<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Main
 Main: Letters
 Main: Lifestyle
 Main: Sports
 Main continued
 Main: Classified
 Main continued














The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00130
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: May 10, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00130
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
    Main: Letters
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
    Main: Sports
        page 9
    Main continued
        page 10
    Main: Classified
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
Full Text


LIBRARY OF FLORIDA HISTORY
404 LIBRARY WEST
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
.il 7k 'r% I CC, T T.7 Vt. S1261 1


iu It, .ru. L '- '


Protectors
ToBe
Honored

Editorial, Page 4


Sponsors Sought
For 4,-H

Campers

Story, Photo, Page 6


Library
Book Sale
Nets $700

Story, Photo, Page 12


Tigers Place
Fifth In
State Track Meet

Story, Page 8


. Wednesday Morning






Monticello


138TH YEAR NO.37, 50 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 10, 200(
. . .. .. ..---I


City In Good Shape Financially


Assets Exceed Debt

By More Than $4M


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Auditors gave the city two-
thumbs up last.week.
"Every thing's in great
shape," Chris Cayre, with
James Moore & Co., P.L.,.told
the City Council on Tuesday
night. "You have a budget sur-
plus, with revenues exceeding
expenditures."
More formally, the written
report from James Moore &
Co. stated that at the end of the
(2005) fiscal year, "the (city) is
able to report positive balances.
in all three categories of net
assets, both for the government
as a whole, as well as for its
separate governmental and
business-type activities."
The audit found that the
city's assets exceeded liabili-
ties by $4,290,637 at the close
of the last fiscal year, which
ran from Oct. 1, 2004, through
Sept. 30, 2005.


For the first time in recol-
lection, the audit found no ma-
terial weaknesses in the city's
internal control over financial
- reporting.
A material weakness is es-
sentially a flaw in the internal
control system that may pre-
vent employees from timely
detecting errors in financial
statements during the perform-
ance of their regular duties.
This has been a consistently
noted weakness in past audits
due to the city's shortage of
personnel, which forces a few
individuals to perform multiple
accounting tasks.
Ideally, a number of differ-
ent individuals should perform
the various financial tasks, to
ensure for accountability and
the timely detection of errors.
"I don't" know wha'"you're
doing, but keep doing it,"
Mayor Julie Conley told City
Clerk and Treasurer Emily An-
derson.
The audit divided the city's


funding accounts into three
categories: governmental, pro-
prietary and fiduciary.
Governmental funds account
for the city's general opera-
tions, as determined by the an-
nual budget.
Proprietary funds, also called


enterprise funds, are business-
type activities that generate in-
come. The city uses enterprise
funds to account for its water
and sewer operations.
Fiduciary funds are used to
account for pension plans,
such as the ones for the police


CHRIS CAYRE, right, with James Moore &
Hayes prior to his presentation of the audit
good financial health. (News Photo)


and the firefighters.
In the area of governmental
activities, the audit found that
the city increased its net assets
by $18,875, which accounted
for 33 percent of the total
growth in net assets.
,The auditors attributed the


Co., P.L., talks with Councilman Brian
report. The audit found the city to be in


increase to a rise in ad-valorem
property tax revenues and a
decrease in overall expendi-.
tures.
At the end of the 2005 fiscal
year, the city's governmental
fund ended with a balance of
$251,532, an increase of
--$85,220 over the previous fis-
cal year.
Of the $251,532 ending bal-
ance, $212,647 constituted an
unreserved fund balance,
which is money the govern-
ment can spend at its discre-
tion.
The auditors attributed the
overall positive situation to in-
creases in state revenues and
the establishment of reserve
funds.
In the area of business-type
activities, the city's net assets
increased by $38,537, account-
ing for 67 percent of the total
growth in net assets.
This increase was attributed
to hikes in the water and sewer
rates, state monies received for
the correction of the inflow/in-
filtration problems at the treat-
ment plant, and the interest
earned on the reserve accounts.
The city had capital assets
(See City's Page 2)


County Does Extremely


Well In Latest Session


City Adopts Impact Fee For

Water; Eyes Sewer Fee Next


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The City Council last week
approved an ordinance estab-
lishing a water system devel-
opment charge for new
structures in the city.
The charge for residential
units is $982, based on the
dwelling being serviced by a
5/8 inch meter.
Commercial and nonresiden-
tial water users will pay a
higher charge, depending on
the size of the meter servicing
the establishment.
The new charges are in-
tended to help the city finance
its future growth. They are
based on an analysis con-
ducted by George & Hutche-
son Engineering Inc. several
months ago.
That report found that "Mon-
ticello is experiencing and will
continue to experience a pe-
riod of rapid growth."
"As the city experiences this


growth, it will need an addi-
tional source of revenue to fi-
nance the capital
improvements that are associ-
ated with the growth," the re-
port stated.


Revenues raised via the wa-
ter system development
charges must be used to fi-
nance projects that are directly
linked to the growth. Existing
(See Impact Page 2)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

City and county officials
aren't celebrating yet (the Gov-
ernor still has to sign the legis-
lation into law), but it appears
that Jefferson County did well
in the legislative session that
concluded Friday.
Extremely well, in fact.
Indications are that the
county will receive $603,331
in. new revenue dollars this
year, along with a guarantee of
a like amount for each of the
next 10 years.
Additionally, the county this
* year is slated to receive:
$350,000 for the court-
house annex project;
$70,000 for the recon-
necting youths project;
$200,000 for the live-


stock arena and horse park;
$400,000 for the Letch-
worth Mounds State Park;
$347,622 for the contin-
ued restoration of the old Jef-
ferson County High School ad-
ministration building;

$600,000 To Be
Recurring For.
Next 10 Years

$1,206,823 for the resur-
facing of CR-149 (the Boston
Highway) from US19 to the
Georgia line;
$2,273,835 for the resur-
facing and widening of CR-
158A (Old Lloyd Road) from
US 90 to SR-59; and,
$7,386,060 for the resur-
facing of US 27 from CR-259
to the Leon County line.


Although local official ap-
preciate all the funding -- and
again, the Governor could still
veto any one of the appropria-
tions -- they especially wel-
come the $603,331, which the
Governor is expected to sign
into law.
The funding, in fact, is an
outgrowth of the Governor's
Rural County Initiative, which
last year the Legislature failed
to pass in the very last mo-
ments of the session.
The money is intended to
help fiscally constrained coun-
ties that are located in Rural
Areas of Critical Economic
Concern or that generate $5
million or .less in property
taxes with one mill (Jefferson
County qualifies on both
counts).
(See Legislative Page 2)


Accident Claims Two

Lives On 1-10 Sunday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

A crash on I-10 Sunday at
the 218 mile marker in Jeffer-
son County, killed two Mon-
roeville, AL. men, and
seriously injured a Tallahas-
see man.
FHP reported that at ap-
proximately 7:50 p.m., Rob-
ert Billings, 42, of
Tallahassee, was driving his
2004 Ford Excursion west in
the westbound lane of I-10,
pulling a horse trailer.
Tony Mcdonald, 23 of


Monroeville and passenger
Jonathan Loyd, 18, also of
Monroeville, were traveling
east in the eastbound lane of
1-10.
Billings lost control of his
vehicle and traveled across
the center median, into the
path of Mcdonald and Loyd,
whose vehicle struck the front
right of Billings' vehicle with
the left front of their vehicle.
The impact caused Billings'
vehicle to overturn, coming to
a final rest on its roof facing
southwest.
Mcdonald and Loyd's vehi-
(See Accident Page 2)


SENATOR AL LAWSON, here with State Representative Will Kendrick, said Friday
that his constituents had reason to celebrate the outcome of the just concluded legis-
lative session. Jefferson County stands to get more than $12 million in state funding
if the governor doesn't veto some of the items. (News Photo)


I
1









PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 10, 2006

-....... ,.


PRIVATE EYE Rick Archer (Jon Taylor) left, faces off with a determined Simon Gut-
terman (Ron Cichon.) Who will flinch first?



'Cafe Noir' Dinner Theatre

Opens Friday At Opera House


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

"Murder at Cafe Noir" mys-
tery dinner theatre opens at the
Opera House 7 p.m. Friday.
The Show continues Satur-
day, and next weekend with a
1 p.m. Sunday matinee.
Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for


the evening shows.
Tickets are $25 for Opera
House members, and $30 for
others.

Matinee tickets are $20.
Reservations are required and
can be made at 997-4242.
The scene is the Island of
Mustique in the Grenadines.
Andre Gauvreau, ladies man,


-"4 I.


all purpose criminal, and
owner of Cafe Noir, had been
found dead.
An American private investi-
gator shows up looking for a
runaway.
The regulars at the Cafe look
at each other with suspicion,
each finding reasons to suspect
the others of murder.
Audience members, as po-
tential sleuths will help solve
the mystery, in this interactive
show.
Directed by George Hook,
the cast includes: Jon Taylor,
as private eye Rick Archer;
Stephanie Meadows-Taylor, as
runaway Sheila Wonderly.
Judi Persons as Madam
Toureau; Lisa Reasoner as
Maria; Bill Hatcher as An-
thony Cairo; Ron Cichon as
Gutterman; and Jack Williams
in an array of parts, including
that of Deputy Inspector Rig-
field.
The Caribbean themed din-
ner will be catered by Carrie
Ann and Company.


Impact Fee Approved For Wate


(Continued From Page 1)
areas, however, may also
benefit from the
improvements.
Projects most commonly fi-
nanced by system development
charges include wells, treat-
ment plants, high service
.pumps and transmission lines.
The city already has identi-
fied several projects that it
plans to undertake in the next
10 years to meet the demands
of growth.


Legislative
(Continued From Page 1)
The legislation supposedly
leaves it to the discretion of
county officials to decide how
the money will be used.
If it's a given that defeat is
an orphan and that victory has
a thousand fathers, expect
many to step forward in the
coming weeks to claim credit
for the various appropriations.
Three groups, however, that
justly deserve credit for their
parts in promoting the interests
of this and other small counties
are the Jefferson County Leg-
islative Committee, the Small
Counties Coalition and the re-
gion's four legislators: Sena-
tors Al Lawson and Nancy
Argenziano, and State Repre-
sentatives Will Kendrick and
Loranne Ausley.
"My constituents have every
reason to celebrate this year's
state budget," Lawson pro-
claimed in a press statement
released immediately after the
conclusion of the session.
Titled "2006-2007 Legisla-
tive Budget for Senate District
6 is a 'Stellar Year'," the re-
lease notes that projects in the
11 counties that make up Law-
son's district represented the
third highest allocation in this
year's $70.3 billion state
budget.


- -


These projects include the
extension of the water system
north on US 19 to the Jeffer-
son County Kennel Club and a
little beyond; connection of an
inter-loop in the Pecan Grove
and Holly Hills subdivision;
and connection of the Rocky
Branch water main loop from
Goldberg to Morris roads.
System development charges
alone will not finance capital
improvement projects in their
entirety, the engineers made
clear. The city will have to in-
cur debt to finance the total
packages. But system develop-
ment charges will go- a long
ways toward minimizing the
amount of the debt the city


will have to take on, the report
stated.
City officials, like their
county counterparts, have been
generally unfamiliar with such
revenue generating tools,
given the lack of development
here previously. But they are
learning quickly.
City officials have already
instructed the engineers to be-
gin another study. This second
study is to determine the
amount the city should impose
for a sewer system develop-
ment charge.
City officials expect the
study will be forthcoming in
the near future.


City's Financial Health


(Continued From Page 1)
totaling $6,187,590 at the end
oi the fiscal year. Capital as-
sets include land, buildings
and systems, improvements,
machinery and equipment, and
park facilities and roads.
The city's outstanding debt at
the end of the fiscal year was
$2,422,599.
The audit projected a rosy fi-
nancial state for the city in the
present fiscal year, based on


Accident
(Continued From Page 1)
cle came to rest on the south
shoulder facing north.

Loyd was pronounced dead
at the scene and Mcdonald
later died from his injuries at
Tallahassee Memorial.
FHP deemed that the crash
was not alcohol related and it
is still under investigation
whether or not the three were
wearing their seat belts.
Eastbound lanes were closed
and traffic backed up for sev-
eral hours.


continued residential growth.
That growth is expected to
come through in-fill develop-
ment and annexations that to
expand the city's tax base.

Besides the expected growth,
the auditors found that the wa-
ter and sewer systems charges
the city is implementing will
provide for future infrastruc-
ture expansions and improve-
ments.


starts June 1
in Monticello, Fla

Websile WWWNFCCEDU
TO REGISTER: l

85I0L 31629


- -l


The Opera


RUANAWAY Sheila Wonderly (Stephanie Meadows-
Taylor) discovers that Rick Archer (Jon Taylor) is pas-
sionate about more than just his job.


Letter Carriers To

Collect Food May 13


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

City and County Letter
Carriers will be conducting
the annual "Stamp Out Hun-
ger Day" food drive Saturday,
May 13.
Again this year, the food
will be donated to the Christ
Episcopal Church food pantry
and the Calvary Baptist
Church food pantry.
Letter carriers are asking
resident to place nonperish-
able food items in or near
their mail boxes before the
letter carrier arrives.
Desirable items include
soup, juice, canned fruit and
vegetables, cereal, rice and
the like, to help needy fami-
lies throughout the commu-
nity.
The carriers will pick up the
food and take it back to the
post office so it can be col-


lated.
Letter Carrier James McDan-
iel said that if residents have
more to donate than will fit in
or near their mail boxes, they
can either drop the items at
the post office or call their lo-
cal post office and arrange-
ments will be made for
workers to pick up the items.
He added that postal work-
ers hope to exceed the 2,070
pounds of nonperishable col-
lected during last year's drive.
Though the food collected
last year didn't total the 2,460
pounds collected in 2004, it
actually totaled more food, a
great deal of dry goods such
as cereals, which weigh less
than canned goods, McDaniel
said.
He concluded, "This worth-
while effort helps the needy,
homeless, sick, elderly and
low income families in the
community.


CASH NOW As seen

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, On T.V.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794.7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


Elwse Stade Ccmpany
presents


AT CAite NelR


Mystery Dinner Theater


Friday and Saturday, May 12, 13, 19 & 20
Uccrs open at :30 p.m., sh w at 7:00 p.m.
$2 .C0 members, $3C.0C others

Sunday, May 21 ~~ Dccrs open at 1:00 p.m.
$20.00 per person
ReservatiCns required. Call 997-4242


NOTICE OF GENERAL ELECTION
I, Sue M. Cobb, Secretary of State of the State of Florida, do hereby give notice that a
GENERAL ELECTION will be held in JEFFERSON County, State of Florida, on the
SEVENTH day of NOVEMBER, A.D., 2006, to fill or retain the following offices:


United States Senator
Representative In Congress: Districts 2 and 4
Governor and Lieutenant Governor
Attorney General
Chief Financial Officer
Commissioner of Agriculture
State Senator: District 6
State Representative: Districts 9 and 10
Supreme Court, Retention of Three Justices
First District Court of Appeal, Retention of Three Judges
Circuit Judge, Second Judicial Circuit: Groups 1, 1 1 and 12
Clerk of the Circuit Court
County Court Judge: Group 1
School Board: Districts 2, 3 and 5
County Commissioner: Districts 2 and 4
Jefferson Soil and Water Conservation District: Groups 1, 2 and 4


IN TestimtonVy W7hereof, I Hereunto
set my hand and affixed the Creat.
Seal of the State of Florida, at
Tallahassee, The Capital, this
Second day of April, A.D., 2006.


< tc Zv tate
Sue M. Cobb
Secretary of State


- I


Hear~trke~refSAmeicanHeat 0








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 10, 2006 PAGE 3


Thomasville Man injured

in Log Truck Crash Here


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

A crash involving a pickup.
truck and log truck resulted in
a Thomasville man sustaining
serious injuries, Thursday
morning.


FHP reports that at ap-
proximately 6:48 a.m., 6/10
of a mile north of Monticello,
Larry J. Bryant, Jr., 43, of
Thomasville, was traveling
west on Boston Highway, in
his 1972 Chevrolet pickup
truck, and came to a stop at
the intersection of US-19.


JCHS Valedictorian To

Matriculate At FSU


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Crystal Brinson is the Vale-
dictorian of Jefferson County
High School Class of 2006.
She is the daughter of Fran-
ces and Lewis Brinson.
Brinson will attend Florida
State University. She remains
undecided about her major,
"but it will probably be some-
thing in the medical field," she
said.
She will live in Tallahassee
and has qualified for a 75 per-
cent Bright Future Scholar-
ship.
While at Jefferson County
High School, Brinson was ac-
tive in the band, on the Aca-


COAL


demic Team, member of
Junior Leadership Group, on
the Yearbook Staff, American
Legion Girls State Representa-
-tive, and member of the Na-
tional Honor Society.
She attributes her academic
success to the encouragement
of her parents, and to instruc-
tors LaGrande Akins and Glo-
ria Norton.
"These teachers know how
to relate to young people," she
said. "They encouraged me
Sand pushed me to do my best."
Her advice to a would be
Valedictorian includes: Don't
procrastinate. Work hard.
Keep priorities straight. Study
hard, and above all ask for
help when necessary.


'Coal' Named
Pet Of Week

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Humane Society has-
named Coal as the adoptable
canine Pet of the Week.
Cole is five months old,
male, and a black lab mix.
He has been neutered and
all vaccinations are up to date.
Shelter caretaker Cheryl
Bautista describes Coal as be-
ing very -playful and:, ex-.
tremely affectionate. .-
SHe is great with other dogs
and children. It is not known
how he is with cats.
To adopt Coal or any of the
other many animals at the
shelter call 342-0244.


A 1996 Mack semi combi-
nation vehicle with a load of
timber, driven by Donnie
Jones, .Jr., 42, of Moultrie,
was traveling south on US-19,
in the left through lane.
Bryant made a left turn onto
US-19 South into the path of
Jones.
Jones then attempted to
steer left to avoid the
collision, and Bryant at-
tempted to make a sudden left
turn into the Pure (S & My"
gas station, located at the cor-
ner of US-19 and Boston
Highway.
Jones' left front struck the
left rear of Bryant's vehicle, in
the northbound through lane
of US-19.
- After the collision, Bryant's
vehicle traveled in a southeast
direction and rotated counter-.
clockwise one and one half
revolutions, into the driveway.
of the Pure gas station.
After Bryant was ejected
from the vehicle, his truck
came to a final rest facing
southeast in the parking area
of the Pure gas station.
Bryant continued traveling
south and came to a final rest
facing south in both north and
southbound left through
lanes, south of where the col-
lision occurred.
Bryant was transported to
Tallahassee Memorial by
county EMS. Jones was not
injured.
FHP reports that Bryant was
not wearing his seat belt.
Jones was wearing his.
The pickup truck sustained
approximately $5,000 in dam-
age, the- semi, approximately
$4,000.


PICKUP driven by Larry J. Bryant, Jr. of Thomasville, sustained $5,000 damage after
pulling into the path of a southbound log truck and suddenly stopped in front of the
semi. (News Photo)


Cox Salutatorian At JCHS

Considers Studying Pharmacy


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Jefferson County High
School Salutatorian is Loran
Cox.
She is the daughter of James
Cox and Lora Cox.
She will attend Florida State
University. Though her major
remains undecided, she is con-
sidering pharmacy, the sci-
ences, or perhaps.International
Business as her career.
Cox plans to live in Talla-
hassee while attending FSU.
While a student at Jefferson
County High School, Cox was
a member of the Key Club,
and president this year, captain
of the varsity volleyball team,


chief editor of the yearbook,
on the academic team, member
of Junior Leadership, Odyssey
of the Mind team, International
- Student Ambassador to Aus-
tralia, and a member of the
Student Council.
She attributes her success to
her mother, who as a single
parent attended FSU to com-
plete her degree, while Cox
was young.
"My mother stressed the im-
portance of education and
taught me I need an education
to better myself. This encour-
Saged me to give 110 percent in
whatever I do."
Cox said her friendship with
Crystal Brinson, valedictorian,
was a give and take relation-
ship as they encouraged each


Week Honors Practicing Nurses


National Nurses Week be-
gan May 6 and continues to
May 12, Florence Nighten-
gale's birthday. '
These permanent dates e-ll
chance p'lnhing for" National;
Nurses week as an established
recongintion event.
National Nurses week be-
gan in 1974 and is designed to
recognize the contributions
that nurses make to the com-
munity.


The City of Monticello


invites you to join us in

celebration of the opening of the

Monticello Bike Trail and to

dedicate the trail in honor of


Mayor: Emeritus Ike Anderson.









The ceremony will take


place:


Thursday,


May 18th, 2006


Sat


9:00 a.m.


in the vicinity of


Chase Street Park.


vanced Practice Registered to expe:
nurses (APRN) can provide 60 their nu
to 80 percent of primary care
services as well or better than Yo
physicians, and at a lesser cost.
49 states and'the District'of
Columbia allow APRNs to M
prescribe medications.
Officials encourage patients



Changing the


ss their appreciation to
rses.


u Can Count
..On The
[onticello
News


other. JCHS 2005 Valedicto-
rian, Shaundala Brown was
also a strong influence on Cox.
Jane Vollertsen, former guid-
ance Counselor at JCHS, "was
a second mother to me.
"She kept me on track, and
encouraged me. As advisor of
the Key Club, she always
ready to share advice."


starts July 11
NFCC Madison, Fla

Webste. WWW NFCC EDU
TO REGISTER: 1


of Prostate Surgery


Introducing

da Vinci

If surgery is required to treat your prostare
cancer you may be a candidate for a ne'.'.,
less invasive approach to radical
prostatectomy called the daVinciT"
Prostatectomy. And Tallahassee Memoria' i tl..
first and only facility in the region to offer
this amazing technological advancement.

For most patients, da Vinci'L
Prostatectomy offers substantially less
pain and a much shorter recovery.
Recent studies suggest that daVinciTM
Prostatectomy may also offer improved
cancer control and a lower incidence of
impotence and urinary incontinence."


Open Prostatectonly Incision


doVinwi Prostatectomy InCisions


daVinci" Prostatectomy is the least invasive method
ofsuwgical prostate cancer treatment. This diagram
illustrates the difference between traditional
prostatectomy incisions, and the significantly
smaller incisions performed by daVinci."


Are you a candidate for the latest treatment option for prostate cancer?
Call us at 850-431-CARE (2273), or visit our web site, www.tmh.org, for more information.


IJL
"-r
Tallahassee Memorial
HealthCare Referenced studies available upon request P/N-DVP03604-10


The innovative daVinci" Prostatectomy leverage the
latest in precision robotics to exponentially increase
surgical accuracy resulting in greatly reduced recovery
periods, and minimized side-effects.


-- -- LI~_- II- -lrr_---~-~-~r7~RPI-rrYPNIIIIC~mF~s~n~~


I









PAGE 4,!MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 10, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

SI# ~LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net

~i~i~ ~ ~ t~:~::::.................................5';';~f~t


Protectors


To Be Honored


- Opinion & Comment


With the annual number of
violent crimes declining by 35
percent since it peaked at four
million in 1993, it is safe to
say we owe a debt of gratitude
to America's more than
870,000 sworn law enforce-
ment officers.
On Monday, May 15th,
Peace Officers Memorial Day,
Americans can show their ap-
,preciation and respect for the
brave men and women who
protect our lives sometimes
at the expense of their own.
Government agencies, busi-
nesses and private citizens
should fly the American flag at
half staff on Monday, May
-15th, Peace Officers Memorial
*Day.
The National Law Enforce-
ment Officers Memorial Fund
(NLEOMF) says this is a spe-
cial tribute honoring the more
than 17,000 American law en-
'forcement officers who have
made the ultimate sacrifice.
In 2006, 466 names will be
added to the walls of the Na-
tional Law Enforcement Offi-
cers Memorial in Washington,
D.C. Of this total, 155 law en-
forcement officers were killed
in 2005, and 311 others died in
prior years.
Approximately every 53
hours a law enforcement offi-
cer is killed in the line of duty.


Since the first recorded law en-
forcement officer death in
1792, more than 17,000 law
enforcement officers have
made the "ultimate sacrifice,"
said Craig W. Floyd, Chairman
and CEO of the NLEOMF.
"Lowering the flags on
Peace Officers Memorial Day
is an appropriate way to show
our respect for those officers
who died in the line of duty
and to remember the family,
friends and colleagues left be-
hind."
The NLEOMF is a nonprofit
organization established to
commemorate the service and
sacrifice of law enforcement
officers and to provide infor-
mation that will help promote
law enforcement safety.
Throughout the year, citizens
can work with NLEOMF in
the following ways to help
keep our law enforcement offi-
cers safe:

Urge law makers to ensure
more officers are issued bullet-
proof vests and similar safety
equipment.
Encourage law enforcement
agencies to offer more driver
training and safer vehicles.
Be careful when passing an
accident or crime scene. There
may be police officers on the
road.


IS 'Dumb' Becoming Norm


A few weeks ago I wrote
aoout our society becoming
coarser and more vulgar and
several readers called or sent
notes to say that, sadly, I was
right on target.
Today I offer another Ci-
chonism and that has to do
with our dumbing down soci-
ety.
Quite frankly, its truly amaz-
ing how dumbness has become
so prevalent these days and I
worry it is becoming accept-
able.
When a high school graduate
applies for a job, sits staring at
the floor and says to the inter-
viewer, "I can't do NUTTIN"
you wonder what happened to
the days when high school
graduates could successfully
enter the workforce.
How about the clerk at one
of the big box stores who
scans a customer's purchases,
picks up the divider, (that the
thing that keeps orders sepa-
rate) and says, "I can't find a
bar code on this."
Not finding the bar code, she
asks the customer, "Do you
know how much this is?"
My own experience at a
pizza place left me wondering


Publisher's

Notebook

Roll (--/,-//
f


L'Roi LCi/u/l


about how dumb we've be-
come.
I ordered a large mushroom
pizza and the clerk said, "one
topping is $11.95 and two top-
pings is $9.95."
"Doesn't that seem a little
strange," I asked? "Nope," she
said.
I then asked who set the
prices and she bellows for the
manager "Hey, Joe, this guy
wants to see you!
Joe came over ready for an
argument and 1 asked him the
same question, "Who sets the
prices?"
He said, "it's in the


computer."
I told him I wanted the
mushroom pizza and I would
pay the $9.95 price and he
could give the second topping
to the next customer.
l-e reluctantly agreed mut-
tering, "I think you're trying' to
pull something on us."
We had a young reporter on
staff years ago who arrived for
work one morning
announcing, "You can't get off
I-10 until you get to an exit."
Several of us stared at her in
disbelief and said nothing.
Then there was the customer
who ordered a half a dozen


chicken nuggets at a fast food
Eatery. The clerk said, "We
don't have a half a dozen, we
have six, nine or 12."
A mother called 911 very
worried because her child had
*, been eating ants. She won-
dered if she should take the
. youngster to the emergency
room.
The dispatcher tells her to
give the child some Benadryl
and she should be okay.
The mother then says, "I just
gave her some ant killer."
The dispatcher shouts, "take
her to the emergency room."
I've had people call me to
complain about a story and
when I asked them if they read
it, they said, "No, not yet."
A bank teller once tried to
convince me that eight and
seven equaled 16. I said add-
ing eight and seven equaled
15.
"That's not what my adding
machine has." says the teller.
"Maybe you hit the wrong
key," I suggested.
She adds the numbers and
gets 15. With some embarrass-
ment she allowed as how she
"was only off one."


From Our Files


TEN YEARS AGO
May 8, 1996
County Commissioners are
keeping their fingers crossed
as they await word from the
federal government on an ap-
plication for a $1.9 million
grant that would allow the
county to upgrade its 911 sys-
tem.
A total of 456 medals were
presented to cadets at the An-
nual Awards Ceremony for the
JROTC unit at Jefferson
County High School last week.
Sandra Sargent Hodgins an-
nounced Monday her intention
to run for Supervisor of Elec-
tions.
Incidents spanning three
days last week kept City Police
on the hop, resulting in 15 ar-
rests.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
May 7, 1986
Predicted sales of cocaine
topped $80 billion dollars,
about one to two percent of the
U.S. Gross National Product in
1983.
Artis Johnson was appointed
interim Assistant Principal of
Howard Middle School Thurs-
day morning.
In the last year the City of
Monticello Police department
has shown a 50.6 percent de-
crease in the annual crime rate,
according to the latest report
released by the Department of
law Enforcement.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
May 6,1976
Melody Thor, a cheerleader
at Jefferson High, rocked her


way to a $100 gift certificate
this weekend in the Badcock
Furniture's Rock-A-Thon.
Mrs. John Kelly was hon-
ored recently at the first an-
nual convention of the Counsel
of Catholic Women when she
was named Lady of Distinction
of Diocese.
A proposal for low cost
housing for the city of Monti-
cello reached the counsel table
again Tuesday night but the
counsel showed little enthusi-
asm for the plan
FORTY YEARS AGO
May 4, 1966
Peggy Wells, head drum ma-
jorette of JCHS band partici-
pated in the twirling contest at
the University of Miami last
Saturday and won first place
medal in Division B.
Walter B. Edwards was
elected Commander of the
American Legion Post. Jesse
Lott, J. Lamar Davis, Marion
D. Walker, Albert Odom, Tom
Braswell and Nepoleon Carrin
are the other officers.
FIFTY YEARS AGO
May, 1956
Mac Ardnt is now employed
in the position of Doorkeeper
in the House of Representa-
tives in the Nation's Capitol.
Cast of the senior class play,
"Spooks and Spasms" was:
Sue Hadsell, Joyce Cooper,
Wilma Freeman, Lucille Sim-
mons, Claude Allen, Henry
Reams, Robert Linton, Lorene
Horner, Loren Reichert, Betti-
lee Bird and Little Dean Dan-
iels.


Animal Rights Goals Ripped


By KATHLEEN
MARQUARDT
Columnist


PeTA gave Pat Buchanan an
award ostensibly because he
saved the life of a turtle. In ac-
tuality, they are using him and
his compassion for animals to
promote their sick and twisted
agenda.
Publicly, animal rights lead-
ers hide their agenda, distract-
ing misguided animal lovers
from their true goals.
Would Pat Buchanan be
proud of receiving an award
from PeTA if he knew their
true goals? One has to know
what PeTA and the Animal
Rights are in order to under-
stand how they are using Mr.
Buchanan for their political
gain.
First, how do animal rightist
feel about animals, human and
nonhuman? Peter Singer, the
"father" of the animal rights
movement, wrote in the pref-


ace of his book, "Animal Lib-
eration" (the bible of the
movement), "We (he and his
wife) were not especially 'in-
terested in' animals. Neither of
us had ever been inordinately
fond of dogs, cats, or horses in
the way many people are. We
didn't 'love' animals." He also
said, "Torturing a human being
is almost always wrong, but it
is not absolutely wrong."
Their crusade is one of a
fight for rights for animals.
But if you stop and think about
affording rights to animals, the
concept is ludicrous. "Rights"
is a concept, and man is the
only species on earth with the
intellect to grasp concepts.
The most important concepts
people think about concern
morality and ethics, questions
of "right and wrong."
Man's unique ability to ask
ethical questions and make
moral choices (rather than be
ruled by instinct) makes us
moral agents.


Rights are the boundaries be-
tween moral agents. In order to
possess rights, we must accept
responsibilities to respect oth-
ers' rights.
We are justified in demand-
ing our rights so long as we do
not violate the rights of an-
other moral agent.
Because animals act instinc-
tively, they cannot even con-
ceive of responsibilities. When
a cat kills a canary, you and I
may be upset, but we also un-
derstand that the nature of
cats is to kill birds.
We recognize that the cat has
committed no moral violation.
The same is true even when a
lion or chimpanzee kills an-
other member of its own spe-
cies.
We understand that nature
has endowed animals with cer-
tain features that sometimes
seem cruel. But, quite
properly, we do not judge ani-
mals on a moral scale.
On the other hand, a person


who torments a cat to death the
way a cat might torment a
mouse deserves our moral
condemnation not because
the cats have rights, but be-
cause people have responsibili-
ties.
Likewise, we insist it is
wrong for people to burn
books, deface a masterpiece,
or desecrate a church not be-
cause these things have rights.
but because people have re-
sponsibilities.
Rights are a serious business.
They are the linchpin of a free
society. Without them, people
would not be able to go about
their business free from arbi-
trary interference by govern-
ment.
Rights offer people freedom
to convince others of different
points of view without having
to resort to violence and the re-
sulting breakdown of civiliza-
tion.

(See Animals Page 5)


Safety On Tap At Parks


Many parents are finding
that with a little bit of care and
planning, fun and safety can
go hand in hand when they
visit a theme park with their
children.
"Parents and guardians can
provide great examples for
children of all ages," said
Charlie Bray, President and
CEO of International Associa-


tion of Amusement Parks and
Attractions (IAAPA).
"As these adults exhibit safe
behavior in a fun way, children
will also find motivation to
practice safe habits at every
theme park, water park, mu-
seum and other attractions they
visit."
Here are some tips on how
families can join the parks and


attractions industry as "part-
ners in safety" from a Web site
called www.ticketforfun.com.
The site offers consumers a
comprehensive online direc-
tory of attractions, amusement
industry news, safety tips and
more:
Upon arriving at the park,
designate a place to meet im-
mediately if anyone gets sepa-


rated from your party. Also,
use the buddy system so no
one in your party is left alone.
Observe all posted rules and
Follow the verbal instructions
given by ride operators or by
li feguards.
Obey the signs. Abide by
listed ages, height, weight and
(See Safety Page 5)


From Our Photo File


I Mi


SEVERAL Jail Committee members met in Oct. 1990, to discuss one of three sites
under consideration for the facility. From left, Herbert Demott, Mordaunt Bishop,
Butler Walker and Sonny Patterson. (News File Photo)


I I I -r I -


--- r -


II I --











Letters...


Citizen Chastises Developer

For Moving Here To Build


Dear Editor:
Hardly an edition of the pa-
per goes by without an article
about local developer Riley
Palmer requesting special
consideration from the City
Commission.
I can't recall a time where
the Commission told him no.
Maybe it is time to question
the City's lack of solid growth
management plan, as we have'
the County's.
I give Mr. Palmer credit for
only building a fourth of the
homes he could have build at
Crooked Creek, although
Mayor Julie Conley wanted
him to build the maximum of
almost 300.
It's all about economic de-
velopment, they say.
What is really ironic is an ar-
ticle about Mr. Palmer and the
Crooked Creek subdivision
that appeared in the Tallahas-
see Democrat, Feb. 5.
Mr. Palmer said he moved to
Monticello because his home-
town of Tallahassee "has
changed so much. This is more
like the town I used to know."
It's not the same, Mr.
Palmer, because it got overde-
veloped. Even a laid off
NASA scientist could figure
that out.
It was my hometown too,
Mr. Palmer. For 52 years it
was my home, and I loved it


for most of those years. Since
you are a developer, maybe
you were part of the cause and
effect of Tallahassee changing
to the point of being unrecog-
nizable from its previous
beauty and charm.
But what concerns me most,
is that you have now come to
develop Monticello and Jeffer-
son County. Where will you
go when you don't recognize it
anymore? I love it here too.
This is the place where my
great grandparents, and grand-
parents lived, worked and
died.
This is the place where my
mother was born and my fa-
ther was raised from a small
boy, the place where my par-
ents got married.
I hope I never hate this place
because it got overdeveloped.
But if you and most of your
colleagues have your way, it
eventually will, because it's all
about capitalizing on one pro-
ject and then planning your
next.
,I laugh and then get angry
when I read developers serial
quotes. They are like boiler
plate statements. "We're ex-
cited. This will be good for the
community. We're here for the
long term. We build only qual-
ity developments."


You weren't in Tallahassee
for the long term, Mr. Palmer,
because you're here now. De-
velopers never talk about the
problems their projects cause,
or the price tag they carry for
extra government services.
Where shall we go next, Mr.
Palmer, when we don't recog-
nize Monticello anymore, be--
cause of you and your devel-
oper colleagues?

I don't have anywhere else to
go where I have any roots. One
of our most influential and
wealthy residents has gotten
into the development and land
speculation business, although
he probably already has more
than enough money to live out
his life comfortably.
But Jefferson County has
just become another item to
add to the investment portfo-
lios, a place where politicians
treat developers like gods.
And it's all a concentric cir-
cle involving dollars, individ-
ual investors, investment
groups, developers and politi-
cians.
A very famous book says it
clearly: "Whoever loves
money never has enough;
whoever loves wealth is never
satisfied with his income.
Wayne Searcy


Dear Editor:
I respect a community with
roots going back 100's of
years and families that have
lived for generations in the
same area.
My material heritage centers
to Virginia and Georgia, mov-
ing over into Alabama around
1849 as hard working cotton
and tobacco farmers.


The whole family worked
the fields. Since my mother
moved up North when she
married, my sister and I were
raised with Southern
traditions, but spoke with a
Yankee accent.
My Aunt Ruth used to tell us
"not to put on airs" just because
we were educated up North.


Safety On Tap At Parks


(Continued From Page 4)
health restrictions. Pay special
attention to experience-level
guidelines for water park rides
as well.
Parents with young children
need'to make sure the ride can
be enjoyed safely and children
understand safe and appropri-
ate ride behavior.
Apply waterproof sunscreen
before leaving home (reapply
throughout the day) and drink
plenty of fluids, avoiding bev-
erages that are heavily sweet-
ened or that have caffeine.
When visiting a water park
make sure nonswimmers and
weak swimmers have a life
vest. Bring your own if you are
unsure of availability and fit.
It is always beneficial to call
the facility or visit their Web
site in advance to familiarize
yourself with their procedures
and regulations.
IAAPA reports that this year a
number of new and innovative
attractions are scheduled to de-
but around the country. Faml-
lies can go to
www.ticketforfun.com 's direc-
tory to connect to some attrac-
tions with online ticketing.or a
reservation system.
Some of the new parks and
attractions include the Falls-
view Indoor Waterpark- an in-
door waterpark in Niagara
Falls, Ontario, Canada, and the
Georgia Aquarium, located in
Atlanta, Georgia.
In addition, the Schlitterbahn
Galveston Island Waterpark -
the world's only "convertible
waterpark" offering indoor and
outdoor experiences in Galve-
ston Island, Texas will also
open this year.

Monticello News
Keeps You
Informed!!
!!


New rides families may want
to put to put on their to do
list include The Voyage at
Holiday World in Santa Claus,
Indiana; Survivor the Ride at
Paramount's Great America in
San Francisco, California; Ex-
pedition Everest at Disney's
Animal Kingdom Orlando,
Florida; and Reese's Xtreme
Cup Challenge at Hersheypark
in Hershey, Pennsylvania.
Some destinations are also
introducing new family-
oriented shows and park areas,
such as the "Believe" Whale
show at Seaworld in Orlando,
Florida, San Antonio, Texas,
and San Diego, California; The
Grand Exposition at Silver
Dollar City in Branson, Mis-
souri; Pirate Shores at Le-
goland in Carlsbad, California;
and Pirates 4-D at Busch Gar-
dens in Tampa.


Su


So you can't always judge a
book by its cover.
When I retired to Florida, it
felt good to be coming home.
What I didn't expect to find
was the developers being the
same kind I faced when Li
served on the Planning Com-
mission in Northern Illinois.
I think it would be clear
when I say the developers are
doing to Florida what the car-
petbaggers did to the South.
And the town fathers are let-
ting them. Has some one for-
gotten history?
Maybe the Planning Com-
mission ought to watch "Gone
With the Wind" one more time
to remind them that there is
growth and then there is
"growth."
Janet Reaves




Animals
(Continued From Page 4)
The animal rights movement
would allow people no more
rights than rats or cockroaches.
The real agenda of this
movement is not to give rights
to animals but to take rights
from people to dictate our
food, clothing, work
recreation, and whether we_
will discover new medications
or die.


ER


...the perfect time for NFCC




New Classes


Start June 26
Summer Term IIIB
NFCC Campus Madison, Fla


REGISTER NOW. CALL TODAY.
North
Fla 850.973.1622

Nl www.nfcc.edu


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 10, 2006 PAGE 5
Y !


When was

the last

time you

made an

investment

,that saved

lives?


LIFE

l SAVER


When you invest in our community
through United VWay, the returns are
enormous-healthier kids, more active
seniors and teens turning their lives
around. ft's a dividend that builds a
strong community.


307 East Seventh Ave. Tallahassee, FL 32303 (904) 414-0844


The Jefferson County Recvclina Proaram


t
accepts


the following items for recycling:

All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jugs, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, cat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles, jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?



Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

.Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
?contents)
r
**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.



Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.


The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.



Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


There Is More Than One

Kind Of Growth Writer Says


c --s ~P I














SA9 V NT'F w rTf I ('i (n i \ JTl'UiN WED, MAY 10. 2006


Lifestyle


Sponsors Sought


For 4-H Campers


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Donors are sought to help
sponsor 4-H students at sum-
mer camp.
Last year 104 youth were
sent to camp thanks to the
generous hearts of sponsors.
This year contributions will
determine how many youth
will be able to attend camp.
The goal is to surpass last
year's numbers.
This year's camp theme is
"If You Know It You Can
Grow It." It will run July 3-7.
The five days four nights
camp will be held at 4-H
Camp Cherry Lake located in
*- "A .


Madison County.
The cost of 4-H Summer
Camp is $129 per child. This
covers all expenses, including
the Wednesday Night Skate
and a T-shirt.
If sponsors cannot send this
full amount, a smaller contri-
bution will be appreciated.
Contributions are due
Monday, May 15. Contribu-
tion is tax deductible.
A thank you letter will be
mailed stating the contributed
amount.
"Do something worthwhile
for our county's youth, and
mail your contribution to the
'Jefferson County 4-H Clubs,"
urges John Lilly Sr., 4-H co-
ordinator.


LARRY HALSEY, extension agent, left, accepts a check
from Dianne Braren, Monticello Garden Club President.
The club is sponsoring two 4-H members to attend
Cherry Lake 4-H camp.




Sorority Celebrates

Founder's Day


Francis On

Dean's List
City resident Shanomia M.
Francis was recently named
to the Dean's List at Keiser
College.
She is majoring in Criminal
Justice.
She is the daughter of Bar-
bara Gamble of Monticello
and Samuel Francis of
Macon, GA, and a 1998
graduate of Jefferson County
High School.
'Francis is also a 2005
graduate of Keiser College,
when she received her Asso-
ciate of Arts in Criminal Jus-
tice.
She is a member of Greater
Fellowship Missionary Bap-


tist Church, where Dr. Melvin
Roberts serves as pastor.


FRANCIS


BILL AND NORMA PINE


Bill Pines To Celebrate

56th Wedding Anniversary


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Norma and Bill Pine of-
Monticello will celebrate their
56th wedding anniversary Fri-
day.
Norma Pine is the daughter
of Dale Sparks and Lila
Sparks-Kaelber, and Bill Pine
is the son of the late Taylor
and Cora Pine, all of Ohio.
The Pines were born and
raised in Ohio, marrying in
Prospect, Ohio.
In 1968, they and son,
Randy (Pine) and daughter,
Annie (Fields) moved to
south California, and in 1989,
Bill retired from Luardian'
Glass and Norma retired from
Pacific Telephone Company.
The Pines movedto Monti-
cello in 1995.
They have seven grandchil-
dren and eight great-
grandchildren.
They will celebrate the oc-
casion with immediate family
members.

Red Hats Must
Reserve Now
For Meeting
The Red Hat ladies are re-
quested to reserve now with
Minnie Stokely for the May
meeting.
The ladies will meet at the
Three Sisters Restaurant
11:30 a.m. Saturday for a
Mother's Day program.
Stokley requests those plan-
ning to attend to bring a pic-
ture and a story of their
mother to share.
Stokley will host the meet-
ing and may be contacted at
997-5607.

JCHS Awards
Night Thursday
Jefferson County High
School invites the community
to attend Awards Night, 7 p.m.
Thursday in the JCHS Audito-
rium on Tiger Lane.
Class of 2006 Valendictorian
and Salutatorian will be intro-
duced, along with honor
graduates.
Scholarships and awards
will be presented at the event.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Xi Lambda Upsilon of Beta
Sigma Phi celebrated Foun-
der's Day on Tuesday; April
25 at Georgio's, a restaurant
in Tallahassee.
President Connie Boland
gave her State of the Union
Address and a review of the
past year.
She followed by offering
gifts to each of her Executive
Board members, and Commit-
tee Chairmen in appreciation
for a "job well done this past
year," she said.
Mary Ann Van Kleunen and
Ann Coxetter each received-
the Golden Circle pin, for 50


HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY!





*Carving station with Filet Mignon
Pork Tenderloin, Omelet station, Pasta Bar, Salads,
fruits, Dessert Table
2415 N. Monroe Street
*Tallahassee Mall*
RESERVATIONS ACCEPTED
(850) 386-1515
Sunday Thursday 11am to 2am
Friday & Saturday ilam to 4 am


SINCE 1934


years of membership in Beta
Sigma Phi.
She then presented each
member with a gift, a.token of
their support and friendship.
Boland was then presented
with an 'outgoing president'
gift from the membership.
Attending the meeting were
Connie Boland, Cindy
Chancy, Ann Coxetter, Linda
Demott, Jean Folsom, Elinor
Garner, Mary Frances Gram-
ling, Katrina Guerry, Carolyn
Hayse, Alice Sander, Mary
'Ann Van Kleunen, Emily
Walker, Velinda Williams,


Moms Like
Massages
cGift Certi6fcate4'



JOYFUL,

MIND
Intergrated
Therapeutic Massage
Pa SmII ea lI ID
I.M IT.I N iII



-E0-2268
32 onKnxRa


ALL ONE, L


Introducing a New. Line of Gin Baskets...
* SUNDAY MORNING BREAKFAST
SPRING GARDENING BASKET
SPA BASKET
MEANS GRILLING BASKET
GET WELL SOON BASKET
ICE CREAM PARTY BASKET
I FEED THE BIRDS BASKET
NUTS ABOUT YOU!


S190 E Dogwood Street Monticello 850.997 2015 www.qellngsflowers.com



Big Bend Hospice Salutes Our
--- ,. .I l i -.. .. .
Cari iad Compassionate Nu



-,: Thank You To Our 136 Nurses For Guiding
Patients And Families On Life's F..I J-purney.
-.. .


National Nurses Week is May 7-13
(850) 997-2827 or toll free 24 hours a day (800) 772-5862
205 N. Mulberry St., Monticello


inAuut f-17 1tiedt n ylf.Pol a et


myrecu.Thy rye, av lod n


A.L. Hall Funeral Directors, Inc.


^ 'i i;UWa'v rfLeuraI 9(Onme/
'. 620 York St., P.O. Box 425, .
., ,' Monticello, FL. 32344
850r997-5553

Alfonza "Al"' Hall ~ William Tillman Vangie Scott
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Where Everybody Gets A Di$count!!
Funeral Financing, Gravesite Restoration, Headstone/Cornerstone
Installation-Financing 72 Hour Return on most Insurance Proceeds Per-
sonalized Services Including Monogrammed Caskets



















Jackz4' D S tO4

"Where Pharmacy is Phamily"
Home Health Care *Free Blood Pressure
Gifts *Counseling on Medication
Free Delivery for Prescriptions
166 East Dogwood Monticello 997-3553




WVoodmont

By Encore Senior Living
Tallahassee's Original Assisted Living Community
Assisted Living ~ Respite & Adult Day Service
850-562-4123 x3207 ~ North Monroe St.
Lic. #99 www.encorsel.com



193 NW US HWY. 221 GREENVILLE, FL. (850) 948-2840
If you are uninsured, you may
qualify for-our sliding fee program:
Serving Madison, Jefferson & Taylor
Counties since 1984
We accept Medicare, Medicaid &
most insurance plans
Open Mon. Fri. 8-5 walkins welcome, 24hr telephone coverage
North Florida Medical Centers, Inc.



$0 Plan Premium Medicare Advantage Plan Now
Available For Jefferson County Residents
Expands Coverage Over and Beyond Original Medicare
Freedom To See Any Doctor or Hospital that
Accepts Medicare
Call 1-800-561-6490 For More Information
Medicare Plan Finders


PAGE 6O, MONTIC ILUU, V V U),I IMW,3,r vv r-, ly A --





MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 10, 2006 PAGE 7


t
From This







M o m enotn-1mmun15p



HOUSE OF 10,000 Rehearsal Dinners We Do Parties
PICTURE FRAMES Showers T arotsPalm Reading
Jo Call in for 2 freequestions!
2003 N. Monliroe St. Luncheons She can help you with
i ,Tallahassee, FL 850-385-7275 Scess Mobnye Rlatbonships
Mon-Fri IOamr-8prm Sun 1-5pm





S IONS INC 9
Cuto Designs & Alterations

'1311H West Jackson Stieet*Thomasville, GA 31792
S "Phoe6: (229) 226-9566 EMAIL: info@nilersfashions.com GO O DM AN 'SS




pRIBS --CHICKEN -BEEF
..- 01"(J

49BYRONBUTLOF PERRY INC. 'SO H.






V Ella Mae Parrish
1886 Hot Rd. -erry, FLCC -
5850-584-7653
Weddi-gs Banquets Reunions & More!









7 ,



Lisa Doxsee
Owner/Bartender
S.850.321.7398
w --isabarrener com








V V

V V
V ,,, V


V goldenn Eagle Country Club combines gracious Southernl'
V hospitality, excellent service, & fine food for those expecting
v the best. Overlooking beautiful Lake Diane, we're the number ,
one location for your wedding reception. For more information
y contact Michelle Lawlev (850) 893-7700 or visit our wvebsite,
www.goldeneaglecc.org
V 3700 Golden Eagle Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 850-893-7700
V V
V ,





PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 10, 2006





SWE SALUTE AND HONOR


ALL OUR LA W


ENFORCEMENT


I


I


I


I


OFFICERS


DURING LAW ENFORCEMENT

MEMORIAL WEEK MAY 8 MAY 14

WITH MUCH THANKS AND

APPRECIA TION!


NORTH FLORIDA
9 ABSTRACT & TITLE CO.
850-997-2670
220 S. Cherry St. Monticello
john@northfloridaabstract.com


REGISTER 'S
MINI-STORAGE
997-2535
271 WAUKEENAH HWy.
MONTICELLO


SPHILIP SHEATS
FRAMING
Cusatom Homes

545-8493 INSURED IC. #CGC1505570

FARMERS
&
MERCHANTS BANK

S Member F.D.I.C.
200 E. WASHINGTON ST. MONTICELLO 997-2591
MONTICELLO'S ONLY FULL SERVICE HARDWARE
EDENFIELD 7/c &e HARDWARE
"WE ARE JUSTAROUND TIHE CORNER."
155 N. JEFFERSON ST.
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA 32344
Mark & Trisha Wirick
(850) 997-2144 fax: (850) 997-4624

Jefferson County High School
Salutes the Jefferson County
Sheriffs Department
&
Monticello Police Dept.
GO TIGERS!!

SMORRIS
PETROLEUM INC.

997-2222
735 E. WASHINGTON ST.
MONTICELLO, FL 32344


Dave's Towing
342-1480
Hwy 90 Monticello, Fl
We Salute Our Law Enforcement Officers!


WENDY'S EXXON TRAVEL CENTER


SE(ON
US 19 South (just past 1-10) 997-9628
SALUTINGALL ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS




1317 S. )EFFERSON ST.
MONTICELLO, FL. 32344
342-3201


ROBERTR. PLANES
COUNTY JUDGE



STEWART HEATING & COOLING INC.
SALES SERVICE INSTALLATION CHANGE OUITS
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL 24 HOUR SERVICE


STEWART DALZELL IV
PO BOX 13797
Tallahassee, FL 32317
Office (850) 514-341 !
Cell (850) 509-0306


540 Valley View Tr.
Monticello, FL 32344
Olfice: (850) 342-3294
Lic. # RA067121


A HEART FILL 'i ii I Ah' 365 DAYSA YEAR FROM
LEIGH AND STEWARTDALZELL


1480 W. Washington St. 997-5622


VMS

1455 N JEFFERSON ST.
MONTICELLO, FL 32344
PHONE: 997-5000, FAX: (850) 997-5002
FOR ROUTINE MAINTENANCE CALL: 888-407-9450

Thank you to all law enforcementfor a job well done!



a Do Racing
Monticello, Fla.
(850) 997-2561
Jefferson County Kennel Club

Mitchell L. McElroy
Private Forester, Inc.
Reforestation Forest Chemical Applications ~
Timber Appraisals ~ Timber Sales Wildlife
Management Multi-Use Management
Office: (850) 997-4103 Cell: (850)545-3453
PO Box 945, Monticello, FL 32345
www.privateforester.com
mlmpfi@earthlink.net

ELECT
Bob (TST) Harms, Dem.
U.S. Congress
District 4
Campaign Headquarters (904) 305-6366
www.harimsforcongress.comn
Pcl. 'ol, \1\.. )by Boli)b H aris am i
Approvecl by Bo1 Harils






































FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Recreation Park Director-
Kevin Aman reports the lat-
est scores in spring sports at
the park.
In T-ball, Capital City Bank
downed Jefferson Builders
Mart, 21-12; Bishop Farms
defeated Rotary, 17-11; The
Bankers beat Rotary, 22-16;
and the Builders downed the
Farmers, 28-11.
In Coach-Pitch action,
Chicken Delite inched by Hi-
ram Masonic Lodge 17-16;
State Farm Insurance
squeaked by Kiwanis, 13-12;


State Farm Insurance
squeaked by Hiram Masonic
Lodge, 13-12; C & F Fencing
downed Kiwanis, 23-4; and
the Fencers defeated Chicken
Delite, 16-8.
In Cal Ripken action, Farm-
ers and Merchant's Bank
blanked Jefferson Farmers
Market, 5-0; Williams Timber
fell Monticello Milling, 14-3;
Jefferson Farmers Market
inched by the .Millers, 6-5;
and Williams Timber eased
by the Bankers, 5-4.
In softball action, Joyner's
Travel Center downed Jack-
son's Drug Store, 17-5 and
12-3.


HMS Begns Spring

Football Practice


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Approximately 18 athletes
began spring football practice
at Howard -Middle- School,
Monday.
e Coach Willie Saffo said he
.expected the team would
build to about 25 players by
the final day of practice, next
Thursday.
"We meet Monday through
Thursday from 3-5 p.m.," said
Saffo. "And the boys are
looking good already."
He added that the majority
of the squad is returning for
the upcoming season, and he
is looking forward to having a
very successful season.

"We've joined, a conference
this year too," said Saffo. "So
there will be a championship
game and we're looking to
come out as champs. We
plan to be on top."


This is the first year in re-
cent' memory that the Bees
have entered a football con-
ference.
He added that the Bees had a
very good year last year, 5-3,
and are already beginning to
look better.
'We would have been unde-
feated last year if our luck
hadn't began to run bad," said.
Saffo. "They were all high-
scoring games, with the sec-
ond string often playing. I
can honestly say that all play-
ers played during every
game."
Saffo said the Bees number
one focus is discipline, aca-
demic and basic football fun-
damentals, including con-
ditioning and, strength
training, offensive and defen-
sive drills, and agility.
Saffo is assisted on the field
by coaches Charles Washing-
ton and Corbin Huggins.
"They did an awesome job
last year and I'm very proud
of them also," concluded
Saffo.


Sports
* m o


Tiger Football Team

Readies For Classic


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County High
School began spring football
practice last week, and in one
week's time, Coach Harry Ja-
cobs said the Tigers are look-
ing very good.


"On average, we're looking
better than we did last year,"
sad Jacobs. "The entire team,
quarterbacks, running backs
offensive and defensive lines,
will be returning, and with
more experience than they
had last year at this time."
On a daily basis, anywhere
from 22-30 Tigers congregate


on the practice field,, where
they work on new defensive
and offensive objectives, con-
ditioning, agility, and in the
weight room.
Practice will continue
throughout this week and
Monday and Tuesday of next
week.

The Spring Classic will be
hosted 6 p.m., May 17, here
and feature Jefferson, Perry,
FAMU, and NFC teams in the-
scrimmages.
"We're basically in good
shape," said Jacobs., "We
should win a lot more games
this year, possibly even state.",


JCHS Plans

Sports

Banquet

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County High
School will be conducting the
annual sports banquet 6 p.m
Tuesday, May 16 in the JCHS
cafeteria.
Athletes and their parents
will eat free and others will be
charged $5 each.
The tentative menu will, be
forthcoming.
Following the meal, athletic
awards for all sports will be
presented.
In related news, the Tigers
will be hosting the annual
Spring Jamboree football
scrimmage, 6 p.m., May 17 at
the old high school.
Teams playing in the
scrimmage games will include
Jefferson, Taylor County,
Florida High and FAMU.
Admission is $5 per person.


HMS Athletic
Banquet Set
Howard Middle School will
be conducting the annual
Academic and Athletic.
Awards Banquet and cere-
mony 6 p.m. Friday, May 19
in the cafetorium.
The tentative.menu for the
evening will include- baked
chicken, green beans, mashed
potatoes, roll, iced tea, and
pineapple-upside-down cake.
Athletes are allowed two
free guests each.
The academic awards and
athletic awards will be pre-
sented following the banquet.


e States


NI-il,-.


LINDSEY DAY plays third
base during this ACA prac-.
tice session. (News Photo)


A's Team

Rained Out

Sunday

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello A's baseball
team remains 1-3 on the sea-
son, after the game slated
against Ichuaway was rained
out, Sunday.
"The-only way we could
have played would have been
if we had boats, rubber balls,
and swim fins," said Coach
Jim Norton.
"That was the first time
since 1979 that a game hosted
in Wacissa was rained out.
-"Usually, we can wait about
30 minutes, rake and toss
some dirt over the field, and
we're good to go, but not on
Sunday," Norton added.
I The game was scheduled as
a.double-header wheh the A's
'face off against: lchul a,, a, 3
p.m., June 18, there.
The A's are slated to play
against Camilla, 3 p.m., Sun-
day, there.

CHECK YOUR
HOT SPOTS!



e' Remember,,.
Keep blankets,
clothing, curtains, furni-
ture and anything that
could catch fire at least
three feet away from
portable heaters.
For free fire safety tips,
write: Fire Safety, P.O. Box
34386, Washington, DC
90043


SAFE
Al S
~i~4lt MUM


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 10, 2006 PAGE 9


I Tigers Finish Fifth in

I State Competition


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Four Jefferson County High
School boy's track and field
team members traveled to the
State Championship in Jack-
sonville, and finished in fifth
place.
SAs a team, the Tigers scored
a total of 39.0 points.
"We didn't compete in
enough events to take the
win," said Coach Harry Ja-
cobs.. "We just didn't have the
numbers"
Jon Dady took first place
wins in two events, and a


third place finish in another.
He took first place in the
high hurdles with 14.9 sec-
onds and third place in the
300 hurdles with 39.9
seconds.
Lucius Wade took fourth
place in the 200 meters with
22.8 seconds.
Daryl Young finished
eighth in the long jump with
20' 8".
Tremaine Parker cinched
seventh in the high hurdles
with 15.7 seconds.
Dady, Wade, Young and
Parker took the first place win
in the 4 x 100 with 42.8 sec-
onds.


l$179ts


Sunday'Brunch .'Buffet
1oam -.4pmn.
'Honey 'lam greek Stylie Chicken
qloast'Beef Carving stationn
'Parmeslan 'Encrusted'Talapla Candied Yl'atl
Mahed'Potatoes Scalloped Potatoes
,'f roccoli with 1olapijRaIse
Grcen Salad Bar assorted 'Pies and Cakes
RESERIATIOAS SUGGESTED FOR PARTIES OF 6 OR MORE -~
A Tallahassee Tradition for Over 26 P ears. Est. 1978
-- .- ...- ^-." -,<*-..-. i. AVW P^1^ I.-J %On.rr.n in tilaf"V.Tvrrt


BORDER 2 BORDER


SPRING IS HERE AND SO

ARE THE FLOWERS!

COME IN AND SEE WHAT'S

BLOOMING


CHECK O UT THESE

SPECIALS JUST IN TIME

FOR

MOTHER'S DAY


LOROPETALUM

$9.99

HYDRANGAES

$9.99

KNOCK OUT ROSES

$13.99

7 GALLON LIGUSTRUM

$24.99


AND OF COURSE WE HA VE ALL TYPES
OF BEDDING PLANTS AND FLOWERS


1105 as Mha


Director Tells Spring

Sports Scores At Park


SFClub TNESS
SflubR 0 i CENTERS
W r' ( A C* T I V E A. 1) U L T S
Where itun ord ffi ?e s? corres t ogether.


? -_---









PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 10, 2006


American Stroke
Association.
A Division of American
Heart Association .

Tfme Mreas On
For people over age 55, the incidence of
stroke more than doubles in each
successive decade.
Stroke Warning Signs:
* Sudden numbness or weakness in
the face, arm, or leg, especially on
one side of the body.
* Sudden confusion or trouble
speaking or understanding.
* Sudden trouble seeing in one or
both eyes.
* Sudden trouble walking, dizziness,
loss of balance or coordination.
* Sudden severe headache
with no known cause. I


18 --T K ovs
Strkessoi0io.or


Monticello

News


Get Your

Annual

Subscription

Today!


In State:


$45.00


Out of


State:


$52.00


'You Can't Be
Without It'


Hoot
(PG)
Fri. 5:15 7:20 9:30 Sat. 12:45 -
3:00 5:15 7:20 9:30 Sun.
12:45 3:00 5:15 7:20 Mon. -
Thurs. 5:15 7:20


PLAN YOUR
ESCAPE,
A Fire Can Happen to
Anyone at Anytime...

0So plan and
practice an
escape route.
For free fire safety tips,
write:
Fire Safety
P.O. Box 34386
Washingtorr, DC 20043

KSAE


I A






SENTINEL
(PG13)
Fri. 4:00 9:50- Sat. -
4:15 9:50 Sun. 4:15 Mon. Thurs.
4:1

STICK IT
(PG13)
Fri. 4:00- 7:35 9:55 Sat. 1:00 -
4:00- 7:35- 9:55 Sun.- 1:00 -
4:00 7:35 Mon Thurs. 4:00 -
7:35

SCARY MOVIE 4 (PG13)
Fri. 5:35 7:50 10:05 Sat.
1:05 3:20 5:35 -7:50 10:05
Sun. 1:05 3:20 5:35 7:50
Mon. Thurs 5:35 7:50

AKEELAH & THE
BEE (PG)
Fri. 4:10- 7:10 9:35 Sat.- 1:25-
4:10- 7:10 -9:35 Sun. 1:25 -4:10
-7:10 Mon. Thurs. 4:10 7:10
NO PASSES

ICE AGE 2 (PG)
Fri. 7:30 Sat. 1:30 -7:30 Sun.
1:30 7:30 Mon. Thtrs 7:30

RV (PG)
Fri. 4:25 7:25 9:40 Sat. 1:10
- 4:25 7:25 9:40 Sun 1:10 -
4:25 7:25 Mon. Thurs. 4:25
-7:25
NO PASSES

Mission Impossible 3
-. ( -PG 13) '
Fri. 4:30- 7:15 -10:00 Sat 1:15
-4:30 -7:15 10:00 Sun. 1:15 -
4:30 -7:15 Mon.-Thurs 4:30 -
7:15
NO PASSES


The Jefferson county Planning
Commission subcommittee will meet
to discuss subdivisions on May 15,
2006 at 7:00 p.m. at the Monticello
Chamber of Commerce, 420 W.
Washington Street, Monticello, Fl
32344. The meeting may be
continued as necessary. From the
Florida "Government in the
Sunshine Manual", page 36,
paragraph c: Each board,
commission, or agency of this state
or of any political subdivision
thereof shall include in the notice of
any meeting or hearing, if notice of
meeting or hearing is required, of
such board, commission, or agency,
conspicuously on such notice, the
advice that, if a person decides to
appeal any decision made by the
board, agency, or commission with
respect to any matter considered at
such meeting or.hearing, he or she
may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings, is made,
which record includes testimony
and evidence upon which the appeal
is based, for information contact the
Jefferson County Planning
Department at 445 West Palmer


15370 US Hwy. *Thomasville, GA *229-226-5870

ALL YOU CAN EAT STEAK

& SHRIMP

$8.99

Come Celebrate Mom's

Special Day at Ryan's

Where The Folks Are

Friendly


Losing a Loved One to Drugs orAlcohol?
t te hare at the answer!-
Monti r 'cello Nwcc s Rare
S3.6 Monath P.Re ,inti l Program
S ceinc Pr,.%t Lu.e L xSeLLng
Sauna Dev.. lo Remoe Drug Residue; and Elarunat
Phy,,.Cal C a-.igi,
Lfe Sialli Training Piepare( Srudenu for Long Term Success
e.:,tProtganr, cotb -RelerAl Net,,.r
Start Living Life Again,
11 N-.4RCONON STONE HA W'K
1-800-998-0989 NnI.nc, 110
wa narcononstoneha% k. com ,



Catch it here at the

Monticello News -


Mill Road, Monticello, FL, 32344,
telephone 850-342-0223
5/10/06, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA. IN RE: The Estate of
CARLTON LAMAR VINSON,
Deceased. CASE NO. 06-49-PR
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the Estate of
CARLTON LAMAR VINSON,
Deceased, is pending in the Circuit
Court of Jefferson County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is Jefferson County
Courthouse, Monticello, Florida-
32344. The names and addresses of
the personal representative and the
personal representatives' attorney
are set forth below. ALL
INTERESTED PERSONS ARE
NOTIFIED THAT:All persons on
whom this notice is served who have
objections that challenge the
validity of the will, the qualifications
of the personal representative,
venue, or jurisdiction of this court
are required to file their objections
with this Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM. All creditors of the
decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom a copy oi
this notice is served within THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM. All other creditors of


.............................. ....... ....... ......................................#.


AFFORDABLE


SHO USING !!



AFFORDABLE HOUSING








IT'S NEVER BEEN EASIER'
CALL TODAY FOR YOUR BUYING POWER
GENA ORJEFF 575-9165

TALLAHASSEE HOUSING CENTER
2520 WEST TENNESSEE STREET
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA


'r~ r' 6

I I
i .-


"~~ "~,,-



.' ,.


< ---Se ... .ble W s, I. Homes Fr m



C ,... ."
.. .. > .-. :. < ,;-. v .- ..
' i ". 1 *. . *'2 : ... .. ,.1.


Declare Your
Independence with

FREEDOM ED
re.- r..-f a .. e. s..u //L E,.. :^. i^


Call now for
FREE*
Diabetic Supplies
, Delivered to
lour Door at No Cost!

888-722-7556
Paid lidbl ,lr.ditcaid


100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS OUR GOAL
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Body & Point Work Frame Straightening


WE TAKE THE
DCNTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


1630 E. JACKSON ST.
tLincated behind Lanadale Auto M


Business




Directory


BURNETTE PLUMBING& R s e s CARROLL HILL AUTo,ELECTRIC, INC. Northside Mower and
S WELL SERVICE egi s r "Complete Auto Electric Repair Service" Small Engine Repair
SFamily Owned Since 1902 Mini-Storage .. For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Plumbing Repairs Wells Drilled ~ Fixtures-Faucets ~ Pumps rSnapper, Murray & More, Warranty,
Replaced Sewer & Water Connections Tanks Replaced- 315 Waukeenah Hwy. Repairs for all makes & models.
Water Heater Repairs- ~All Repairs 1/4 Mile off US 19 South ..-Pickup & Delivery Service Available
SThomasville Road 115 Albany Rd.
997-2535 (on Cot11 229226-0717 562-2962
(on Carroll yinMP) 229-.226-0717


CUMMNG 'S APPLIANCES 'LEE FULLER ~ OWNER MONTICELLO'S ONLYLOCAL HEATING & COOLING COMPANY

Mr MORRIS FULLER PAINTING LL C STEWART
850-997-7468 HEATING & COOLING INC.

850-997-5132 Office (850) 671-2286 Sales Service Installation Change Outs

90 DAY WARRANTY ONALL APPLIANCES Cell (850) 284-6134 Residential Commercial
CHRISTOPHER CUMMINGS OWNER I, a 8366 Guerry Lane, Talldhassee, FL 32317 Family Owned a Office: (850) 342-3294
Lic. & Insured Lic. # RA0067121 CELL: (850) 509-2903


Please do not encourage
Florida's wildlifeto do
things that are not
natural. Help keep
our wildlife safe.


all) '


--


r- -- --------


f.
1
I


\LYI---- _I









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 10, 2006 PAGE 11


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions Wednesday and Friday...$7.00
Each Additional Line....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LEGALS

the decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the
decenden't estate must file their
claims with this Court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THIS NOTICE. ALL
CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is Wed., May 3, 2006.
Dated this 26 day of April, 2006.
Brian T. Hayes FL. Bar I.D.
#0034687, P.O. Box 1275,
Monticello, FL 32345, 850-997-2065
Attorney for Personal
Representative, JASON VINSON.
JASON VINSON, as Personal
Representative Of Estate of
CARLTON LAMAR VINSON
Deceased.
5/3, 5/10, 5/17, 5/24/06
NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING:
The District Board of Trustees of
North Florida Community College
will hold its regular monthly
meeting Tuesday, May 16, 2006 at
5:30 p.m. in the NFCC Student
Center Lakeside Room, NFCC, 325
NW Turner Davis Dr., Madison, Fl.
A copy of the agenda may be
obtained by writing: NFCC, Office
of the President, 325 NW Turner
Davis Dr., Madison, FL 32340. For
disability-related accommodations,
contact the NFCC Office of College
Advancement 850-973-1653.
NFCC is an equal access. equal
opportunity employer.
5/10/06, c

HELP WANTED
MAINTENANCE- PT, 36 unit
apt. Complex. Resume/Apply to
Heritage Manor, 1800 East
Texas Hill Road, Monticello,
FL. 32344 Fax: 850-997-7288
Phone: 850-997-4727
5/10, c
Jefferson County Board of
County Commissioners is
seeking applicants for part time
Mosquito Control Specialist
positions. Job description and
applications may be obtained at
the Jefferson County Health
Department Annex Building
located at 1175 W. Washington
Street, Monticello, Florida.
ESSENTIAL JOB
FUNCTIONS: 1 position will
require driving a, mosquito
truck and spraying in the
county, perform complaint
investigations, conducting
community surveys, perform
manual tasks as assigned, such
as cleanup and securing
facilities, vehicles and
maintenance of storage facility.
Hours of work to be assigned by
Supervisor weekly basis.
ESSENTIAL JOB
FUNCTIONS: 2 positions will
bleed chickens at 4 sites in
Jefferson and Madison counties
as required by our sentinel
chicken surveillance program.
Drop off chicken feed at sites as
needed. Spin blood, label and



Hov. TO KEEP
YOUR KIDS

FREE OF DRUGS.



Rule


#7.


Educate

Yoursef.

It's not a matter of
learning the latest
street talk. It's a mat-
ter of learning why
crack is so dangerous.
That marijuana can
often lead to hard
drugs. That every
illegal drug has the.
potential of causing
catastrophic damage
t9 your child. To learn
more about drugs and
how to talk with your
kids about the subject,


HELP WANTED

place in refrigerators per
instructions. Hours of work to
be assigned by Supervisor an a
weekly basis. MINIMUM
QUALIFICATIONS:
Knowledge of operation, safety
requirements. Ability to work
independently and as a team
member, follow oral instruction.
EDUCATION AND
EXPERIENCE: one (1) year
related experience in
performing these types of duties.
Florida Drivers License and
valid Social Security card
required. Applications will be
accepted until 4:00 p.m.. May
24, 2006 at the Jefferson County
Health Department Annex
Building located at 1175 W.
Washington Street, Monticello,
Florida. Equal Opportunity
Employer. Drug Free
Workplace and Drug Testing is
required as part of the
pre-employment physical.
Applicants with a disability
should contact the above office
for accommodations. For
additional information please
call 342-0170 ext. 221
5/10,12,17,19,c
Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital-
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn, c
Caregiver in Lloyd area, to fill
in as needed, $65 per day, 9:30
a.m.-10 p.m. Call 879-8698, 224-
4131
4/28, 5/3, 5, 10, pd
NOTICE OF JOB OPENING:
Jefferson County Road
Department is seeking
applicants for Equipment
Operator/Laborer. Applications
may be obtained at the Road
Department office located at
1484 S. Jefferson St. Monticello,
Florida. A high school diploma
or, equivalent and a valid
drivers license are required.
CDL drivers license would be
desirable but not required.
Experience running a backhoe,
small dump truck, and road side
mowing tractors. Phone number
997-2036. Accepting
applications until 5/22/06.
4/28-5/20, c
A Bclhvioral Health Care
Center is currently seeking:
FEMA Crisis Counselors
(#2262) A Bachelors' Degree
from an accredited University
or college with a major in
counseling, social work,
psychology, criminal justice,
nursing, rehabilitation, special
education, health education, or
a related human service field; or
other Bachelor's Degree from
another accredited University or
college with one (1) year of full
%time or equivalent work or
volunteer experience in a social
service, health care, or related
field. Shift: variable. Licensed
Therapist (2267a) Masters
Degree from an accredited
university or college with a
major in the field of counseling,
social work, psychology, or a
related human services field and
two years of professional
experience in providing services
to persons with behavioral
illness. License required. Some
local travel required. Substance
abuse knowledge preferred.
Shift: variable hour, some late
afternoon work required. For
more information and a
complete listing of available
positions:
www.apalacheecenter.org,
850-523-3217 or 1-800-226-2931
Human Resources 2634-J Capi-
tal Circle N.E., Tallahassee, FL.
Pre-Hire Drug Screen and
FDLE background .check. An
Equal Oppurtunity/Affirmative
Action Employer Drug- Free
Workplace.
5/10, c
Gas station attendant needed.
Good starting pay and benefits.
Call 997-1133
5/3 tfn, c
Weekend baby-sitter needed for
3 children. Some nights
required. Call Liz 342-1162
5/3, 5, 10, 12, pd
Electric Meter Change-Out
Field Technicians: How would
you like to earn some extra
money during the summer
months? Utility Meter Services
is looking for temporary meter


change-out field technicians in
the Monticello area. You must
have a valid Florida driver's
license, pass a pre-employment
drug test and background
check. We will train qualified


HELP WANTED

individuals. Starting salary will
be $15.00 hr. Please call
727-368-9753, or send your
resume to UMS@asplundh.com.
UMS EOE
5/1012,17,19, c
MONTICELLO: Part-time
janitorial position available
immediately. Please call
681-3148 for more information.
4/12, 14, 19, 21, 5/3, 5, 10, 12, c

AUTOMOTIVE
No Credit Checks Just Low
Down Payments on Good Cars
& Trucks
2 and 4 Door Model As Low As
$750 down 850-536-9111 ~
www.JumpinJims.con Ask For
Mr. Deal.
11/2, tfn
1998 Chevy Malibu 4-door. All
power, excellent condition,
recent tires, ext. $5000 OBO.
Serious Inquiries only.
850-997-6308
5/10, pd
1993 Suburban 4x4- new motor,
as new condition, 3 seats,
$4300.00. My mean wife says
sell. 997-0129
5/10,12,17, pd

FOR RENT
Prime downtown office space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980.
11/30, tfn, c
Mobile Home for rent 2
bedroom, 1 '/ bath on a pond.
Large storage building. $450/
month off Drifton Highway.
421-3911
4/28, 5/3, 5, 10, pd!
Country living- 1 bedroom, 1-
bathroom, $500.00 and 2
bedroom, 2 bathroom, $550.00
monthly. Located between
Wacissa and US98. Call
997-6653
5/3, 5, 10, 12, 17, 19, 23, 26, c

REAL ESTATE
Thinking of Selling? Great
timing! Call Lynette for a free
market analysis. Find out what
your property would sell for in
today's active market. With her
proven marketing plan and
track record of success,
Lynette's the full time
REALTOR who's uniquely
qualified to sell your property
for the best price. Lynette C.
Sirmon, Realtor Associate
850-933-6363 or after hours
850-948-5000 R. Winston
Connell, Realtor.
5/10, pd


FOR SALE, .
Registered 6 year old Dark Bay
Thoroughbred Philly $2000.
Call Mike 519-6506.
5/10, pd
Rhode Island Red Roosters for
sale, $10 each. Call 997-0901,
leave message.

SERVICES
Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We 6ill
Medicare Call for a assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
available
1/19, tfn
Like other churches, we have
our hypocrites, but hypocrites
.have to go somewhere. Christ
Episcopal Church, three blocks
N of the courthouse. Sunday
service at 10:30 a.m. 997-4116.
5/10,c

Backhoe Service: driveways,
roads, ditches, tree & shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten 997-3116, 933-3458.
4/28,.tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available
only at Jackson's Drugs,
Hoodiacol is designed to curb
the appetite, burn fat and
increase energy levels resulting
in considerable weight loss over
time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key
ingredients incorporated into
rice bran oil with natural
flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss,
you may see benefits for the
hair, skin and nails from the
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in
rice bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is
a cactus found in the Kalahari
Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits
appetite but increases the sense
of satiety. This tends to limit
total caloric intake by 30-40%
without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should
result from such a drop in
caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd, 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn


FREE


Roosters. Call Carlo Grisanti
342-9918
5/10,12, pd


E DIGITAL
RECEPTION
SERVICES, INC.
Satellite TV Installers

Position -tiroughout rida
For details and it aine go to:

www.hrmcacclairi'c;d iai ydrscareers


*2.5 Acres in NE area of county, private dirt road, mo-
bile homes allowed, rolling hills terrain, large mer-
chantable pine trees just $10,000 per acre.
*6.42 acres, East on U.S. 90, pond, well, septic, home-
site, nature at it's best, only $ 14,900 per acre
* Fixer Upper, 5 room cracker house, porches, poor
condition, Greenville, needs everything, $30,000 As Is.
*Tucked in the shade of the old oaks, 3 Bd/2bth, DW,
on 4.11ac, carport, fireplace, porches, $139.500
* Little farmhouse, 2/2, on 5.69 ac, mostly wooded,
grain bin, pole barn/shed, $155,900
*Huge Brick Home, 5 acre hilltop, workshop, garage,
$419,000 overlooks woodsy duck pond
Don't see what you want here, let me check MLS
for you, I have access to hundreds of listings.

Lynette C. Sirmon, Realtor Associate,
R. Winston Connell, Realtor
850-933-6363 Mobile or After Hours 850-948-5000


HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR
TRAINING FOR EMPLOYMENT

S Bulldozers, Backhoes, Loaders, Dump
Trucks, Graders, Scrapers, Excavators
-National Certification
-Jo6 Placement Assistance

800-405-5833


Associated Training Services


www.atsn-schools.com


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com



Serious About Sellinq?

List with me today!

Country Living 2000 double wide 3 bedroom 2
baths, screened porch on a very pretty 1.6 acres
in Lloyd Acres $74,900

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially cleared
acres on US 19 south near Dennis' Trading post
only $16,500 per acre

Price Slashed! 2 bedroom 1 bath home with
small fenced yard, family room behind IGA on
Bowman Street Now $76,500

Peary Doest It Aqain! Under Contract-
Priced to Sell 1993 Fleetwood 3 bedroom 2
bath home on 2.5 acres in Lloyd Acres paved
road frontage $76,500

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly wooded
acres Only $36,500

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big doublewide w/
fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks, pond,
north of Greenville only $329,000

Peary Does It Aqain! Under Contract
Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge Lane
100'x220' in the City $15,500 each

Just Listed! Beautiful Homesite
12. 59 beautiful acres on the Waukeenah Highway
near town, big trees, nice fields, nice and private, per-
fect for a nice home $265,000

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bedroom
2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10 year old
planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50 acres in
planted pines, swimming pool, detached garage, barn
nice field near US 90 and SR 59 only $1,200,000

Peary Does It Aqain! under Contract-
Buildinq lots Town on Morris Road call for details
$10,000 to $40,000

Peary Does It Aqain! Under Contract Cox
Road 10 mostly wooded acres just a few miles
North of town $12,000 per acre

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Terrific Land Investment 5 acres under con-
tract 5 available on the east side of town high and
dry in quiet location with lots of game, 9 year old
planted pines, profit from both appreciating land
and growing pine Now $9,500 per acre

Peary Does It Aqain! Near Lake Hall Under
Contract 2 wooded acres $26,500

Home Site close to town on West Groover-
ville Road only $14,500

Peary Does It Aqain! Christmas Acres
Sold -3 bedroom 2 bath mobile home on 3 acres
with a big deck, carport and a workshop $96,000

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
Simply the Best!
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


You Can Depend On The

Monticello News Classifieds

For The Best Results!!


call fof a free parent's
handbook.

1-800-624-0100
ARaWSHIOP R A DRUG-FRUEE FLOI..AMEU-C
c/o Bush & Associates, Inc.
1001 Allemate AlA Jupiter, FL 33477











Library Book Sale


Generates $700


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The second annual library.
book sale saw some 1400
books averaging 50 cents
each bring in more than $700
for the Friends of the Library.
Business was brisk, and as
one library patron was heard
to say, "After I found out how
cheap they were, I went back
to get more."
The purpose of the sale was
to clear library shelves of du-


plicates and books no longer
circulated, as well as to mar-
ket books that were brought
in for the sale.
SMany children's books were
available and were carefully
arranged by Pat Ervin.
The newly reorganized
Friends of the Library will
prioritize the needs of the li-
brary and spend the money
where it is needed most
Books not sold will be of-
fered at a book sale planned
during the Watermelon Festi-
val.


Members of the Jefferson
County Democratic Party, and
Friends of the Library organ-
ized the sale.
Sallie and Sam Worley pro-
vided musical entertainment
during the morning event.
Chairpersons for the Sale
were Shelley and Dave Wat-
kins.

OUR LIFELINE

IS-TOLLFREE

Grabi tielineand
let us help you.


THE VOICEOF HOPE
1-800-572-1717
-- j* iijj A-ia~


ELEANOR HAWKINS sells books to Ruth Martin Letchworth at the recent Friends of
the Library Book Sale. (News Photo)



Scholarship Awards Total

$101,650 At ACA Program


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy
held its Academic Awards
Program Friday.
Students receiving awards
and their grade levels
include:
Seventh grade, Caroline
Mueller, Highest GPA in lan-
guage arts; Kaitlin Jackson,
highest GPA in geography,
math; and Mueller, the Citi-
zenship Award.
Eighth grade; Dana Watt,
highest GPA in math; John
Stephens, highest GPA in his-
tory, language arts, and sci-
ence; and Jacob Pitts, the Citi-
zenship Award.
Seven eighth grade students
received the Presidential
Award for Academic Excel-
lence: Jessica Hunt, Wilson-
Lewis, Jacob Pitts, Sydney
Plummer, Brian Scholte, John
Stephens and Dana Watt.
Freshmen: Ashley Echols,
highest GPA in Spanish I; Re-
bekah Falk, highest GPA in
English I; Michaela Roccanti,
highest GPA in math; and
Bryon Love, the Citizenship
Award.
Sophomores: Ben Buzbee,
highest GPA in biology;
Courtney Connell, highest
GPA in world history;
Stephanie Dobson, highest
GPA in Algebra II; Ramsey
Revell, highest GPA in Span-
ish II; Rebekah Aman, high-
est GPA in Bible, English II,
Physical Science, and Spanish
II; and Courtney Brasington,
the Citizenship Award.
Spanish students received
Special Recognition Certifi-
cates for maintaining an A av-
erage throughout the year
include: Ben Buzbee, Chelsey
Kinsey, Nicole Mathis, Tris-
tan Sorensen, Rebekah Aman,
Courtney Brasington, A. J.
Connell, Courtney Connell,


Jayce Davis, Stephanie Dob-
son, Will Hartsfield, Alfa
Hunt, Claire Knight, Prateen
Patel, Bethany Saunders,
-Hannah Sorensen, Angela
Steinberg, and Ramsey
Revell.
Juniors: Jennifer Pitts, high-
est GPA in College Biology;
Taylor Rykard, highest GPA
in College Algebra and Col-
lege Spanish; Rikki Roccanti,
highest GA in American his-
tory, chemistry, English III,
and geometry; and Roccanti,
the Citizenship Award.
Seniors; Shane Arrington,
highest GPA in English IV;
Jana Connell, highest GPA in
College Spanish; Katie O'S-
teen, highest GPA in con-
sumer math; Alex Searcy,
highest GPA in western civili-
zations; Kristyn Tuckey,
highest GPA in ecology; Su-
zanne Walker, highest GPA
in college art; and Corie
Smith, the highest GPA in
college art and college Eng-
lish.
Corie Smith received the
Presidential Award for Aca-
demic Excellence.
Special awards and n6mina-
tions went to Jim Stephens
and J. T. Ward, junior boy's
state representatives; Stepha-
nie Dobson, Sophomore
Hugh O'Brian Leadership
Representative.
Corie Smith, Daughters of
the American Revolution Citi-
zenship Award; eighth grader
Ryan Pritcher and eleventh
grader J. T. Ward, Woodman
of the World History award;
Stephanie Dobson, HOBY
Leadership Award; Casey
Gunnels, Academic All State
Athlete nominee; Corie
Smith, Robert C. Byrd Schol-
arship nominee.
The total scholarship dollars
for the class of 2006
amounted to $101,650.
Scholarships awarded in-
cluded; Jana Connell and Co-


rie Smith, $500 Altrusa
Scholarship; Connell, Smith
and Casey Gunnels, $500 Ki-
wanis Scholarships; Amy
Blanton, $250 Archbold
Award; Alex Searcy, $400
James Hardee Memorial
NFCC Scholarship.
Jason Holton, $500 Benja-
min Butler Read Memorial
Scholarship; Keri Brasington
and Kristen Tuckey, $3,900
NFCC Presidential Scholar-
ships; and Jennifer Hagan
$200 NFCC Scholarship.
Recipients of the $7,500
Florida Medallions Scholars
Award included; Amy Blan-
ton, Jana Connell, Ben Gran-
tham, Casey Gunnels,
Jennifer Hagan, Mallory Kin-
sey, Katie O'Steen, Matt Pos-
ton, Alex Searcy, Corie
Smith, Kristyn Tuckey, and
Suzanne Walker.
Help your community
when a-disaster strikes!
Become a trained Disaster
Services Volunteer by contacting
the Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross at 878-6080
or visit our web site at
www.tal lytown.com/redcross.
American
Red Cross


Help prevent damage from bark beetles,
diseases, and wildfire, through practices
that promote healthy pines.


* Thin dense pine stands.

* Control understory
plant competition.
* Minimize tree wounds
during harvests.


PREVENT



SfB


* Use prescribed fire.
* Harvest low-vigor
stands and replant.
* Plant species right
for the soil ind site.


SoJtheast Regional Cancer Center, a member of The rNorth Florida Can-
cer Netvorl ,is pleased to bring pro',en, state of the art treatment to the
people of lorth Florida. TomoTherap', is a ne t highl\ effective form of
treatment celi\er, andl is ideal for the treatment of prostate cancer.
Southeast Regional Cancer Center was the fourth facility to begin treat-
Ient v ith this new.' technology and v.e are proud to be pioneers in this
new frontier.

Dr. Rost has spol-en around the ld o te id the iuse and benefits of Tomo-
therap', for cancer patients. This technology, allows the patient to receive
the most accurate, non-intasive treatment a ailable for prostate cancer.

TomoTherap', has provided ouir patients with a better qualil', of life, ith
fev'., or no si:le effects. our treatment is done on an outpatient basis,
with eas accessibilit, to ',o.ur physician and nursing staff. If 'OLI woLidr
like to find out more about TomoTherapy please contact us for more in-


formation.


PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., MAY 10, 2006


A message from the Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer Services,
Division of Forestry, the University of
Florida/IFAS, and the USDA Forest Service.


,. -- -I'-
I