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The Monticello news
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00135
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: May 26, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00135
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
    Main: Sports
        page 8
    Main continued
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
    Main: Classified
        page 13
        page 14
Full Text








we Owe Debt
To War

Dead

Editorial, Page 4


: TOTDA H1STORT






Elementary

Academic Awards
Given At ACA

Story, Page 7


Howard Middle
Athletic
Awards T'old

Story, Page


Tips For Safe
Driving Over

Holiday Weekend

Story, Page 11


r Friday Morning


Monticello


138TH YEAR NO. 42, 50 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews


FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2006


FCAT Scores Rise


In Math,


Grade 4 Tops In Math,

Grade 6 In Reading


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor


SHERRY HEYEN, director of school improvement, ex-
amines the latest FCAT scores released Tuesday after-
noon from DOE. (News Photo)


Water Dist. Says


Growth Coming
Growth is coming, so let's people are leaving the cities
prepare for it together, and flocking to the quieter, ru-
That was the message Su- ral areas.
wannee River Water Manage- "Folks are drawn to Jefferson
ment District (SRWMD) offi- and adjacent counties, in part,
cials brought to local business by the natural resources,"
and elected leaders at a lunch- Houder said. "So we don't
eon Tuesday at the Chamber of want to kill the goose that lays
Commerce. the golden egg."


"The pace of change is pick-
ing up dramatically in Jeffer-
son County, and one of the hot
spots is along the Aucilla
River," Charlie Houder,
SRWMD deputy executive di-
rector, told the audience of
about 40 community leaders.
"Our main message today,"
Houder continued, ."is that
business and government must
work side by side to protect
the environment and expand
the economy, which are both
vital to the region's future."
Houder referred to national
studies, which indicate that


He cited a 2001 University
of Florida long-term economic
forecast report that projects
rapid employment growth
through 2015 for counties with
large tourism and retirement
bases.
Pointing to Jefferson
County's many historical and
natural resources, Houder
praised community leaders for
their participation in the Flor-
ida Main Street and Tree City
USA programs.
He further encouraged them
to continue focusing on "qual-
(See Growth Page 5)


FCAT scores for grades
three through 10 in District
Schools released Tuesday by
DOE, show an increase in
reading in every grade but
eight, while math scores in-
creased in all grades except
seven and nine, where scores
remained the same.
"I can only repeat what I
said earlier," Superintendent
Phil Barker said. The credit
belongs to the principals, stu-
dents, staff, and parents. They
have all worked hard and it
shows"
Director of School Improve-
ment Sherry IHeyen stated:
"Progress, by definition, is
gradual.


"Our task now is to examine
what we did to help students
improve and to continue to
work towards that goal.
"Likewise, it is our responsi-
bility to find out what we need
to do to help those students
improve, who did not do so."
Grade six showed the great-
est gains in reading over any
other grade in District Schools,
while grade four showed the
greatest increase in math .
The test is scored from one
to five, 1 i1, three and above
considered passing scores.
Fig ,. : cited below indicate
,tlyt percentage of students
eaftning a three or higher on
the 2006 FCAT, versus the
scores in 2005.
Reading scores at Jefferson
Elementary School:
Grade three: 63 percent in


Reading


2006, up from 53 percent in
2005.
Grade four: 45 percent in
2006, up from 44 percent in
2005.
Grade five: 49 percent in
2006, up from 45 percent in
2005.
At Howard Middle School:
Grade six: 43 percent in
2006, up from 30 percent in
2005.
Grade seven: 41 percent in
2006, up from 33 percent in
2005.
Grade eight: 21 percent in
2006, down from 27 percent in
2005.
At Jefferson County High:
Grade nine: 21 percent in
2006, up from 14 percent in
2005.
Grade 10: 14 percent in
2006, up from 8 percent in
2005.
Math scores at Jefferson
Elementary School:
Grade three: 55 percent in
2006, up from 40 percent in


2005.
Grade four:
2006, up from
2005.


43 percent in
24 percent in


Grade five: 30 percent in
2006, up from 27 in 2005.
At Howard Middle School:
Grade six: 27 percent in
2006, up from 17 in 2005.
Grade seven, 35 in 2006,
same in 2005.
Grade eight, 37 percent in
2006, up from 30 percent in
2005.
At Jefferson County High
School:
Grade nine: 31 percent in
2006, same in 2005.
Grade 10: 42 percent in
2006, up from 38 percent in
2005.
FCAT scores are particu-
larly important in grade three
because state law mandates re-
tention for students who don't
pass the FCAT in that grade.
Likewise grade 10 FCAT
scores are important as stu-


R ., -' ,

RON SLIK, past commander of American Legion,
placed a flag on the grave of a veteran in Roseland
Cemetery, last year. The annual event will take place
Monday, following the Remembrance Event at Legion
Hall. (News Photo)

Commission Renews


Two-Cents


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


CHARLIE HOUDER, left, and Jerry Scarborough, of the
Suwannee River Water Management District, talked to
community leaders here Tuesday of coming growth in
the area. (News Photo)


With little fanfare, commis-
sioners last week renewed a
two-cents gasoline tax that will
be in effect for the next 15
years at least.
The ordinance establishing
the two-cents fuel tax was
originally adopted in 1991 and
renewed in 1997 as a way of
generating money for the
county.
In 1998, commissioners
pledged the proceeds from the
tax to pay back the loan that fi-
nanced the construction of the
jail at the industrial park.
Absent commissioners' ac-


Fuel Tax
tion last week, the tax was
scheduled to expire later this
year.
The newly-amended ordi-
nance reinstates the imposition
of an additional two cents local
option gas tax on every gallon
of motor fuel and special fuel
sold in thle county until 202 1.
According to Clerk o' Court
Dale Boatwright, the payments
on the jail loaLn are about
$250,000 annually. lHe said the
money raised via the two-cents
tax "just about covers the pay-
ments".
The life span of the loan is
another 15 years or so, Boat-
wright said.
When commissioners ini-
(See Gas Tax Page 2)


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Memorial Day will be ob-
served on Monday, as a day of
remembrance for all those who
have died in the service of our
nation.
Memorial Day was origi-
nally called Decoration Day,
and began in the spring of
1866, when Henry C. Welles,
a pharmacist in Waterloo, NY,
suggested that patriots who
died in Civil War should be
honored by decorating their
graves.
Townspeople made wreaths,
crosses, and bouquets for each
veteran's grave.
The village was decorated
with flags at half mast, and a
procession to the town's ceme-
teries was held.
Decoration Day was offi-
cially proclaimed by General
John Logan, May 5, 1868,
when flowers were placed on
the graves of Union and Con-
federate soldiers at Arlington
National Cemetery.
By 1890, it was recognized
by all of the northern states.
As late as the 1940's, it was
common for northern cities
and towns to decorate the
downtown area with red, white
and blue bunting, in patriotic
displays.
A parade was also held to
celebrate the day.
The South refused to ac-
knowledge the day, honoring
its dead on separate days, until
after World War 1, when the
holiday changed from honor-
ing just those whio died in the
Civil War, to Americans who
died in any war, and was re-
named Memorial Day.
Of all the County residents


who died in the service of our
country, Sgt. Ernest "Boots"
Thomas is immortalized by the
monument on US 90 West,
commemorating the raising of
the US Flag on Mt. Suribachi,
Feb. 23, 1945, signifying the
US victory over Iwo Jima.
(See Memorial Day Page 7)

See Story
About Events
Here, Page 7

Following the capture of Mt.
Suribachi, Thomas and the
28th Marines, moved to battle
on the opposite side of the is-
land, where he was killed by
enemy fire, March 3, 1945.
Though no complete listing
of county natives who died in
the service of our country is
available, this much is known:
*During the Civil War, three
men were killed in action:
George Johnsoin. Williamt
Johnson, and Augustine K ylc.
*In the Spanish American
War, William Denham Pasco
was killed in action.
*Other County natives who
made the supreme sacrifice in-
clude:
Clemon Alexander, Lcroy
Bell, Ilomer Bird, Will Bolen,
Marion Bradshaw, Caradine
Braswell, David Chancy, liar-
rison Councll, Earl Cooksey,
and Olin Cooksey.
Thomas Daniel, AlphonTo
Ganzy, Robert I air. George
1lampton, Raymonod Hatcher,
Eddic Jacksoin, Samlllmy
Jenkins, Sylvester Johnsoin,
liaywood Jordon, and Raillord
Kersey.
Craig IKinighl, \WillimI
Llovd, Russell N llloy, J.imes
MasseV, E-rnest Mills,
(See FCAT Scores Page 2)


Memorial Day


Began In 1866


I I I i -I









PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 26, 2006


4-HERS learn to use a compass during a conservation session. From left, Charles
Bruner, Josh Rodriguez, Stephanie and Alyssa Brignoni. (News Photo)


4-H County Events

Winners Reported


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Winners have been an-
nounced in the 4-H County
Events competition held re-
cently at the Extension
Office.
Competition categories in-
cluded: Leisure Arts/Recrea-
tion, Health, Safety, Human
Development, General, Public
Speaking, Waste Manage-
ment, Food and Nutrition,
Food Preparation, Poster Art,
and Photography.
Winners were: Calvin Cru-
mitie, first place, Leisure
Arts/Recreation, Junior Divi-
sion,
Cydney Hastings and Ty-
shonda Jordan, first place,


FCAT Scor
(Continued From l'age I)
dents must pass the test (with
opportunities to retake) in or-
der to graduate.
Barker said: "Just because a
student doesn't pass the FCAT
(earn a score of three or
higher) does not mean he/she
has made no improvement.
"If a student moves from
level 1 to level 2, he/she still


Gas Tax Get


(Continued From Page 1)
tially approved the tax, the ac-
tion generated opposition, es-
pecially from some in the fuel-
dispensing industry.
At the time, commissioners
assured them that the tax was
intended as a temporary meas-
ure, their way of making the
action more palatable.
One commissioner stands
out for his dissenting view. Al-


Health, Junior Division Team.
Shayla Koonce, first place,
Safety, Junior Division.
Monique Colson and Alicia
Pleas, first place, Human De-
velopment, Junior Division
Team.
Deion Siplin, first place,
General, Junior Division.
Alana Chambers, first place,
Public Speaking, Senior Divi-
sion.
Alex Farmer, first place,
Waste Management, Senior
Division.
Angela Scurry, first place,
Health, Senior Division.
Keiona Scott, first place,
Leisure Arts/Recreation, Sen-
ior Division.
Jazmaun Hall and Carmen
Shipworth, first place, Food
and Nutrition Team, Senior


'es Rise
hasn't passed, but has im-
proved all the same," he ex-
plained.
If a student never reads out-
side of school, is never read to
at home, or begins school
without being able to recog-
nize letters, "Progress will be
made, but the road is long ,"
Barker emphasized.


s Renewed


though he ultimately voted for
the imposition, Commissioner
Mordaunt Bishop made the
point that it was unlikely the
tax would ever be repealed.
It was his lifetime experi-
ence, Bishop said, that once a
tax was imposed, reason could
always be found to keep in
place.
Amen.


Farmers

&

Merchants Bank








Will Be Closed

Monday

May 29, 2006

In Observance of

Memorial Day




Regular Banking Hours

Resume Tuesday, May 30th

Member F.D.I.C. An FMB Bank


Division.
Arsenio Bright, first place,
Food Preparation, Senior Di-
vision.
Tierra Thompson and Che-
varra Ulee, first place, Food
Preparation Team, Senior Di-
vision.
Shanka Farmer and Shayne
Broxie. second place.
Alyssa Stephens and Stepha-
nie Stephens, first place, Geri-
-eral Senior Division.
Deion Siplin, first place,
Photography, Junior Division.
Poster Art winners were: Si-
plin, first place, Junior Divi-
sion,
second place.
Alana Chambers won first
place in Photography.
Other Photography winners
included: Arsenio Bright,
Alyssa
Stephens, Shanka Farmer, and
Angela Scurry.


starts July 11
NFCC,- Madison, Fla

Website: WWW.NFCO.EDU o
TO REGISTER: 81





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On behalf of all the employees of the Jefferson County School Board family,
we congratulate the faculty and the students at Jefferson Elementary School for
a job WELL DONE! We are very proud of your hard work and achievement!

Phil Barker, Superintendent of Schools
Fred Shofner, Chairman of the School Board
Charles Boland, School Board Member
Franklin Hightower, School Board Member
Beverly Sloan, School Board Member
Edward Vollertsen, School Board Member

Commissioner Winn Announces Top 10 School Districts
Closing the Achievement Gap.
TALLAHASSEE- Education Commissioner John L. Winn today announced
the top 10 school districts closing the achievement gap between minority third
graders and their white counterparts. The top. 10 districts were identified by
comparing the increased percentages of district's African-American and His-
panic students who are reading and demonstrating mathematics skills at or above
grade level on the Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test compared to the
percentage of white students from 2005 to 2006.

"It is critical that all students achieve success now, so they may success later in
life," said Commissioner Winn. "I applaud these school districts for working to
close the achievement gap, but there is still much to be done. We cannot rest
until we eliminate any disparities between all students."

African-American Students
Top 10 districts closing the achievement gap for African-American third
graders .in reading:
Jefferson by 16.67 percent
Union by 16.29 percent
DeSoto by 15.50 percent
+ Charlotte by 13.10 percent
Hamilton by 12.74 percent
Madison by 11.93 percent
Suwannee by 11.92 percent
Pasco by 11.48 percent
+ Flagler by. 11.38 percent
+ Washington by 11.00 percent

Top 10 district closing the achievement gap for African-American third
graders in mathematics:
+ Desoto by 26.91 percent
+ Jefferson by 25.83 percent
Flagler by 15.82 percent
Martin by 11.85 percent
Hernando by 10.38 percent
Putnam by 8.86 percent
Jackson by 7.92 percent
Dixie by 7.79 percent
+ Union by 7.13 percent


- I V











MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS,

Caribbean Home Town

Get Down Set Friday


3tAWX?-&


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Caribbean Home Town
Get Down, takes place 5-9
p.m., Friday.
Spokesperson Ericka Im-
brunone said the Home Town
Get Down is planned to
kickoff the Memorial Day
weekend, considered the first
weekend of summer.
Merchants will be attired in
Caribbean style, including
Hawaiian shirts, grass skirts,
colorful shorts, beach wear,
flip-flops, big floppy hats,
an the l- Ike.


SALLY COLE, of the Sheriff's Department, spoke on Internet safety, along with Police Merchan ts will a
Department Lt. Fred Mosley, and Sheila Choice, of DCF, at the Refuge House Lunch their own "Cani a
workshop, recently. (News Photo) booths" outside ofth

lishments, selling su
aterm elon Festival as frozen bananas
W aterm eion Fest ivaots that msic in the gar- candy, sno-cones, D
den will be provided by
Kickoff Dinner Set JimmyGillis.

Thursday, June 1 Fundraiser Saturday


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


The 56th Watermelon Festi-
val opens with the Kickoff
Dinner, 5-7 p.m. Thursday,
June 1, at the Opera House.
Chef Hal Bennett will grill
the chicken, and the dinner
will include all the comple-
ments, including dessert and a
cold drink.
Tickets are $7.50 for adults
and $4.00 for children.


Members To
Exhibit At
Jefferson Arts
The Jefferson Arts will pre-
sent a Members Only Show
5-9 p.m. Friday June 16, and
9 a.m.- 2 p.m. Saturday June
.17, during the Watermelon
Festival festivities.
Members wishing to exhibit
should bring their works to
the Gallery by Wednesday,
June 14.
Only members with paid up
membership dues may
exhibit.
The show will be ongoing
for several weeks.
Many volunteers are
needed for the event.


The cost of the ticket will
include a chance to win an as-
sortment of door prizes, do-
nated by local vendors, and
individuals.
Buddy's Home Furnishing
has donated a color television
as a major prize.
Festival Pageant Contest-
ants will be introduced and
Princess and Queen Pageant
contestants will sell raffle
tickets.


also have
val type
eir estab-
ich items
s, cotton
op corn,.


candy apples, and more.
Caribbean food will also be
available.
Both Dogwood and Cherry
Streets will be lined with ven-
dors.
The Caribbean band, "To-
coma" has been booked to en-
tertain during the event.
Besides the 50/50 cash raf-
fle, activities and music, Im-
brunone said a "Dress Your
Pet" contest will take palce.
Limbo contests for both
children and adults will be
ongoing throughout the eve-
ning.
Another contest on tap will
be the pre-carved watermelon
contest. The melons will be
judged on originality.
Also, Monticello Caribbean
Home Town Get Down T-
shirts will be for sale.
Winners of all contests will

No sunscreen.

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To Provide For Smith's

Outreach Ministry


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Resident Will Smith, a
2004 graduate of Aucilla
Christian Academy, will host
a fundraiser sale 8 a.m. Satur-
day at Steve Walker Realty
on South Jefferson Street, to
fund his missionary trip to
Campus Outreach Ministries
in Panama City Beach.
Items for sale will include
household goods, clothing,
furniture, bric-a-brac, and the
like.
Food items will also be
sold, including, hot dogs,
hamburgers, drinks, baked
goods, and the like.
All proceeds will benefit
Smith's missionary trip to
Panama City Beach.
A total of $1,200 is needed
for Smith to participate in the
event, held from the end of
May until the end of July.


During his two-month stay,
Smith will be one of many
students brought to the area
and trained to take the mes-
sage of Christ back to their
campuses.
The program assists stu-
dents participating, to find
jobs in the Panama City
Beach area, where they will
work during the daylight
hours.
On weekends, participants
head to the beaches in an at-
tempt to reach the beach go-
ers.
They conduct tug-of-war
and volleyball, and other
games, drawing people from
around the beach, then wit-
nessing to them.
This will be Smith's second
year participating in the pro-
gram. He currently attends
Huntingdon College in Mont-
gomnery, AL, where he is ma-
joring in Communications.


,FRI., MAY 26, 2006 PAGE 3


receive fresh flower leis and
complimentary plastic leis
would be given to the chil-
dren who attend the event,
and will also be available for
sale to adults.
The Humane Society will
have an adoption booth and
Humane Society T-shirts as
well as Prevent the Litter T-
shirts will be sold during the
event.









1





starts June 1
in Monticello, Fla

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TO REGISTER:

85 .9 3.6' 29_


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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 26, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net




We Owe Debt


TO War Dead


More than 1 million men and
women have lost their lives
fighting for freedom in the
U.S. armed forces. We can
never reimburse the price they
paid. We can summon no
words to allay the pain of their
loved ones. We can, and we
should, honor America's war-
dead on Memorial Day.
We, as beneficiaries of
America's departed heroes,
should make three pledges on
Memorial Day to ensure that
the Supreme Sacrifice of our
nation's war dead never will
be in vain.
The first pledge we should
make is to fly the U.S. Flag
and to participate in our com-
munity's commemorative
events. America's patriots shed
their blood in defense of our
nation's core values of free-
dom, justice and equality as
well as the U.S. Flag that sym-
bolizes our values.
Memorial Day should unify
all Americans in solemn trib-
ute to those who did not come
marching home and to conse-
crate the principles for which
they fought.
The second pledge we
should make is to teach our
children and grandchildren that
the freedoms they may take for
granted were purchased by in-
credible sacrifice. When we
lead by example, by bringing
our children and grandchildren
with us to Memorial Day pub-
lic observations, we teach the
leaders of tomorrow that free-
dom is not free.
The third pledges is to par-,
ticipate in our democracy in


order to give patriots-present
the best opportunity to triumph
against evil.
Today's troops form the light
of hope that pierces the dark-
ness of tyranny.
These contemporary pledges
flow from the earliest tradi-
tions of Memorial Day. South-
ern women in the spring of
1865 planted flowers on the
graves of Confederate war
dead.
Gen. John Logan, com-
mander in chief of the Grand
Army of the Republic, an or-
ganization of Union veterans,
ordered his group to decorate
the graves of Union troops on
a uniform date in 1868.
These and other commemo-
rations would give rise to the
first national Memorial Day
observance on May 30, 1868
at Arlington National Ceme-
tery. Gen. James Garfield, key-
notes speaker for the
observance, said those who
lost their lives fighting for
freedom engaged in the ulti-
mate expression of humanity's
"highest virtues." The general
was right!
More than I million men and
women, preponderantly of
modest means and infinite
courage, sacrificed all of their
tomorrow's while fighting for
America's unifying "virtues."
Surely we can honor their
sacrifice, transmit the values
for which they fought and pre-
serve the "common defense"
that is liberty's backbone. By
our vigilance, the sacrifices of
America's departed heroes
shall never be in vain.


If It's Old, Now


It's Fashionable


The newest thing is old. From
TV Classic to retro fashions,
nostalgia is in As we grow
older, decades past can seem
better and better in out memo-
ries, and we look for remind-
ers- in art, in entertainment
and in cultural artifacts that
hearken back to Good Old
Days as we remember them .
Vintage advertising imagery
is particularly popular. For ex-
ample, many restaurants dis-
play vintage posters and
memorabilia on their walls to
lend a whimsical decorative
touch More and more Ameri-
cans are replicating this in
their own homes, with ads-as-
art growing in popularity every
year.
In fact, some ads are art.
Over the years, some of Amer-
ica's best loved artists, such as
Norman Rockwell, Alfred Bu-
ell, J. C Leyendecker and An-
drew Loomis, have contributed
significantly to companies'
visual legacies and brand
identities.
For example, Kellogg Com-
pany's archives department is
like a walk through history,
documenting a century of
American and social change,


including a significant shift in
eating habits and family life-
styles.
It is a time capsule of nostal-
gic imagery, evoking emotion,
humor, warmth and fond
memories. To get a virtual
glimpse inside, visit
www. KellogglOO.com
Now the company is crack-
ing open the vault and tap-
ping into it's archive of
original artwork, design and
packaging. For it s 100th anni-
versary, Kellogg is celebrating
the beauty and historical stay-
ing power of iconic images
such as Cornelius the Rooster
and Snap! Crackle! Pop! by
partnering with licensees to
create nostalgic, vintage mer-
chandise.
It will be available through a
broad range of retail outlets ,
allowing consumers of all ages
to enjoy and celebrate a cen-
tury of cereal.
Modern-day icons will be re-
united with such old friends as
Smaxey the Seal and Sugar
Pops Pete from the 1940's
and Milton "Milty" the Toaster
from the 1970s, sure to delight
audiences of all ages.


Opinion & Comment


U Short Takes & Other Notions


By MERRY ANN FRISBY

There was a touching
Monticello-type bird drama in
our back yard this week. A
pair of brown Trashers had se-
creted their nest in our grape
arbor. We could see the par-
ents duck into the greenery
amid demanding squawks
from their babies.
Unfortunately, this feeding
also attracted the attention of a
red-shouldered hawk. The
hawk landed on top of the
grape vines and he shook,
dancing up and down. This
frightening specter scared the
baby Thrashers into squealing
for their Mom and Dad. Their
baby squeal, of course, al-
lowed the hawk to pinpoint
their exact location. He began
to pick them off one by one
and eat them.


Mom and Dad Trasher flew
at the hawk, fluttering and
pecking near his head in an at-
tempt to distract him. They
were ineffectual and panicked
fighters. I believe I could hear
them sobbing.
Then, out of the sky, in a
ragged formation, came a
squadron of Mockingbirds.
About five or six Mocking
birds flew at the hawk with
passionate precision.
They dive-bombed him
pecking him square on the
head and shoulders as he con-
tinued to tear apart and eat
each baby Thrasher.
We watched in horror. They
actually ran the hawk off once,
but he returned within a short
time to finish his blood feast.
The Mockingbirds never gave
up. As time past, more and
more Mockingbirds, attracted
by the bird noise, arrived from


surrounding neighborhoods,
Even after the hawk ate the
last baby and began to fly
south, the Mockingbirds pur-
sued and harassed him. They
were fearless and magnificent.
During my years in Monti-
cello, I have seen this com-
mendable Mockingbird
behavior to be exactly the kind
of response Monticellans ,give
when one of our "own" is in
trouble.
Whenever there is a death in
any family, a casserole bridade'
forms almost immediately. All
churches open their doors and
hearts to anyone when there is
an evacuation from some trou-
bled place. Recent Amber
Alerts mobilized the entire
town.
Divisions in class, race, age
and church affiliation all dis-
solve. Each Monticellan rises
to the aid of stricken fellow


humans. Like Mockingbirds,
we are fiercely protective of
our neighbor Thrashers. I am
always touched and proud of
this response.
I recall that in New York
many years ago, a poor lady,
Kitty Genoviese, was stabbed
to death while many neighbors
watched. This could not hap-
pen,.inM.Aonticello.J, believe we,
have intentionally nurtured this
heightened sense of commu-
nity responsibility.
We can fuss with each other,
even fuss fiercely with each
other. However, when the
-chips are down, I do not know.
one person who would refuse
to help a neighbor.
I suspect some other towns
may be this way also, but this
is certainly true in my town.
As for me, I plan to "make like
a Mockingbird" if another
Monticellan needs me.


Boyd Pushes VA Benefits


By ALLEN BOYD
Congressman

Memorial Day is a wonder-
ful time to gather with family
and friends, but more impor-
tantly, it is the time to reflect
on the blessings we have as
Americans and honor the men
and women who made the ulti-
mate sacrifice for freedom.
As we pay tribute to those
who courageously served our
country in times of war and
peace, we also must take this
opportunity to renew our ef-
forts for our troops, our veter-
ans and their families.
Those of us who serve in
Congress should thank veter-
ans by rolling up our sleeves
and addressing the critical un-
met needs of our veterans'
population.


One. of my top priorities has
always been to honor the com-
,mitment this country has made
to our veterans, and in Con-
gress, this is accomplished
through meaningful action and
tangible assistance. For this
reason, I have been working to
enact a new GI Bill of Rights
for the 2 1st Century.
In 1944, we honored the
Greatest Generation through a
Bill of Rights, and in each ma-
jor military conflict since, we
have honored the service of:
our soldiers through a new GI
Bill.
This bill would strengthen
benefits for our men and
women in uniform today and
provide long overdue benefits
for the veterans and military
retirees who have already
served.
The new GI Bill focuses on


improving veterans'
healthcare, including mental
healthcare, to meet the needs
of out returning troops.
The bill also would end the
Disabled Veterans' Tax, which
prevents disabled veterans
from receiving military retiree
and veterans' disability bene-
fits concurrently. At this time,
over 41,000 Florida retirees
are forced to pay this tax and
give up one dollar of their pen-
sion for every dollar of disabil-
ity pay they receive.
I have worked with my col-
leagues in Congress to score a
partial repeal of this tax, but
the remaining disabled military
retirees should be allowed to
receive all of their promised
benefits.
In addition to improving
benefits, we also must make
healthcare more accessible and


timely to our veterans. In
2003, the Department of Vet-
erans Affairs developed the
Capital Asset Realignment for
Enhanced services (CARES)
Commission to meet the in-
creased demand for veterans'
healthcare service over the
next 20 years.
The CARES Commission
made several recommenda-
tions for improved access to
veterans' healthcare through
Community-Based Outpatient
Clinics (CBOCs), specifically
to address the healthcare needs
in rural areas.
In 2004, the Commission
stated their intent to build 156
CBOCs throughout the country
by 2012, including one in
Marianna. Currently, veterans
in Jackson County and sur-

(See Boyd Pushes Page 5)


Stupid is As Stupid Does


By DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

Sometime back in one of my
past articles, I forewarned eve-
ryone of the impending mas-
sive financial giveaway our
national legislators are poised
to undertake. I anticipated that
we as a nation would all fall
asleep and predicted our col-
lective memories would fail, as
usual, as time passed.
What I am referring to is the
financial giveaway of your


hard earned tax dollars to pri-
vate citizens and businesses to
rebuild New Orleans.
At last count, Louisiana
Senator Susan Landrieu, (D) is
asking congress for no less
than $250 billion dollars for
the reconstruction of a city and
neighborhoods. I think that our
founding fathers are rolling
over in their graves at the very
thought of citizen tax dollars
going to build homes and busi-
nesses for other citizens.
After all, isn't it the premi-
ums we pay each month for


our home owners (business
owners) hazard insurance that
protects us against loss and
provides funds to rebuild fol-
lowing natural disasters?
Why then is New Orleans
expecting the rest of us to bail
them out because they were
too cheap to carry the neces-
sairy insurance like the rest of
the home and business owners
in this country?
I firmly believe that setting
such a precedent of the expen-,
diture of our tax dollars is, in
and of itself, the most devastat-,


ing of disasters. What this
would mean is that from now
on, every time there is a flood,
hurricane, tornado, earthquake
or wildfire, all affected Ameri-
can citizens 'are entitled to
have their home and property
completely rebuilt and re-
placed by the federal govern-
ment. Not as the customary
low interest repayable federal
loan, but free.
I propose that if Congress is
going to be so carefree with
your and my tax money, rather
(See Stupid Page 5)
i


From Our Photo File


IN OCT, 1990, Teacher Theresa McKown hosted an elementary school pumpkin
patch, during a Chapter 1 outreach workshop. From left Steven Strickland, Daniel
McKown, Daniel Hart, Sandra Johnson. (News File Photo)


I









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 26, 2006 PAGE 5


Stupid Is As Stupid Does


(Continued From Page 4)
than rebuilding a New Orleans
to await yet another hurricane
to wipe the city out once again,
we just give the money to the
citizens outright and let them
relocate elsewhere in this great
country.
Let's see, with a bankroll of
$250 billion dollars, every
man, woman and child resident
of New Orleans would receive
$516,528.00. (That's over two
million bucks for a family of
four).
There were 188,251 homes
in New Orleans. $250 billion
dollars would provide each
home owner $1,329,789.00 to
rebuild. Yes, that's "million".


Not such a bad deal for being
stupid enough to construct a
city well below sea level on
the hurricane rich gulf coast
and not bother to pay for any
hazard insurance.
The numbers clearly tell you
that there is a great deal of
wealth about to be made by a
handful of individuals poised
to take on the New Orleans re-
building project. Rest assured,
you might expect they may
well become big contributors
to Senator Landrieu's reelec-
tion campaign and any other
legislator who is in a position
to flutter away our tax money
to rebuild a city.
I don't even want to know
about the millions of dollars


Boyd Pushes VA Benefits


(Continued From Page 4)
rounding areas must travel to
Panama City, Tallahassee and
even farther for their health-
care needs, causing over-
crowding in these facilities and
inconvenience and difficulties
for many veterans in North
Florida.
With 22 new CBOCs opened
in 2005 and 68 more in the
works for the next two years, I
am confident these facilities
will greatly improve access to
veterans' healthcare nation-
wide. The CBOC in Marianna
is still in the planning phase,
and I will continue to work in
Congress to ensure that the
healthcare needs of our North
Florida veterans are met.

Strengthening veterans'
benefits and providing more
accessibility to veterans'
healthcare are two major ways
that the federal government
can plan and provide for the
needs of our veterans.
With over 21,000 Floridians
currently serving in Iraq and


Afghanistan, we must all be re-
minded of the true meaning of
this holiday and show our
overwhelming gratitude and
respect for our troops and our
veterans.
Those who have fought and
defended our country can be
proud of the job they have
done, and for this, Congress
must deliver on our promises
and responsibilities now and in
the future.


(850) 386-7553
Tallahassee
1882 Capital Circle, NE,
Suite 103
Tallahassee, Florida 32308


that good Americans contrib-
uted to relief organization to
assist in getting New Orleans
and its citizens back on their
feet. From my perspective, it
appears that most if not all of
that money has been squan-
dered away as precious little
appears to have been done to
clear the city and reestablish
its residential base.
New Orleans Mayor Ray


Nagin, you know, the one who
sent people to the Super Dome
without any follow up plan for
food, security, water or
evacuation and failed to use to
hundreds of buses to evacuate
these people, just garnished the
highest percentage of votes
and is now in a runoff election
to continue on as New Orleans
mayor. Like I said, stupid is as
stupid does.


Growth Coming, Per SRWMD
(Continued From Page 1) ,for the property appraiser's
ity growth that will preserve web site.
the integrity of the past." Too, the SRWMD -- in part-
"Regulation doesn't have to nership with the City of Monti-
be an impediment to develop- cello, the Department of
ment," Houder said, under- Environmental Protection and
scoring the importance of Simpson Nursery -- is working
balancing environmental pro- on a $1.5 million water recla-
tection with economic devel- nation project that will offset
opment in small rural counties, an estimated 500,000 gallons
Added SRWMD Director of groundwater withdrawals
Jerry Scarborough, "The daily.
SRWMD's goal is to get more The project also will upgrade
tools into your hands and pro- the city's wastewater treatment
vide more incentives to cities plant.
-A 1 "


and counties.
Although the SRWMD offi-
cially covers only the eastern
half of the county, the agency
has been involved in a number
of significant projects here, in-
cluding the purchase of the
head of the Wacissa spring and
providing technical support to
help develop a GIS (geo-
graphic information system)


Help your community
when a disaster strikes!
Become a trained Disaster
Services Volunteer by contacting
the Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross at 878-6080
or visit our web site at
www.tallytown.com/redcross.
American
Red Cross


-Caminez, Brown

I & Hardee, P.A.

Jon D. Caminez
I $i5 Board Certified Trial Attorney
Ian Brown
Cary A. "Bo" Hardee, III


(850) 997-8181
1307 S. Jefferson Street Monticello, Florida 32344


L E-mail: FleetSpan@aol.com http://fleetspan.com




Monticello Vineyard and Winery

Ladybird Organics 294-9463
o 1211 Waukeenah Hwy.,
Monticello, FL. 32344
Hours: Sat, Sun, & Mon. 8 6
Call for an appointment 997-7224










For decades, Edward Jones has been committed to
providing personalized investment service to individuals.
Froni our office here in Monticello, you can rely on:
i Convenience
Face-to-face meetings, when and where you're available.
i Timely Information
Techrrolog. that gives you instant access to information
on your account and other investments.
I Personal service
Investment guidance for your personal needs.


Robert J. Davison
Investment Representative
205 E. Washington St.
Monticello, FL 32344
850-997-2572


850-997-2572


www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC


-- - -- -----


FOR CLERK OF COURT

FROM JEFFERSON COUNTY, FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY !


PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT APPROVED BY KIRK REAM PAID FOR BY CAMPAIGN ACCOUNT OF KIRK REAMS FOR CLERK OF COURT DEMOCRAT


Fellow Jefferson Co
S County Residents,
AMfy name -
runningn Kk Re County is
Jeffers, cg Cleirk Reams and I a Intend to b mypast;it
Je onff< fo lr Cour "'*f--eOto beTy ; Isf wat
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---------------------------------------- ------------------ -------


...........
















PACE 6 MONTICFlO. (FL). NEWS. FRI.. MAY 26.2006


Lifestyle


----~- -- --- ----~ -/


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Monticello Red Hats
met at the Three Sisters Res-
taurant for their May gather-
ing, and a Mother's Day
program.
The program consisted of
specially selected poems, read
by Maggie Shofner, as mem-
bers shared pictures of their
mothers.
The ladies discussed how
time had changed the style of
dress, hair, and the like.
Hostess was Minnie Stok-
ley, who provided rose bud
vases as prizes, won by Lee
Condon and Carmela
Naranjo.
Other prizes and winners in-
cluded: Red Hat pins to Betty
Bard and Thelma Birdwell.


During the April meeting
the members had decided to
change their regular June
meeting date to Thursday,
June 15, so as to attend the
Watermelon Festival Lunch-
eon and Fashion Show.
Those attending were re-
minded not to delay in pur-
chasing their tickets as there
is a limited amount available.
Plans for the July meeting
were discussed, and it was de-
cided that the ladies will car-
pool to Thomasville, GA. to
the Oriental Buffet.


RED HATS meet for the May meeting at Three Sisters Restaurant and enjoy a
Mother's Day Program. From' left, Minnie Stokley, Carmela Naranjo, and Maggie
Rossi.


Pre-Kindergaren Registration
Scheduled At JES June 1


Jefferson Elementary School
Pre-Kindergarten Registration
will be held 9a.m.-3p.m.
Tuesday, May 30.
Students must be 4 years


Homes Of Mourning
William Henry of Wacissa, one daughter
Johnson Amanda Sasser (Gordon) o
William Henry Johnson, age Tallahassee; two brothers Pau
58, died Monday, May 22, Johnson of Grady, Al. am
2006, in Brooks County Geor- David A. Johnson of Ashford
gia. Al.; and four sisters Ruth E
Brackin of Cottonwood, Al.
Services were Thursday, Shirley Combs of Milton
May 25, 2006, at 11:00 a.m. at Charlotte Walls of Ashford
Wacissa United Methodist Al. and Mary Price of Ashford
Church in Wacissa. Interment Al.; and five grandchildren.
followed at Beth Page
Cemetery. Visitation was E Ul
Wednesday, May 24, at Beggs
Funeral Home Monticello
Chapel in Monticello, from 6
to 8 p.m.
Williams was born in Ash-
ford, Al. and had live in Jeffer-
son County for thirty years.
William was a horse trainer FLORAL I
and a member of the Tennes-
see Walking Horse Association






Johnson, three sons Richard
Peters (Donnelle), W.H. "Dub" 190 E Dogwood Street
Johnson, and Frank Williams .


old on or before September 1,
2006.
Items necessary for registra-
tion include:
*Child's birth certificate


CARD OF THANKS
'Perhaps you sent a lovely
card, or sat quietly in a chair.
Perhaps you sent a funeral
spray, if so we saw it there.


*Immunization (shot) records Perhaps you spoke the kind-
*Physical examination re- est words, that any friend
cords could say.
*Social Security card Perhaps you were no0t 1hcrce


at all, just thought of us that
day.

Whatever you did to con-
sole our hearts, we thank you
so much, whatever the part.
The family of the late
David H. Allen
(The Gator)


-lr lbIntra.nI
FO1., A01


P 2


Quilters Stitching

Quilt For Raffle


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Crazy Quilters continue
their stitching skills on the
"Trail to Oregon" quilt, to be
raffled during the Monticello
Christmas event in December.
Raffle tickets for this queen
size quilt of blue and white
are $1 each, and may be pur-
chased from the quilters at
community events.
They have been seen quilt-
ing at the Opera House during
the Tour of Homes, the Down
Town Get Down's, the Bless


the Beast Feast, and they will
be set up and quilting during
the Watermelon Festival.
The funds raised through
the sale of tickets for the
"Trail to Oregon" will be do-
nated to the County Refuge
House Outreach Program.
The Quilters meet 1 p.m.
Wednesday at the Library.
New members are always
welcome and there is no fee
to join the group.
Meetings are also open to
those who chose to work on
projects of their own.
Contact Barbara Sheats at
997-8732 for more informa-
tion.


Family Council Meeting

Set At Nursing Center


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Jefferson Nursing Center
Director of Social Services
Mae Kyler invites family
members to a Family Council
6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday,
June 1 in the main dining
room.
It can be difficult having a
family member or a friend ad-
mitted to and/or residing in a
long term care facility.
There are often questions,
concerns, and unresolved is-
sues and feelings that are not
addressed.


Jefferson Nursing center is
not only dedicated to provid-
ing quality care to all of their
residents, but they also recog-
nize the importance of family
and friends and their contin-
ued support.
In an effort to facilitate
open communication, under-
standing, and support, the
Center encourages all inter-
ested parties to attend the
Council meeting.
This will provide an oppor-
tunity for learning, sharing,
and meeting people, those di-
rectly involved in the resi-
dents' care, and other
residents' family and friends.
Refreshments will be served.


CRAZY QUILTERS work on "Trail to Oregon" Quilt. The quilt will be raffled later in
the year and proceeds donated to local Refuge House Outreach. From left, Pat
Monge, Jeanne Brenner, Carolyn Milligan, Barbara Sheats. (News Photo)


Camellia Garden Circle Plans

Events For Coming Year


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Members of the Camellia
Garden Circle met at the
home of Chair Isabelle de
Sercey for a plant exchange
and planning meeting for the
new year.
New Circle Chairs elected
include: Becky Reid, chair-
man; Debbie Snapp,
secretary; and Carolyn Milli-
gan, treasurer.
They will be taking over
with a whole new format of
year-round programs.
Members gathered on the
back porch to enjoy the sights
of the ducks on the pond, the


flowers in bloom, and the fish
in the patio fountain pool.
A table of wine and sweet
treats was decorated with
-vases of fresh cut gardenias
and roses.
Members brought in a vari-
ety of flowers, bushes, seeds,
and seedlings to exchange.
Program ideas and locations
of monthly meetings were
discussed, and a tentative
schedule was developed.
Every member in atten-
dance participated in the dis-
cussion and volunteered to
host a meeting or be involved
in a program in some way.
"Next year is going to be
great fun, if the excitement
shown here today is any kind


of a sign," exclaimed de Ser-
cey.
Members expressed their
appreciation of the new
board's willingness to step
forward and take charge.
They offered a big welcome
back to Ginger Nichols, and
greetings to new members
Georgie Joseph and Jean Del
Vecchio.
They also said farewell to
member Pat Elliott who is
moving to a new home in
South Carolina.
Anyone interested in joining
this Circle or any of the other
Circles is encouraged to con- -
tact Garden Club President
Dianne Braren at 997-3729.


Church News
The Ameter Hill Women
Missionary Society Annual
Evening in White worship
service will be held 4 p.m.,
Sunday, at New Bethel AME
Church.
Rev. Helen Johnson-
Robinson and congregation of
Bethel AME Church, Monti-
cello, is the guest speaker.

Ford Chapel AME will ob-
serve its Homecoming, along
with the Jones/Blackshear Re-
union, May 26-28.
Worship service 11 a.m.
Sunday with Minister Lanorris
McFadden of West Palm with
the FCYYA choir. All other
activities are at the Kirksey Es-
tate.

John White #65 Order of
Eastern Star, will be in charge
of worship service 11 a.m.
Sunday at Shiloh AME
Church.
Speaker is OES Chaplain,
Minsiter Joyce Sabree.
Lunch will be served after
the service.

First Baptist Church will
celebrate Memorial Weekend
11 a.m. Sunday. Pastor Moor
will speak on "Remembering
and Forgetting."


Central
Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166
Sunday: -
10 QAM Bible School -
11AM Worship Hour,
5 PM-Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

The Lord our
God, the Lord is
one. Love the
,Lord your God
with all your
heart and with all
your soul and
with all your
strength.
Deut 6:4-5


Become an American Red Cross
Disaster Services Volunteer

The Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross is seeking to
train Disaster Services Volunteers
in your community. Contact us at
878-6080 or visit our web site at
www.tallytown.com/redcross.



+
American
Red Cross


Six-Week Grief Support Group
S Feeling 1,,f -_l:.. an, d n rict : n -i e o'ver-
.i ..I.h rilmirin Thi i *.-1'.,k__'. r ,ef si support
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S h ro t- dille rieft foll:I.. ing the death
o a l:.-ed, one -I ld i.e P.r-cipr ants
the p.. :'.rr.urir, ro e r.-lr,-e r leir gnel in
a i, J.,te .n i i .: -r rg err ir.,rim enr ,

'.' I,.n E r.: '.' .i_. .d t 1i", : -2 0r r
S-i .:.11 l- lul', '' .-n .


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I I-'- (,rl t -r i: .r -r i i -'jr '
P',-p-nt ,,:,r, ,.: reqiJred


Red Hat Ladies Enjoy

Mother's Day Program










MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 26, 2006 PAGE 7

Local Rotary Club Receives

Awards At Annual Conference


EDNA HENRY, mistress of ceremonies for the Jefferson Nursing Center, is served
plate of food by the kitchen staff at the Center. (News Photo)


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Otto M. Walker Ameri-
can Legion Post 49 will spon-
sor a Memorial Day
Remembrance 7:30 a.m.
Monday, at the Legion Hall
on South Water Street.
Coffee and pastries will be
served.
Guest speaker is Len Dod-
son, Captain, US Navy, re-
tired, who will address the
group at 8 a.m.
A Flag Retirement Cere-
mony will commence at 8:30


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Rotary Club President Bill
Beaty accepted a number of
awards on behalf of the Club
at the District 6940 Annual
Conference, held in Panama
City Beach, recently.
Among awards received
were:
Vocational Service Project
of the Year in recognition of
the club reaching its long time
goal of establishing a perma-


nent endowment fund that
generates interest income to
fund the club's Vocational
Scholarship Program.
Beaty recognized Mike
Sims for his leadership and
direction to make this goal a
reality for the club.
The Platinum Medal of
Honor for outstanding pro-
jects in all areas of Rotary's
"avenue of service."
That included merit awards
for World Community Serv-
ice in recognition of Dr. Wes
Scoles' mission work in Gua-


a.m.
Individuals with flags need-
ing proper retirement may de-
liver them to the American
Legion location or to the Jef-
ferson County Veterans Af-
fairs Service Officer Michael
Bishop, prior to Monday.
Those wishing to have an
American flag posted on the
grave of a deceased family
member, can meet the Ameri-
can Legion Flag detail at the
entrance to the Roseland
Cemetery at 9 a.m.
Post members will provide
the flag and assistance in
placing it at the grave site.


temala;
Public Relations for keeping
the public informed of Ro-
tary's service to the commu-
nity;
Community Service in rec-
ognition of the club's wheel-
chair ramp building and
Thanksgiving basket program
The Club was also honored
as a Rotary Foundation Sus-
taining Club, which means
the club has given $100 per
member per year to the Ro-
tary Foundation.
"It should be noted that
these awards are club awards
won by teamwork and dedi-
cated to making our commu-
nity and world a better place
to live.
"I extend a special thanks to
Ron Cichon and the Monti-
cello News for the continued
support and coverage of the
club's projects," said Beaty in
announcing these awards to
the club members.
Beaty also noted that of 46
clubs in the district, the Mon-
ticello club was one of three
clubs that won the Platinum
Medal of Honor.


Senior Appreciation Day

Set June 14 At Center


PROGRAM CHAIR Edith Adams, left,and Woman's Club President Amanda Ouzts, pre-
sented a NAFTA Program during the April meeting. (News Photo)



Elementary Academic Award


Winners At Aucilla Christian


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


Aucilla Christian Academy
held its Academic Award Pro-
gram for elementary students
last week.
Receiving Presidential Fit-
ness awards were: Brooklyn
McGlammory, grade three,
Erica Keeler, and Natalie
Sorensen, grade one, Emily
Davis, grade six, and Nikki
Hamrick, grade seven.
Third graders receiving
awards include: Ricky Finlay-
son, Winston Lee, and Bryce
Sanderson, Highest GPA in
reading.
Winston Lee and Bryce
Sanderson, Highest GPA in
English.
Winston Lee, Highest GPA
in spelling.
Winston Lee and Carson
Nennstiel, Highest GPA in
math.
Winston Lee, Highest GPA
in science.
Brooklyn McGlammory,
Perfect Attendance.
Winston Lee, Math Super-
star.
Students recognized for be-
ing on the A honor roll all
year include: Winston Lee
and Bryce Sanderson.
Fourth graders receiving
awards include: Highest GPA
in reading, Rachel Lark.
Aimee Love received high-
est GPA in math, social stud-
ies, science, English and
spelling.
Annie Yang, perfect atten-
dance; and Aimee Love, Math
Superstar.
Students on the A honor
roll all year include Aimee
Love, Rachel Lark and Jes-
sica Welch.
Fifth graders receiving
awards include: Highest GPA
in Bible, Ashli Cline, Jay Fin-
layson, Kaley Love and
Wendy Yang.
Highest GPA in reading,
Kaley Love and Wendy
Yang.
Wendy Yang, highest GPA
in math.
Kaley Love and Wendy
Yang, highest GPA in


English.
Wendy Yang, highest GPA
in social studies.
Kaley Love, highest GPA in
science; and Ashli Cline,
highest GPA in spelling.
Dakota McGlamory and
Wendy Yang, perfect atten-
dance.
'Wendy Yang, Math Super-
star.
Students on the A honor roll
all year include: Jay Finlay-
son, Kaley Love and Wendy
Yang.
Sixth graders receiving the
Presidents Educational Aca-
demic award include: Levi
Cobb, Matt Dobson, Marcus.


:.7
- r.:.


Evans, Tyler Jackson, Austin
Richie, Tori Self, Austin Shir-
ley and Shelby Witmer.
Tyler Jackson received the
highest GPA in math, reading,
English, and social studies.
Shelby Witmer, highest
GPA in science.
Tyler Jackson and Matt
Dobson, highest GPA in
spelling.
Matt Dobson, highest GPA
in Bible.
Tyler Jackson was named
math superstar.
Students who have been on
the A honor roll for the entire
year include, Matt Dobson
and Shelby Witmer.



First Birthday
Maria Danelle Rosas cele-
brated her first birthday
Wednesday, May 24, 2006.
She is the daughter of Leslie
Lamb Rosas and Jose Rosas.
Her grandparents arc Pat and
Sue Lamb, of Monticello, and
Jose and Maria Rosas of Mex-
ico.


UitdSae


Big Bend Area Health Edu-
cation Center (BBAHEC) in
partnership with the Area
Agency on Aging of North
Florida, and the Department of
Elder Affairs, is sponsoring a
Senior Appreciation Day, 9
a.m. to 1 p.m., Wednesday,
June 14, at the Jefferson Sen-
ior Center.
The day is planned in recog-
"ition of seniors living in the
County, and to celebrate the
many accomplishments and
contributions made by local
seniors.


Memorial Day
(Continued From Page 1)
Maynard McCleod, Russell
Platt, Richard Plummer, Ken-
neth Rector, Joe Register,
Richard Russ, Fleming
Thompson, Harold Thompson,
Raymond Thompson, and
Otto Walker.

Please do not encourage
Florida's wildlife to do
things that are not
natural. Help keep
our wildlife safe. @


The event will provide free
cholesterol screenings, have
prizes, educational booths,
presentations and discussions
of maintaining good health, fit-
ness, and safety awareness tips
for seniors.
All County seniors are en-
couraged to attend the event.


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Post 49 Memorial Day

Events Occur Monday















PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 26, 2006


Sports


Howard Middle School


Athletic Award Winners


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Howard Middle School
Athletic Director Willie Saffo
reports the award winners at
the HMS Athletic Banquet
held last week.
In football, the Academic
Award went to Brandon
Whitfield; MVP, Marquise
Dobson; 110 Percent Award,


Alphonso Footman; Most Im-
proved Player, Darius Brooks;
Offensive Back of the Year,
Keyron Bellamy; and Offen-
sive Player of the Year, De-
vondrick Nealy.
Receiver's Award, Shaquan
Plunkett; Offensive Line
Award, Breyon Crumity; De-
fensive Line Award, Tavaris
Thompson; Defensive Back
Award, Lawrence Thomas;
Defensive Player of the Year,


Demontray Johnson; and Ap-
preciation Award, Eric Evans.
Twenty-six Coaches Awards
were presented to the Bees
team.
Members of the team in-
cluded Jarvis Akins, Raheem
Allen, Gerrold Austin, De-
marco Bellamy, Dennis Bel-
lamy, Keyron Bellamy, Dar-
ius Brooks, Jimmie Crim,
Breyon Crumity, Marquice
Dobson, Shelderrick Duhart,
and Alphonso Footman.
Also, Carlester Isom Ray-
mond James, Demontray
Johnson, Breon Macon, C. P.
Miller, Kenyatta Mills, An-
drew Murphy, Devondrick
Nealy, Shaquan Plunkett,
Jacarri Ross, Lawrence Tho-
mas, Tavaris Thompson,
Deandre Tucker, Denzel
Whitfield, Brandon Whitfield,
and Eric Evans.
In girl's basketball, Shata-
viah Anderson, 110 percent
award; Emily Howard, aca-
demic award; Breana Harvey,
most dependable; La'Ashle
Norton, offensive award,
Anna-Lee Montgomery,
sportsmanship award; Dru-
cilla Shaw, rebounding
award; and Simone Williams,
most improved player.
In softball, Mariah Brinson,
spirit award; Emily Howell,
"Grit" award and academic
award; Brionna Jones, coach's
award; Lanesiya Massey,
pitching award; La'Ashle
Norton, outfielder award;
Misty Watson, 110 percent
award; and Amber Weinrich,
most improved player.
In boy's basketball, Devon-
drick Nealy, MVP; Harold In-
gram, coach's award;
DeAndre Tucker, rebounding
award; Teylor Richard, team
spirit award; Brandon Whit-
field, scholastic award; Greg-
ory Dotson, most improved
player; and Demontray John-
son, hustler award.
On the track team, Keyron
Bellamy was given the aca-
demic award; and Bellamy,
Kenyetta Holmes, Alexandria
Saair, Devondrick Nealy,
Mantrez Davis and Kevin
Wade were each given the
coach's award.


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FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Recreation Department Di-
rector Kevin Aman reports
the final scores in Spring
Sports action at the park.
In T-ball action, Capital
City Bank defeated Bishop
Farms, 25-8; and Rotary tied
Jefferson Builders Mart, 20-
20.
In Coach Pitch, C & F
Fencing routed Kiwanis 17-4;
Hiram Masonic Lodge,
downed State Farm Insurance,
19-16; Chicken Delite won a
21-15 victory out of State
farm Insurance; and Hiram


Masonic Lodge beat Kiwanis,
17-6.
In Cal Ripken action, Mon-
ticello Milling downed Farm-
ers and Merchants Bank, 5-3;
Jefferson Farmers Market
squeaked by Williams
Timber, 7-6; the Farmers
hammered Williams Timber,
11-7; and the Millers deflated
the Bankers, 7-2.
Capital City Bank was
named the T-ball champions;
C & F Fencing was named the
Coach Pitch champions. Joy-
ner's Travel Center was
named the softball
champions; and Farmers and
Merchants Bank was named
the Cal Ripken champions.


ACA Falls To Munroe,

Carrabelle in Jamboree


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Though the Aucilla Chris-
tian Academy varsity football
team lost against both schools
during the Spring Jamboree
scrimmage, last week, Coach
Joe Striplin said he was proud
of the young Warriors per-
formances.
The Warriors played two
quarters against Munroe, los-
ing 21-0 and two quarters
against Carrabelle, losing 14-
6.
Striplin related that because
most of the varsity football

team was still playing in the
baseball post-season games,
the scrimmage was started
with four eighth graders, one
sixth grader and two seventh
graders.
"I thought they were doing a
great job," said Striplin.
"They displayed a great deal
of the Warrior spirit, going up
against bigger, more experi-
enced players and they never
backed down."

He added that the young
Warrior team committed no
penalties, no fouls and only
had two turnovers.

As quarterback, Matt Dob-
son attempted 28 passes with
16 completions for 148 yards,
two touchdowns and two in-
terceptions.

Receiver Reggie Walker
had seven receptions for 61


PLEDGING OUR
ALLEGIANCE


yards; Steve Griffin, six re-
ceptions for 72 yards; and
Daniel Greene, three recep-
tions for 15 yards.
In rushing, Greene had 12
for 28 yards.
In defensive tackles, Wade
Scarberry had seven; J. T.
Ward, four; Walker, three;
Griffin, three and one sack;
and Greene,three tackles, one
for a loss.
"They learned a lot from the
Jamboree, and during the fall,
they will be playing hard and
game outcomes will be differ-
ent," Striplin said.
In related news, football
summer workouts began
Monday, 6-8 p.m., and will be
held every Monday, Tuesday
and Thursday.
The first full day of practice
will be conducted 7 a.m., July
31.
"We will be working to get
stronger and faster, on agility,
and making improvements to
offensive and defensive tac-
tics to improve the team,"
concluded Striplin.


SKYLER HANNA, ACA JV
Softball player had 19 hits
in 40 times at bat for the
season. (News Photo)



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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 26, 2006 PAGE 9


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 26, 2006


NIS
323d.c 4 s4


3,b3L
(obst vans


Dn behalf of all the employees of the Jefferson
County School Board family, we congratulate
the faculty and the students at Howard Mid-
dle School for a job WELL DONE! We are
very proud of your hard work and achieve-
inent!
Phil Barker, Superintendent of Schools
Fred Shofner, Charmin of the School Board
Charles Boland, School Board Member
Franklin Hightower, School Boa rd Member
Beverly Sloan, School Board Member
Edward Vollertsen, School Board Member


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News


68


CLIP AND SAVE
Watermelon Festival 2006

June 1
5 PM Kick Off Event
Bed Race
Live Music in the Garden
by Jimmy Gillis
Opera House
June 3
7 PM Little King & Queen Pageant
Old JCHS Auditorium
6-10 PM Dinner & Dance
Willow Pond
June 10
Noon Former Queen's Luncheon
Chamber Bldg.
4 PM Queen Contestants Tea
Chamber Bldg.
7 PM Queen Pageant, Princess Pageant a
&Baby Contest Winners Announced
Old JCHS Auditorium
SNoon Fashion Show and Luncheon
Opera House
June 16
Noon-until Arts and Crafts Show Downtown
5:30 PM Rotary Barbecue
Opera House
S7 PM Street Dance
S. Water Street
8 PM Rodeo on Nash Road
June 17
7:30 AM Breakfast at FMB
8:15 AM Melon Run on Tiger Lane
S9 AM Arts and Crafts Show Downtown I
10 AM Parade Downtown
All Day Car Show in FMB Parking Lot
11:30 AM/I PM Children's Theater in Opera House
S11 AM-2 PM Platform Events with Marine Band
Downtown '
8 PM Gospel Sing at Opera House
8 PM Rodeo on Nash Road
- - - - - - a a a a a- a a a a -


~aaffX~CSXJmaESJaaFSJE3f3~CJCJCXXSEJESC~J


EJaCJEsCJCSCSSSCJmC~II~E~ac)~SaacJcSmama


ST











Tips For Safe Driving

Over Holiday Weekend


With the Memorial Day
Weekend on the horizon, offi-
cials warn that although re-
sponsible drivers try to avoid
getting into an auto accident,
even the best of drivers can
have bad luck behind the
wheel.
According to the national
Safety Council, approxi-
mately 20 million drivers,
nearly ten percent of all US
drivers, will be in an auto ac-
cident this year.
Ten Top Tips are offered to
help prevent injury, save time,
money and minimize the
stress involved in an auto ac-
cident:
Stay Calm. Avoid ten-
dencies toward road rage,
and stay calm if you encoun-
ter another driver who is be-
having irrationally.


When these situations esca-
late, they can often lead to
dangerous driving and
crashes.
Protect yourself. Be alert
to traffic scams that seem like
"accidents", such as when
driving on a lightly traveled
road, particularly at night, and
being tapped from behind.
Predatory criminals do this
to get the driver to exit the car
and either rob the driver or
steal the car.
If you are suspicious of the
circumstances, stay in your
vehicle and drive to a police
station or heavily populated
area for assistance.
Stop! If you are in an ac-
cident, do not leave the scene
until you have spoken with
the other driver or the police.
* Take steps to prevent fur-


their accidents. If practical,
move the car and all passen-
gers safely to the side of the
road, preferably to the right
If functioning, turn your
emergency flashing lights on
and, if available, set out a
flare on the road for nighttime
accidents.
Call the police from the
scene or ask someone to call
for you.
It is usually best to have the
police address any traffic in-
fractions, assist with injuries
and immortalize the occur-
rence for the record.
Request medical assis-
tance if needed. If you or
others are bleeding, feel light-
headed or are suffering any
physical injury, always err on
the side of calling for assis-
tance.


Unless trained in emergency
medical assistance, do not at-
tempt to move injured persons
or perform medical proce-
dures yourself.
Do not admit fault or dis-
cus the accident with anyone
except for the police or your
auto insurance company.
Write down pertinent in-
formation such as the other
driver's name, addresses tele-
phone number, license plate
and driver's license number
and the time of the accident.
Note the names, addresses
and phone numbers of any
witnesses, the badge number
'of any police officers and
where to obtain a copy of the
police report and any other
pertinent information about
the scene, such as exact loca-
tion, the issuance of any tick-
ets by the police, and any rec-
ollections of your vehicle's
handling or mechanical func-
tioning just prior to the acci-
dent.
Carry an emergency kit in


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 26, 2006 PAGE 11
your car, that should mini- wish to offer assistance, pull
mally include; a road flare or your car off the road ahead of
traffic triangle, brightly col- the accident scene.
ored cloth to tie to your radio Do not park in back of the
antenna or driver's side door accident, which will make
handle, a flash light with fully your vehicle vulnerable to on-
charged batteries, a first aid coming traffic and block the
kit with duct tape and a pen view of emergency or police
and paper. When arriving at the scene
Always have a copy of of an accident, first determine
your insurance company ID if there are any injuries. If
card in your glove compart- there are, immediately call for
ment and have with you, your medical assistance.
driver's license and car regis- Unless trained in emergency
tration. medical assistance, do not at-
Assist others. If you tempt to move injured persons
come along an auto accident or perform medical proce-
that you are not a party to and dures yourself.


Housing Vouchers
We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571


BUSINESS

DIRECTORY
D 1^^^^


Portable Toilets
Billy Simmons Septic
850-509-1465 cell
850-997-0877 home
Clean Portables for construction sites,
4 family reunions, parties
Events and Types


DOUG'S TREE &.LAWN
SERVICE


Trimming
Mowing
Removal
Maintenance.


0 Stump Grinding
0 Aerial Device
0 Bush Hogging


997-0039 Lic. & Insured


Register's Mini-Storage

315 Waukeenah Hwy.
(1/4 Mile Off US 19 South)

997-2535


Lawn & Landscaping
r-----------------
Mention This Ad & receive
I A 10% Discount
-11025 East Mahan --- 877-4550
11025 East Mahan ~ 877-4550


B & M Tractor Service R r ary CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC, INC. 'TA Craig
Specializing in Food Plots, Bush Hogging, Realtor Tim a Peary L I A Craig
Liming & Fertilizing, Spraying, and Fencing o.p.... A
; "" 850-997-4340 "Complete Auto Electric Repair Service" Larichiuta
N See all our listings) Lloyd, FL32337
," .. www.TimPeary.com [ ero -
Brad McLeod' c Simplythe Best! *Cta
Cell: (850) 210-2942 Mack McLeod -. .7
Cell: (850) -2 Ce H 0 500346 Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate! Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd. *Sand : ... 997-6788
10534 South Salt Rd, Lamont, FL. 32336 Simply the Best! (on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717 *'bp Soil


Your Local Professional Painters
Interior Exterior
Lic. & Ins. #4676







Septic Tank & Land Clearing
Complete Septic Service & Repair
Lot Preparing & Land Clearing
Thomas B. Scott, Sr.
Rt 1 Box 137
Lamont, FL 32366
ph:997-5536 cell: 933-3620


1-10 CHEVRON
We have received a new delivery of
ladies purses at reasonable prices.

Morgan's Chewing Tobacco
$1.96 pack, $5.55 -3 packs,
$21.42 carton +Tax

Swisher Sweet Buy One Get One

Little Cigars, 5 2 packs

Sweet Cherry or Milds
$6.89 with $2.00 Coupon + Tax
( Limited to supply on hand)
Free crystal lighter with each carton

WE ACCEPT ALL MANUFACTURERS
COUPONS


Residential & Commercial ic.# egc #1507547

YEAGER CONTRACTING CO. INC.
CUSTOM HOMES




PH: 997-2296 CELL: 508-2383


WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!
997-6500
WHEN You NEED To SOLVE COMPUTER PROBLEMS.
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY ONSITE SERVICE
*Diagnosis Repair *Upgrades *Installations *Consultations
'Tutorials *Removal of Viruses, Adware, Spywafe


Appliance Repairs:P H
Washers, Dryers, Stoves, Call for quality work
Refrigerators. 45 Years In The Trade
Owned & Operated by Andy Rudd Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
997-5648 850-997-7467 ~ 850-544-2917
Leave Message *Residential ~ Commercial *Interior ~ Exterior


THURMAN TRACTOR SERVICE
\ MOWING -HARROWING-
Foon PLOTs


DAN BURCH


LIC. & INS. *License

James Thurman, LLC Residenr
850-997-5211 FREEESTI
850-545-0139


.Since 1977
'd *Bonded *Insured


ntial & Commercial
MATES 997-4100

Pmto P11110111151


u WlimThe Decorator's MR. MERCHANT

Warehouse, LLC THIS SPACE

S260 N. COULD BE

Cherry Street YOURS FOR
S* Furnishing & Accessories ONLY $10.00

MONTICELLO'S ONLY LOCAL HEATING & COOLING COMPANY M AT
MR. MERCHANT
STEWART THIS SPACE
HEATING & COOLING INC. THIS SPACE
S ScOTTT BE Keaton Tire Re'-air
Sales ~ Service Installation ~ Change Outs COULD E E "Service Is Our Business on ai, e Road"
Residential Commercial YOURS FOR EDD KEATON 850-997-0903 Shop

Family Owned Office: (850) 342-3294 TRAVIS KEATON 850-264-6871 Cell
Lic. # RA0067121 CELL: (850) 509-2903 ONLY $10.00 Lamont, FL 32336 850-997-5443 Home


r'yrone Davis
Sales Manager


Ultimate

o age Auto

877-7222
A Very large selection to choose from
A All trade-ins are welcome
A Best rates as low as 4.5%
, Free warranty on every vehicle sold


Trade
pushy u'll, or prag
It A v vehicle
everyone"


(000 (P[NiT, W (P[IT,
iT 001[K T IATITP


Cal TYiONE, hrsanif
hape heUliat Aa


I


MINOWN016










PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 26, 2006
v -


ATTENTION

CAPITAL ONE CRDIT CARD HODlERS
\as a secunir depose. Jued ro ou aid
hen you opened a api One Credi
Card account In 2001 or 2002:
CallNOVO for inforniaTrion regrai,/.' e. voter
leg/l *rights.

Toll Free

i-866- 50o 7 5i8

James Kaulinan, Cauley Bowvman
Licensed in Florida (CateUy&-A' IlllamlS
Principal oficc in Litle Rock, Al l iU [I A :,d1 )-, L,.i Rck, AR 72116
The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be
based solely on advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send
you free written information about our qualifications and experience
^. ~ t~v~ tntn~vnri^ itW W l m.- ,.r MW Wc^**** -* --


American Stroke
Association.
A Division of American
Heart Association

Timne Marches On
For people over age 55, the incidence of
stroke more than doubles in each
successive decade.
Stroke Warning Signs:
* Sudden numbness or weakness in
the face, arm, or leg, especially on
one side of the body.
* Sudden confusion or trouble
speaking or understanding.
* Sudden trouble seeing in one or
both eyes.
* Sudden trouble walking, dizziness,
loss of balance or coordination.


* Sudden severe headache
with no known cause.


...
--- --_- _








If It Happens In Our County

You'll Read It In

Your Local Newspaper









Order Your Subscription Today!







In State*...................$45.00



Out Of State.............$52.00







Extensive Coverage of Jefferson County
Every Wednesday & Friday





Mail Your Check To:

Molticello News

P.O. Box 428

Monticello, Florida 32344


LEGAL NOTICE

'1 IF .1' Iii 41'ICIAL
(tINit F" 11I), FOR


W1IiON h11kki ), ushbandland
wie Up No.(00-481 CAS Plainrtiffs,

NI 51, T I NVAlLIEVR, SAM
J 1, 11 II XX W IIAMxXS,


CELIL (also kuown as CELIA
IC'IER), iif alive, and if dead their
unknown spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, judgment creditors, and
all other parties claiming by,
through, under, or against them; the
unknown spouses, heirs, devisees,
gr'antees, and judgment creditors of
MNARGARET WALKER, SAM
JAMES, LIZZIE WILLIAMS,
CELIE (also known as CELIA)
Tucker, deceased, and all unknown
persons if alive, and if dead or not
known to be dead or alive, their
several and respective unknown
spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees,
and judgment creditors, or other
parties claiming by, through, or
under those unknown n natural
persons; and the several and
respective unknown assigns,
successors in interest, trustees, or
any other person claiming by,
through, under, or against any
corporation or other legal entity
named as a defendant; and all
claimants, persons or parties,
natural or corporate, or whose
exact legal status is unknown,
claiming under any of the above
named or described defendants or
parties or claiming to have any
right title, or interest in the
property described in this
complaint, Defendants. NOTICE
OF ACTION To: MARGARET
WALKER, SAM JAMES, LIZZIE
WILLIAMS, CELIE (also known as
CELIA) Tucker, if alive, and if dead
their unknown spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees, judgment
creditors, and all other parties
claiming by, through, under, or
against them; the unknown spouses,
heirs, devisees, grantees, and
judgment creditors of MARGARET
WALKER, SAM JAMES, LIZZIE
WILLIAMS, CELIE (also known as
CELIA) TUCKER, deceased, and
all unknown natural persons if
alive, and if dead or not known to
be dead or alive, their several and
respective unknown spouses, heirs
devisees, grantees, and judgment
creditors, or other parties claiming
by, through, or under those
unknown natural persons; and the
several and respective unknown
assigns, successors in interest,
trustees, or any other person
claiming by, through, under or
against any corporation or other
legal entity named as a defendant;
and all claimants, persons or
parties, natural or corporate, or
whose exact legal status is unknown,
claiming under any of the above
named or described defendants or
parties or claiming to have any
right, title or interest in the
property described in this
complaint, and allege: YOUl ARE
IIEREBY NOTIFIED OF AN
anienided action to quiet and
confirm title of Plaintiffs in and to
lands located in Jefferson County,
Florida. Described below, and to
determine the heirs of SAM
NIJAMES, CELIE a/k/a CELIA


NOTICE OF H1 AIRING ON PROPOSED

ENACTMENT OF CI TY ORDINANCE 2006-06



The City Council of the Citv of Momi'cello proposes to adopt the following entitled
ordinance: AN ORDINANCE OF TH CITY' OF MONTICELLO, FLORIDA,
ANNEXING PROPERTY CONSIST!',:INC OF APPROXIMATELY 273.63 ACRES
LOCATED IN SECTIONS 25 and 36. TO NSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 4 EAST TO
THE CITY OF MONTICE.l0: REDEFINING THE BOUNDARY LINES OF THE
CITY OF MONTICELLO TO INCLUDE SAID PROPERTY; AND PROVIDING FOR
AN EFFECTIVE DATE. This property is furlhr idctitilied on the map below. A
complete metes and bounds description, as i as Ihe entire text of the ordinance may be
inspected at City Hall, 2N5 Soruh Mulberv Screc, Monticello, Florida between the hours
of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., ondav though nd:civ. A public hearing will be held on the
adoption of the ordinance on Tuicsdayuie 6. 6, iat 7:00 p.m. at City Hall.


i Pr A


5'.

I'


45.,
P4'
.~er~e
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~,O' Ac.iitDuD

*31 ~ err -sup, P %R,
I ,cpeeni,,C
U Ws4~~


jrcs k

ir
uQ.aC,

~


scafie'Fa;1
oxCt W-


AT1I' /iLliDRD


NEW PARCEL
8 273.63 ACRES


an6 '16


Monticello


News


'You Cgan't Be Without It'


PAM1
on"PRU

3'. -


HeartStrok,]e
Briefs
For more information, call
1-888-4-STROKE or visit
%rokeAssociation.nro


I poua~~ -~-~rRYP-tr*rr _r


I









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 26, 2006 PAGE 13


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions -Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


[IELP',', -_


TUCKER and LIZZIE
WILLIAMS: South half (Sl/2) of
Lot 11, 50 x 200 feet, as per Deed
Book II, page 250, Scotts Northern
Addition to the Town of Monticello,
Florida. This being the same
property of record in the Trustee of
the I.I. Deed Book 1, page 214,
Official Records of Jefferson
County, Florida and the North
(N1/2) of Lot 11, Scotts Northern
Addition to the Town of Monticello,
Florida. This being the same
property of record conveyed in
Deed Book II, Page 448, Official
Records of Jefferson County. As
described on the Warranty Deed
attached to the original complaint
filed in this cause, recorded in
Official Records Book 361, Page 157
of the public records of Jefferson
County. You are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses to it, if
any, to: Teresa Cooper Ward
Attorney for the Plaintiffs, 245 E.
Washington Qtreet, Monticello, FL
32344, on or before June 15, 2006
and file the original with the Clerk
of this Court, at the Jefferson
County Courthouse, Monticello,
Florida, either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter, or a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Amended
Complaint or Petition. Witness my
hand and Seal of this Court on May
10, 2006. CLERK OF THE
COURT.
5/12, 5/19, 5/26, 6/2/06, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2006-48-PR IN RE: The
Estate of FLORENCE W.
GLOVER, Deceased NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION: The
administration of the estate of
FLORENCE W. GLOVER, File
Number 2006-48-PR, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Jefferson
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is Jefferson
County Courthouse, Room 10,
Monticello, Florida 32344. The
names and address of the
co-personal representatives and the
co-personal representatives'
attorney are set forth below. All
interested persons are required to
file with this Court, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE: (1) all claims against the
estate and (2) any objection by an
interested person to whom this
notice was mailed that challenges
the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative venue, or
jurisdiction of the Court. ALL
CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT
SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED. Publication of this Notice
has begun on the 19th day of May,
2006. JOHN D. CARLSON, ESQ.
Attorney at Law, Florida Bar No.
0117838, 241 East Sixth Avenue,
Tallahassee, Fl 32303, (850)
681-7191; Co-Personal
Representatives: Felix A. Johnson
Jr., Esq. 195 Felix Road, Monticello,
FL 32345, James R. Dukes, Sr., P.O.
Box 268, Hudson, WY 82515
5/19. 5/26/06. c

HELP WANTED
Pine Lake Nursing Home in
Greenville is seeking a
Maintenance Director.
Responsibilities include
maintenance of a small health
care facility with the aid of a


,Zaunch your dreams at Island Town Center in
charming New Smyrna Beach-a mere hours drive
froOr /ando and ., .,. .. attractions.
Enjoy our warmest welcome in person.
Pre-construction prices from the $400's
to the m;id $900's.


Maintenance Assistant. General
knowledge of mechanical,
plumbing and electrical systems
as well as carpentry is needed.'
Call 948-4601 and ask for the
administrator or apply in
person. Resumes can also be
faxed to 948-1702 or e-mailed to
adminpinelake@earthlink.net
5/24, 26, c

Wanted: An enthusiastic high
energy Activity Director for
Pine Lake Nursing Center in
Greenville. Qualified applicants
will have the ability to work
with a very dedicated team of
professionals to insure that our
residents have the highest
quality of life we can provide.
Call 948-4601 and ask for the
administrator or apply in
person. Resumes can also be
faxed to 948-1702 or emailed to
adminpinelake@earthlink.net
5/24, 26, c
Clerical Help for busy
administration office. Please call
Ron Cichon. 997-3568.
tfn
Huddle House Now accepting
applications for Cooks and
Servers. Call 342-3284
5/12,17,19,24,26,31, pd
Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn
The City of Monticello is
accepting applications for the
full time position of Lead
Dispatcher (Midnight). Duties
include answering multiple
phone lines, taking citizen
complaints, using radio to
dispatch officers to calls.
Computer literacy a must, as
well as general office duties.
Must be able to work under
pressure, training is provided.
Salary and benefit information
available upon request. Submit
.application and resume to
Monticello Police Dept. 195 S.
Mulberry St. Monticello, FL
32344, Attn: Paula Pierce by
June 6, 2006 EOE/Drug-Free
Workplace.
5/24, 26, c

BUSINESS '
OPPORTUNITIES'

THOUSANDS OF
BUSINESSES For Sale By
owners Nationwide. Preview
Business For Free! Interested In
Buying Or Selling A Business
Call: GW Merger-
(877)217-8231 Or Visit
www.gwmerger.com



No Credit Checks Just Low
Down Payments on Good Cars
& Trucks. 2 and 4 Door Model
As Low As $750 down
850-536-9111
www.JumpinJims.com Ask for
Mr. Deal
11/2-tfn


IslandTownCenter

Launch Your Dreams
(888) 312-2004
www.islandtowncenter.com


Now Hiring

CNAs Risk Manager

Full-Time or Part-Time
Sign-On Bonuses


CI inical Liaison RN or LPN, Full-Time


Risk Manager RN Only, Full-Time, Mon.-Fi



Marshall Health

& Rehabilitation Center



207 Marshall Drive Perry, Fl. 32347
Drug Free Workplace, Equal Opportunity Employer


Roosters and Laying Chickens
$10 each; Goats, female $100
each. Leave message. 997-0901
5/12,17,19,24,26,31 pd
Mayhaw Berries U-pick $6
gallon We-pick $12 gallon.
Golden Acres Ranch 508-2607,
997-6599.
5/12, 17, 19, 24, 26, pd
GE Dryer Full size, like new,
$150 Call 997-8668.
5/24, 26, pd


Country living 1-bedroom,
1-bathroom, $500.00 Located
between Wacissa and US98,
997-6653
5/5,10,12,17,19,23,26, pd
Beautiful historic 2-story home
to share in Monticello. Private
bed room, office bath. Use of
house, garden and patio. Ideal
for nonsmoking professional
female. $400 month, plus 1/3
utilities. 850-544-2322
5/24, 26, ..,
Prime downtown office space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980.
11/30 tfn,c
Charming Country Cottage.
Perfect for quiet single or
mature couple. 251-0760
5/26, 31, c
Cute and comfy 2 bedroom, I
bath. Walk to library, church,
downtown. $850 251-0760
5/26, 31, c

GARAGE SALE
Saturday. 8 a.m. Until, at Steve
Waker Realty. Household items,
clothing, furniture,
brick-a-brack and more.
Proceeds benefit Will Smith
Missonary Trip.
5/26, pd


would d )ou like to ient an
apartment or office downtown?
Call 997-5517 leave message and
phone number.
5/12, tfn


IIt' Happens In
.lefferson County',
You'll Read It In The
Monticello News


TILE INSTALLATION Jeff
Wilson LLC, 838-5929. Regrout,
tile repair, concrete coating,
grout repair.
5/24, 26, 31, 6/2, pd
Handy Man- pressure washing,
woodworking, painting.
interior/exterior, siding, trim.
and housekeeping. Call Billy @
251-4575
5/5,12,19,26, pd
Painting Professionals Int./Ext.
call Edith or Harvey for free
estimate, prices can't be beat!
342-1330.
5/24, 26, 31, 6/2, 7, 9, 14, 16, c
Have you been taken off your
hormone replacement? See our
new menopausal products.
Jackson's Drug Store
5/12, tfn,c
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy_
Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.-
509-8530, quick responses.
Peters Satellite -- Your Satellite
Dish dealer. We offer
equipment, installation, repair,
parts, and prompt service. We
also offer Go-Karts, utility
trailers and lawn mowers.
Located at: 1150 Old Lloyd
Road, Monticello, Fla.
850-997-3377
1/25, tfn, c
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
NOW AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn


Monticello

News

needs help for busy

administrative office.

Please call Ron

Cichon 997-3568


Professional Realty of Perry
522 South Jefferson Street
Perry, Florida, 32347
850-584-5844 fax 850-584-2584
www.prorealtyofperry.com







Ef m lovment
CONNECTIONS
Work solutions.for you

Looking for a Job?
Employment Connections Staff Members
will be at the Jefferson County Public
Library Lifelong Learning Center
375 Water Street, Monticello, FL 32344
May 31,2006 @ 2:00 p.m. 4:00 p.m.

We will assist job seekers with registration and
job search activities. Applications & local
employers will be available.


* DIGITAL
RECEPTION
SERVICES, INC.


Field Service Techs


Comp proyided truck & tools

Paid train i e~pEgripnce required

Great advance en't portunitie.s

Medical & ent

Paid vacations ,,


Positions throughout Florida
For details and to apply online go to:

www.hrmcacclaim.com/apply/drscareers


SABOR REALESTATE
,n_ MARK VOLLERTSEN
0M3 Realtor .
SALES ASSOCIATE
850-997-1691 OR 850-459-4864
MARKRV7@AOL.COM
"SERVICE You DESERVE / PEOPLE YOU TRUST"
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL INVESTMENT LOTS ~ ACREAGE





'Statistics Show People Remember
85% of what they read
and 15% of what they hear
J


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com

Serious About

Selling? kL

List with me to-

day!

Peary Does It Aqain! Under Contract
Just Listed! 7.8 acres on Whitehouse Road
near Hwy 59 $158,000

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Den-
nis' Trading post only $36,500 per acre

Price Slashed!,2 bedroom 1 bath home
with small fenced yard, family room be-
hind IGA on Bowman Street Now $76,500

Peary Does It Aqain! Under Contract-
Priced to Sell 1993 Fleetwood 3 bedroom 2
bath home on 2.5 acres in Lloyd Acres paved
road frontage $76,500

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly
wooded acres Only $36,500

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big double-
wide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in re-
mote, oaks, pond, north of Greenville only
$329,000

Peary Does It Aqain! Under Contract
Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge Lane
100'x220' in the City $15,500 each

Just Listed! Beautiful Homesite
12. 59 beautiful acres on the Waukeenah
Highway near town, big trees, nice fields,
nice and private, perfect for a nice home
$265,000

Peary Does It Aqain! Under Contract-
Buildinq lots Town on Morris Road call for details
$10,000 to $40,000

Peary Does It Aqain! Under Contract Cox
Road 10 mostly wooded acres just a few miles
North of town $12,000 per acre

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 5 acres under
contract 5 available on the east side of
town high and dry in quiet location with
lots of game, 9 year old planted pines,
profit from both appreciating land and
growing pine Now $9,500 per acre

Home Site close to town on West
Grooverville Road only $14,500

Peary Does It Aqain! Christmas Acres
Sold -3 bedroom 2 bath mobile home on 3 acres
with a big deck, carport and a workshop $96,000

Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
Simply the Best!
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


~ ---






PAGE 14, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 26, 2006


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