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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00136
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: May 31, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00136
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
    Main: Letters
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
    Main: Sports
        page 8
        page 9
    Main continued
        page 10
    Main: Classified
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
Full Text



404 Y VaST


UNw


House Keys
Get In
Wrong Hands

Editorial, Page 4


INl


VTLT1E. h 26U

4-H District
Events Award
Winners

Story, Photos, Page 7


JCHS Academic
Award
Winners Told

Story, Page 10


How To
Prepare For
Hurricanes

Story, Page 12


SWednesday Morning






Monticello


138TH YEAR NO. 43. 50 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ws

WEDNESDAY, MAY 31,2006,


County Rezones 450 Acres




For Eventual Development


Amendments Go To

DCA For Final Review


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


County commissioners re-
cently approved four Compre-
hensive Plan amendments, two
of them relatively controver-
sial.
The amendments now go to
the Department of Community
Affairs (DCA) for final review
and approval.
The two ,amendments that
drew public opposition in-
volved land-use changes af-
fecting 450 acres.
One amendment rezones 73
acres on US 19 South from.-
agriculture-5 (one unit per five
acres) to agriculture-3 (one
unit per three acres).
The second rezones two par-
cels totaling 377 acres near
I Waukeenah from mixed-use/
suburban-residential (up to
four units per acre if central
water and sewer is provided)
and ag-3, to R-1 (one unit per
acre).


The two amendments that
drew no opposition are ordi-
nances creating new standards
for family member subdivi-
sions and adopting a new geo-
graphic information s;, stem
(see related story).
The original request for the
US 19 and Fulford Road prop-
erty called for the zoning des-
ignation to be changed from
Ag- 5 to R-1.
Apparently responding to the
expressed concerns of sur-
rounding property ox\ ners. ap-
plicants Steve Andris and Don
Joiner amended their request
to ag-3.
g-3 '.%li all '\ r a maximum
of 24 ,units on the property ,
versus the 14 allowed under
the present zoning.
Seven residents spoke out
against the US 19 proposal.
The residents voiced concerns
about the proliferation of sep-
tic tanks, the lack of infrastruic-
ture to accommodate the
growth, the impact on county's
_ services and rural quality of


life, and the loss of archaeo-
logical and cultural resources.
One questioned the justifica-.
tion for the rezoning, and an-
other pointed out its precedent-
setting nature.
"I want to know whether
there have been changed con-


diions to justify the amnend-
ment?" Cindy Lee asked of the
two amendments..
Commissioners did not re-
spond to her question..
Lee also tried to get the
,amendments kicked out on a
-lechnicalit,. She pointed out


that according to state 'rules,
the amendments had to be
adopted or rejected within 60.
da\s of their receipt by the
county.
Consideration of the amend-
ments had now exceeded the
60-day period, Lee said.


COMMISSIONER JUNIOR TUTEN, left, and Planning Commission Attorney Scott Shir-
ley discuss land-use issues during a commission meeting. (News Photo)


Attorney Scott Shirley, who
represents the county on plan-
ning issues, disagreed. He ar-
gued, that the 60-day rule was
not absolute.
"Well over half of compre-
hensive plan amendments, are
_ adopted after expiration of the
60-day requirement," Shirley
said. "I've seen them go as
long as 18 months. There are
no sanctions. It's not a legal
impediment to consideration of
* the amendment."
John Hedrick, a member of
Jefferson County Citizens for a
Sustainable Future -- a group
that advocates planned growth
-- asked commissioners to con-
sider the consequences of their
action.
"This is the nose of the
camel in the tent," Hedrick
said. "Repeated often enough,
this situation will double the
population of the county.
You're not required to change
the zoning. We can control the
kind of life we want here if
you start saying where devel-
opment is appropriate."
Following the public com-
ments and assurance by the de-
velopers' representative that a
(See Rezoning Page 2)


Bullock Gets Pay

Hike, More Duties


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Building Inspector Wallace
Bullock .has received a sub-
stantial pay increase to go
along with his added responsi-
bilities as both Jefferson and
Madison counties building of-
ficial.
Bullock's present annual sal-
ary is $41,015, not counting
benefits such as health insur-
ance and pension. His new sal-
ary. will be $52,500, not
counting the benefits.
As part of the deal, a second
building inspector has been
hired here at a salary of
$26,423, up from the previous
$24,000.


Bullock's new salary goes
into effect as soon as the inter-
local agreement between Jef-
ferson and Madison counties
kicks in. Which occurs as soon
as Madison County hires a.
new building inspector --
something expected to happen
imminently. ,
By the terms of the' agree-
ment that Jefferson and Madi-
son commissioners adopted
several weeks ago, Bullock
will supervise the building in-
spection operations in the two
counties, among other duties.
The agreement specifies that
Jefferson County has primacy
over Bullock's services, should
a scheduling conflict arise be-
tween the two counties.
(See Bullock Page 2)


L---u- ------


Map Upgraded,


Rule Tightened


COMMISSIONERS agreed to give Building Inspector
Wallace Bullock a sizable increase as part of the agree-
ment with Madison County. (News Photo)


L AZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Two of the Comprehensive
Plan amendments that com-
missioners adopted recently
have been a long time in the
making.
The two are ordinances. One
creates new standards for
family-member subdivisions
and the second adopts-a new
geographic information system
m(GIS).
The family-meinber subdivi-
sion ordinance attempts to cor-
rect the previously recurring
problem of the subdivision of


land by variance.
It happened every time a
resident appealed to the Plan-
ning Commission for a vari-
ance to place a second home
on their property to accommo-
date an elderly or ill relative.
Inevitably, when the hard-
ship ended, the second home
remained on the property and
many times was rented out, in
effect diluting the density re-
quirement of the area.
The new ordinance seeks to
prohibit such subdivisions.
Residents who take in relatives
for hardship reasons are now
encouraged to build an addi-
tion to the existing dwelling,
(See Map Upgrade Page 3)


Comcast To Launch Four

New Cable Channels Here


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Comcast to provide
(News Photo)


Just when the city officials
were readying to call a Comn-
cast representative on the car-
pet, the company responded
with good news.
Effective June 20, according
to a Comcast communication
mailed to Councilman Brian
Hayes on May 18, Comcast
will launch four new channels
in Monticello.
The four new channels, ac-
cording to Comcast General
Manager K.C. McWilliams,-


are the Fox News (channel
58), the History Channel
(channel 59), the Trinity
Broadcasting Network (chan-
nel 60), and the Golf Channel
(channel 61).
"Our continued commitment
to you is to provide a wide va-
riety of choices in entertain-
ment, programming and
service through a state-of-the-
art cable system," McWilliams
wrote.
Two weeks earlier, City
Council members had re-
quested that McWilliams be
asked to appear at their June
meeting, to report on the cable


company's progress relative to
the issues raised by the council
in February.
Among the complaints that
council members and members'
of the public voiced at that ear-
lier meeting were poor recep-
tion, poor service -- including
frequent power outages and "a
customer service that sucked"
-- and a paucity of available
channels.
At the time, McWilliams
promised to look into the com-
plaints. For sure, she said, the
company should be able to of-
fer the History and Golf chan-
nels.
(See Comcast Page 3)


COUNCILMAN BRIAN HAYES, right, took the lead in pressing
more channels. Here he talks with City Attorney Bruce Leinback.


I I;


-----`~`- IV 113-` ^


; .1. ~~----








PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 31, 2006


Monticello Christian Academy

Presents Academic Awards


PLANNING OFFICIAL BOB ARREDONDO, left, and Planning Commission Attorney.
Scott Shirley confer during a Comprehensive Plan amendment hearing. (News Photo)



450 Acres Get Rezoned


(Continued From Page 1)
study had found the site had no
archaeological significance,
commissioners voted: unani-
mously to approve the amend-
ment .
The proposal involving the
rezoning of the 377-acre prop-
erty near Waukeenah -drew
stronger opposition, including
objections from the DCA.
The DCA's objections es-,
sehtially boiled down to the
property not being suited to ac-
commodate 377 houses, the
maximum potentially allowed
under the rezoning.

As Planning Official Bob
Arredondo explained it to
commissioners, however, the
DCA had misunderstood the
county's intention.

Arredondo said the DCA.
failed to see that the county's
approval was contingent on the
developer limiting the maxi-
mum number of houses to 204,
with 173 acres of the property
to be dedicated to conservation
easement.
Once the DCA understood
'the county-imposed restriction,
the state agency's objections
concerning septic tanks, water
quality, traffic, schools, etc.,
would go away, Arredondo
said.
Under the present zoning,-
Arredondo said the developer
could place 94 units on the 47-
acre parcel zoned
mixed-use/suburban residential
and 110 units on the 330-acre
parcel zoned ag-3, for a total
of 204 houses.
And if the developer chose to
put in water and sewer, he
could place 188 units on the
47-acre parcel, Arredondo
said.
Thus, by placing a cap on the -
maximum number of units al-
lowed, the county in effect was
preserving the rural character
of the area, Arredondo said.
"The amendment doesn't
change the density," he said.
"It merely allows (the housing
units) to be distributed differ-
ently."
Opponents didn't buy the ar-
gument.
What proof did the county
have that the developer would
actually put the 173 acres into
conservation easement?
Wayne Searcy wanted to
know'.


Commissioner Skeet Joyner,.
gave assurance that he person-
Sally would see -that the stipula-
tion was made part of any de-
velopment approval.
How would the archaeologi-
cal resQurces on the property ,
:be protected? Santa Hokanson
asked.
The developers' representa-
tive offered assurance that a
study of the property had indi-.


houses?
"If the'de\ eloper can do 204
houses on the land, why do we
*Want to change it?" she said.,
"Let the village of Waukcenah
be %\here the village is. Why
do we want to take something
that's not broken and fix it? I'm
asking you to do something for
the people who have lived here
all their lives. Search your
hearts. Do"-, hat's right."


cated mte site na no arcnaeo-
logical significance. Commissioner Jerry Sut-
phin's flippant remark to the
Told by officials that the is- effect that the only obvious so-
sue athand was a rezoning. not lutionto opponents' objections
a request for a development was to adopt an ordinance that.
permit, Marcie Hamilton ap- prevented property owners
peared dumbstruck. Of course, from selling to developers elic-
the bottom line was'for a de- ited chuckles from the pro-
velopment, she said. development element.
"How many of you buy a ',. 'Sutphin found little merit
new car to put it in, the w ith the opponents' objections,.
garage?" she said. "You're go- giventhat the county's stipula-
ing to drive it!" tion was limiting the develop-
Bill Tellefsen, chairman of ment to 204 houses.
the Planning Commission, Commissioner Eugene Hall
spoke as a citizen, agreed. Absent the county's
stipulation, the developer
He pointed out that suitable could conceivably install water
areas for higher-density devel- and sewer and raise the density'
opments existed all over the to 377 houses, he said.
county. The problem 'wasn't Conimissioners Skeet Joyner '
the lack of suitable-sites,-4ae.-and Junior--Tuten- echoed.-the --
said. The problem was the fail- sentiment, pointing out that
ure of officials to abide, by the their solution was the best pos-
Comprehensive Plan. sitble to help preserve the areas
rural character.
"You should be able to direct Commissioner Danny Mon-
the growth rather than let de- roe alone expressed concern.
velopers' application direct the 'How long is never?" Mon-
growth," Tellefsen said. "I find roe asked, referring to the
it hard to continue planning if stipulation that the developer
every time something drops convert part of the property to
here or over there that doesn't conservation easement.
fit with our plan we change it. It has been pointed out in
It doesn't seem the plan is very previous discussions that even
much to uphold the plan. I contracts establishing agree-
don't think the plan should be ments into perpetuity can al-
changed until we're ready and ways be amended, if the
not when the developer says. situation changes and if the po-
We already have vacant prop- litical and legal wills exist to
erty zoned for development, make the change.
you just need to go get it." Monroe said that with the ex-
- Fred Williams, .an adjacent ception of one individual, no
property owner with "a stake one in his district -- which en-
in what went on next door", compasses the development --
questioned the need for the re- had expressed support for the
zoning rezoning. ,
"Where is the demonstrated "It's true that 204 is better
need for this community?" than 377," Monroe said. "But
Williams said. "It appears it's that's a potential of what may
a done deal, but it helps my or what occur if water and
conscience to tell you how I sewer are put in. I still have a
feel." problem doing this. I sat on the
Planning Commission for 29
Betty Boland, whose grand- years and worked on the Com-
father once owned the land prehensive Plan. There needs
about to be developed, won- __to be a need for it to be
dered why the Comprehensive changed."
Plan had to be amended, if the The vote to approve the latter
present zoning allowed for 204 amendment was 4-1.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Monticello Christian Acad-.
emy held its. scholastic
awards program, May 23.
Receiving awards were:
Bethany Hamilton named
academic student of the year.
Drista Bailey, Brianna
Larry, Ethan Morrow, and Ian
Morrow received the Princi-
pal's Award.
. Students on the A honor roll
receiving awards for main-
taining a 92 percent grade av-
erage all year include:
, Grade 1: Amy Barker, Sara
Joiner, and Dylan McGrath.
Grade 2: Malyce Collins,
Caleb Hamilton, and Brianna
Larry.
Grade 3: Nick Matthews
and Gregory Meeks.


Grade 5: Brendon Hamilton.
Grade 6: Kevin Thompson.
Grade 9: Bethany Hamilton.
Grade 12. KatIltn Burke.


Grade 10: Luke Lingo, Lyn-
sie Matthews, and Sarah Par-
rott.


.. ...Grade 11: Lauren
Students receiving awards esperance and an Morrow.
for B honor roll, maintaining Students receiving special
an 84 percent grade average awards include:
all year include: Tw s i e:
Syear include: Emily Adams, A. J. Mur-
Giade 2: Rafael Rosas. phy, and Sarah Tharpe, per-
Grade 4: Jared Bailey, Kani-_ fect attendance.
sha Fishbum, Delmar Ben Morrow, Samuel Lin-
Jackson, Autumn Lamb, Mal- gle, and. Shannon McDonald,
lory Mims, and Christina creative writing.
SMorrow .. Nick Matthews, Christina
Grade 5: Rayne Baker, Ja-- Morrow, Danna Lowers and
votee' Godfrey, Thurston Shannon .McDonald, for
Hutchenson and Paige Sand- Christian character.
ers. Jean-Pierre Dupis, Sharieka-
Grade 6: Kiersten Hayes, Parrish and Chris Jordan,
and Danna Lowers. most improved.
Grade 7: R. J. Lacy.. Jason Shiver, kindergarten
Grade 8: Samuel Lingle and award.
Ethan Morrow. Cafeteria ladies, Mrs.
Grade 9: Marsha:Jehkins, Hutchinson, and Mrs. Brown
were named volunteers of the
year.


Boyd Secures Funding

For Green Institute
Congressman Allen Boyd. a
member of the House Appro-
priations Committee has voted
in favor of the Agriculture Ap- M A
.propriations Act for fiscal year
2007 (HR 5384.)
In this legislation Boyd se- N
.cured $450,000 for the Green
Industries Institute for Profes-
sional Development. .2837 N.
The Monticello facility is
dedicated to horticulture edu- V ONTICt
cation and research in Florida.
"The Green Institute pro- 997
vides hands on classroom ex- 9 77 7-
perience for the horticulture
industry a multibillion dollar
industry," said Boyd. We Wish The Watermelon Fes
"This funding will allow the Watermelon Groi
Green. Institute to continue
giving people the skills they
need to secure jobs in this vital
industry,"
The Green Institute also con-
ducts research used to study
weed control, detection of [O
pathogens in irrigation .. ph
systems, nutrient water man- ...ie perfect .
-agement,.and the economics of
nursery management aspects.
Established in late 2001,
Green Industries Institute is a
horticulture training in partner- N ew
ship with FAMU, NFCC, and
University of Florida and the
nursery., landscape and arbori- Start J
culture industries. .


Help your community
when a-disaster strikes!
Become a trained Disaster
Services Volunteer by contacting
the Capital' Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross at 878-6080
or visit our web site at
www.tallytown.com/redcross.
American
Red Cross


Vickie Bailey was/named
substitute teacher of the yearr,
"Danielle Matthews was
named the teacher of the year.




LLLOYVS

NURSERY


JEFFERSON

ELLO, FLA

3661

stival and The Jefferson County
vers-The Very Best! .






I.MER
time for NFCC




'lasses


lune 26
Term IIIB
s Madison, Fla


Bullock Gets Salary increase


(Continued From Page 1)
It also gives Jefferson
County the authority to negoti-
ate Bullock's salary, with
Madison County contributing
half the cost.
'An escape clause in the con-
tract allows either county to
terminate the agreement with








1-800-USA-NAVY
wwwnavyj obs.com


due notice, should it become
unworkable for any reason.
"This is a trial undertaking,"
Bullock reminded commis--
sioners.
At an earlier meeting, he
called the timing for the ar-
rangement propitious, given_


the level of development in the
two counties at present.
"We're in a good steady con-
struction phase right now,"
Bullock said. "This agreement
will give both counties time to
grow until they can separate at
the navel. This is a no lose
proposition for both counties."


Launch Your


Help prevent damage from bark beetles,
diseases, and wildfire through practices
that promote healthy pines.


* Thin dense pine stands.
* Control understory
plant competition.
* Minimize tree wounds


during harvests.


PREVENT



JfB


* Use prescribed fire.
* Harvest low-vigor
stands and replant.
* Plant species right
for the soil and site.


A message from the Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer Services,
Division of Forestry, the University of
Florida/IlFAS, and the USDA Forest Service.


Summer
NFCC Campu!


REGISTER NOW. CALL TODAY.


,.,"0 850.973. 1622
Sw'"W v.fc. edu



























0 2U $.
RAY CICHON, managing editor, accepts a Certificate of Appreciation on behalf of the
"Monticello News," from Juanice Hagan, co-chair of the County Relay for Life. Front
row, left, Cichon, Juanice Hagan, Relay co-chair, Molly Wahl, Cancer Society Liaison,
back, Bill Bassett, and Jo Morris. (News Photo)


Variety Of Summer

Camps For 4-Hers


DEBBIE SNAPP
S Staff Writer
SAnother 4-H year is cot
pleted; ,school is out, a
many 4-H members will
S continuing ',.4-H activii
throughout the summer.
4-H members are encoi
Saged to take advantage of t
summer camps offered th
year.
e They are fun and infoim
tive and are put together esp
cially with the 4-H member
.mind.
Available camps include:


Map upgrad
(Continued From Page 1)
rather than install a secor
S structure.
The ordinance exempts res
dents whose homestead e:
emption dates earlier tha
1990. "hen the Comprehetr
sivPlan wash adopted.
The second ordinance rc
places the old Future Land Us
Map with a new, more sophist
ticated and accurate GIS-base
mapping system.
The change is a technology
cal improvement that esse
tially affects the intern
operations of the Property A
praiser and Planning depa
ments.
Because the new system
based on the GIS, it more a
curately depicts the reality <
the'ground. It also allows ti
overlaying of different layer
S of information on a particul
S parcel.
Thus, officials can over
the county's map with natui
and marimade features, such
rivers and roads, as well as p
litical, geographic and oth
information.


Festival
Gospel Sing
Set June 17
The Watermelon Fest
Gospel Sing takes place 6 p
Saturday, June 17, at the Op
House.
An incorrect time was
ported in the Festival schec
published in the Friday, 1\
26 edition of "Montice
News."
The Sing will feature
Brightside Spiritual Singe
and the Angel Band, prese
ing spiritual and Gospel mus
Soloist Lucy Quick will a
perform, as will the Big Be
Hospice Music Thera
Group, "Keeping It Rural."
Refreshments will be serve
during intermission, by
youth of Indian Springs BE
tist Church.
A love offering will be tal
at the door to benefit Big Be
Hospice.


Wildlife Day Camp, June
5-9 for ages 10-15.
Summer Fun Day Camp,
June 19-23, for ages 5-7.
m- Annual Summer Camp'
nd theme, "If you know it, you
be can grow it," July 3-7.
ies Summer Fun Day Camp,,
July 17-20, for ages 8-9.
ur- There is still a need for'
he 4-H Camp .Counselors. A
his mandatory training is sched-
uled for 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Friday,
la-. June 30 at the .Extension Of-
>e-


fice.
Anyone interested in being
a camp counselor and can fol-
low the guidelines, is asked to
call 342-0187, or come by the
Office at 275 North Mulberry.
Street, to sign up.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 31, 2006 PAGE 3
committeee Presents
t Pt Wahl explained that bills
T t|N e w s e r cic atl, .v were still arriving and the fi-
ews', Certificate nal Relay for Life total is not

of Appreciation yet know.
for its coverage of the Relay
itEBBIE SNAPP ftndraisers and the County
Staff Writer Relay for Life, which raised
$87,750, with more coming
in.
The Relay For Life Steenring .
,Committee hosted'an appre- f
ciation Luncheon for the om c
Monticello News staff Thurs- (Cointinued.From Page 1)
'iy afternoon. She also promised to look
A selection of sandwiches into the complaints about the
'donated by "Sage," .a medley poor service.
.-of fresh fruit, 'and potato As of the May meeting,
;chips were delivered to the however, the council had not
lNews office by the members heard back from McWilliams. StIf S Jun 1
of the'Steering Committee. Nor had any of the complaints o
Dessert was homemade been addressed, as far as coun- in Monticell, Fla
,brownies, baked by Bill Bas- cil members could see.
settRelay co-chair. Hayes then requested that Website: WWWM.NFCC.EDU
Other Steering Committee McWilliams be asked to ap- TO REGISTER: li
memberss %%ere Co-Chair Jua- pear before the council. __ _
:.nice Hagan, Jo Morris., pub- Weeks later, Comcast's let-'
licity chair for, 2007, and terarrived. 85.9 31
Molly Wahl, of Tallahassee,
American Cancer Society liai-
sone Comminee presented S'orensen Tire Center
the,"Monticello Ne\s" with a ,
Certificate- of Appreciation Jeff SorenSen


Use Spanish for business and
pleasure in a social setting
Fleet's Spanish Training Program
Dr. Anita Fleet
Call 681-7792 for information
E-mail: FleelSpan-.5aol.com hllp://fleelspan.com


Major Credit Cards Accepted
FROM WHEEL BARROW TO 18- WHEELER
We've Got Your Tires!
Computerized Wheel Balance and Alignment Front End Work,
Brakes,. Auto-Truck Repair
On/Off Road Service Truck ~ AG/Industrial Tires & Repair
1300 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL. 32344
850-997-4689


Un

ElA ..Y


HOME IS



WHERE OUR


HE 'TART S .


TO OUR FRIENDS,

NEIGHBORS & GUESTS...



ENJOY THE 2006 FESTIVAL





Organized 1906 2006




Jefferson County's Hometown Bank.

Farmers & Merc hants Bank
AN FMB BANK MEMBER F.D.I.C.


I i II I


I --- V-










PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 31,2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc'.

RON CICHON
A IPublisher


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.,
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




House Keys Get


U


From Our
- '


Photo


File
,J I..


CONNIE SWIGGARD, left, was elected Crime Watch block captain in' Oct. 1990. Her
daughter Megan is on her lap. At right is her former husband Hal Swiggard, with their
son Trevor on his lap. The group listened to a presentation by then Sheriff Ken For-
tune about neighborhood Crime Watch Techniques. (News File Photo)


in Wrong Hands- pinion & comment


What can you do. to safe-
guard your home if your house
keys accidentally end up in the
wrong hands? That's a ques-
tion nearly two out of every
three American homeowners'
should consider closely, ac-
cording to a new study.
The stud\,Danoer at Amer-
ica's Doorstep: Who Has Keys
to Your Home?,. looked at ho\
homeowners protect or fail to
protect their house keys and
safeguard their home.
The survey found that a ma-
jority (64 percent) of Ameri-
can homeowners have know-
ingly circulated their house
keys outside of .their immedi-
ate family and nearly one-third
(27 percent) of American
homeowners have given out a
key three ,or more.times. .
Every 15 seconds a burglar
Breaks into a house, apartniti'fi
or condo in the U.S.
Burglars are often quick to
attack a home's easiest point
of entry, and nothing's easier
than unlocking a front door
with a set of keys.
According to John Heppner,
President and CEO of Fortune
Brands Storage and Security,
including Master Lock Com-
! pany L.L.C., "Too many
Americans underestimate the
potential risks they invite to
their homes when they let their
house keys wander.". .
Fortunately, there are ways
to prevent. strangers, from en-
tering s our home even if they,
have your key.


For example, the Master
Lock NightWatch Deadbolt
looks and works just like a
standard deadbolt lock, but it
offers a powerful new security
feature a patent pending
blocking :function that locks
out all keys.
To activate, owners simple\
lock the deadbolt as the\
would a standard deadbolt and
then pull the lever towards
them.
This simple motion locks the
deadbolt into an "engaged" po-
sition that blocks out any key.
The lock can only be engaged
or disengaged from: indoors
and can be easily installed' in
any standard entry door,' re-
placing any other standard
deadbolt.
To safeguard their homes,
homeowners should:'
1..... Keep keys secuted where,
they won't be forgotten or left
behind.
2. Don't hide keys in
"secret" places outside your
home experienced burglars
can usually find them.
3., Never attach your keys to
anything that lists your name,
address or phone number, and
never leave them behind' in a.
locked (or unlocked) car.
4. Always separate your
house keys from your car keys
each time you valet your car or
drop it off for maintenance.
5. Only give your keys to
someone who will watch ovpr
them, as if they were their
own.


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
May 29, 1996
A severe thunderstorm
pelted the city with hailstones
and toppled trees late Thurs-
day afternoon, creating power
shortages.
Youths in the Explorer pro-
gram with the Jefferson
County Fire Rescue will now
be able to accompany fire-
fighters on emergency calls;
The County Commission re-
cently approved a ride-along
policy, if with trepidation. The
vote was 3-2.
Contributions for the annual
fourth of July Fireworks Dis-
play have begun to come but
more are needed.
Despite predictions that a
poor watermelon harvest
would result this year because
of the late freezes, now ap-
pears that the local harvest did
not suffer excessively and will
only lag a little behind sched-
ule.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
May 28, 1986
County officials say they are
still sizing up alternatives for a
countywide fire protection
plan.
The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy Baccalaureate worship
service has been set for' Sun-
day night in the school audito-
rium. The service will feature a


message by Rev. Calvin God-
dlett, Rector of Christ Episco-
pal Church of Monticello.
Bobbie Krebs has announced
her candidacy for County
Commissioner, District Four.

THIRTY YEARS AGO
May 27, 1976
Walter A. (Tony) Brown has
won the State Student Award
at. Aucilla Christian Academy.
The award is sponsored by the
Florida Chamber of Commerce
and criteria includes work ex-
perience, preparation of an es-
say on .the free enterprise sys-
tem, leadership in the school
and community an academic
achievement.
Two Jefferson County
women have joined the FBI.
Mildred Bythewood Thomp-
son, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Theodore Bythewood, is pres-
ently employed as leave and
mail clerk at FBI headquarters
in Washington D.C. Bonita
Glenn, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. David Glenn of Monti-
cello, is a finger print exam-
iner also based in Washington.

FORTY YEARS AGO
May 27,1966
Donna Blow and Poppy Rev-
ell have been chosen to repre-
sent Jefferson County at Girl's
State June 17-20.


Bottle was Bill's Darling


I was just a \oungster in this
business when 1 worked next
to Bill who "as at least 30
Nears my senior.
This fellow had been on a
roller coaster ride most' of his
life due to his love affair with
the bottle..
He told me he once .owned
'the largest asphalt pa\ ing com-
pany in his home state losing
his business to booze and bad,
judgments
He bounced back and bought
a small newspaper and in less
than 10 years he had six thriv-
ing weekly newspapers. Once
again success ruined himi and
he took up with the bottle.
There \ as a car dealership, a:
real estate business, and large
motel in his background too.
For a time I was convinced
Bill has a vivid imagination
and a hard past.
Then one day his ex-wife
called to see how he was
doing.' Bill was out on assign-
mnent and I took the call' for
him.
We talked for a few minutes
and I reported that Bill was do-
.ing OK.
She was delighted. Then she_


Publisher's


Notebook


Ron Cichon
_, ^ 1ip


, said, "You know, Bill has been
a millionaire several times
over and each time his drink-
ing brought him down."
I -was.astonished,!. Were these
stories he had been telling me
really true?
I asked the lady about the as-
' phalt 'paving business and she
verified Bill's story.' How
about the six newspapers? And
the car dealership and the mo-
tel?
All those stories were true,
she said. Bill had an uncanny
ability to make a business suc-
cessful. And an uncann\ abil-
ity to lose one tpo.
Bill and I continued to work


at desks next to each other for
several months and one day he
didn't come to work.
He had been so responsible
that I really didn't give a,
thought to the idea that he
might have started drinking
again.
About noon'it hit me. I won-
dered if Bill was back on the
bottle?
The next day I reported to
work and noticed Bill's empty
desk. There was no sign of him
all day.
After work I decided to drive
by Bill's apartment to see if he
was there.
His front door xwas ajar and I


called to him. No answer. I
pushed the door open and
squinted trying to see in the
darkened apartment. I took a
couple of steps and found a
light switch and flipped it on.
There %uas trash all oier the
floor. The blinds uere closed
and drapes were drawn.
I peered in his bedroom and
saw Bill stretched out on the
bed. For a second I thought he
was dead.
As I stared at him I sa\" the
bottle cradled in his. 'arm and I
could see him breathing.
I tried to rouse him but he
was dead drunk.
That wasn't the last time I
saw Bill. although he never did
return 'to,''work- and' another'
person was hired in his place.
Several weeks later I stopped
.at a convenience store to pick
up a quart of milk and I saw
Bill leaving the store with a
bottle.
I called to him. He turned
back to see -, ho it %\as then ran
around the comer clutching his
bottle. .-
His love affair % ith (he bottle
had been rekindled and was
--now in full bloom.


Seize FCAT Momentum


B) DENNIS FOGGI
Columnist

It was great to read about the-
Jefferson Elementary School
improved FCAT scores for
third graders in the May 5th
addition of the "Monticello
News."
Everyone who worked with
these students to increase their
knowledge in reading and
mathematics deserves a con- -
gratulatory pat on the back.
The question and challenge
now, (as I am sure Principal
Collins is fully aware) is how
does one seize on the moment
of this success?
Interestingly, the education,
community and politicians
tend to look toward,
"structured" solutions to these
education dilemmas. Things
such as smaller teacher-student
ratios, increased teacher pay,


concentrated sterile education
programs and even % ouchers.'
What is missing and \\3a too
serious to overlook', is the so-
cial and psychological pan of
the student equation. Back in
the 1970's psychologist named
Walter Mischel made a re-
markable and telling
discovery.
SHe conducted an experiment
using four year-old children.
He placed them in a room with
a bell and a marshmallow and
instructions that if they rang
the bell, they could eat, the
marshmallow, but if they did
not ring the bell and waited for
him to return, then they would
get two marshmallows.
Not surprising, some kids
rang the bell right away and
ate the marshmallow while
others would work to distract
'themselves for up to fifteen
minutes in some cases, to earn
the two marshmallows.


This experiment in and of it-.
self was little more than an in-
teresting look at individual ef-
forts in self control. The sig-
nificant of the experiment,
how ever, was discovered
many years later while track-
ing the same kids into adult-
hood. .
On average, those kids exer-
cising self-control by waiting,
went on to get higher test'
scores in school and on college
entrance exams, earned their
college degrees and generally
had a better quality of life.
Those kids who showed less'
self control by ringing the bell
quickly tended to have drug
problems and other brushes
with the law, generally did not
go to college, achieved lower
test scores and constituted the
larger percentage of drop outs.
This need for self gratifica-
tion makes students think in
-the short term. They fail to rec-


ognize any long term effects or
consequences of their actions
and behavior. Unfortunately,
many of these kids are from
poor homes where sometimes
a strong family structure and
enduring values are often lack-
ing, violence and abuse of al-
cohol or drug may be more
prevalent and frequent family
relocations is commonplace.
The good news is that chil-
dren can be taught to have self
control. Students who are
given tests and situations that
demand their individual self
control, tend to improve their
ability to put off self gratifica-
tion and sequentially increase
and improve their ability to
wait.
This creates for them a more
stable environment in which to
think through and successfully
resolve problems. and achieve
more reasonable and lasting
(See FCAT Page 5)


Environmental Three R's


.Every day in America, each
man, woman and child gener-
ates nearly four pounds of
trash'.
That's over .one trillion
pounds of solid waste or 365
trillion pounds each year. It's
staggering statistic when you
consider the environmental ef-
fect that much garbage has on
our fragile ecosystem.
As adults, it's easy to forget
the importance of the 3 R's our
world depends on reducing, re-


using, and recycling for the
:'health and safety of future gen-
irations our children, that will
bear the consequences of to-
day's environmental misman-
agement, unless an effort is'
made to improve upon current
behaviors.
For the third year, one hotel
company is stepping up to the
task, helping kids to think
globally and act locally by
educating them on how to
properly care for the environ-


ment.
With help .from The National
Arbor Day Foundation, Dou-
bletree Hotels is distributing an
environmentally focused les-
son plan that provides the
framework for taking would-
be waste and recycling it into
artistic treasures to thousands
of elementary school students
in the U.S. and Canada. ,
The education initiative is an
extension of the hotel's Teach-
ing Kids to CARE program, a


community outreach initiative
that pairs hotel properties with
elementary schools and youth
groups to educate children
about making conscious deci-
sions about environmental
care.
This spring, Teaching Kids
to CARE volunteers and chil-
dren will create "litter critters,"
a reduced, reused and recycled
representation of animals in
the world hurt by litter, and
(See Environmental Page 5)


r


I








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 31,2006 PAGE 5


Letters...


Should Growth Be C

Or History, HeritagE


.Dear Editor:.
Diane Roberts, in the book-
'"Between Two Rivers: Stories
from the Red Hills to the
Gulf," said it better than I ever
could.
She said: "I guess you could
.call 'me a hypocrite. I have
,benefited from my people's ex-
;.ploitation of the land, and now
. Want it to stop.
S"Unless you cherish this
,place for its oldness and wild-
ness and quiet, I want you to
'stay away. I embrace my hy-
pocrisy: I say not in my back-
yard. Not in yours either.
"If you uant a grocery store
'and a gas station every ten
feet, you can get that in Or-
lando. The developers tell us
that this is going to be good
for us, good for the 'economy,
good for jobs... .
"But even if paving over the
whole place from St. Marks to
Perdido Key would make the
over extended owners of the
Piggly, Wigglys and out of
work shrimpers, and the debt
laden peanut farmers all as rich
as old Ed Ball himself, would
that really compensate for the
loss of our history? _


"Our heritage? The beauty of
this other Florida? But more
and more the subdivisions and
the superstores encroach on it,
and. the night sky is no longer
lapis blue but dirty orange. My
'Florida is disappearing fast."
In the same book, Susan Ce-
rulean writes: "Even if we
treasure our homeland just as it
is, monumental change is
headed our x\a': some has al-
read\ arrived.
"The same forces that have
run roughshod over much of
South Florida large develop-
ments and unplanned sprawl
have set their sights on our
clean rivers and mild hills. The
true face of our landscape is
slipping through memory, re-
designed and renamed by cor-
porate interests, and blurring
into predictable strip malls,
and chain establishments.
"Between 1990 and 2000,
Wakulla \ as among five Flor-
ida counties that rocketed in
growth by more than 60 per-
cent. These rates of growth are
projected to continue. even in-
crease, and it's safe to say that
nowhere in our area are we
prepared with the infrastruc-
Srure, *vision, and protective


Dear Editor:
This is my first time writing
to you, but I 'am positively
compelled to do so now.
First, I would like to tell you
.that I enjoy reading each issue
of the "Monticello News!"
You and your staff do a very
good job of reporting the news
and activities of this rural
town r ;M_ f f": '" :" :"p*' ; '
h i I, am partioi'arlyt' impressed-
witf- the performance of your.
senior. staff writer, Laz
Aleman. I believe he is very
accurate, fair, and -balanced in
his reporting.
Secondly, since my wife and
I moved here from the Central.
Florida area eight months ago,
I have been interested and con-
cerned with the %way the count)
is governed, and the perform-'
ance of its operations.,
It is much improved over,
this: time period. The elected
officials and the operational
staff have developed profes-
sionally in almost every way.
"WE" all still have a ways to
go, but I feel "WE" are going'
or growing in the right ditec-
tion.


An example follows: I have
always been concerned with
the way this county is growing
or developing. This has to be
accomplished with good plan-
ning and management by de-
veloping good land
development rules and sticking
to them. AND following our
present Comprehensive Plan.
In closings, I would like to
reflect on an effort that encour-
ages me to believe "WE" are
planning in the right direction.
As Mr. Aleman has previ-
ously reported, there is a sub-
committee of the .Planning
Commission that is working
on subdivisions.
I have had the opportunitN to
attend these meetings and they
have always solicited feedback
from area conservationists, de-
velopers, planners, and citizens
alike.
I am impressed with what
they have-done and appreciate'
their efforts, especially since
they are voluntary public ser-
vants.
Thank You.
Tom LaMotte


FCAT



(Continued From Page 4) *
\ adults. It also helps sitting
o n tr ll through some of those boring
oo n tro lleU db J. classes in school and college to
Lo st? ultimately graduate.
e Lo St? It would be wise for educa-
tors to consider implementing
policies, to handle what's corn- -programs that foster individual
ing our way." students ,self control while si-
Our County Commission has multaneously invoking tar-
already voted on two occa- getied educational programs
sions to amen4 the Compre-. such as math and reading.
hensive Plan. The Department Combining the psychological
of Community Affairs staff re- and academics objectives
portn n the proposed \Vau- could quite easily produce sig-
keen project indicates that nificant improvements in stu-
the amendment met .several dent comprehenion and
criter a for urban sprawl as de- uitin atelyFCATscores.i a
fined in the Florida Admims-
trative Code.
My compliments, though, to
Charlie Ward and Max Bilin- [ II
ski, two local guys who are m I'.m
building subdivisionsx\tithin or j -
beyond the density require-
.nents established in our With your help, MDA
Count Comprehensi e Plan. .., investigators are racing to
This could be a lesson to oth- beat 40 neuromuscular diseases.
ers that it can be done. And Join our team in the battle for life.
you don't see them up at the
courthouse all the time asking 9"' for special consideration from Mu t,:o.lor
the various boards. "0 :, ,,
SWe can question the logic of rr
tampering with our Conmpre-
hensive Plan no,\, or we can '
ignore it.
The choice is ours. ITf\e ig- ,
nore it, is it worth risking the va E 5i
loss of our historN, heritage -
and natural resources? i w '
S .Sincerely, e lJ .
S. Wai ne Searcy I .


AU


&4 ortgage group, Inc.


Marianne Arbulu, President
1417 Timberland Road Suite 120
Tallahassee, FL 32312
850-577-1300 fax 577-0555 cell 528-5758
e-mail: monaia'ialphamortgage.us .
www.alphamortgage.us
,., FAMB State Broker of the Year 2001
... Correspondent Lender


Three Sisters


. Will Be Closed From


U
U
U


June 2nd June 14th

Reopening -

Thursday June 15th


Ati EE. Elk ...M U l I


e Southern FTrinds

Antiques ~,Collectibles Custom Framing

2 LOCATIONS
235 N. Jefferson Street, Monticello, FL 323+4
850-997-2550
Hours:-Tues: Fri. 10 5
Sat 9 3

S Publix Shopping Center, Thomasville, GA
229-227-1500
Hours: Mon. Sat. 10 7

Proud To Support The Jefferson Watermelon Festival


Environmental 3 R's


(Continued From Page 4)
will plant more than 10,000
seedling trees across the U.S.
and Canada.
For those parents (and men-
tors) wanting to engage their
kids (or nieces, nephews and
grandkids) in environmentally
conscious activities, here are a
few tips:
1. Recycling is Fun Pass it
On Recycling isn't all about
aluminum cans and old news-
papers.
Encourage your kids to start
their own recycling program in
which they share old toys,
books and games with their
friends and classmates.
One child's trash is another
child's treasure and by "pass-
ing it on," kids will learn that
they can reduce waste by recy-
cling their old things so that
others can reuse them.
2. Become a Habitat Hero-
Challenge your children to
gather up all their friends and
classmates to help clean up a
park or school yard (with pa-
rental supervision). Whoever
collects the most trash wins the
"Habitat Hero" award and
prize (as- decided upon by
you).
3. Plant a "Family Tree';
Take your kids to a garden or
home store and allow them to
help pick out a young tree.
(Make sure to check that it can


survive in your climate
region.)
Plant the tree in a special lo-
cation as a family, assigning a
different task (digging,0 plant-
ing, watering) to each 'family
member.
Make sure to document the
activity with a photo, so kids
can remember how small the
tree was when they planted it.
4. You CAN Make a Differ-
ence.Encourage your children
to save empty aluminum cans,
then take a weekly trip to a
nearby "Cash for Cans" drop-
off location.
Decide with your kids how
best to use the money they've
collected from their recycling
efforts to better the environ-
ment.
Options to consider include
volunteering for tree planting
projects, adopting a local
stretch of highway to be beau-
tified and maintained or donat-
ing the money to a local
environmental organization.
5. Pulp to Paper This fun,
hands-on project shows kids
how old newspapers are recy-
cled back into fresh newspa-
pers.
Have your child tear a half
page of newspaper into small,
one-inch pieces. Fill buckets or
bowls with one-part newspaper
and two parts water and let
soak for several hours.


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Reader Lauds

Senior Writer


Jefferson County Library

342-0205
375.South Water St.
We Wish The Watermelon Festival and The ,
Jefferson County Watermelon Growers'
The Very Best!


MENCOUN


i















DAr_ i. Mrtv NTrCT.O iF (F. NEWS. WED.. MAY 31.2006


SLifes' style


Getches To Celebrate

50th Anniversary


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Sue and Lewis Getch of-
Monticello, will celebrate
their 50th wedding anniver-
sary 3-5 p.m., Saturday, June
3, with a reception, in the
First Baptist Church Fellow- .
ship Hall on West Washing-
ton Street.
The couple was married
June 3, 1956 in the First
Methodist Church, Moore Ha-
ven FL.
The Getches have. operated
Monticello Printers and Of-
fice Supplies for 36 years.
They are both active mem-
bers of the First Baptist


Church, where he is a deacon,
both sing in the choir.
Their children are Navy
CWO5 Earl Lewis Getch, Jr.,
and wife Annette, of Bowdo-
inham, ME, Charles Freder-
ick Getch, and wife, Dr.
Yvette, of Watkinsyille, GA,
and Rebecca Sue Getch Kelly
of Tallahassee.
Their grandchildren include
Heather, Garret, Keith, Brit-
tany, Tiffany, Ricky,
Madison, Tiffany, Nate and
Emily Getch, Raichelle Burt
and Devon Kelly, and great
grandson, Isaha Burt.
The Getches invite all of
their friends to celebrate their
anni% ersanr \\ith them.


SHARE Reports

Registration Dates


Registration for Aucilla
SHARE is set 10a.m.-12p.nm.
on the Saturdays of June 3
and 10.
The two locations accept-
.ing registration are Central
Baptist Church, 655 Tindell
Road, Aucilla, and the Li-,
brary, at 375 Water,Street.
Only cash, food stamps, or
EBT is accepted.
No orders can be accepted
for the June food packages af-,
ter June 10.
The food packages -. ill be
available for pick up on Sat-
urday. June 24 at the church,
location only.
The cost of the Basic Pack-
age for June is S18, a guaran-


SUE AND LEWIS GETCH


teed retail value of $36.
It will consist of 6 pack Hot
Pockets 27 oz., assorted fla-
vors, 1 lb. fully 'cooked
bacon, 1.7 lbs. chicken drum-
sticks, 1 lb. lemon, pepper
chicken for kabobs, 1 lb.
boneless pork chops, and a 30
oz. rising crust pepperoni
pizza. plus a selection of fresh
fruits and vegetables.
0 i ''
1 ..- ]


I ri-ii;[ IhI -i 1 i'l cIII illJ.II'i Irl


ir 'i'to, ea' i'rl
to learn!


.. .



LYNN DAVIS, standing, helps the Lions with their first Bingo game. First winners of
the evening Irene Dean, and Betty Kendrick. (News Photo); ,


400 Se r C er have sales booths'set up at the
Se nio9 e n1 U' V dWatermelon' Festival e ents,
and Bed Race, the Fashion
Cookbooks Sold Show Luncheon, and at other
Cookbooks Sold various upcoming events and
ted by local cooks., monthly Club meetings.
DEBBIE SNAPP- Cost of the book, which Chairman Mary Ann Van
Staff Writer makes a reasonably priced Kleunen may be reached at
gift for all occasions, is $12. 997-3.986 for books or more
The Jefferson Senior Citi- The bnnoks may be purchased information. Also Ruby Whit-.'


zen Center cookbook: "Reci-
pes & Memories, What's
Cookin' in Monticello", went
on sale in April, and has sold
nearly 400 books.'
200 books were sold in the
first 10 days of sale.
The publishing costs have
now been paid and continued
sales will benefit the Center.
Some 300 recipes, are con-
tained in the book, all submit-


at a few local retailers such as
Jackson's Drug, Dunn's Furni-
ture, Gelling's Flowers and
Gifts, Monticello Florist and
Gifts, Decorators Warehouse,
'local real estate agency's, and
the Chamber of Commerce.
Books may also be pur-
chased at the Senior Citizen
Center.
The committee responsible
for the sale of the books will


on, at 997-4232.


Lion's Club First Bingo

Game Raises $200
If It Happens In
DEBBIE SNAPP Jefferson County,
Staff Writer You'll Read It In The
Monticello News


The Lloyd Lions Club held
its first Saturday Night Bingo,
May 20, with much success.
The fundraisier began at 5
p.m. and continued until 7:30
p.m. and netted $200 for the
Club.
Several varieties of Bingo
were played with a finale of.
Bingo Bonanza.
Pam and Sam Brown, from
Bainbridge, GA. called the
numbers.
Door prizes, donated by lo-
cal businesses,' were awarded
throughout the evening to the
lucky ticket holders.
For sale during the event
%%ere grilled hor dogs, ham-
burgers, a varietyy .of chips,
chocolate bars, cold drinks
and coffee.
Members will discuss hold-
ing a monthly Bingo Game at
the Tuesday, June '6 meeting.


800.377.539


Sorority Installs

New Officer Slate


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Xi Lambda Upsilon Chapter-
of Beta Sigma Phi met May
23 at the Chamber of Com-
merce for a dinner meeting,
and installation of officers for
2006-2007.,
New officers are: Peggy
Day, president; Betty Messer,
vice president; Carolyn
Cheshire, secretary; and
Linda Demott, treasurer:
The new Executive Board
will meet July 25 to plan the
upcoming year, and to ap-
point committees
A scrapbook was presented
to outgoing President Connie
Boland by Historian Cindy
Chancy.

The Sorority will present a
monetary donation to Big
Bend Hospice.
Katrina Guerry was pre-
sented her pledge pin, and her
pledge training will begin in
the fall.

Hostess for this evening
meeting was Mary Frances
Gramling.


In attendance at this meet-
ing were: Barbara Boland,
Connie Boland, Judy Carney,
Chancy; Cheshire, Ann Cos-
-- setter, Dee Counts, Day, De-
mott, Elinor Garner,
Gramling, Guerry, Carolyn
Hayse, Kathy Joyner, Messer,

Alice Sander, Mary Ann Van
Kleunen, Emily Walker, and
Carolyn Wright.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 31,2006 PAGE 7

25 Locals Win Awards


At 4-H District Events


stripe ribbon.
DEBBIE SNAPP Monique Colson and Alicia
Staff Writer Pleas won 1st place team for
Human Development. They
4-H District Events were-received a blue rosette and


DISTRICT III 4-H winners in the General Category are Stephanie and Alysa Stephens


held in Crawfordville, re-
cently, with eight counties
represented and 25 4-H mem-
bers participating from Jeffer-
son County.
Among participants were:
Clover Bud Leah Wirgau,
who participated in Share-the-
Fun and received a green par-
ticipation ribbon.
She also won 3rd place in
the Junior Division for Share-
the-Fun, receiving a white ro-
sette and a red stripped
. ribbon.
4-H members in the Junior
Division participated in Fash-
ion Revue, Share-the-Fun,
Poster Art, Leisure Arts/Rec-
reation, Human Development,
Health, Safety, and Photogra-
phy.
David Wirgau received a
red striped ribbon for Junior
Division Share-the-Fun.
Tiranique Brockman, K'Sha
Lewis, and Destene' Williams
received white striped ribbons
for Junior Division Fashion
Revue, for Clothing
Selection.
Brandon Whitfield won 2nd
place Junior Division for
* Fashion Revue, Clothing Se-
lection. He received a red


red stripe ribbons.
Cydney Hastings and Ty-
shonda Jordan won 1st place
team for Health. They re-
ceived a blue rosette and blue
strip ribbons.
Shayla Koonce won 2nd
place for Safety. She received
a red rosette and a red stripe
ribbon.
Calvin Crumitie won 3rd
place for Leisure Arts/Recrea-
tion. He received a white
stripe ribbon.
In the Senior Division 4-H
members participated in
Share-the-Fun, Public Speak-
ing, Fashion Revue, Waste
Management, Leisure, Arts
and Recreation, General,
'Health, Food Preparation,,
Food 'and Nutrition, Poster
Art, and Photography.
Stephanie Stephens won 1st
place in Share-the-Fun. She
received a blue rosette and
blue stripe ribbon. She also
won in the General category
for team demonstration and
won 1st place team.
Keiona Scott won 1st place
in Leisure Arts/Recreation.
She received a blue rosette
and a blue strip ribbon.
Alana Chambers won 1st


Six Graduate From
Kindergarten At MCA


ALANA CHAMBERS Dis- ANGELA SCURRY, District
trict III Public Speaking III Health.
and Share-The-Fun.


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FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Monticello Christian Acad- -
emy held its first commence-
ment exercises for the
graduating kindergarten class
of 2006, on May 19.
Graduates included Emily
Adams, Drista Bailey, Jason
Joiner, Nate Matthews, Heidi
Mims, and Autumn Peck.
Pastor Mike Burke said all
six of MCA's graduates had a
second grade level score on
the CAT achievement test.
Instructor Danielle reports


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that her students were a joy to
teach, and that she is proud
of their accomplishments this
year.
"They all have a very bright
future ahead of them," Burke
concluded.


place for Public Speaking and
2nd place for Share-the-Fun.
She received a blue, and a red
rosette and a blue stripe, and a
red stripe ribbons
Angela Scurry won 1st
place for Leisure Arts/Recrea-
tion. She received a blue ro-
sette and blue stripe ribbon.
Tierra Thompson and Che-
varra Ulee won 1st place for
Food Preparation team. They
received blue rosettes and
blue stripe ribbons.
Arsenio Bright won 1st
place for Food Preparation.
, He received a blue rosette and
blue stripe ribbon. He also re-
ceived 3rd place for Fashion
Revue, Clothing Selection
earning him a white rosette
and a white stripe ribbon.
Alex Farmer won 1st place
for Waste Management and
2nd place for Fashion Revue,
Clothing Construction. He re-
ceived a blue rosette and a
'blue strip ribbon, and a red
rosette and a red stripe ribbon.
Michelle Ward participated
in Fashion Revue for Con-
struction and received a blue
rosette and a blue stripe rib-
bon.
Jazmaun Hall and Carmen
Skip%%orth won 1st place for'
team for Food and Nutrition.
They received a blue rosette
and blue strip ribbons.
Alyssa Stephens partici-
pated in Fashion Revue,
Clothing Selection and Gen-
eral and won 1st place. She
received a blue rosette and a
blue stripe ribbon.
All seniors who participated
in County arid District Events
are invited to attend 4-H State
Congress.
All Ist .Place District Event.
winners will receive a plaque
and certificate at the 4-H
Awards Banquet.


We \\ ish The Watermelon Festival and The Jefferson
County Watermelon Growers The Very Best!




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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 31, 2006


S rts


Jefferson County High


Athletic Award Winners


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County High-
School Athletic Director Al-
freddie Hightower reports
award winners during the
2006 All Sports Banquet,
conducted last week.
In football Desrick Jones
was named the. MVP.
Robert Nealy received the
Defensive Line Award; De-
metrius Hicks, Offensive Line
Award; Jon Dady, Best All
Around; Lucius Wade, Run-
ning Back Award; Tim Cru-
mitie, Defensive Back Award;
Breon Parker, Defensive
Award Special Dondre Tyson,
hit man award; and Tremaine
Parker, Defensive Award.
In soccer, Thomas Lyle and
Alex Lingle were named the
MVPs.
Jashawn Moore and Scott
Goodlin each received the
Senior Award; Eduardo Bar-
ron, Best -Offensive Player;
Jesus Rosas, Best Defensive
Player; Jonathan Flowers,
Most Improved; and Thomas
Smith, the Coach's Award.
In baseball, Demario Rivers
was named the MVP.
Curtis Hightower received
the Coach's Award; Shane
Broxie, Pitching Award;
Breon Parker, Defensive
Award; and Malcom Norton,
Telvin Norton, and Patrick
Cherry, each received a var-
sity baseball plaque.
In softball, Chandra Tucker
was named the MVP.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy-
varsity softball coach Roslyn
Bas has released the individ-
ual playing statists for the
Lady Warriors.
In batting; Brittany Hobbs
had 43 hits out of 76 times at
bat, an average of .566, and
25 RBI.
Lindsey Day, 41 hits out of
71 times at bat, an average of
.547, and 28 RBI.
Bethany Saunders, 43 hits
out of 73 times at bat, an av-
erage of .466, and 21 RBI.
Chelsey Kinsey, 34 hits out
of 81 times at bat, an average
of.420, and 21 RBI.
Nicole Mathis, 18' hits out
of 45 times at bat, an average
of .400 and 11 RBI.
Keri Brasington, 27 hits out
of 72 times at bat, an average
of..375,and 21CRBI.
SJoanna Cobb, 27 hits out of


Jemaria Cuyler received the
Rookie of the Year Award;
Keandra. Seabrooks and
Heather Miller were each
given Senior Awards;
Heather Miller, Coach's
Award; Shanice Brooks, De-
fensive Player; Majetta Jeffer-
son, Offensive Player;
Keandra Seabrooks, Hitting
Award; and Ireshia Denson,
Most Improved.
In boy's track, Jon Dady was
named MVP.
Daryl Young, Lucius Wade
and Tremaine Parker were
each awarded State Competi-
tion Winner Awards (Dady
was also on the team in the
state competition).
In. girl's track, Alexis Hug-
gins was named Most Dedi-
cated; and Quaneshia
Franklin was given the
Sprinter Award.
In girls' basketball, Shau-
mese Massey was named
MVP and received the Aca-
demic Award.
Shanise Brooks received the
Most Improved Award;
Donna Ransom, Hustle
Award; India Wyche, New-
comer Award; Kandice Grif-
fin, Coach's Award; Nakidra
Thompson, Rebounds Award;
and Keandra Seabrooks, Sen-
ior Award.
In boys' basketball, Demario
Rivers was named MVP.
Rivers also received awards
for first team Allstate, Big
Bend Player of the Year, and
team leader in points, re-
bounds,. assists, and steals.
Quantez Burke, received the


.346, and 21 RBI.
Paige Thurman, 16 hits out
of 53 times at bat, an average
of .302, and 15 RBI.
For the Lady Warriors who
were at the plate than 30
times:
Tristan Sorensen, 9 hits out
of 20 ties at bat, an average of
.450, and three RBI.
Melissa Martin, 6 hits out of
17, times at bat, an average of
.353, and six RBI.
Mallory Plaints, nine hits
out of 29 times at bat, an av-
erage of .310.
Hannah Sorensen, four hits
out of 17 time at bat, an aver-
age of .235.
In pitching; Hobbs pitched
129 innings, 16 wins, five
losses and an earned run aver-,
age (ERA) of 2.98.
Saunders, 17 innings.
pitched, three wins, no losses,
and 6.18 ERA.
Thurman, 15 innings
pitched, two wins, no losses,


78 times at bat, an average of and 1.87 ERA.




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Senior Award; James Skip--
worth, Coach's Award; La-
markus Bennett, Defensive
Player of the Year; Marko
Kapor, Academic Award; and
Lucius Wade, Mr. Hustle;
Award.
In JV boy's basketball, Don-
trell Oliver was named MVP
in JV boy's basketball; Mari-
cio Scott received the Coach's
Award;
Other awards include spe-
cial plaques of appreciation
awarded to Jazmaun Hall and
Takaylah Mcintosh in basket-
,ball; and Amber Mays in
baseball.
In JV volleyball, Keneshia
Coates was named MVP.,
In varsity volleyball, Kean-
dra Seabrooks and Shaumese
Massey were named MVPs.
Loren Cox was Most Im-
proved; Jemaria Cuyler,
Freshman XAward: Chandra
Tucker, Sophomore Award;
Loren Cox, Academic Award;'
Carmen Skipworth, Coach's
Award; and Jazmaun Hall,
Highest Percentage Service
Points.
In cheer leading, Alexia
Huggins, Kimberly Grant and
Michelle Allen, were named
most valuable cheerleaders..
Colita Rivers, earned the
Highest GPA; Taqara Miller
and Amber Mays Most Blos-
somed; Alexia Huggins,
Leadership; Colita Rivers,
Most Dedicated and Depend-
able; and Kimberly Grant,
Great Charmer and Best All
Around.
Bill Grant received a Parent
.Plaque for 100 percent sup-
port and sponsorship of the
Jefferson a Counr
cheerleaders; and Fontella
Mitchell: received a Parent
Plaque for support of the
cheerleaders.


ACA TENNIS varsity team award winners, from.left, Rebekah Aman, Coach's Award;
Kaitlin Jackson, Caroline Mueller, Best Match Record; Sunnie Sorensen. (News
Photo)


Tigers Take Win in

Spring Jamboree


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School football team won
both halves of the Spring
Jamboree, beating FAMU in
the first half, 7-0, and NFC in
the second half, 7-6.
Coach Harry Jacobs did not
keep statistics during the
scrimmage, but. he did recall
some standout plays from
some of the Tigers.
Desrick Jones was named
the defensive player of the
game with at least 30 tackles
and assists to his credit.
Dar)l Young intercepted a
pass reception and ran it all
the way back down field for.a
Tiger touchdo wn
Quarterback Breon Parker
scored one touchdown in the


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 31, 2006 PAGE 9


Scenes From ACA Sports Banquet


VARSITY BASEBALL award winners, L-R: Josh Carswell, Best Defense; Dustin Rob- VARSITY CHEERLEADING award winners, L-R: Ramsey Revell, Most Spirited; Su-
erts, Pitching Award; Chris Tuten, Batting Champ; Casey Gunnels, MVP; Glen zanne Walker, Best All Around; Angie Steinberg, Most Improved.
Bishop, Best Offense.


ALEX DUNKLE, left, and Brandon Dunbar, MVPs, B TIFFANY BRASINGTON is the MVP for girl's grades DANAWATT, Most Spirited; Savannah Williams, Best
grades seven, eight basketbBrandon Dunbar, MVPs, Boy'sbasketballAll Around.
grades seven, eight basketball. seven, eight basketball. All Around.


VARSITY BASKETBALL L:R Casey Gunnels, Best Defense; Ben Grantham, MVP; Wade
Scarberry, Most Improved; Back: Luke Sadler, Hustle Award; Reggie Walker, Stephen
Griffin, Best Offense.


ACA Varsity Softball award winners, L-R: Brittany Saunders, 110 Percent Award; Keri
Brasington, Golden Glove Offense; Lindsey Day, Big Stick Award; Chelsey Kinsey,
golden glove infield.


VARSITY FOOTBALL, L-R: Colby Waddail, Ben Grantham, Best Defensive Linemen;
Chris Tuten, Coach's Award. Back, Colby Roberts, Best Offensive Lineman; Jason JV SOFTBALL, L-R: Olivia Sorensen, MVP; Skyla Hanna, Coach's Award; Michaela
Holton, Best Defensive Back; Casey Gunnels, MVP, All Conference Player of Year. Roccanti, Best Defense. (News Photos)










PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 31, 2006

Jefferson High School


Academic Awards Told


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County High-
School has released the list of
students reports the list of
students earning Academic
Awards, at a recent ceremony.
In Instructor Aikens' Voca-
tional Class students achiev-
ing honor status are: Scott
Goodlin, Andrew Redmond,
Michael Silcio, and Linton
Wildgoose.
In Insructor Anderson's sci-
ence class: Shanadria Alex-
ander, Ireshia Denson,
Richard Hawkins, Robert
Nealy, and Andrew
Redmond.
In Instructor Brown's sci-
ence class: Shanice Brooks,
iMarishia Bueschell, Jermeika
Howard, Renee Huggins, and
'Ana Rosas.
In Instructor Brumfield's
history class, Eduardo Barron,
Olivia Beger, Nicole Bynum,
Brendon Curtis, Brittany Har-
ivey, Renee Huggins, Amber
Lacy, Keiona Lawrence, Ty-
: ler Murdock, Shalin Pitts, and
Colita Rivers.
In Instructor Coon's math
class: Crystal Brinson, Loran
Cox, Richard Hawkins,
Courtney Holmes, Latasha
Jones, Shaumese Massey,
1Amanda Mitchell, and Char-
les Pitts.
In Instructor Garland's Eng-
lish 'class: Jemaria Cuyler,
'Brittany Harvey, Richard
SHawkins, Shavondria Norton,
Kiarra Powell, and Carmen
Skipworth.
In Instructor Halsey's math
class: Shavondria Alexander,
tLaura Anderson, Jarod Con-
;nell, O'Byran Fryson, Demet-
;rius Hicks, Aaron Lawrence,
Robert Nealy, Shavondria
SNorton, Justin Oliver, Angel
SReams, and Michael Walker.
| In Instruoctor Hamilton's vo-
icational cJass: Brittany Har-
.vey, Paul Huggins, Michelle-
,Keaton, Shaumese Massey,
Amber Mays, and Freddreka
Washington.
In Instructor Heller's: Span-
ish class: Brittany Harvey and
: Courtney Holmes.
In Instructor Junious' Eng-
lish class: Latoya Footman,
Tyler Murdock, and Andrew
Redmond.
In Instructor Junious' read-
ing class: Taquara Miller.
In Instructor Knight's physi-
cal education class: Jamaria
Cuyler, Ireshia Denson, Jona-
than Flowers, Kayangelia
Gadson, Richard Hawkins,
Curtis Hightower, Desrick
Jones, Anthony McDaniel,
Shavondria Norton, and Char-
les Pitts.
In Instructor Marx's history
class: Crystal Brinson, Jona-
than Counts, Loran Cox,
Shaumese Massey, Amber
Mays, Darin Mills, and Char-
les Pitts. -


In Instructor McBee's voca-
tional class: Cedric Banks,
Crystal Bellamy, Tyrone Crm-
mity, Kayangelia Gadson,
- Tiffany griffin, Latoya Henry,
Darrell Houston, Chaquanda
Johnson, Cleve Jones, Kasha
Larry, Jarkey Miles, Clint
Morris, James Nazworth,
Richard Ramos, Thomas
Smith, William Wade, and
Monica Williams.
In Instructor McBee's read-
ing class: Chaquanda
Johnson, Tyrone Crumity,
Tiffany Griffin, Richardo Ra-
mos, and James Nazworth.,
In Instrucor Norton's Eng-
lish class: Crystal Brinson and
Shaumese Massey.
In Instrucor Phelps' physics
Class: Crystal Brinson. In
Phelps' chemistry class: Ju
Sheng Chen. In Phelps' sci-"
ence class: Justin Clark, Sarah
Griffin, Adrenne Hamilton,
and Tony Roberts.
In Instructor Reichert's sci-
ence class: Nikki Barrington,
Crystal Brinson, Tabitha Carl-
ton, Sharhondra Coe,
Cashonda Coleman, Jonathan
Counts, Loran Cox, Tammy
Davis, Stephanie Fountain,
Steven Lafreniere, Aaron'
Lawrence, Heather Miller,
Jessica Miller, Darin Mills,
Catherine Reichert, Lyndsey
Richard and Yvonne Seab-
rooks.
In Instructor Rissman's
math class: Ivory Baker,
Maresha Barrington, Eduardo
Barron, Byron Bell, Shaunia-
via Clinton, Manwell Davis,
Marissa Fogle, Renee Hug-
gins, Majetta Jefferson, Sha-
toria Menchen, Nickolas
Parker, Ana Rosas, Jeremy
Shiver, Caleb Vaughn, Fred-
dreka Washington, Cassandra
Williams, and Bridgette
Wright.
In Instructor Scott's English
class: Sliauntavia Clinton, and
Takedral Gilley.
In Instructor Smart's math
class: Cedric Banks, Kay
Gadsen, Chanquenda John-
son and Tamia Scott, and
Monica Williams.
In Insturctor Wideman's
reading class: Arnez
Ammons, Ivory Baker, Kene-
shia Coates, Melissa Crumity,
India Deloach, Qdaneshia
Franklin, Courtney Holmes,
Joey Hood, Zanquisha Jones,
Amber McDonald, Taquara
Miller, Kiarra Powell, Jalisa
Rooks, Maricio Scott, Tor-
rence Tucker and Lucius
Wade.
In Instructor Wilson's music
class: Olivia Beger, Jordan
Blair, Arsenio Bright, Shayne
Broxie, Quantez Burke, Ji-
marko Crumitie, Tammy
Davis, D'Andre Fagan,
Quaneshia Franklin, Khier
Gallon, Kimberly Grant,
Chelsea Hamilton, Richard
Hawkins, Latasha Jones,
Takayla McIntosh, Miesha
Mitchell, Santana Mitchell,


Jashaun Moore,. James Naz-
worth,' Dramon Parrish, Ni-
cole Parrish, Saunte' Perry, .
Keiona Scott, D'Vondre Seab-''
rooks, Antwamoiya Williams,
and Antwon Young.
Cleve Jones received the
Principal's award.
Students receiving the Re- :'
publican Women scholarship"
were: Quantez Burke 'and
Tammy Davis. *
Students who were inducted,'
into the National Honor Soci-:,
ety included: April Nicole
Bynum, Jessica Cherry, Ka-
leesha Francis, Takedral Gil-
ley, Shaumese Massey,
Amber McDonald, Charles
Pitts, Shalin Pitts, and Brit-
terica White.
Members of the academic
team who participated in the
state academic tournament in-
cluded: Catherine Reichert,
Loran Cox, Darin Mills, and
Jonathan Counts, additional
members of the ,academic
team were Crystal Brinson
and Angela Scurry.
Recipients of the Phoenix
award included: Tammy
Davis, who also received a
trophy for earning 230 of 240
possible points, Aaron Law-
rence, Lyndsey Richard,
Sharhonda Cole, Cashanda
Coleman, Steven Lafreniere,
Heather Miller, Yvonne Seab-
rooks, Stephanie Fountain,


The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy football team have been
working diligently during
summer practice, three nights
per week.
Coach Joe Striplin said that
an average of 15-20 Warriors
report to the filed each day,
both varsity and JV players ,
alike, to take ad\ antage of the
summer training program.
The boys and' caches have
been getting together every
Monday 1 Wednesday and
Thursday evening 6-8 p.m.,
working in the weight room,
working on running, agility,
and football related exercises,
as well as practices their of--


O.Jessica Miller, Nikki Barring-
.ton, Crystal Brinson, Loran
"'Cox, and Tabitha Carlton.
Loran Cox received the Ki-
, wanis Scholarship.
Tammy Davis received the
..Archbold Hospital award; Lo-
ran Cox received the Altrusa
Club scholarship and the
Women's Club scholarship.
Recipients of Shirley Wash-
ington Scholarships included:
Chevelle Francis, Quantez
Burke, LaCola Brooks,
Tammy Davis, Tasha Tolbert,
Keandra Seabrooks, Loran
Cox, Crystal Brinson, lruce
Wilson, Jasmine Brown,
Nikki Barrington, Yvonne Se-
abrooks, Michele Allen,
Shakera Norton, Thomas
Lyle, Je Sheng Chen, Charles
Pitts, Jonathan Counts, Alex
Lingle, Tabitha Smith, Jessica
Miller and Sierra Tyson.
Recipients of the NFCC
Presidential Scholarships
were Alex Lingle and Char-
les Pitts.
Jessica Cherry received the
NFCC scholarship.
Crystal Brinson and Loran
Cox received the Seminole
Boosters scholarship.
Crystal Brinson was the re-
cipient of the Democratic
Party Government award.
Shaumese Massey was the
recipient of the Woodmen of
the World History award.
Recipients of the 100 Black
Men Award were Chevelle
Francis and Clinton
Wildgoose.*
Crystal Brinson received the
Retired Educators Association
_scholarship.


fensive and defensive plays
on the field.
Striplin reports that the
2007 football season looks to
be promising for Aucilla, with
prominent players returning
,'to the team, including Wade
. Scarberry, J. T. Daniels,
't:WoMod\ 'Vollertsen,' Dianiel
^v Greene and Reggie Wallser,

Coaches assisting Striplin
include Loren Vause, defen-
sive coordinator, Terry Dob-
son, working with the
receivers and defensive backs,
and Richard Watt, working
with the linebackers and tight-
ends.


WAUKEENAH

Fertilizer & Farm SUPPLY INC.

Specializing in
SEED FEED FERTILIZER (BAG/BULK) SPREADER SERVICE
FENCING MATERIALS ~ VETERINARIAN SUPPLIES FARM
CHEMICALS

9643 WAUKEl!NAH HWY.,
WAUKEENAH (MONTICELLO) FL

997-4460

WELCOME VISITORS! ENJOY THE FESTIVAL!


THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.
05-297-CA DIVISION WELLS
FARGO BANK, NA SUCCESSOR.
BY MERGER TO WELLS FARGO
HOME MORTGAGE, INC. F/K/A
NORWEST MORTGAGE, INC,
Plaintiff, vs. WALTER B.
LAVALLEY,. et al, Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure
dated May 10, 2006 and entered in
Case No 05-297-CA of the Circuit
,Court of the SECOND Judicial
Circuit in and for JEFFERSON
County, Florida wherein WELLS
FARGO BANK, NA SUCCESSOR
BY MERGER.TO WELLS FARGO
HOME MORTGAGE, INC. F/K/A
NORWEST MORTGAGE, INC, is
the Plaintiff and WALTER B.
LAVALLEY; CHARLES E.
LAVALLEY; ANY AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED


Monticello

News

"You Can't Be
Without.It"


INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS;
JEFFERSON COUNTY BOARD.
OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS;
ASHVILLE AREA PROPERTY
OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC;
are the Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash at
NORTH DOOR OF THE
COURTHOUSE LOBBY IN
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA at
11: a.m. on the 8th day of June,-
2006, the following described
property as set forth in said Final
Judgment: Lot 5, BLOCK C,
JEFFERSON LANDING
SUBDIVISION AS PER THE
PLAT THEREOF FILES IN PLAT
BOOK B, PAGE 39 OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A
1999 DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE
HOME WITH VIN NUMBERS
11990313687A AND 11990313687B
LOCATED THEREON AS A
FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE
THERETO. A/K/A 161 SNEADS
DRIVE, GREENVILLE, FL 32344
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on May 17th, 2006.
Dale Boatwright, Clerk of the
Circuit Court.
5/24, 5/31/06, c


Danny's Collisions



SCustoms, LLC

765 E. Washington St.

S 997-1500


We Wish The Watermelon Festival and The Jefferson County
Watermelon Growers The Very Best!



C. Luther Pickels,



CERTIFIED PUBLIC-ACCOUNTA4NT


440 West Washington Street

Post Office Box 413

Monticello, Florida 32345


Welcome To The 56th Annual Watermelon Festival




R. Winston Connell Realtor
"Serving the community since 1978?"

310 South Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32344

997-4780/850-997-5252 mobile: 850-545-5783
Fax 850-997-0216 Res. 850-948-8141
email- rwconnell@aol.com


It's Funtime At The Watermelon Festival


Business




,Directory



BURNETTE PLUMBING & Register's PARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC. Northside Mower and

WELL SERVICE e s "Complete Auto Electric Repair Service". Small Engine Repair
Family Owned Since 1902 M in i St ra rge For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled- Fixtures-Faucets Pumps Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Replaced-' Sewer & Water Connections Tanks Replaced- 315 Waukeenah Hwy. Repairs for all makes & models.
Water Heaer Repairs -All Repairs /4 ile ffUS 19 South ........
'"eot ~ Thomasville Road 1 15 Albany Rd. Pickup & Delivery Service Available
.997-2535 (on Carroll In)229~-226-0717 562-2962


CUMMING SS APPLIANCES

850-997-7468

850-997-5132

90 DAY WARRANTY ONALL APPLIANCES
CHRISTOPHER CUMMINGS OWNER


LEE FULLER ~OWNER

MORRMoIS FULLER PAINTING LL C

Office (850) 671-2286
Cell (850) 284-6134

8366 Guerry Lane, Tatllhassee, FL 32317
Lic. & Insured


MONTICELLO 'S ONLY LOCAL HEATING & COOLING COMPANY

STEWART
HEATING & COOLING INC.

Sales ~ Service ~ Installation ~ Change Outs
Residential Commercial

Family Owned > Office: (850) 342-3294
Lic. # RA0067121 q ? CELL: (850) 509-2903


ACA Summer Football

Practice In Full Swing








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 31, 2006 PAGE 11


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 06-48 CA
LEVERNE WILSON and ELVIRA
WILSON," husband and wife,
Plaintiffs' v. FLORA BELL
GILCHRIST, MARGARET
WALKER, SAM JAMES, LIZZIE
WILLIAMS, CELIE (also known as
CELIA) TUCKER, deceased, and
all unknown natural persons if
alive, and if dead or not known to
be dead or alive, their several or
and respective unknown spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees, and
judgement creditors, or other
parties claiming by, through, or
under those unknown natural
persons; and the several and
respective unknown assigns,
successors in interest, trustees, or
any other persons claiming by,
through, under, or against any
corporation or other legal entity
named as a defendant; and all
claimants, persons or parties,
natural or corporate, or whose
exact legal status is known, claiming
under any of the above named or
described defendants or parties or
claiming under any of the above
named or described defendants or
parties or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in property
described in this complaint,
Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION
To: MARGARET WALKER, SAM
JAMES, LIZZIE WILLIAMS,
CELIE (also known as CELIA)
TUCKER, if alive, and if dead their
unknown spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, judgment creditors, and
all other parties claiming by,
through, under, or against them; the
unknown spouses, heirs, divesees,
grantees, and judgment creditors of
MARGARET WALKER, SAM
JAMES, LIZZIE WILLIAMS,
CELIE (also known as CELIA)
TUCKER, deceased, and all
unknown natural persons if alive,
and if dead or alive, their several
and respective unknown spouses,
heirs, divesees, grantees, and
judgment creditors, or other parties
claiming by, through, or under
those unknown natural persons; and
the several and respective unknown
assigns, successors in interest,
trustees, or other persons claiming
by, through, under, or against any
corporation or other legal entity
named as defendant; and all
claimants, persons or above parties,
natural or corporate, or whose
exact legal status is unknown,
claiming under any of the above
named or described defendants or
parties or claiming to have right,
title, or interest in the property
described in this complaint, and
allege: YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED OF AN amended action
to quite and confirm title of
Plaintiffs in and to lands., located in
Jefferson County, Florida.
Described below, and to determine
the heirs of SAM JAMES, CELIE
a/k/a CELIA TUCKER, and
LIZZIE WILLIAMS: South half
(S1/2) of lot 11, 50 x 200 feet, as per
Deed Book II, page 250, Scotts
Northern Addition to the Town of
Monticello, Florida. This being the
same property of record in the
Trustee of the I.I. Deed Book 1,
page 214, Official Records of
Jefferson County, Florida. As
described on the Warranty Deed
attached to the original complaint
filed in this cause, recorded in
Official Records Book 361, Page 157
of the public records of Jefferson
County. You are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses to, if
any, to: Teresa Cooper Ward
Attorney for Plaintiffs, 245 E.
Washington Street, Monticello, FL
32344., On or before June 15, 2006,
and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court, at the Jefferson
County Courthouse, Monticello,
Florida, either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or immediately
thereafter, or a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Amended
Complaint or Petition. Witnessed
my hand and Seal of this Court on
May 10, 2006. Clerk OF THE
COURT.
5/17,19,24,26,31//06 c

HEP WANTED
Monticello News Needs Clerical
help for busy administrative
office. Please call Ron Cichon
997-3568.
tfn
Nursery Laborer, Full-time,
must have own transportation.
Contact Mr. Nichols at Ox Lake
Tree Farm, 585 Lott Rd.
997-4018
5/31, 6/2, 7, 9, c
DRILLERS HELPERS No
experience needed. Some travel
required. Great pay and
benefits. Career Opportunity.
EOE & Drug Free
800-487-9665.
5/31, 6/2, 7, 9, c


HEALTHCARE You'll Have
More Freedom With Us! If
you're a talented healthcare
professional who's tired of the
daily routine, there's never been


a better time to explore a whole
world of new challenges with
Prison Health Services at the
Taylor Correctional Institution.
Health Services Administrator
Bachelor's degree in Nursing,
hospital administration or
business administration.
Master's degree preferred. Must
have at least 3 years experience
in a supervisory/management
capacity.
Director of Nursing Must have
at least 2 years
supervisory/management
experience or BSN,
Mental Health Counselors: FT
and PT Must be licensed Mental
Health Counselor, Licensed
Marriage and Family Counselor
or Licensed Clinical Social
Worker. RNs & LPNs FT, PT
and PRN all shifts; LPN FT,
Monday to Friday 1p -9:30p to
work at the Taylor CT Work
Camp. Great rates and benefits
offered. Contact Linda Ottesen
at 850-838-4073; fax
850-838-4081. EEO/AA
www.prisonhelath.com
5/31, c
A Behavioral Health Care
Center is currently seeking:
FEMA Crisis Counselors
(#2262) A Bachelors' Degree
from an accredited University
or college with a major in
counseling, social work,
psychology, criminal justice,
nursing, rehabilitation, special'
education, health education, or
a related human service field: or
other Bachelor's Degree from
another accredited University or
college with one (1) year of full
time or equivalent work or
volunteer experience in a social
service, health care, or related
field. Shift: variable.
Licensed Therapist (2267a)
Masters Degree from an
accredited university or college
with a major in the field of
counseling, social work,
psychology, or a related human
services field and two; years of
professional experience in '
providing services to persons
with behavioral illness. License
required. Some local travel
required. Substance abuse
knowledge preferred. Shift:
variable hour, some late
afternoon work required. For
more information and a
complete listing of available
positions:
www.apalacheecenter.org,
850-523-3217 or 1-800-226-2931
Human Resources 2634-J
Capital Circle N.E., Tallahassee,
FL. Pre-Hire Drug Screen &
FDLE background check An
equal Opportunity/Affirmative
Action Employer Drug free
WorkPhlce.

Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn, c
The City of Monticello is
accepting applications for the
full time position of Lead
Dispatcher (Midnight). Duties
include answering multiple
phone lines, taking citizen
complaints, using radio to
dispatch officers to calls.
Computer literacy a must, as
well as general office duties.
Must be able to work under
pressure, training is provided.
Salary and benefit information
available upon request. Submit
application and resume to
Monticello Police Dept. 195 S.
Mulberry St. Monticello, FL
32344, Attn: Paula Pierce by
June 6, 2006 EOE/Drug-Free
Workplace.
5/24, 26, c
The City of Monticello is
accepting applications for the
position of Police Officer. This
position requires a minimum of
a high school diploma and
Florida Police Standards. The
successful candidate must live
within 25 miles of Monticello
Police Station. Applicant must
complete a Department field
training program within the
first month. The position
requires a background check.
Salary and benefit information
is available upon request.
Submit application and resume
to Monticello Police Dept. 195 S.
Mulberry St. Monticello, FIl
32344 by June 6, 2006


EOE/Drug-Free Workplace.
5/24. 31, c


HUDDLE HOUSE -
accepting applications
Cooks and Servers.


Now
for
Call


342-3284
5/17,19,24,26,31, pd


Down Payments on Good Cars
& Trucks
2 andQl Door Model As Low As
$750 down 850-536-9111 ~
www.JumpinJims.con Ask For
Mr. Deal.
11/2, ifn


Prime downtown office space-
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980.
11/30, tfn, c
Charming Country Cottage.
Perfect for quiet single or ma-
ture couple. 251-0760.
5/31, c
Cute and Comfy 2 bedroom, 1
bath. Walk to library, church,
downtown, $850. 251-0760
5/31, c
Office for RENT 238 W.
Washington St. Call 997-2646
M-F, 9-5 available May 1st
3/31 tfn
'FOR -..L- .. t ..
Canning Jars Quarts and
Pints, Cleaned and Boxed.
997-3488, leave message.
5/31, 6/2, pd


Roosters and laying
$10 each; Goats, fe
each. Leave message
5/17,19,24,26,31, pd


Would you like to rent an H housing Vouchers
apartment or office downtown? H housing Vouchers
Call 997-5517 leave message and '
phone number., We accept all vouchers
tfn 5/12, c 2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.

Pool & Youth Activities

Health Care Equipment 5756571
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for a assessment


oi your nees. 997-3553. UPSra
available
1/19, tfn

Backhoe Service: driveways,
roads, ditches, tree & shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten 997-3116, 933-3458.
4/28, tfn
TILE INSTALLATION Jeff
Wilson LLC., 838-5929.
Regrout, tile repair) concrete
coating, grout repair.
5/24, 26, 31, 6/2, pd
Painting Professional Int./Ext,
call Edith or Harvey for free
estimate, prices can't be beat!
342-1330.
5/24, 26, 31, 6/2, 7, 9, 14, 16, c
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd, 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn


g chickens Have you been taken off your
male $100 hormone replacement? See our
997-0901 new menopausal products.
SJ___ ackson's Drug Store.


Saturday, June 3

Door Open 8am -12 Noon
707 Gil Harbin Industrial Blvd. Valdosta, Ga.

Call for Directions: 800-633-2215,




A BLUE BIRD HOMES

& LANDS, INC.

1623 W. Washington St., Monticello, FL
850-997-1360
Tallahassee Board of Realtors, FAR, NAR, MLS
"HOMEOWNERSHIP FOR ALL"
S. W. Ellis, Realtor 567-3800
Linda Alexander, Realtor 251-4828
Reginald Ofuani, Realtor, 510-1600
Sheila Slik, Realtor 528-6698

Congratulations Festival Organizers and Volunteers


SEmploVment
CONNECTIONS
Work solutions for you

Looking for a Job?
Employment Connections Staff Members
will be at the Jefferson County Public
Library Lifelong Learning Center
375 Water Street, Monticello, FL 32344
May 31, 2006 @ 2:00 p.m. 4:00 p.m.

We will assist job seekers with registration and
job search activities. Applications & local
employers will.be available.





NURSES



LOOKING FOR INNOVATIVE

FLEXIBLE HOURS......


Need more time with family? Want

to return to school? Just ?????


Marshall Health & Rehab Center

has just the opportunity for you


Call Sue Love, RN

850-584-6334


Statistics Show People Remember
S 85% of what they read
and 15% of what they hear


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com

Serious About

Selling?

List with me to-

day!


Peary Does It Aqain! Under Contract
Just Listed! 7.8 acres on Whitehouse Road
near Hwy 59 $158,000

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Den-
nis' Trading post only $36,500 per acre

Price Slashed! 2 bedroom 1 bath home
with small fenced yard, family room be-
hind IGA on Bowman Street Now $76,500

Peary Does It Acain! Under Contract-
Priced to Sell 1993 Fleetwood 3 bedroom 2
bath home on 2.5 acres in Lloyd Acres paved
road frontage $76,500

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly
wooded acres Only $36,500

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big double-
wide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in re-
mote, oaks, pond, north of Greenville only
$329,000

Peary Does It Aqain! Under Contract
Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge Lane
1.00'x220' in the City $15,500 each

Just Listed! Beautiful Homesite
12. 59 beautiful acres on the Waukeenah
Highway near town, big trees, nice fields,
nice and private, perfect for a nice home
$265,000

Peary Does It Acain! Under Contract-
Buildinq lots Town on Morris Road call for details
$10,000 to $40,000

Peary Does It Aqain! Under Contract Cox
Road 10 mostly wooded acres just a few miles
North of town $12,000 per acre

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 5 acres under
contract 5 available on the east side of
town high and dry in quiet location with
lots of game, 9 year old planted pines,
profit from both appreciating land and
growing pine Now $9,500 per acre

Home Site close to town on West
Grooverville Road only $14,500

Peary Does It Aqain! Christmas Acres
Sold -3 bedroom 2 bath mobile home on 3 acres
with a big deck, carport and a workshop $96,000

Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
Simply the Best!
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


i j7,4tirlj6A, jj&W Vr i q ro;f-


~L1^1._--


C_~_ I ILL-










Officials Tell How To


Prepare For Hurricanes


HONORED at the Jefferson Nursing Center Volunteer
Martin, and Dorothy Lewis. (News Photo)



Festival Rodeo

Returns June 16, 17


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


p.m. Friday, June 16 and Sat-
urday, June 17.nights.
The rodeo will feature as


The Watermelon Festival usual, the top cc
Rodeo returns this year, 8 the southeast Ui


Katlyn Burke Honor

Graduate At MCA
Katlyn Burke graduated
from Monticello Christian
Academy May 13.
She maintained a 3.75 GPA -
and graduated with all honors.
Burke served as student
council president, and on the
yearbook committee her I
:sophomore and senior year. -
She has been an active A-H I' i
member for ten years, holding P- !
multiple offices and partici-
.pating in numerous commu-
nity service projects.
Burke is currently president
of the EZRiders 4-H Club. L1:
She is a member of the
Pony America Club and BURKE
started showing ponies and
horses at the age of seven.
She has shown locally, on the
state level and nationally. J
Burke intends to pursue a
degree in veterinary medicine.
(


How TO KEEP
YOUR KIDS
FREE OF DRUGS.



Rule

#8.


Get
Involved.

Perhaps the single
biggest deterrent to
drug abuse is communi-
cation- simply talking
with your kids about
drugs. That's almost
impossible unless
you've built a founda-
tion. By doing things
with them. By getting
involved with their
school and their sports.
By knowing their
friends. To learn more
about how to reach
your kids, call for a fiee
parent's handbook.

1-800-624-0100
PARTNERSHIP FOR A
DRUG-FREE FLORIDA


contenders in
united States,


Banquet are, left, Norma


competing in professional
bull riding, intermediate bull
riding, low girl's barrel racing
and team roping, along with
special events for the
children.
An added attraction this
year, bull rider Charles "Re-
'ride" Dowdy, will put on an
exhibition of professional bull
riding, in which he rides a
bull, backwards.
Coordinator Charlie Driver
said that after not holding the
rodeo last year, he received a
large number of calls from
people wanting to know why
it was not held and requesting
that it be brought back, due to
its increasing popularity.
"Weather permitting, we
should fill up," said Driver.
He added that the year before
last, approximately 3,500
people attended the annual
event, and that he expected
the numbers to be pretty
much the same, maybe even
higher this year.
Tickets are $12 for adults,
$6 for children and children
under four years old are free.
Driver said that entrants may
make their entries, Monday,
June 12, 7-10 p.nm.
For further information, con-
tact Driver at 997-4713.


'HITIP SEATS

FRAMING

Custom Homes


545-8493
INSURED ~ LIC. #CGC1505570


North Florida Abstract & Title CO.
220 S. Cherry Street
(P.O. Box 838, 32345)
Monticello, FL 32344
pH. 850-997-2670 Fax 850-997-3412
email: john@northfloridaabstract.com

Proud To Support The Jefferson Watermelon Festival


ATTENTION
CAPLMAL ONE CREDrr CARD HOLDERS
Was a security deposit charged to your card
when you opened a Capital One Credit
Card account in 2001 or 2002?
Call NOW for information regarding your
legal rights.

Toll Free

I-866-507-1518

James Kaufman, Cauley Bowman
Licensed in Florida Caey&7Williams
Principal office in Litde Rock, AR 11311 Arcade Drive Little Rock, AR 72116
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be
based solely on advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send
you free written information about our qualifications and experience
r,,w a i .g.-*B i N',Bi6 .a.a ^^


With the 2006 hurricane sea-
son starting June 1 and run-
ning through the end of No-
vember, employers are en-
couraged to take steps before
a hurricane strikes to protect
their business and employees.
Steps to take include:
*Prevent salt water damage
by storing electronic devices
in a high and dry place.
*Backup computers and take
one computer off-site tT en-
! sure files will not be
damaged.
*Protect the side of the
building that will be hit by the
strongest winds.
" *Cover all valuables and
store all documents.
*Check to see what your
flood insurance covers.
*Purchase materials such
as sandbags, plywood, plastic
sheeting, garbage bags and
lumber.
*Move furnishings to safe
ground, fill propane tanks to
keep them from floating


away, and tie down tanks and
grease immovable machinery.
*Do not handle live electri-
cal equipment in wet areas
and have all electrical equip-
ment dried and checked be-
fore returning to service.
*Report broken electrical
equipment and utility lines to
the appropriate authorities.
*Video tape the building or
home before and after the
*Make temporary repairs to
prevent looting or any other
further damage. For example,
board up holes in walls and
broken windows.
Tips for homeowners
include;
Inventory your household
items, including receipts, pur-
chase dates and serial num-
bers. Photograph. or video
tape your possessions. Keep
copies of this information and
your insurance policies in a
_ safe place and keep the origi-
nals in a safe deposit box.
Write down the name, ad-


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Caminez,

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U Hardee, PA.
Attorneys at Law

997-8181
1307 S. Jefferson St. Monticello, FI 32344
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When was

the last

time you

made an

investment

that saved

lives?


dress and claims-reporting -
telephone number of your in-
surance company, which may
differ from your agent's con-
tact information.
Keep this information in a
safe place and make sure you
have access to it if you are
forced to leave your home.
*. When a hurricane, threat-
ens, take action to protect
your property.
Buy the materials you need
to secure your home.
Cover your windows with
shutters, siding or plywood.
Move vehicles into a garage
or carport when possible.
*Remember to withdraw
money before a pending natu-
ral disaster. Normally finan-
cial institutions will be. closed
at least two days after a direct
hit and ATM's could be out of
commission even longer.
*Keep materials such as
plywood and plastic on hand
in case you need to make tem-
porary repairs after a storm.
Repairs made to prevent fur-
ther damage to property are
reimbursable by your insur-
ance company as long as you
keep all receipts.








POSEIDON
(PG13)
Fri.-Thurs. 1:40 4:30 7:35 10:05

DA VINCI CODE
(PG13)
Fri. Thurs. 12:00 3:15 6:30 9:45
NO PASSES '
DA VINCI CODE
(PG13)
Fri. Thurs 12:45 4:00 7:15 10:30
NO PASSES
X-MEN 3
(PG13)
Fri. Thurs. 1:25 4:10 7:00 9:25
NO PASSES
OVER THE HEDGE
(PG)
Fri.-Thurs. 12:15 2:30 5:00 7:30 -
9:30
NO PASSES
RV (PG)
Fri. 4:15 7:05 9:45 Sat. 1:30 -
4:15 7:05 9:45 Sun 1:30 4:15 -
7:05 Mon. Thurs. 4:15 7:05
NO PASSES
Mission Impossible 3
(PG 13)
Fri. 4:30- 7:15 -10:00 Sat 1:15 -
4:30 -7:15 10:00 Sun. 1:15 4:30
-7:15 Mon.-Thurs 4:30 7:15
NO PASSES

RV
(PG)
Fri. Thurs. 1:10 4:25 7:25 -
9:40

MISSION IMPOSSIBLE 3
(PG13)
Fri. -Thurs. 1:15 4:30 7:20 -
10:00
NO PASSES


* LIFE

a% SAVER


When you invest in our community
through United Way, the returns are
enormous-healthier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. Ir's a dividend that builds a
strong community.


307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL 32303 (904) 414-0844


PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 31, 2006


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