/US 19
Saturday, June 10th 7:30-1:30.'
See last Friday's ad for details.
6/7, 9, pd
FREE


fits! Free Black and White Kitten to
good home please call 342-1486
6/7,9, pd,,


FOR SALE
Roosters and laying chickens
$10 each; Goats, female $100.
each. Leave message 997-0901
6/7, 9, pd
Riding Mower, 25hp, 50" cut.
Used 2 summers $900, 997-4200
Eves.' 6/2, 7, pd
Exercise Equipment: Air
Walker brandnew $75.
997-4441
6/2, 7, pd
Nursery Laborer Full Time
must have own transportation.
Contact Mr. Nichols at Ox Lake
Tree Farm, 585 Lott Rd.
997-4018
5/31, 6/2, 7, 9, pd
Electric Luxury Lift Chair,
burgundy leather, 3-positions,
small to medium chaise lounger,
$300. 997-2973, 997-1132,
6/2, 7, 9,.14, 16, 21, 23, 28, 7/5,
pd
Bunkbed, Wood, 3 years old 2
shelves, desk and chair. Very
nice bed. $300 OBO 519-4528
6/2, 6/7, pd


No Credit Checks Just Low
Down Payments on Good Cars
& Trucks
2 and 4 Door Model As Low As
$750 down 850-536-9111 ~
www.JumpinJims.con Ask For
Mr. Deal.
11/2, tfn


FOR RENT


Prime downtown office space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980.
11/30, tfn, c
Jefferson Place Apartments, 1 &
2 Bedroom, 1468 S.Waukeenah-
St. Office 300 Monticello.
997-6964 Equal Housing
Opportunity.
6/2, tfn, c




REAL ESTATE
Would you like to rent an
apartment or office downtown?
Call 997-5517 leave message and
phone number.
5/12, tfn, c
SERVICES
Health Care Equipment
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for a assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
available
1/19, tfn

Backhoe Service: driveways,
roads, ditches, tree & shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten 997-3116, 933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Painting Professional Int./Ext,
call Edith or Harvey for free
:estimate, prices can't be. beat!
342-1330.
5/24, 26, 31, 6/2, 7,9, 14, 16, c
Cattle: heat synchronization, ar-
tificial insemination, and preg-
-nancy checking of cattle, very
experienced, references. Call
Tony Strickland 850-926-6339.
,6/7, pd. ,-
Appliance Repairs: washers.
dryers, osioes, refrigerators.
'Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd, 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/11, tfn
Christ Episcopal Church
extends a special invitation to
sinners, doubters, backsliders,
lost sheep, prodigal son's and
daughters the confused and
merely curious. We are three
blocks N of the courthouse.
Sunday service at 10:30 a.m.
997-4116
6/7, c
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-SS30, Quick Responses.
6,2, s/d, tfn
Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
new menopausal products.
Jackson's Drug Store.
5/12 tfn, c
WANTED
To Rent: Electric Wheelchair
for 2 months, 997-4441.
6/2, 7, pd


HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR EMPLOYMENT


Bulldozers, Backhoes, Loaders, Dump
Trucks, Graders, Scrapers, Excavators
-National Certification
-Job Placement Assistance


800-405-5833


Associated Training Services


www.equipment-school.com


DIGITAL
RECEPTION
SERVICES, INC.


Field Service Techs


Positions throughout Florida
For details and to apply online go to:

www.hrmcacclaim.com/applyldrscareers


Housing Vouchers m

We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 ~ -3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities

5756571 '





Statistics Show People Remember
85% of what they read
and 15% of what they hear


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com

Serious About

Selling? B9L

List with me to-

day!

Peary Does It Aqain! Under Contract
Just Listed! 7.8 acres on Whitehouse Road
near Hwy 59 $158,000

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south land use
designation permits 4 houses per acre-
near Dennis' Trading post only $36,500 ,
per acre

Price Slashed! 2 bedroom 1 bath home
with small fenced yard, family room be-
hind IGA onBowman Street Now $76,500

Peary Does It Aqain! Under Contract-
Priced to Sell 1993 Fleetwood 3 bedroom 2
bath home on 2.5 acres in Lloyd Acres paved
road frontage $76,500

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly
wooded acres Only $36,500

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big double-
wide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in re-
mote, oaks, pond, north of Greenville only
$329,000

Peary Does It Aqain! Under Contract
Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge Lane
100'x220' in the City $15,500 each

Just Listed! Beautiful Homesite
12. 59 beautiful acres on the Waukeenah
Highway near town, big trees, nice fields,
nice and private, perfect for a nice home
$265,000

Peary Does It Aqain! Under Contract-
Buildinq lots Town on Morris Road call for details
$10,000 to $40,000

Peary Does It Aqain! Sold!! Cox Road 10
mostly wooded acres just a few miles North of
town $12,000 per acre

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 5 acres available
on the east side of town high and dry in
quiet location with lots.of game, 9 year,
old planted pines, profit from both appre-
ciating land and growing pine Only $9,500
per acre

Home Site close to town on West
Grooverville Road only $14,500

Peary Does It Aqain! Christmas Acres
Sold -3 bedroom 2 bath mobile home on 3 acres
with a big deck, carport and a workshop $96,000

Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900
Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
Simply the Best!


;


"


t









PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., JUNE 7, 2006

Retired Educators Attend


. ....................


Annual Conference


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Eleven members of the Jef--
ferson County Retired Educa-
tions Association attended the
52nd Florida Retired Educa-
tors Association Annual As-
sembly and Convention was
held May 23-26 at the re-
nowned Crowne Plaza Jack-
sonville River front Hotel.
The theme of the event was
"Sailing To New Horizons."
The four-days of activities
began Tuesday with hotel
check-in, conference registra-
tion, trustee meeting,
Local members were in-
vited to the home of Martha
and Maggie Stokes' niece
Ethel Brinson, for a special
dinner.
Wednesday mornings
agenda began with the setting
up of the Cultural Affairs Ex-
hibit by Dorothy Bamhart and
Mary Madison.
Wednesday's afternoon
session began with the pres-
entation of colors by Manda-
rin High School Naval Jr.
ROTC, followed with the
Pledge of Allegiance To The
Flag, thought for the day and
the introduction of the
speaker.
The keynote speaker was
Van Ponder, winner of the
Profiles. in Courage award,
given each year on John F.
Kennedy's birthday, based on
the courage exemplified in
Kennedy's book. The award
is presented to an elected offi-
cial whose career represents
courage and integrity in the
face of political pressure.
Ponder, as a member of the
Georgia House of Representa-
tives, delivered a speech on
the House floor (FREA As-
sembly) on behalf of a hate-
crime bill being proposed.
His stand on the bill was
very unpopular in Georgia in
2000, to many who heard his
oratory realized its greatness
and the courage it took to de-
liver.
Ponder received a standing-
ovation for his inspiring mes-
-sage.
Other reports, special inter-
est session and announce-
ments ended the agenda.
Wednesday evening, the
group was bused to the Al-
hambra Theater for dinner
and a live performance of
"Beauty and the Beast".
Thursday's activities began
with an early grab-and-go
breakfast, then breakouts of
the 10 District sessions.
The second general session
brought the writing of the
FREA fifth grade essay win-
ner award amd other awards,
merits and special recogni-
tions.



GTI


IN THEI



SWIM









If you know
a child with
muscular dystrophy
who can benefit


The third general session
was opened with the Memo-
rial Servic, "With These
Hands" for all district and
-state members, deceased from
October, 2005 through Febru-
ary 2006.
Jefferson County REA lost
Doris G. Herring during this
period.
The evening activities in-
cluded a reception, hosted by
FREA endorsed Insurance
Company, followed by the
formal black-tie "Captain's
Dinner".
Entertainment was provided


by the Steve Chapman Trio,-
who presented "The Best of
Broadway", after which 2005-
2006 FREA volunteers of the
year were recognized and
awarded from each district.
The county recipient from
district 2 was Martha Hall
Local attendees include:
President Willard and wife
Dorothy Bamhart, Flossie
Buggs, Marsha Hall, Mary
Madison, Mathe McCloud,
Beatrice Sloan, Violet Sailor,
Maggie Stokes, Carolyn
White and FREF Trustee Let-
tie White.


r-m.- --.r M-wrnr -Ma--nr--mm


Monticello


Christian


Academy









Now Enrolling K-12 Grade For
'06-'07 School Year

1590 N. Jefferson St.

Monticello, Fl. 32344

997-6048


Zn -

Merrill Lynch
Certificates of Deposit (CDs) are sold by Merrill Lynch; ierce, Fenner &.Smith Incorporated ("MLPFS") and held in brokerage accounts at MLPFS,
in which standard account fees may apply. CDs are issued by Merrill Lynch Bank USA or Merrill Lynch Bank & Trust Co. Balances on deposit at
each bank, including CDs and any amounts swept automatically from an MLPFS account are FDIC-inrsured up to a maximum of $100,000, in
accordance with FDIC rules. Certain retirement accounts are FDIC-insured up to a maximum of $250,000. MLPFS limits the purchase amount
of a single CD from any one Bank to $97,000 for six-month CDs and $98,000 for three-month CDs.'MLPFS limits the purchase amount of a
single CD for certain retirement accounts from any one Bank to $243,000 for six-month CDS and $246,000 for three-month CDs. Annual
Percentage Yield (APY) is accurate as of 5/22/2006 and is subject to change without notice. Early withdrawal of CDs is generally not allowed
and a penalty may apply, if allowed. Although not required to do so, MLPFS may provide a secondary market so that customers can sell their
CDs prior to maturity. Liquidating CDs in the secondary market will be subject to current market conditions, and the price may be higher or lower
than the price originally paid.Total amount of CDs to be issued under these offers is limited. To be eligible, funds must come from sources other
than an existing Merrill Lynch relationship. Offers may be withdrawn at any time. Total Merrill (design) is a registered service mark of Merrill Lynch
& Co., Inc. Total Merrill is a service mark of Merrill Lynch & Co., Inc. 2006 Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner.& Smith Incorporated. Member, SIPC.

.::: : -:: i


from a special
getaway, tell him
or her about MDA
summer camps.
They're fun and free!



Muscular Dystrophy Association
Jerry Lewis, National Chairman
1-800-572-1717
wvww.mdausa.org