<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Main
 Main: Letters
 Main: Lifestyle
 Main: Sports
 Main continued
 Main: Classified
 Main continued














The Monticello news
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00129
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: May 5, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00129
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
    Main: Letters
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
    Main: Sports
        page 8
    Main continued
        page 9
        page 10
    Main: Classified
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
Full Text








Consumers Hit

By Scam

Artists

Editorial, Page 4
I


SS..:F ,5? FLORIDA HISTORY
L,1-bRARY WEST
E.SITY OF FLORIDA
k.SVTIJi, PL. 3261.1


SHARE

Registration

Saturday

Story, Page 6


Boys, Girls Club
Names Athletes
Of Year

Story, Photos, Page 9
I


(

Jamie's

Body Works

Celebration Set

Story, Page 12
Ir


S Friday Morning


Monticello


1IRTH VP A R NC- 36 .0L CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ews


FRIDAY, MAY 5, 2006


1.3,3 1 11 1 OR 1 T r` r I IlI I IIM I 3ilflll II I a





Dynamic Action Boosts JES




FCAT Reading, Math Scores


Principal,. Students,

Staff, Parents Credited


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Questioning the faculty and
analyzing the answers helped
JES Principal Kay Collins de-
cide what steps to take to turn
FCAT scores around.

Adding a reading text and
hiring a math consultant for a
new math program were in
part responsible for JES expe-
riencing double digit increases
in third grade reading and
math scores.
Director of School Improve-
ment, Sherry Heyen, attributes
the improvement to the com-
bined efforts of Principal Kay
Collins, students, staff and par-
ents.
Collins who came on board
July 18, 2005 explains how
she lead her team:


"Time was short and I had to
work with the speed of light,"
she explained. i
"I asked questions ano ana-
lyzed the answers and in 72
hours I knew what I had to
do."
One of the first things Col-
lins did was to incorporate a
reading text which encouraged
students to read, in addition to
learning about reading.
"With the existing text as a
supplement to the new one, the
emphasis and practice of read-
ing was enhanced.
When it came to Math, Col-
lins faced a similar situation..
This she resolved by ordering
a program which came with a
consultant who worked in
house for a period of time,
which resulted in JES becom-
ing one of the top 10 districts
making the greatest one year


COLLINS
increase in math proficiency.
"He was in the classroom-
with the teachers and showed
them first hand how to imple-
ment the methodology," Col-
lins said.
"He was a resource person,
one who would advise and an-
swer questions and demon-


HEYEN


state in the classroom with
actuall students, how the pro-
gram works.
Teachers also had a hot line
on which to reach the consult-
ant if they found it necessary.
In addition, Collins stressed
the need for students to write
and stated: "At JES we write


from Pre-K though grade five.
Commenting about the reac-
tion of her staff to the new
methods, Collins said: "They
have seen them work, and I
doubt they would return to the
former methods.
''I have a super staff and
they are supportive and willing
to try new things.
"I have some super stars who
just needed a little more en-
couragement to be,really out-
standing," she said.
"Success feels good, looks
good, smells good, and is con-
tagious,' Collins added.
Regarding what comes next,
Collins explained that when.
the individual FCAT scores
come back, data will be ana-
lyzed so it will be crystal clear
what each student knows and
where he/she needs to
improve.
By means of summer work-
shops and in service, teachers
will be well aware of the needs.
of their students next year, to
be able to focus on what needs


to be learned, reinforce what
the student has learned and of-
fer enrichment areas for those
on target.
"I want students to want to
come to school, and plan to re-
instate enrichment courses
such as art, music and physical
education to help students be-
come well rounded."
By means of team teaching,
the computer lab, and tutors
borrowed part time from en-
richment areas, and ability
grouping, students will re
ceive the hacp they need.
Heyen said the District was
working iard to change the
public's perception of the
schools.
"We have seen a glimmer of
light, and we want to win back
community support. -'
"It is my job to support the
school leaders (principals), and
we achieve success by believ-
ing in it and acting like we
know we can succeed."
With scores looking better,
(See FCAT Page 2)


City Okays Two Projects


Totaling 84 New Houses


i-.-,, ,,,...- ..,..

DEVELOPERS ROW -- Builders and developers representing three new subdivisions
crowded City Hall on Tuesday night. Riley Palmer, of Crooked Creek subdivision, in
the foreground. (News Photo)


Former Police Officer Arrested

On Violation Of Drug Probation


FRAN HUNT,
Staff Writer

William Larry Bates Jr., 37,
was arrested on a no-bond
warrant Friday for violation of
his drug offender probation
and is presently in the Madison
County jail.
Arraignment is set for June
5.
The violation resulted from
Bates' alleged association with
a person engaged in a criminal
activity.
Bates' was placed on drug of-
fender probation in 2004 for
three offenses. The three of-
fenses were grand theft of
property, grand theft firearm,
and purchase of a controlled
substance and obtaining or at-
.tempting to obtain a substance


by forgery/misrepresenation.
Mayor Bill Bullock reported
Tuesday that the arrest was
made due to a Violation of
Probation warrant issued by
Bates' probation officer and
signed by Judge Robert
Plaines.
"His probation officer be-
lieve that he violated his pro-
bation by associating with a
Tallahassee woman, Maggie
M. Oglesby, 51," Bullock said.
TPD reported that on April
7, 2006, officers Michael
McLeod and Barbie Mala-
fronte were conducting foot
patrol at Capital Inn, located
at 2702 North Monroe St., in
reference to reports of prosti-
tution and drug activity.
McLeod reported that he
observed Bates and Oglesby
exit the motel and get into a


black F-150, and that the
truck's license tag displayed a
decal which expired 10-05.
He further reported that
Bates drove the truck in the
parking lot and attempted to
drive onto North Monroe
Street, and McLeod initiated a
traffic stop on the vehicle.
A name check revealed that
Bates had a probation record
and Oglesby, an extensive
drug history.
As McLeod awaited the
vehicle's registration to come-
back by radio, he made con-
tact with Oglesby again, ask-
ing if she minded speaking
with him at the rear of the
truck, to which she consented.
"Due to her drug history, I
advised Oglesby that if she
(See Police Officer Page 2)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

The City Council on
Tuesday night approved
preliminary plats for two
subdivisions that together will
add 84 new houses to the city.
The two involve the 85-acre
Crooked Creek subdivision
just west of town (74 houses),
and the 5.31-acre Cooper's
Ridge subdivision southwest
of town (10 houses).
The council ultimately
approved the two preliminary
plats, subject to the developers
meeting all appropriate state
permitting requirements and
addressing the cited concerns.
Regarding the Crooked
Creek subdivision, the main
concern centered on the
subdivision's two outlet roads,
which empty into US 90 near a
hilly and curvy area.
"It doesn't, look safe to me,
because of the hill and curve,"
said Councilman Tom
Vogelgesang, expressing a
common view.
He wanted assurance that
the appropriate authorities
would address the road safety
issue.
Developer Riley Palmer said
the issue was being addressed.
He said the Department of
Transportation (DOT) was
reviewing the plans and it
would not approve anything
that was unsafe.
"The DOT's pretty strict,"
Palmer said.
As for the issues raised by
the city's consultant engineer,
Robert George, and by
Planning Official Bob


Arredondo, Palmer said these
already had been addressed.

Traffic, Runoff
Concerns Raised
These issues included the re-
quirement that the walking
trail and jurisdictional wet-
lands be dedicated to conser-
vation areas and that the devel-
opment meet all applicable De-
partment of Environmental
Protection (DEP) require-
ments.
Palmer told the council that
the project already had re-
ceived the DEP's approval and
he was only awaiting the
DOT's findings.
The only other concern
raised came from a resident of
the adjacent Holly Hill subdi-


vision. The resident wondered
why Crooked Creek was being
connected to Holly Hill via
Willow Road.
He worried that the connec-
tion would only spill more
traffic into Holly Hills. Palmer
responded that the Department
of Community Affairs encour-
aged interconnections between
communities.
Furthermore, the connection
would allow Holly Hills resi-
dents use of the new subdivi-
sion's walking trails and
recreation area, he said.
Palmer's plans call for the
subdivision to have under-
ground utilities, sidewalks,
curb-and-gutter construction
for roads, three stormwater
ponds, and a recreation area.
(See City Okays Page 2)


Armed Robber Holds

Up Convenience Store


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

City Police were on the hop
Wednesday morning with re-
ports of an armed robbery at
one location and property
theft at another.
MPD Chief Investigator
Sgt. Chip Springer reported
that at approximately 6:30
a.m., Wednesday morning,
MPD officers responded to an
armed robbery at the Pic-N-
Chic convenience store on
North Jefferson Street.
Springer reported: "The
clerk reported that a subject
entered the store and re-


quested an over-the-counter
medication.
"As the clerk was turning to
point out the requested item,
the suspect produced a hand-
gun and demanded money,"
said Springer.
The clerk complied and the
suspect fled on foot taking an
undisclosed amount of
money.
The suspect is described as
being a dark completed
black male, approximately six
feet tall and weighing about
180 pounds.
He was last seen wearing a
dark toboggan hat, sweater,
jacket and gloves and he was
(See Armed Robber Page 2)


u.


: -








PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 5, 2006


Police Officer


(Continued From Page 1)
possessed anything illegal on
her person and gave it to me,
that I would work with her
and possibly give her a
break."
He reported that Oglesby
then took a used small glass
crack pipe from her purse and
gave it to him. McLeod ad-
vised Oglesby that she was
under arrest and searched her
purse, at which point, he lo-
cated a metal container in her
purse, on a key chain, that
contained a small white rock.
The rock field tested positive
for presence of cocaine.
As McLeod continued to
wait for dispatch to advise
him of the truck's expiration
date, he asked Bates if he
would consent to a search of
his person. Bates consented to
the search and nothing illegal
was found. However, a Monti-
cello Police. Department
badge was in his wallet.
McLeod reported that Bates
did not have a Police ID card,
and Bates stated that he used
to be an officer in Monticello.
McLeod, feeling that the
badge may have been stolen,
contacted Sgt. Mack Norton
of MPD and Norton advised
him that Bates was terminated
from MPD and should not
still possess a badge.
At Norton's request,
McLeod took the badge from


City Okays
(Continued From Page 1)
Relative to the Crooked
Creek subdivision, the council
also considered an ordinance
that amends the city's zoning
map to reflect the amended Fu-
ture Land Use Map (FLUM)
on the Comprehensive Plan.
The proposed change re-
zones the 85.01-acre parcel to
R-l residential single-family,
in keeping with the FLUM.
The change is expected to
become final at the June 7
council meeting.
Developer Thoem Robinson
is behind the Cooper's Ridge
subdivision, which consists of
10 lots off Cooper's Pond
Road.
The city engineer's two con-
cerns were that the developer
show proof that the off-site re-
tention pond had sufficient ca-
pacity to accept and discharge.
stormwater, and that the devel-


Bates, and was advised that
Bates' tag was updated.
Bates was released and
warned about his tag and the
badge was impounded to be
released to MPD.
Oglesby was transported to
the Leon County Jail. ,
By way of recap: in Sept.,
2004, Bates was tried and ad-
judicated guilty of four drug-
related charges and sentenced
to five years in felony drug
probation, with the first six
months to be served in the
Gadsden County Jail.
Following his release, Bates
was to enter a six-month resi-
dential drug treatment pro-
gram and then participate
another six months in an after
care drug treatment program.
During his trial, Bates ad-
mitted to an alcohol and drug
addiction problem that had its
beginning at the age of six.
Bates then said at the age of
16, he was using cocaine, in-
halants, marijuana and Quaa-
ludes, "You name it, I had my
hands on it, he said.
Bates resigned from MPD
Jan. 12, 2004 rather than sub-
mit to a urinalysis.
MPD discovered that drugs
and more than $3,000 cash
were missing from its evi-
dence room, as well as a
semiautomatic pistol.


Projects
oper provide written permis-
sion from an adjacent property
owner that the latter would ac-
cept runoff from the develop-
ment into her pond.
The adjacent property owner,
Jo Freeman, indicated Tuesday
that she was not willing to ac-
cept the runoff.
A resident of nearby Spring
Hollow Road also voiced con-
cerns about runoff, drainage
problems and traffic, among
other things.
The representative from
Alday-Howell Engineering,
Inc., which is handling the
project, assured the council
that all the voiced and written
concerns would be addressed.
The council approved the
measure subject to the condi-
tions imposed by the city's
consultant engineer, who will
monitor the project for compli-
ance.


SHIRLEY WASHINGTON, Boys, Girls Club education leader, presents a check to Sue
Wood and La Darian Smiley for their participation in Education Day events. (News
Photo)


Club Members Receive $50 Checks


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Three local Boys and Girls
Club members received $50
checks from Shirley Wash-
ington, education leader, for
their part in Education Day


activities, held in Tallahassee
at the Bethel Boys and Girls
Club of the Big Bend.
Receiving checks were: La-
Darian Smiley, Sue Wood,
and Tyreria Jones.
Members from 12 Clubs in
Jefferson, Franklin, and Leon


!Now-


County Club competed with
each other for a place at the
SState Games.

This is the third year of pre-
paring and moving forward to
the State Games in Sarasota
for the members of the Jeffer-
Sson Clubs.


FCAT Scores
(Continued From Page 1)
grades will go up, she said.
Collins described students
approaching her to ask if she
had their individual scores
back yet, something that was
rare heretofore.
"We have started to turn
things around and we are ex-
cited," Collins said.
The theme at JES, she said
is: Success starts here, and it
has!


I Choose
a health
insurance plan
that keeps YOU

in Mind
Call 850-997-9981
to find out more.
Steve McClelland
FMB Insurance Services
108 E. Washington St.
Monticello, FL 32344
A Contracted General Agency for
BlueCross lueShich
of PFloridla


I -


4 Sprint.
.\
7 ULe


Armed Robber Holds Up


(Continued From Page 1)
*wearing a mask covering his
nose and mouth.

Investigators are currently
pursuing leads and request
that anyone with information
contact MPD at 342-0150.
In an unrelated matter, ap-
proximately 9:30 a.m., Officer
cer Toby Ward responded to
a call about a theft at Fred's
Department Store, also 1o-


cated on North Jefferson
Street.
Springer said store employ-
ees reported that unknown
person or persons. stole sev-
eral pieces of lawn furniture
from the display outside the
store.
Items taken included a picnic
table, and several plastic lawn
chairs and tables.
Anyone with information'is
asked to contact MPD.


Reliable High-speed Internet


with home phone service.


Locals Perform In NFCC Revue


County residents performed
in the "I'll Be Seeing You,"
1940s Musical Revue, pre-
sented recently at NFCC.
Local performers include:
Janis Courson, vocalist and.
trumpet player; Scott Hubert,
actor, who played the night-
club MC; and Arnold Burkart,

Kiwanis To
Present ACA
Scholarships

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Kiwanis representative Ka-
trina Walton will visit Au-
cilla Christian Academy
Friday, and present three sen-
iors with $500 scholarships
during the morning academic
award ceremony, slated to be-
gin at 8:30 p.m.
Those seniors include Jana
Connell, Casey Gunnels, and
Corie Smith.
She said the scholarships
could be used for any Florida
community college or State
University of their choosing.


narrator.
Directing the performance
was Dr. Rebecca Burkart,
NFCC music instructor.
More than 200 people at-
tended the performance and
helped raise at total of $500 in
support of NFCC music schol-
arships.



It keeps

more than

memories

alive.




American Heart
AssociationsM'A
Fighting Heart Disease
and Stroke


Get them both, High-speed Internet and the
Sprint SolutionssM Basic Plan for less than $55 a month!
(One-year term agreement required for High-speed Internet service. Applies to up to 1.5 Mbps speed and excludes'
taxes, fees and $49.99 activation charge.)

Enjoy consistent broadband connection speeds 24/7! Plus, with the
Sprint Solutions Basic Plan, you'll get 911 service and dependable home
phone service without delays, static or dial tone problems, some of which
you might experience with other providers.


Call 1-877-SPRINT 2


Click sprint.com/high-speed


Services may not be available in oal areas. Monthly rate good for new rardential customers only. Offers notvalid with any additional r o ors discounts and subjectto change or cnncewlthout notice Additional restrictions may apply. Monthly Fee: Prics
vary by market 54. offer plan includesS2995 monthlyfe for basic service plan and S2495 High-speed Internlet I ono of the *. i. a
Service: ile customers may purchase vercal features by colyintgtheyhave a logbmnte medical at saloy need orf eaure! i i .. .i i, i ,., .- ,. r n
foowill apply if service is cncelled before neyeorPerormance mayvarydue yo condyio ns outside of networtc con Ua No mm inr .." .i aj.u.u ui.u .i,. u> u ,.,i-. ., ,,.r i.. .1 d. I.. '- I
network congestion. server and router speeds of web sito accessed, inside walking, or tolephon conditions. 2006 Sprint All rights osered. Sprin, the diamond logo design ond Sprint Solutions ore trademarks of Sprint Communications Coanpiy LP
-4hG055


IlThe Opera Hiuse Staee Company
presents






AT CAinerNCIt


Mystery Dinner Theater


friday and: Saturday, May 12, 13, 19 & 20
UIcrs open at 6:30 p.m., show at 7:00 p.m.
$25.00 members, $30.00 others

Sunday, May 21 ~- Uors open at 1:00 p.m.
$2C0.0 per person
leservatins required. Call 997-4242.

!!. 1 ml ,i I L I


I I I C-


-. .i
1:14


.

as'

geti~







MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 5,2006 PAGE 3
MIA,;i~ ''~~I ~ I I


BRUMBLEY


BURNS


EADES HALL
'3"1gimimil llum ..2~--2.-.-...al~;


HARVEY HIGHTOWER


McELWEEN


----
i -
:r


$';


SCHOFILL


MORGAN PREVATT


SWICKLEY


SHEALEY


16 Contestants Vie For


THOMAS


WHEELER


Baby Contes
Applications
Now Availab
Applications are now be
accepted for the 2006 Wa
melon Festival Baby Contes
.They are available at Ja
son's Drug Store and Mo
cello Florist and Gifts.
All contestants must be
time residents of Jeffer
County, and last year's w
ners are not eligible for
year's contest.
There will be a boy and
winner in each of the foll(
ing categories: 0-5 months,
12 months, 1 year old, 2 y
old, 3 year old, and 4 year o
Contestants must be un
the age of 5 as of June 3, 20
All applications, pho
graphs, and entry fees must
submitted to either Mbntice
Florist or Jackson's Drug St
by 5 p.m., Wednesday, M
31,2006.
Winners will be notified
later than Wednesday, June
2006.
Awards will be presented
the winners during the Wat
melon Queen Pageant, Ji
10.


Little

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The Watermelon
Little King and Queen
takes place in conjunct
the Princess Pageant,
S Saturday, June 3 at tl
auditorium.
Four boys will con
the title of Little King
girls will compete for
Sof Little Queen.
In alphabetical ord
testants are:
Jared Brumbley is th
Dale and Trevor Brum
is six years old, and in
garten at Florida High
Kayla Bums is the
of Melissa. Burns an
Bradley. She is five y
and a pre-K student a
son Elementary.
Summer Eades is th
ter of Caryn and Travi
S She is six years old an
dergarten at Jefferson
tary.
Kenlie Harvey is th
;t ter of Kent and Leslie
She is five years old
K-5 at Aucilla Christia
le emy.
Sarah Hall is the dau
Ring Debbie and Mark Hal
.ter- six years old and in
st. grade at Aucilla
ack- Academy.
nti- Elizabeth Hightowe
daughter of James and
full Hightower. She is six
son and a student in K-5 a
vin- Christian Academy.
this Emily Knowles is th


girl
oW-
,6-
'ear
Id.
der
06.
)to-
be
ello
ore
lay

no
7,

Sto
ter-
une


King, Queen
ter of Granville and Tracey
S .... ... Kno\ les. She is six years old
and in the first grade of Au-
cilla Christian Academny.
Festival- Sara McElveen is the daugh-
SContest ter of Jack McElween. She is
tion with six years old and in the first
7 p.m., grade at Jefferson Elementary.
he JCHS Abgail Morgan is the daugh-
ter bf Mitchell and Susan Mor-
ipete for gan. She is five years old and a
, and 12 student in K-5 at Aucilla
the title Christian Academy.
Mark Prevatt, Jr. is the son
ier, con- of David and Rachel Prevatt.
He is five years old and in
ie son of Pre-K at Jefferson Elementary
ibley. He School.
n kinder- Chelsea Scarborough is the
School. daughter of John and Valerie.
daughter She is five years old and in
d Kevin, kindergarten 'at Chaires Ele-
rears old mentary School.
it Jeffer-
Megan Schofill is the daugh-
Sd ter of Billy and Paulette
ie daug- Shofill. She is, four years old
is Eades.
d in k and in K-4 Aucilla Christian
d in kin-
Elemen- Academy.
Peyton Shealey is the daugh-
e daugh- ter of Phillip and Lora
Harvey Shealey. She is five years old
I and and a student in K-5 at Monti-
1 and in
an Acad- cello Christian School.
Nicolas Swickley is the son
ughter of of Eve and Brian Swickley.
1. She is He is five years old and a stu-
the first dent in K-4 at Aucilla Chris-
Christian tian Academy.
Quinton Thomas is the son
er is the of Stephen and Shana Thomas.
d Gretna He is six years old and in K-5
years old at Aucilla Christian Academy.
t Aucilla Ria Wheeler is the daughter
of Lupe and Randy Wheeler.
e daugh- She is six years old and in kin-


crowns
L l I d e, r Hn.,4 u. h.4IIi,: .l,,, ',,,T i i. --." J
Ade lenn t.ucll Chrn-Ith


Attention People with Medicare:


S Do you have a Medicare Part D

Prescription Drug Plan?


Are you considering a Medicare
I Part D Prescription Drug Plan


Do you know if you're getting the

most value for your health care dollar?


Did you know that Humana Gold Choice is an all-in-one
Medicare health plan that already includes the Medicare Part D
drug benefit coverage* for a low monthly plan premium?
Get the answers to your questions
by attending a free luncheon seminar:.

MONTICELLO
Three Sisters Restaurant
370 South Jefferson Street
Monday, May 8th 11:00 a.m.

Our.seminars present you with your choices in an easy-to-understand way.
You'll get the information you need to make the right decision.
Over 2.4 million people now receive their Medicare prescription drug
coverage or Medicare health plan coverage through'Humana.










HUMANA.
Glu.;ianlce when you need it most
Nledicare Group health Individual health Dental and Life

An Insurance Company with a Medicare Advantage contract to offer a Private Fee-for-Service plan
available to anyone enrolled in both Part A and Part B of Medicare through age or disability who
continues to pay Medicare applicable premiums. 'Copayrnents, service area and benefit limitations
may apply. A sales representative will be present with information and applications
GH 19597_PFFSLow TAL 05/06


KNOWLES


THANKS

To OUR SHERIFFS DEPARTMENT FOR
CHECKING BUILDINGS IN THE LAMONT
AREA DURING THE EARLY HOURS
LAMONT BAPTIST CHURCH
BOB PERRY, PARISHIONER


SCARBOROUGH


CASH As seen

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, oh T.V.
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


r
L.







PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 5, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net

Consumers Hit


Consumers Hit


From Our Photo File


I-' '*t


k-7,--; 7


ftf
' Lc


SALLY JORDAN directed Cub Scouts in FMB parking lot, as they picked
collect trash around the City, in Sept., 1990. (News File Photo)


up bags to


By Scam Artists Opinion & Comment


The chances are good that
the person sitting next to you
may have been a victim of a
crime.
Statistics indicate that 8 out
of 12 Americans will become
victims of a crime at least once
in their lifetime. Most people
think violent crimes-rape, as-
sault, robbery- when they think
of victims.
But not victims experience
crimes of violence.
According to the Office for
Victims of Crime, frauds,
theft and financial schemes
victimize millions of Ameri-
cans each year.
Consumers fall pray to
phony investments scams, get-
rich-quick schemes, foreign
lotteries, telemarketing, fraud,
Internet scams and identity
'theft every day.
Millions of hard-earned dol-
lars and life savings of victims
line the pockets of scammers,
who have no regard for their
victims or the damage they've
done to their lives.
Last year, 10 million Ameri-
cans became victims of iden-
tity theft, according to the
Better Business Bureau, with a
loss of over $50 billion.
Insurance frauds costs the
average family $400-$700 per
year in higher insurance pre-
miums. Fraudsters in the mul-
tibillion dollar telemarketing
industry target older Ameri-
cans, with estimated loss over
$500 million.


Victims often feel helpless in
the aftermath of a crime. They
feel alone and isolated by the
crime and many are financially
devastated.
If you or someone you know
or love does become a victim
of a financial crime or any
other type of crime, there are
countless professionals and
volunteers who stand ready to
help cope with the conse-
quences of the crime, to offer
support, and to provide guid-
ance that can help victims bet-
ter understand their options.
The good news is there are
laws ready to protect victims.
The Federal Crime Victims'
Bill of Rights was created to
give victims a proper place in
the criminal justice system, en-
sure they have the opportunity
to be heard and provide assis-
tance to further their recovery
process. -.
Most states also have vic-
tims' rights laws for cases han-
dled in the local criminal
justice system.
U.S. Postal Inspectors urge
you to learn more about vic-
tims' rights and services by
visiting
www.LooksTooGoodToBeTru
e.com and to order "All The
Kings' Men" a free DVD on
victim' rights, visit
www.USPS.com/postalinspec-
tors.
Remember, being a victim of
a crime is nothing to be
_ashamed of. Neither is seeking
help to recover from it.


Strange Attraction


To Pro Wrestling
professional wrestling.
BY REX M. ROGERS But somehow it still seems
Columnist different to me. If Jim Carry is
guilty of over-acting at times,
So called professional wres-- then pro wrestlers must really
tling has always perplexed me. be over-the-top. They yell,
It's crass, it's fake, and on top scream, argue, look bug eyed
of all that it's fairly expensive into the camera, "threaten"
to watch: tickets over $60. "opponents," develop their
These big boys are athletic, no bodies into grotesque carica-
question, but World Wide tures the real human body,
Wrestling is more about prance around in ridiculous
schlock entertainment than it is outfits, and. in general demon-
competitive sports.. state that while we have the
gift of gab they do not have
I suppose proponents could facile minds.
say that watching the "morality Why would people pay good
plays" of faux wrestling is no money to watch other people
different than watching drama act like fools? I don't know.
on stage at a cinema But then again, I like
comedians-at least clean come-
I mean, the star didn't really dians, and they act like fools
fall five stories without injury, too.
The actors didn't really shoot God made a big world and
12 people while nary a return gave us lots of room to move
shot nicked them. It's just a around in it. I'm just glad
story. It's, entertainment, there's enough room for me to
Maybe the same is true for move away from WWF.



Letters to the Editor Welcomed

500 Words or Less
Letters must be signed and include

phone number of writer.


Short Takes & Other Notions


By MERRY ANN FRISBY

i noticed that the bike trail is
almost finished. I understand
that the weight of a normal car,
will damage the bike trail, so I
am glad to see that the poles
are in to prevent folks from
driving cars on it.
The abandoned vehicles and
falling down buildings along
the side of the trail are just:
about-all cleaned up. The land-
scaping is maturing and
benches dot the course for
setting" "Settin" is one of the
finest southern traditions I
knov, The bike trail is a real
plus tor Monticello.

People who ride bikes are a


different breed. When my dad
was ill, I used to push him up
and down Pearl Street in his
wheelchair. I could only do
this at a very slow pace. Roots
in numerous places, damage to
the sidewalks, and various
other bumps caused me to ma-
neuver the wheelchair care-
fully whenever I took my Dad
for a ride.
Ike Anderson was in his late
70's at the time. He rode by on
his bike and said "want to
race?" When my Dad giggled
and said no, Ike said, Want
to see me ride with my feet on
the handlebars?" My dad
laughed so hard he almost feel
out of the chair.
It was a wonderful moment
for me. Ike loved that old red


bike and rode it all over town.
I wonder where the old bike is
now that he is too frail to ride.
I am delighted that our bike
trail is named for Ike.
When our children were
small, they rode bikes every-
where. One neighbor bought a
medium sized brown dog that
liked to nip at their legs when
they rode by .
This was especially frighten-
ing to our 9-year-old daughter
and she came home wailing in
terror. She became the dog's
favorite victim, probably be-
cause she made such a scene.
She is to this day, a very dra-
matic girl.
Her hero brothers got a thin
rope.' They held it between
them as they rode their bikes


on either side of the road. They
sent their 9-year-old sister be-
hind them as bait. The dog
spied his favorite target and
made a rocket-like dash for
her. The dog failed to see that
the boys were ahead of her
with a trap set.
The dog ran unimpeded into
the rope and fell flat on his
dogbutt. He never saw the
rope. The boys repeated this
stunt several times until -the
dog decided that this little girl
had some kind of bad mojo.
He never chased her again.
Maybe the local police need
a strong rope. They could ride
on either side of the bike trail,
waiting for someone to drive a
car on the trail... Never mind.
Bad Idea.


Land Use Policy Is Trap


BY: TOM WEESE
Columnist

I love the Beatles' music.
My respect for them ends
there. Paul McCartney has
spent a lifetime making in-
credible music while uttering
pure gibberish on issues that
matter.
It seems that if he can't put a
rhyme and a tune to it, his
brain turns to mush.
He has been a major pro-
moter of the animal rights
scam perpetrated by PeTA.
And he has operated a sheep
farm with a "commitment to.
natural methods, and the farm
and produce have gained rec-
ognition and designation as or-
ganic status," according to a
McCartney spokesman.
In other words, Paul McCart-
ney has spent years accepting
and promoting the environ-
mental agenda that is based
More on political propaganda


than scientific fact.
Sir Paul has done his best to
toe an impossible, antihuman
line. Worse, he has used his
celebrity status to push that
misguided agenda on the rest
of us.
Paul is only human. He has
needs and wants. And he has
the money to get them. Or so
he thought.
It seems Paul is the victim of
Sustainable Development and
its strict land use policies that
allow a power elite to dictate
what we do with our own pri-
vate property.
Paul's farm is an extensive
estate with lots of land just 70
miles outside London. But
when he built a simple one and
a half story log cabin on the
property to serve as a quite re-
treat, away from the hustle and
bustle of the farm, he was
foiled.
It seems the local community
planning committee doesn't
like the cabin. They say it


"harms the intrinsic landscape
quality and character of the
area."
Says Councilman Grey Met-
calf, "planning laws are there
for a reason. If there was free-
for-all, people would build
where they liked, whenever
they liked." The council says
that Paul ruined an area of out-
standing natural beauty.
The fact is, Paul's cabin
doesn't harm anything. It's just
that his neighbors want to
control what he does on his
own property because they
consider the view over his
fields to be their own "view
shed" and they don't want him
building something in the way
to spoil there vistas and sun-
sets.
Protecting the environment
is just a euphemism for steal-
ing property.
Paul's problem is that he
never argued before the Coun-
cil that the land was his and
that he should have the right to


build a little cabin if he wants
to.
Instead he argues his need,
saying he has a need to
privacy, seclusion and security
due to the proximity of a pub-
lic foot path running next to
his farm house. Of course the
foot path was already enforced
over private land as part of the
open space rules.
Paul then goes on to plead
what a great environmentalist
he is. In essence, Paul pleaded
that I'm one of you how
can you do this to me?"
The Council countered say-
ing the cabin isn't necessary to
the running of the farm, so he
really doesn't need it.
Paul then learned the hard
way that the pigs he had
helped put in charge, through
his support of the dictatorship
called Sustainable Develop-
ment, are now more equal than
he is.
(See Land Use Page 9)


Retirement Requires Plan


Americans tend to have an
optimistic view on retirement-
but a recent poll found that
many still have a lot of work'
ahead of them before they can
leave their jobs.
For instance, 47 percent of
the respondents said their re-
tirement savings will last them
10 to 20 years.
Those numbers seem prom-
ising until you consider that
people should be actually
planning for 30 years.
Similarly, nearly half of all
of Generation X respondents


said they expect to rely on
pensions to help fund retire-
ment.
The plan may seem sound,
but experts warn that many
pension plans in the U.S. are at
risk of going belly up. Plus,
fewer than a third of all com-
panies now offer pension
plans.
The poll was sponsored by
the American Institute of Cer-
tified Public Accountants
(AICPA) in an effort to better
understand the American pub-
lics' approach to savings and


retirement.
The group sponsors a web
site called 360 Degrees of Fi-
nancial Literacy
(www.360financialliteracy.
Com) to help people come to
terms with financial issues at
different life stages. Here's a
look at some additional polling
results.
Younger Americans do not
plan to rely on Social Security
for retirement as do older
Americans.
Close to six in 10 people age
55 and older plan to fund their


retirement with Social
Security.
Only four in 10 (41 percent)
of Americans under the age of
55 are counting on Social Se-
curity tq, fund their retirement.
Instead of relying on Social
Security, those under 55 are
more likely to rely on their
personal savings and invest-
ments.
About three in 10 Americans
have a child who is planning
on going to college in the next
five to ten years.
(See Retirement Page 9)





_


-


Aki ,l


~i ~~

b ~c~a/;
k








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 5, 2006 PAGE 5


!Letters...


Writer Upset With Center


Director Tripling Salary


Dear Editor:
It is very shocking to com-
pare the resporise of two mem-
bers of our community to simi-
lar situations.
Our county building inspec-
tor, Bubba Bullock, was re-
cently asked to also serve
Madison County as its build-
ing inspector.
Our county commission gave
its approval, and Mr. Bullock
is now serving both counties.
Bobbie Krebs, the executive
director of the Jefferson Senior
Center, was similarly asked to
serve as the executive director
of both the Taylor County and
Gadsden County Senior Cen-
ters.
After the Senior Center's
Board of Directors gave its ap-
proval, Mrs. Krebs then com-
menced to serve, and is still
serving as Executive Director
of all three Senior Centers.
Unfortunately for all three
communities, there the similar-
ity ends. On one hand, Mr.
Bullock has properly and ethi-


cally continued to work for the
same salary, both county com-
missions having agree to
equally share this financial re-
sponsibility.
On the other hand, Mrs.
Krebs has continued to draw
her full salary from the Jeffer-
son Senior Center, while re-
ceiving full time salaries from
both other Senior Centers.
She is being paid three full
time salaries for one full time
job.
The fact that she only de-
votes a third of her time to our
Senior Center can only have
negative effects.
Both my wife and I, caregiv-
ers to two elderly mothers re-
ceiving benefits provided to
them by and through the Sen-
ior Center, are shocked by
Mrs. Krebs' actions, as well as
by the approval given by its
Board to this arrangement,
which allows her to continue
to be paid for the two thirds of
her time that is not devoted to
Sthe needs of our community's


senior citizens.
One clear and concrete
example of the effects of this
situation arose when we
recently attended a caregiver's
conference in Tallahassee.
We learned of a program
which provides a small stipend
to all family caregivers, of
which we were never informed
by the case managers at the
Jefferson Senior Center.
After making them aware of
it, they confirmed the
program's benefits were
available in Jefferson County,
and very efficiently processed
our application.
Beginning next month, we
will receive a small monthly
check. It does not come close
to compensating my wonderful
wife for her full time labors as
our mothers' caregiver, but it
is a welcome benefit.
I have no personal animosity
towards Mrs. Krebs, who has,
until now, done an excellent
job serving as the Senior


Center's full time executive
director.
I simply cannot comprehend
how she can justify what in
effect has been a tripling of her
salary, and how the Center's
Board of Directors, who have
ultimate responsibility for its
operation, as well as fiduciary
responsibility to ensure that its
financial well being is
maintained, can approve such
San arrangement.
The Senior Center finan-
cially depends, in great part,
on the contributions of our lo-
cal government, local busi-
nesses, and private member of
the community.
I urge the city council, the
county commission, all private
contributors, and especially all
of us who care for our elderly
parents and loved ones, to con-
tact the Senior Center Board of
Directors and let them know
that we do not approve of this
waste of our community's
- money and support.
Michael Reichman


MAYHAW


BERRIES

U-PICK $6.00 gallon
WE PICK $12.00 gallon

bring your own container


GOLDEN ACRES RANCH
704 BARNES ROAD
MONTICELLO, FL
off 19 North 1 mile north ofJCKC

(850) 997-6599 (850) 508-2607


Developers Need To Pay For

Consequences Of New Housing


Dear Editor:
"If it ain't broke, it don't
need fixin'." That was one of
the sayings I remember from
my Aunt Ruth.
She was from Alabama and
had a way of getting her point
across.
The forgotten coast didn't
stay forgotten long as the con-
struction boom spread to
northern Florida.
All a developer had to do
was follow the money and talk
$weet. There are two kinds of
developers. Ones that have a
habit of moving in and moving
on.
The other kind are local so
they have to face the neighbors
when they build.
The fastest way to make $$$
is high density housing. If
town fathers are "persuaded"
to alter their zoning, quick
money is made.
Big Bucks can be made from
Ag 5, but it takes longer.
Growth is good for the com-
munity, only if the developer
pays for the services of which
his housing creates a need.
The one thing we take for
granted most is water. Aqui-
fers suffer the most from a
population explosion.
Florida aquifers are being
stressed and polluted. The re-
lease of dye packets recently
proved pollution in one county
can spread in the underground
rivers of the aquifers to neigh-
boring counties.
It's the water coming out of
your faucet, so it is your busi-
ness. When a watering ban is


called for, or e-coli detected,
it's proof of environmental
trauma and needs "fixin'."
Schools are never big
enough for the influx of stu-
dents, so they need "fixin'.'
Remember the rule of thumb:
two children per home.
The roads are being pounded
to death by construction
traffic, so they need "fixin'." A
lot.
Lift up another comer of the
community rug for a reality
check. Crime.
The more people in an area,
the more crime. Who controls
crime? Police. So more police
are hired by taxpayers. Either
that, or I greet strangers at my
gate with my hand in my
pocket.
For a fact, I can't bring to


Dear Editor:
I wanted to let you know
how much one of your staff
writers has meant to us.
Fran Hunt started covering
the store) of the burning of the
Lamont Baptist Church two
years ago.
She kept the story in the
News. She got to know me and
would call me to get an update
on construction.
By keeping the story in the
news, it not only helped in-
getting donations but the
story took on a readership fol-


mind any community that real-
ized what a thorough job de-
velopers did in convincing
citizens "progress developer
style" was for their own good.
It never is.
Last week I called develop-
ers "freeloaders." Unless they
actually pay for the services
their housing developments
generate, "freeloading" fits.
New homes create a need for
services that either taxpayers
or developers take on.
Communities all over the
United States are beginning to
realize they have a right to de-
mand developers pay for the
consequences of their con-
struction.
Something really needs
fixin' in Jefferson County.
Janet Reaves


lowmg.
I would have people call me
that I did not even know, to
ask how they could help.
The project came to comple-
tion this past Sunday, with the
Dedication and Open House.
The church had a standing
room only crowd. It was a tre-
mendous day, full of joy,
pride, and thanksgiving.
Thanks again to your news-
paper and staff writer, Fran
-Hunt, for the support she gave
us during this challenge.
Sincerely,
Gerald Bailey


The Jefferson County Recycling Proqram


the following items for recycling:


All plastic bottles soda bottles (any size), milk jug4, water bottles,
laundry detergent bottles, etc.

All type cans Tin cans food cans, dog food cans, oat food cans, etc.
Aluminum cans soda cans, beer cans etc.

Newspapers, Magazines, etc.

All cardboard products grocery bags, cereal boxes, food boxes,
laundry detergent boxes, shipping boxes, etc.

All glass bottles,,jars etc. (clear, brown & green)

Residents can bring these items directly to the Recycling Center located at
1591 Waukeenah Street or they may drop them off at any one of the collection
sites in the County.

Remember, every time you recycle you are extending the life of our Landfill and
saving your County dollars in Tipping fees. How could you go wrong?



Additional items accepted at the collection sites:

Household garbage

*Waste Tires (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Batteries

*White Goods (which consist of) Refrigerators, freezers, washing machines,
dryers, air conditioner units, etc. (not accepted at the Recycle Center)

Used Oil & Oil Filters

Household Hazardous Waste pesticides, swimming pool chemicals, paint,
paint thinner, etc. (Please have all containers clearly marked to identify
contents)

**The Recycle Center Household Hazardous Waste Office will accept medical
& pharmaceutical waste. These items must be turned into an employee of the
facility and not just dropped off.



Please take notice to all of the signage posted in the
collection site for the proper disposal of above items.




The City of Monticello offers Curbside pick-up for city residents
for recyclable items on each Wednesday morning. For further
information on other items for disposal in the City, please call
Don Anderson at 342-0154.



Please visit the Jefferson County web page
http://www.cojefferson.fl.us/SolidWaste.html for the locations &
hours of operation for each individual site. For further information
please call the Solid Waste Department at 342-0184.


Citizen Thanks Writer

For Story Coverage


NORTH FLORIDA'S
LARGEST AC
HEATING & COOLING CONTRACTOR FOR THE
PRODUCTS .MANUFACTURED
i :Ih HOUSING
Florid. ^oS

Mobile Home

Supply, Inc.
FSEERGLAss 576-5113 ,UyL1 "s
S Year Li. tCKS Toll Free 1-800-633-2356 Grey~ sand
5 Ye Mite d -VahinB I
Warranty 200 AMP. ,,,,,
POWER POLE
Door Canopies Call For Installment Doors & Windows ,All Sizes)
Roof Coating (Aluminum & White) Plumbing Fixtures, Fittings & Pipe

ISI Open: Monday Friday 7-5* Closed Saturday & Sunday
732 Blduntstown Hwy., Tallahassee (Between Pensacola St. & Hwy. 90W on Blountstown Hwy.)
Fla. Lic. #C050446, #RA0035243, Ga. Lic. #CN003927, L.P. Lic. #2406, ES-0000151


I ,*%FF-" 6%


accents


.0













PAGE 6. MONTICELLO. (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 5, 2006


Lifestyle


~----, -- -----~~


Apply Now For 4-H

Camp At Cherry Lake


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Applications are being ac-.
cepted now for 4-H Cherry
Lake Camp for the week of
July 3 7.
This week long camp is
an overnight camp. The fee
for this camp is $50.
On Monday of the week,
campers get settled in their
cabins, get to know their
cabin mates, and are given the
opportunity to test their swim-
ming ability.
Tuesday through Thursday
are filled with classes, infor-
mation, guest speakers, swim-
ming, organized recreation,
fishing, boating on a pontoon
boat, canoeing, board games,
camp store time, and some
free time.


Special activities are sched-
uled daily.
Tuesday carries a patriotic
theme complete with ice
-cream making, a picnic sup-
per, a 4th of July cake com-
plete with candles, water
games and water slide activi-
ties.
Wednesday night the camp-
ers will enjoy a night out at
the skate rink.
Thursday night will con-
clude with fireworks, a dance
or movie, and a powerpoint
presentation highlighting the
week's activities.
Friday is a for packing to go
home, and for saying good-
bye to friends.
Come by the Extension Of-
fice to register for any of the
4-H Camps offered this year,
or call 342-0187 for more di-
rection.


Homes Of Mourning


Betty (Clayton) Staten, St. Pe-
tersburg, Olivia Few, Gloria
Ann (Willie) Tiffa, and Sandra
(George) Clayton all of Perry,
Sharon Stephens and Renita
Howell, both of Tallahassee,
21 grandchildren, several great
and great great grandchildren,
and numerous nieces,
nephews, other relatives and
friends.

JeAnette T. Rivers
JeAnette Thompson Rivers
age 59 a retail sales clerk died
Friday, April 28 in Ft. Walton
Beach.
The service will be 3:00 p.m.
on Saturday May 6, 2006 at St.
Rilla' Missionary Baptist
Church in Lloyd with burial at
Springfield Cemetery in
Lloyd. Family will receive
friends (viewing) from 2:00
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Friday,
May 5 at the Tillman Funeral
Home.
A native of Monticello, Mrs.
Rivers was a 1964 graduate of
Howard Academy High
School Monticello. After mar-
rying her higih school sweet-
heart, Bakor Rivers, Sr. She
moved to Tampa, Fl. For the
past 12 years, she lived in Ft.
Walton Beach where she was a
sales clerk for Big Lots.
Mourning her death and
cherishing her memory are her
Husband, Bakor Rivers, Sr. her
daughters Wanda Rivers Cow-
(See Homes Page 9)


School Improvement Director

Speaks At Chamber Meeting


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Chamber of Commerce-
members met for their April
meeting and heard a presenta-
tion from Director of School
Improvement, Sherry Heyen.


Heyne stated that in con-
junction with Superintendent
Phil Barker and the School
Board, she was laying .the
foundation for new ideas and
restructuring to be set into
place to "turn the schools
around."
She explained: "We seem to


SHARE Registration

Scheduled Saturday


McDUFFIE


McDuffie

Earns AA

Degree

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Doris McDuffie, daughter-
of Corene McDuffie and the
late Walter McDuffie gradu-
ated with honors from Talla-
hassee Community College
on Saturday, earning an Asso-
ciate of Arts Degree.
McDuffie is a 1972 gradu-
ate of Jefferson County High
School.
Attending the afternoon
ceremony were members of
her immediate family, which
consists of Corene McDuffie,
Jacob and Mary Thompson,
Curtis Hagan, Ann McDuffie,
Joyce Plummer, Alyssa
McDuffie, Anissa and Odis.
Henry, and Azhlel; and Ed-
wina McDuffie.
McDuffie will attend Flor-
ida State University in the
Fall.



Church Sets

Carwash
The Youth Department at
Memorial MB Church are
sponsoring a carwash 9 a.m. -
2 p.m. Saturday, at Grant's
Service Station located at
1270 North Jefferson Street.
Donations collected will
support the youth's summer
trip.
For more information, con-
tact Youth Directors Valarie
Williams or Glyndell Presley
at 997-4947.


Sam Howard
Sam Howard age 74 a retired
Logger died Sunday, April 30,
2006 in Tallahassee.
The services will be at 11:00
a.m. on Saturday May 6, 2006
ut Beth Page Missionary Bap-
tist Church in Wacissa with
burial at Beth Page Cemetery
also in Wacissa. Family will
receive friends (viewing) from
2:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Friday,
May 5, 2006 at Tillman Fu-
neral Home.
A native and lifelong resi-
dent of Wacissa in Jefferson
County, Mr. Howard was a re-
tired:logger for Williams and
Boland .Logging. He was- a
member of Beth Page Mission-
ary Baptist Church.
Among those mourning his
passing and treasuring his leg-
acy are his former wife, Lilla
Mae Howard of Monticello;
sons, Sam Howard, Jr., Norris
(Mary Alice) Howard and Pat-
rick (Doris) Howard, both of
Monticello; Leonard (Curley)
Howard and Quinton Howard
both of Tallahassee; daughters,
Katherine (Robert) Jenkins,
Palatka, Lorene Howard and
Earestine Keaton, Monticello;
his mother, Mrs. Reather Sut-
ton of Wacissa, brothers Her-
bert James and Tucker (Rev.
Barbara) Sutton, Wacissa and
Jerome Howell of St. Peters-
burg; sisters Viola Stubbs,
Mary Robinson, and Bernice
(Hazel) Glover, all of Tampa,


Aj


NORM


iLAL '


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

SHARE registration is
scheduled 10 a.m. to noon
Saturday, at the library and at
the Central Baptist Church at
655 Tindell Road, Aucilla.
The Basic Package consists
of 1 pound chicken breast frit-
ters, 12 ounce breakfast links,
14 ounce seasoned beef steak,
2.6 pounds split chicken.
breasts, 1 pound ground beef,
8 ounce pancake mix, plus a
selection of fresh fruits and
vegetables.
This $18 Package is a guar-


EDWARDS


IN LOVING MEMORY
Elizabeth Edwards
"Mama Lizzie" and "Nana"
1923-2004
Two years ago, God called
you home to rest.
We had to understand, that
He only takes the best.
We love you and we miss
you dearly, but we know
you're watching over us all
day and all night.
Love,
Celia, Herbert, Shelton,
Grands, Great Grands,
and Great Great Grands


WOODEN
Table & Chairs

,,14995&








$149.95
Vi-
Vi 3Vtt Set S/ow,,nt
S,r~x S, S( L 49.9s


'1t^RE IC. ,


anteed retail value of $36 or
more.
This month's specials in-
clude 2 pounds coconut
shrimp for $9.50, choice sir-
loin steaks for $15, and a Hog
Wild Special of 2 pounds
boneless. pork tenderloin, 3
each 6 ounce boneless center
cut pork chops, and 2.5
pounds whole pork spare ribs.
Save 50 percent with the
Basic Package.
Only cash, food stamps, or-
EBT will be accepted.
No orders will be accepted
for the May food package af-
ter May 6.



FSU School

Of Nursing

Admits Curtis
Meredith Curtis was one of
72 students accepted to FSU
School of Nursing.
She is a 2004 graduate of
Aucilla Christian Academy
and was valedictorian of her
class.
Curtis is the daughter of
Randy and Louise Curtis of
Monticello.
Grandparents are John and
Patricia May of Pine, CO, and
Don Curtis of Orelans, VT,
and the late Carole Curtis of
Monticello.
Curtis is a member of the
FSU Honor Society and has
been consistently on the
Dean's List.


-IS


have all the right things in
place but the foundation is not
laid. I don't want just a 'quick
fix' with a band aid. We need
to make progress and making
progress means 'fixes' that are
doable and long term."
She has been keeping the
public up to date on the pro-
gress and improvements in
the school system through
speaking engagements at lo-
cal group functions and meet-
ings.
Chamber President Marga-
ret Levings announce that the
monthly Chamber sponsored
Lunch and Learn sessions
have been successful.
They are brown bag
lunches, with iced tea served
by the Chamber.
May's Lunch and Learn
date, and speaker will be an-
nounced at a later date.
Levings said that the cross-
walk sign at the intersection
of US 19 and Dogwood
Street, has slowed traffic "to
.an unbelievable pace, thanks
to Emily Anderson for getting
that sign in place."
She stressed the importance
of trading locally to fuel the
Monticello economy.
She encouraged all to:
"Think of one simple thing
you can do in our community
this month to make it better
for all of us."
The Chamber will meet
noon on Tuesday May 9 to
hear a program presented by
Morris Steen, president of
North Florida Community
College.

Call; Chamber Director,
Mary Frances Gramling at;"
997-5552 for more informa-
tion.


Central
Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166
Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
5 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
7 PM Bible Study

The Lord our
God, the Lord is
one. Love the
Lord your God
"with all your
heart and with all
your soul and
with all your
strength.
Deut 6:4-5


ItCELBRATE


iNO PDMAYOALL Wf/KNPD


Tallahassee's Biggest Party

Bring your largest Mug for a .99 Mexican Beer

FREE MARGARITA FOR FIRST 100 MONTICELLO LADIES

OUTDOOR GRILLING
Saturday Night Parrot Head Night-Live Music

Did mexico Grill i& Lantina

3212 Appalachee Parkway

(850) 878-TACO


FA CORY OUTLET
THOMASVILLE BEDDING COMPANY
OF GEORGIA Est.1968
Family Owned Business Where The Customer Still Counts!
In Stock -
Tempur Pedic le r,
A Mattress That Will
Meet Your Needs & Comfort
"Where The Customer Still Comes First"
Call Or Come By 671-3002
www.thomasvillebedding.com.
3347 Capital Circle NE (Across from Kevin's & Home Depot)


I-- I -


_ I, I r s ~~e


i


~Si~i






MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 5,2006 PAGE 7



0 M


f 0 DPre IDN f
IV













.,Call in for2freequestions!
IflN
engagement to the honeymoon o me n t





















$." i^-*iakes a g great g ift. ... R r r a. t i' .r.. Wey 'T W illia m
M On


%J r



e Do' P'' Laie. -.
Tarot Cards ,- Palm ReadinIs Asroog

r Contains 20 bbed hapt r MFl'siTron lym.i. I n- '. -I : --' '-
S1728 Mahan Drive 878-9327








S-: Owner er '
100 Days Se As Cash









. : ,' ..: .. .. ... ... .. ..
Planning a Wedding? No CreditLCheck

V *Nl kes a great gift. qto.ganized. \rl n b .
NMary Tomlinson Williams' .aq











I C-on -sainsg 2idedapsabe,. iV U. -k
PLUS -Tecomplete Alphabet yZipPockets P..Box419
D Day Planner format with ringedlbli'der 850-385-8491

5 5.(85L850'T35 4 L-8 3 083; (85'I 3-432 201-

IV


t y




S.,:Lisa.-D0XSebe,





VV
ihlMniV.a.w


r V
gj&sgr
~i r\OE~2lt~t ~ 'fV

y IN V
V:~~~;~


V -Y/olden Eagle Country Club combines gracious Southern i
r hospitality, excellent service, & fine food for those expecting
V the best. Overlooking beautiful Lake Diane, wee're the number '
V one location for your wedding reception. For more information
contact Mlichelle Lawley (850) 893-7700 or visit our website,
S" wwwx\-.goldeneaglecc.org
V 3700 Golden Eagle Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 850-893-7700
S -V
V V














PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 5, 2006


Fencers Undefeated

In Coach Pitch Action gii


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The C & F Fencing Coach -
Pitch team remains unde-
feated after downing State
Farm 9-2 and Hiram Masonic.
Lodge, 17-8, in Spring Sports
action.
In the game against State
Farm, the Fencers were trail--
ing 2-1 until the third inning,
when C & F scored four runs
and played good defense to
hold the State Farm score for
the final three innings.
Fencers making key defen-
sive plays included Alex
Campbell, Shawn Blue, Ca-
sey Demott, Hunter Handley
and Jake Edwards.
Against Hiram Masonic
Lodge, Coach Mike Holm
said the gamewas really close


until the fourth, when the
Fencers scored seven runs.
and four more in the fifth to
put the game away.
-Demott and Brandon Holm
each turned double-plays; and
Blue made two great catches
in the outfield.
Offensively, the Fencers
were led by Handley, who
went five for five with three
doubles; Brian Bowman, Kel-
sey Reams and Holm, all
went four for five; Demott.
three for five; and Sherquez
Ivey, three for five with a
double.
Campbell, three for five with
a home run; Doug Gulledge,
four for five, one triple, one
double; Blue two for six;
Emma Witmer, two for five,
one double; Ty Chancey, two
for six; and Edwards, one for
five.


Monticello A's Lose To

Miccosukee 17-7 Sunday


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello A's baseball
team lost to Miccosukee 17-7
Sunday, to stand 1-3 on the
season.
Coach Jim Norton attributed
the loss to a large number of
errors committed by the A's.
James Wesley pitched and
struck out two, gave up 12
hits, nine earned runs and


eight unearned runs, due to
seven errors.
"Those errors will get you
every time," said Norton.
-At the plate, Kelvin Norton
went two for five, with two
runs; Wesley two for five
with two runs, one RBI; Al;
Washington two for five with
a double, two runs and two
RBI;, and Ron Graham scored
one run.
The A's play against Icha-
way, 3 p.m., Sunday in Wa-
cissa.


<. i ,.
FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Lady Diamonds
downed the Monticello Kings
of the Hill, 15-8, in softball
action Monday.
Tanya Young and Kidra
Thompson both went four for
four; and Chandra Tucker, T.
Brooks and Lisa Crumitie, all


went three for four.
Shanice Brooks, Fannie
Mae Fead, Diane Fead, and
Shericka Parrish, all went two
for three.
Wilbo Ellis, Jr. went three
for three for the Kings; Kel-
vin Jones, Warren Allen, De-
metrius Hicks and Johnny
Gilley, all went two for three;
and K. 'Jay and Eldred Jen-
nings, both went one for three


Greenville Beats Kings


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Kings of the South
softball team fell to Green-
ville 17-7, Sunday.

Kelvin Jones went three for
three; Warren Alien, two for
three; Johnny River, two for
two; Ronzo Wade, K. Jay,


JCHS Tiger
Track Team
Sets Carwash

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Jefferson County High
Schpol track team will be
conducting a fundraising car
wash 8 a.m. until noon, Satur-
day, at the former North Side
gas station, next to the Post
Office.
Residents are encouraged to
stop by and support the track
team in this event.
Donations will be accepted.


OUR LIFELINE
IS-TOLL-FREE
Grab the line and
let us help you.

THE VOICE OF HOPE
1-800-572-1717
>.0<.> ~~~DmP


James Edward and Eldred
Jennings, all, one for two.
Tommy and Demetrius
Hicks, one for three; Wilbo
Ellis, one for one; Johnny Gil-
ley, 0 for one; and N. Seab-
rooks, 0 for two.
The Kings will square off
against Jasper 4:30 p.m., Sun-
day.
Assisting Coach Roosevelt
Jones is Kelvin Jones.
M Omn


Sports


I Diamonds

Lose To

-, l Mayo 25-6

S'd FRAN HUNT
L_. I Staff Writer


SHOWN HERE in practice, Jon Dady took first place at District Competition in the
high hurdles with 14.9 seconds, first in the 300 hurdles with 39.9 seconds and first
in the triple jump with 43 feet, one half inch. (News Photo)


Lady Warriors Fall

TO Eagleview 11-9


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Lady Warriors softball
team fell to Jacksonville's Ea-
gleview.11-9 in the Region 1,
lA playoffs, standing 23-5 on
the season.
The Lady Warriors commit-
ted 11 errors, which permit-
ted Eagleview to capitalize
and score eight unearned
runs.
Coach Roslyn Bass attrib-
uted the loss to those errors.
"Those errors killed is," said
Bass. "You can't win games
like that, ... .
."I hink \e ere looking too,
far ahead," said Bss. "It's.so
uncharacteristic for us to
make errors like that."
ACA had their 7-3 lead
erased by Eagleview with a
pair or runs in the third and
fourth. The score was tied
until the seventh inning when
the Lady Warriors apparently
fell apart, committing five er-
rors during the seventh.
At the bottom of the seventh,
ACA was able to plate two
runs, but were unable to plate
two more to tie the score.
Brittany Hobbs pitched the
game, which Bass said was
probably her best pitching
game of the season. Hobbs
struck out nine, and gave up


no walks and 12 hits. She
ends her season, 15-5 op the
record.
"But I have heard that Ea-
gleview has gotten a lot better
since the last time we played
the, so it should prove to be a
really good game," said Bass
last week.
When the Lady Warriors
squared off against First
Coast Christian in the Re-
gional Quarterfinals, ACA
downed First Coast, 12-2.
In the Regional Semifinal,
the Lady Warriors hammered
Paxton, 15-2.
Multiple errors being un-
characteristic for the Lady
'' Warriors could have been no
truer, in the semifinal games,
ACA committed a total of
three errors during both
games.


Chelsey Kinsey lead the
charge for.the Lady Warriors
at the plate, going three for
four with.a double and two
runs.
Lindsey Day went two for
three, three RBI, one run;
Bethany 'Saunders, two for
four with two runs; Keri
Brasington. two for four, one
RBI, one run; Joanna Cobb
scored three runs; and Mal-
lory Plaines, Nicole Mathis
and Paige Thurman, all went
one for three.
Coach Roslyn Bass said
ACA and Eagleview have
gone against each other twice
in the past during Regional
Finals, and ACA took the win
on both occasions.

You Can Count
On The
Monticello

News


The Monticello Lady Dia---
monds softball' team lost to
Mayo 25-6, last week.
"The errors are what killed
us," said Coach Roosevelt
Jones.
Nakidra Thompson pitched
a good game and at the plate,
she went three for three.
Shericka Parrish and Tonya
Young both went two for two;
Keandra Seabrooks and Lisa
Fead both two for three; Di-
ane Fead two for two; Letita
Fead, Nikki Cooks, Kathy
Starling and Valerie Robert-
son, all one for two.
Shanice Brooks, Chandra
Tucker, Ashley Allen and
Fannie Mae Fead, all went 0
for one; and Kista Hill one for
three.
Kelvin Jones now serves as
the assistant coach for the
Lady Diamonds.

Help your. community
when a-disaster strikes!
Become a trained Disaster
Services Volunteer by contacting
the Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross at 878-6080-
or visit our web site at
www.tallytown.com/redcross.
American
Red Cross





NOW AVAILABLE!
New Pool Tables
Balls Cues
,.Other Supplies- ,.
*Soft Drinks'-leer W1ne
850-668-7665
1698Village Square Blvd. Tallahassee
Open Noon til 2 am 7 Days Weeld


Lady Diamonds Down

Kings Of South 15-8


Monticello

News


Get Your

Annual

Subscription

-Today!


In State:


$45.00


Out of

State:

$52.00


'You Can't Be
Without It'


i --tHours: M-F 8:.30 5.30 Sat. 8:30 4:00 HorSiA
W IWMr W Brian Miller, Phone: 229-558-9016 Pure Performance
tM General Manager Toll Free: 1-800-558-9016
aquatrax.honda.com AQUATRAX ARERECOMMENDED FOR OPERATORS 16 YEARS OF AGE AND OLDER. ALWAYS WEARA U.S. COAST GUARD-APPROVED PERSONAL FLOTATION DEVICE, NEOPRENE WETSUIT BOTTOM,
EYEWEAR AND OTHER APPROPRIATE SAFETY APPAREL ALWAYS RIDE WITH THE SAFETY LANYARD ATTACHED TO YOUR PERSON. READ YOUR OWNER'S MANUAL THOROUGHLY, AND ABIDE BY ALL LOCAL, STATE AND FEDERAL
LAWS AND REGULATIONS. TAKEA SAFETY CbURSE. Call he U.S. Coast Guard at 1-800-368-5647 to locate a boating salely course near you. AquaTrax and Pure Performance" are trademarks of Honda Motor Co., Ltd. (11/05) 05-0020


4 A L^4 Ll..... 4 f% U"-..Mft











Benny Bufford Termite

Technician Of Year


BUFFORD


Church News
The Deacon and Deaconess
Board of Greater Fellowship
MB Church will celebrate their
anniversary 3 p.m. Sunday.
Elder Willie Cuyler and St.
Tabernacle Church of God in
Unity is is charge of the serv-
ice.
***
Waukeenah United Method-
ist Church will hold a spring
sale at its Thrift Store, 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Saturday. Donations
are accepted.


Homes Of

Mourning
(Continued From Page 6)
ard, Tampa, Daisy (Spencer)
Armour of Mary Esther, FL
and Tiffany Rivers of Ft. Wal-
ton Beach, sons Bakor Rivers,
Jr. Tallahassee and Edwin Riv-
ers of Clearwater a devoted
grandson Anthony Coward of
Ft. Walton Beach, her loving
mother Mrs. Viola Thompson,
Monticello; four brothers,
James C. (Mildred) Thompson,
Jr., Upper Marlboro, Md., Sgt.
Major Arthur Thompson, Hau-
lock, NC, Minster Walter
(Darlene) Thompson, and Qtr.
Master 1st Class Elton
(Kineta) Thompson of Jack-
sonville, FL; six sisters, Joyce
(Elder Dr. Anthony) Webster,
Springfield, VA., Theola (Os-
carlee) Crumity, Juanita
Hampton, and Eunicei` (Carl)
Love, Talljla"j.c ''IHazel
Thompson of Jacksonville and
Helen King of Monticello, 11
grandchildren, 2 great grand-
children, and a host of nieces,
nephews, aunts, uncles, other
relatives and loving friends.
Mrs. Rivers was preceded in
death by her father, J.C.
Thompson and her youngest
sister, Glenda Elaine Thomp-
son.



Land Use
(Continued From Page 4)
It's the new order of things
Sir Paul thought he wanted.
Of course, it can be argued
that Paul has received what he
deserves because he's so eager
to inflict the same idiocy on
the rest of us. But gloating
over Paul doesn't restore our
property rights.
Will he ever understand that
his actions and political gib-
berish have consequences?
Perhaps Paul could now be en-
couraged to rewrite George
Harrison's son "Tax man" and
replace those words with
"Land ma, "


Retirement
(Continued Form Page 4)
One quarter of these parents
plan to pay for their child's
education with personal sav-
ings, another quarter intend for
their child to earn scholarships
to pay for tuition.
Surprisingly, only 13 percent
of respondents plan to use pri-
vate student loans and 12 per-
cent plan to fund their child's
education with financial aid.
Rising energy and home-
heating costs and uninsured
medical expenses rank as the


highest financial concerns for
Americans (15 percent each).
Retirement and the price of
gas (13 percent each) follow
closely behind.
Education costs are also a
concern as 9 percent of respon-
dents worried about their own
college education.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Benny Bufford, of Dixon
Exterminating, has been cho-
sen PCT/Syngenta Profes-
sional Products Technician of
the Year.
This 2005 Termite Techni-
cian of the Year, heads up the
termite team at Dixon Exter-
minating.
Among his many accom-
plishments was the discovery
of the first point source For-
mosan termite infestation in
Southwest Georgia.
He is a skilled technician
and leader by example, and is
quick to acknowledge the
contributions of his entire
crew.
"It's Bufford who sets the
tone for his crew with
honesty, integrity, work ethic,
and thoroughness," said Char-
les Dixon.
"He understands the value
of a dollar and the work ethic
that's involved in the
business, he continues. "He
also knows that his crew is
the most valuable resource
and he really tries to treat
them well."


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Tara S. Rosenblum, staff at-
torney for Legal Services of
North Florida, announces a
series of community educa-
tion workshops to be held at
the Public Library, 6:30 p.m.,
Tuesday, May 9 through
June 6.
Family Law is the topic of
the first workshop to be held
on May 9.
Tax Law and Tax Problems
workshop is set for May 16.
A discussion about educa-


"I'm sweet, soft, and cud-
dly and can be yours for
only $20," Miss Piggy.
(News Photo)



Area Writers

To Meet

At Library
The Monticello Writers
Group invites all area writers
to join them at the library, 7 to
9 p.m. Thursday, May 11.
The group meetsmonthly in
a casual setting to share ideas,
offer critiques, and lend sup-
port.
All are welcome whether
published or unpublished.
Bring a few pages of work to
read to the group, or just come
to offer opinions.

For additional information,
contact Michael Breitzman at
997-5771.


tion, is planned May 23.
Debt Management and
Bankruptcy information will
be the topic on May 30.
Social Security Disability
and Appeals will be dis-
cussed, June 6.
Legal Services of North
Florida is a private non-profit
corporation dedicated to pro-
viding free, high quality legal
representation to low income
people with civil legal prob-
lems.
For more information about
the above workshops contact
Rosenblum or Scott Manion
at 385-9007.


Miss Piggy Is

Pet Of Week

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer.

This week's Pet of the
Week, named by the Humane
Society, is a Guinea Pig,
named Miss Piggy.
She is an adult multi-brown
color, long hair Guinea pig.

Miss Piggy is soft, sweet
and cuddly.

She can be adopted for $20,
which includes the adoption
fee, cage and food.

To adopt Miss Piggy or any
of the other many animals at
the shelter call342-0244.


CHECK YOUR
HOT SPOTS!



e Remember_..
Keep blankets,
clothing, curtains, furni-
ture and anything that
could catch fire at least
three feet away from
portable heaters.
For free fire safety tips,
write: Fire Safety, P.O. Box
34386, Washington, DC
20043



SAFE
S, f KIDS
~eC_ =1


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 5, 2006 PAGE 9

Boys, Girls Clubs Name

Athletes Of Week


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


TUCKER


MARTIN


4.,


WATKINS


JONES


Five Monticello Boys and
Girls Club members were se-
lected as "Athletes of the
Week", by the Boys and Girls
Club of America.
They include Reggie Wat-
kins, 17, of the JCHS Boys
and Girls Club; DeAndre
Tucker, 14, and Agnes K.
Williams, 13, both of the St.
Phillips Boys and Girls Club;
and Samiria Martin, 12, and
Brionjala L. Jones, 12, both of
the Monticello Boys and Girls
Club.
Spokesman James Mercado
said the student members




How TO KEEP
YOUR KIDS
FREE OF DRUGS.



Rule


#7.


Educate

Yourself.

It's not a matter of
learning the latest
street talk. It's a mat-
ter of learning why
crack is so dangerous.
That marijuana cap
often lead to hard
Drugs. That every
illegal drug has the.
potential of causing
catastrophic damage
t9 your child. To learn
more about drugs and
how to talk with your
kids about the subject,
call fof a free parent's
handbook.

1-800-624-0100
al[M6DlA r-iPIh AME*'. I
c- n gu' h .L -.'; h 1 '1,
lIIlml .Mic l'. l IA ""'' '- ;'


RGOODM AN'S
Real Pit B-B-Que
OF PERRY INC.


ONLY THE FINEST QUALITY MEATS
SLOW COOKED OVER AN OPEN PIT


RIBS CHICKEN BEEF
PORK BAR-B-QUE BEANS


Catering Available or All Occasions
Weddings Banquets Reunions & More!
Call Ahead for Carry Out' Drive-in Window
2429 BYRON BUTLER PKWY. HWY. SOUTH PERRY


were asked a variety of ques-
tions ranging from, "What do
they want to do when they
grow up?", as Samiria Martin
answered, "My goal is to be a
doctor.", to their thoughts of
the Boys and Girls Clubs in
Jefferson County, as Tucker
stated, "I think the flag foot-
ball league has brought some-
thing new and exciting to our
clubs and our county."
The student members pro-
files can be viewed at
www.bgcayyouthnet.org., un-
der the sports tab of the web
site, and they can be viewed
for the next several weeks.
For information on how to
become a member of the
county clubs, call Mercado at
519-1200.




American Stroke
Association,
A Division of American i
Heart Association .

'Time iaLrsWhaes O
For people over age 55, the incidence of
stroke more than doubles in each
successive decade.
Stroke Warning Signs:
* Sudden numbness or weakness in
the face, arm, or leg, especially on
one side of the body.
* Sudden confusion or trouble
speaking or understanding.
* Sudden trouble seeing in one or
both eyes.
* Sudden trouble walking, dizziness,
loss of balance or coordination.
* Sudden severe headache
with no known cause. B


'1
Herttrk


SENTINEL
(PG13)
Fri. 4:15 -9:50-Sat. -
4:.15 9:50 Sun. 4:15 Mon. Thurs.
4:15

STICK IT
(PG13)
Fri. 4:00- 7:35 9:55 Sat. 1:00 -
4:00 7:35 9:55 Sun.- 1:00 -
4:00 7:35 Mon Thurs. 4:00 -
7:35

SCARY MOVIE 4 (PG13)
Fri. 5:35 7:50 10:05 Sat.
1:05 -3:20-5:35 -7:50- 10:05
Sun. 1:05 3:20- 5:35- 7:50
Mon. Thurs 5:35 7:50


Value Has a New Address AEEH)& THE
Fri. 4:10- 7:10 -9:35 Sat. 1:25-
4:10-7:10-9:35 Sun. 1:25-4:10
7:10 Mon. Thurs. 4:10 7:10
NO PASSES

YOur Kubota Dealer rICE AGE 2 (PG)
Your Kubot Dealer ri. 7:30- Sat. 1:30-7:30 Sun.
Power. Versatility. Ease-of-operation 1:30- 7:30 Mon. Thurs 7:30
Things you value in a tractor.
Honest. Customer Service RV (PG)
( T.* '" Product Knowledge. .7-
Things you value c o t Fri. 4:25 7:25 9:40 Sat. 1:10
in a dealer. .. 4:25 7:25 9:40 Sun 1:10 -
Now you have it all in one place: 4:25 7:25 Mon. Thurs. 4:25
-7:25
NO PASSES

iMission Impossible 3
Service *Parts (PG 13)
*Free Delivery w/ Fri. 4:30- 7:15 -10:00 Sat 1:15
New Purchase -4:30 -7:15 10:00 Sun. 1:15 -
-Only Kubota Dealership 4:30 -7:15 Mon.-Thurs 4:30 -
in I Counties
*We'vebeen in 7:15
business for 32 years NO PASSES

Hoot
(PG)
Fri. 5:15 7:20 9:30 Sat. 12:45 -
3:00 5:15 7:20 9:30 Sun.
12:45 3:00 5:15 7:20 Mon. -
Thurs. 5:15 7:20

(80)67 -28


Legal Services workshops

Scheduled At Library


thSEA Ti,-n.owt vodhs MA K.- o oligtio. N


see o iur ebi fe a -fre -. I *adl
arkr


I I I- _J


;"

~:''~
'-e








PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 5, 2006

Healthy Hearts Campaign

Targets High Blood Pressure


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Healthy Hearts Campaign
has as its goal to help resi-
dents lower high blood pres-
sure.
This year's theme is: Pre-
Vent and Control High Blood
Pressure: Mission Impossible.
"It's easy to join the
mission," said Physical Ac-
tivities Instructor for the
Healthy Hearts Campaign,
Tequila Hagan.
"Just ask your doctor what
your blood pressure numbers
are, what they mean, and
what you need to do to pre-
vent or control high blood
pressure."
Hagan said that high blood
pressure currently affects one


out of every three American
adults, and although it has no
signs or symptoms, uncon-
trolled high blood pressure
can lead to heart disease,
stroke and kidney disease.
"High blood pressure af-
fects more than 40 percent of
African Americans," said Ha-
gan. "In Jefferson County
age- adjusted death rates from
major cardiovascular disease
from 2001-2003 were 70 per-
cent higher for African
American residents than for
whites, and were 25 percent
higher than the state average.
"That's why Healthy Jeffer-
son, Healthy Hearts Cam-
paign is partnering with Afri-
can American churches to
promote high blood pressure
education and action," she
added.


On May 7, National Work-
shop Site Education Day, pas-
tors in Jefferson County have
been asked to speak about this
important health concern and
to distribute flyers on preven-
tion and control of high blood
pressure to their congrega-
tions.
The Healthy Hearts Cam-
paign is also providing nutri-
tional classes and training and
support for church volunteers
who lead physical activity and
walking groups at their
churches. Each group re-
ceives educational materials,
scales and pedometers.
Often, simple lifestyle
changes such as losing
weight, if necessary, and
maintaining a healthy weight,
following a healthy eating
plan, eating less salt and so-


dium, limiting alcohol con-
sumption, being physically
active, and being smoke free
can help; lower blood
pressure, said Hagan.
Just 30 minutes of moderate
physical activity most days of
the week will help," said Ha-
gan. These can be divided
into 15 minute periods.
Churches interested in start-
ing an exercise or walking
group to promote heart health,
can contact Agnes McMurray
at 877-1529 to join the pro-
gram.


l
LEGALS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION. IN RE:
ESTATE OF YVONNE WINIFRED
BARFIELD, Deceased, NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION. The
administration of the estate of
YVONNE WINIFRED BARFIELD,
deceased, File Number 06-47-PR is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Jefferson County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Jefferson County Courthouse,
Room 10, Monticello, Florida,
32344. The name and address of the
personal representative and of the
personal representative's attorney


Housing Vouchers
We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 3/2 $715 4/2 $895 ~ $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571


LEGALS
are set forth below. ALL
INTERESTED PERSONS ARE
NOTIFIED THAT: All persons on
who this notice is served who have
objections that challenge the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of this Court are
required to file their objections with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER
OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All
creditors of the descendant or other
person having claims or demands
against descendant's estate on
whom a copy of this notice is served
within three months after due date
of the first publication of this notice
must file their claim with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM. All other creditors of
the decedent and persons having



BUSINESS




DIRECTORY


Portable Toilets DOUG'S TREE & LAWN
Billy Simmons Septic SERVICE Register's Mnm-StorageBBOE
850-509-1465 cell 0 Trimming o Stump Grinding 315 Waukeenah Hwy. Lawn & Landscaping
850-997-0877 home o Mowing AerialDevice--
Clean Portables for construction sites, 0 Removal 0 Bush Hogging (1/4 Mile Off US 19 South) Mention This Ad & receive
family reunions, parties 0 Maintenance A 10% Discount_
Events and Types 997-0039 Lic. &Insured 997-2535 11025EastMahan 877-4550


B & M Tractor Service CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC INC. LA HIUT rai
Specializing in Food Plots, Bush Hogging, H L 1 Eig
Liming & Fertilizing, Spraying, and Fencing A' ...R Larichiuta p e
., "Complete Auto Electric Repair Service" Larichiuta
Richbourg Nursery, Inc. .r Lloyd, FL.32337
merock
Brad McLeod 99 Richbourg Road -
Cell: (850)210-2942 Mack McLeod ntllo, F 3 T -1 0
997-45 Hoe: (850) 997 309omasville Road 115 Albany Rd. .Sand 6788
10534 South Salt Rd, Laumont, FL. 32336 Tel. 850- 997-3764 (on Carroll Hill) 229-226-071 7 *:: -p Soil
Fax 850-997-8388


Your Local Professional Painters
Interior ~ -xterior
Lic.& Ins. #4676








Septic Tank & Land Clearing
Complete Septic Service & Repair
Lot Preparing & Land Clearing

Thomas B. Scott, Sr.
Rt 1 Box 137
Lamont, FL 32366
ph:997-5536 cell: 933-3620


*Lot Cleaning *Driveways *Dig Ponds *Road
Building *Culvert Installation *Fill Dirt
*Limerock *Gravel
Billy Simmons, Owner
Backhoe and Hauling Septic TanksContractor &
Excavation Contractor
Phone: (850) 997-0877
Cell: (850) 509-1465
Insured D.O.H. Li. SR0971265
Visa & Mastercard Accepted!


1-10 CHEVRON
We have received a new delivery of
ladies purses at reasonable prices.

Morgan's Chewing Tobacco
$1.96 pack, $5.55 -3 packs,
$21.42 carton +Tax

Swisher Sweet Buy One Get One

Little Cigars, 5 2 packs

Sweet Cherry or Milds
$6.89 with $2.00 Coupon + Tax
( Limited to supply on hand)
Free crystal lighter with each carton

WE ACCEPT ALL MANUFACTURERS
COUPONS


Residential & Commercial Lic.#cgc #1507547

YEAGER CONTRACTING CO. INC.
CUSTOM HOMES

."- nmein :dgultur Bi~igs
:. .: ...6 -- L -

PH: 997-2296 CELL: 508-2383


? WE GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!
997-6500
WHEN You NEED To SOLVE COMPUTER PROBLEMS.
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY ONSITE SERVICE
*Diagnosis Repair *Upgrades *Installations *Consultations
'Tutorials *Removal of Viruses, Adware, Spywate


JEFFERSON PLACE APARTMENTS PiItYuHs
1468 S. WAUKEENAH ST.OFFICE 300 .....
MONTICELLO, FL 32344 Call for quality work
1+ 2 BEDROOM / HUD VOUCHERS ACCEPTED
CALL 850-997-6964 TTY-711 45 Years In The Trade
Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
,* 850-997-7467 ~ 850-544-2917
Sw *Residential ~ Commercial *Interior ~ Exterior



i MOWING~ HARROWING-
FOOD PLOTS
Since 1977
LIC. & INS. Since 1977
S*Licensed *Bonded *Insured

James Thurman, LLC Residential & Commercial
50-97 211 FREE ESTIMATES ~ 997-4100
850-997-5211
850-545-0139 FT11 IMM I


The Decorator's

Warehouse, LLC


260 N.
Cherry


Street


Furnishing & Accessories


MONTICELLO'S ONLYLOCAL HEATING & COOLING COMPANY

STEWART
HEATING & COOLING INC.

Sales ~ Service ~ Installation ~ Change Outs
Residential Commercial

Family Owned Office: (850) 342-3294
Lie. # RA0067121 u_ CELL: (850) 509-2903


A&S Flooring, L.L.C.
43 Years experience
CERAMIC, TILE, CARPET, VINYL,
LAMINATE, REPAIRS & SALES
342-9922 HOME
570-6593 CELL
LICENSED & INSURED


EDD KEATON
TRAVIS KEATON
54 Capps Hwy
Lamont, FL 32336


850-997-0903 Shop
850-264-6871 Cell
850-997-0937 Fax
850-997-5443 Home


-'- ultimate

Utage Auto

87717222
Tyrone avis, A Very large selection to choose from
Sales Manager 4 All trade-ins are welcome
A Best rates as low as 4.5%
A Free warranty on every vehicle sold
Trade
pus, Ir ag OO CREDITT, BAD (REINT,
e ,AVeAle IT DO[ESNT MATA R
,Fe Tr Y e ykonef
For Eve Th

'1 1 :1~~T1i


MR. MERCHANT

THIS SPACE

COULD BE

YOURS FOR

ONLY $10.00


Keaton Tire Repair
"Service Is Our Business on and off the Road"


I









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 5,2006 PAGE 11


To Place Your Ad





997-3568


CLASSIFIED


Your Community Shopping Center


CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES
3 Lines, Two editions ~ Wednesday and Friday...$7.00.
Each Additional Line.....$1.00
DEADLINES: Monday Noon for Wednesday
Wednesday Noon for Friday
Call Our Classified Department at:
997-3568


LeEGALS -

claims or demands against the
estate of the decedents must file
their claims with this Court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this Notice is May 5, 2006. Attorney
For Personal Representative
T.BUCKINGHAM BIRD P.O. Box
247 Monticello, FL. 32345
850-997-3503 FL Bar ID #0006176,
TIMOTHEE A. BARFIELD 1500
N. Jefferson Street Monticello,
Florida 32344
5/5,12/06, c
NOTICE: The Jefferson County
Board of County Commissioners
will hold a PUBLIC HEARING, at
6:00 p.m., on Thursday, May 18,
2006, at the Jefferson County Court
house, courtroom, Monticello,
Florida, to consider adoption of an
ordinance, as follows: AN
ORDINANCE AMENDING
ORDINANCE 91-7, IMPOSING AN
ADDITIONAL TWO (2) CENTS
LOCAL OPTIONS GAS TAX
UPON EVERY GALLON OF
MOTOR 'FUELAND SPECIAL
FUEL. SOLD IN JEFFERSON
COUNTY AND TAXED UNDER
THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER
206 AND 336.025, FLORIDA
STATUTES; PROVIDING THAT
THE IMPOSITION SHALL BE
EFFECTIVE FOR A PERIOD OF
FIFTEEN (15) YEARS, BEGIN-
NING SEPTEMBER 1, 2006; PRO-
VIDING FOR DISTRIBUTION
PURSUANT TO F.S. 336.025(3)(a)
BETWEEN JEFFERSON
COUNTY AND THE CITY OF
MONTICELLO; PROVIDING AN'
EFFECTIVE DATE. The complete
ordinance is available for inspection
in the office of the Clerk of Circuit
Court, Courthouse, Room 10, Mon-
ticello, Florida, 32344, between the
hours of 8:00 a.m. And 5:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday. Danny
Monroe, Chairman.
5/5/06

HELP WANTED

Stylist/Skin Tech/manicurist
needed at upscale salon in
Madison. 'Must be motivated for
full time and part time, call
973-3318 ask for Jessie.
4/28, 5/1, 3, c


Caregiver in Lloyd area, to fill
in as needed, $65.00 per day
9:30am-10pm. Call 879-8698,
224-4131
4/28,5/3, 5,10, pd

How would you like to earn
some extra money during the
summer months? Utility Meter
Services is looking for
temporary meter change-out
field technicians in the
Monticello area. You must have
valid Florida driver's license,
pass a pre-employment drug test
and background check. We will
train qualified individuals.
Starting salary will be $15.00hr.
Please call 727-368-9753, or
send your resume to
UMS(asplundh.com.
UMS-EOE
4/28, 5/3, 5, pd

MONTICELLO: Part time
janitorial position available
immediately. Please call
681-3148 for more information.
4/12, 14, 19, 21, 5/3, 5, 10, 12, c

Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn

Jefferson County Road
Department is seeking
applicants for Equipment
Operator/Laborer. Applications
may be obtained at the Road
Department office located at
1484 S. Jefferson Street,
Monticello, Florida. A high
School Diploma or Equivalent
and a valid drivers license are
required. CDL drivers'license
would be desirable but not
required. Experience running a
backhoe, small dump truck, and
roadside mowing tractors.
Accepting applications until
5/22/2006. Phone number
997-2036
5/5, c

Gas station attendant needed.
Good starting pay and benefits.
Call 997-1133
5/5, tfn, pd

Weekend baby-sitter for 3
children, some nights required.
Call Liz 342-1162
5/5,10,12, pd


Dog- 4/17/06, Kim's Lane,
behind McDonalds. Male,
American Fox Hound- like. Call
997-2768. 5/5, ne

FOR SALE :,,_.'.1;;
Metal roofing save $$$ Buy
direct from manufacturer. 20
-colors in stock with all
accessories. Quick turn around!
Delivery available toll free
(888)393-0335.
4/28-fcan
Rhode Island Red Roosters for
sale, $10 each. Call 997-0901,
leave message.
5/5, pd
Queen size Sealy Posturepedic
pillowtop bed with white Disney
headboard. $175 & 7 drawer
dark wood desk and chair.
$50.00 Call 997-4304
5/5, pd


AUTOMOTIVE


1977 Chevy P/U Truck 305
with heavy duty rear end. Good
shape. $1700 OBO Call
997-6706
5/5, pd
1993 Suburban 4x4 New motor,
as new condition, 3 seats,
$4300.00. My Mean Wife Says
Sell!! 997-0129
5/5, 10, 12, 17, pd
1983 Toyota Tercel runs good,
A/C $600.00 firm or $300.00
down and $100.00 for 4 weeks.
Call 997-6706
5/5, pd
1988 Chevy Malibu 4-door. All
power, excellent condition,
recent tires, etc. $5000 OBO.
Serious Inquiries only.
850-997-6308
5/5, pd
No Credit Checks Just Low
Down Payments on Good Cars
& Trucks. 2 and 4 Door Model
As Low As $750 down
850-536-9111
www.JumpinJims.com Ask for
Mr. Deal
11/2-tfn

BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITIES


All cash candy route. Do you
earn $800/day? 30 machines.
Free candy. All for $9,995. (888)
629-9968 BO2000033. Call us.
We will not be undersold.
4/28 fcan

SERVICES: .H
Handy Man- pressure washing,
woodworking, painting
interior/exterior, siding, trim,
and housekeeping. Call Billy @
251-4575
5/5,12,19,26, pd
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quick responses.
6/22, tfn


Peters Satellite -- Your Satellite
Dish dealer. We offer
equipment, installation, repair,
parts, and prompt service. We
also offer Go-Karts, utility
trailers and lawn mowers.
Located at: 1150 Old Lloyd
Rn ui 7A ;irll RAi8


Koaa, monticeiio, ri Pa.
850-997-33177
1/25, ifn, c


V~:~Ui



?i- A, Ai~
i' ;.- iiLA


Joe F. Roberts
Realtor -Associate
Cell 850-672-0741


DIGITAL

RECEPTION

SERVICES, INC..
Smtollra~ TV Izirstamllc-ws


Healthy Weight Loss available
only at Jackson's Drug,
Hoodiacol is designed to curb
the appetite, burn fat and'
increase energy levels resulting
in considerable weight loss over
time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key'
ingredients incorporated into,
rice bran oil with natural
flavorings to give it a palpable,
taste. In addition to weight los,'-
you may see benefits for the :
hair, skin and nails from the.;~
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in
rice bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is
a cactus found in the Kalahari_
Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed, as an appetite'
suppressant, it not only limits
appetite but increases the sense.
of satietyr. This tends to 'limit
total caloric intake by 30-400'.)
without experiencing hunger.
Significant, weight loss should
resul t from such a drop in
caloric intake.
s/d. 5/18, tfn


8a~m-1pm. Furniture, household
goods and new Reese fifthwheel
hitch $450.00
5/5, pd
Wilkinson Warehouse Sale
Saturday, May 6 Doors open 8
am-12 Noon. 7071 Gil Harbin
Industrial Boulevard Valdosta
Georgia. Call for directions
800-633-2215
4/28, 515, c


Rooster. Call Carlo Grisanti
i342-9918. 5/5,pd


Mi'me downtown office space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack. Carswell,
997-1980.
11/30 tfn, c
Office for Rent 238 W
Washington St. Call 997-2646
Ma-F 9-5 available May Ist
tfn


MMM"


I


" L -


Home Health Care Equipment'-'
Jackson's, Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
NOW ~ AVAILABLE -
1/19-tfn


Garage' sale Saturday May 6 on'
'Texas" Hill across from Tire~
Plantation. We will have a little
of everything You'll be able to
find 11 This, That,The others and
Then' some." Also iittle- girl
clothing sizes 4-6. See ylaill theq.e
515, pd
Saturday 8 am noon. 317
Waukeenah Highway,
knick-knacks, kitchen, linens,
computer softwa~re/hardware,
windows, aluminum rims and
tires, books, speakers, TV, tools.
5/5, pd
Saturday, May 6, 8am l2pm
Green Acres Mini Storage
behind Morgans Bows IN' Toes
N. Jefferson Street.
515, pdh
.Royal 1 Mini Storage US 19 S.
Garage Sale 'Saturday, May 6,


-Mobile Home for rent, 2 BR 11/2
bath on a pond. Large storage
building. $450.00/Month. Off
Drifton Highway. Call 421-3911
4 28,5 3 5, 10, pd

:Country living I-bedroom,
I-bathroom, $500.00' and
.2-bedroom, 2-bathroom,
$ 550.00' monthly, located
:between Wacissa and US98,
,997-6653
S5/5,10,12,17,19,23,26, pd

REALiI ESTATE
IThinking of sellingg' Great
timing! Call Lynette for a free
market analysis. Find out what
your property w~uld sell for in
today's active market. With her
proven marketing plan and
track record of success,
Lynette's, the full time
SREALTOR who's uniquely
qualified' to sell your property
for the best price. Lynette C.
Sirmon, Realtor Associate
:850-933-6363 or after hours
'8510-948-5000, : R.Winston-
SConnell, Realtor.


(850) 997-4340,

www.TimPeary.com



Serious About Sellinq?

List with -me today!

Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bedroom 2
baths, screened porch on a very pretty 1.6 acres
in Lloyd Acres $74,900

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially clear ed
acres on US 19~south ne 'ar Dennis' Tradjua.Wic.L
only $16,500 per acre


Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly wooded
acres Only $36,500

Horse.Farrn 29 acre horse farm big doublewide w/
fireplace, stables, round pen in remote, oaks, pond,
north of Greenville only $329,000

PearV Does It Aqain! Under Contract
Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge Lane
1 00'x220' in the City $15,500 each

Pearv Does It Adiain! Under Contract Free-
man Road 26.46 acres of pasture land with easy
access to 1-10, US 19 and US 27 Only 3,500 per acre

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bedroom
2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10 year old
planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50 acres in
planted pines, swimming pool, detached garage, barn
nice field near US 90 and SR 59 only $1,200,000

Pearv Does It Aqain! under Contract--
Buildinq lots Town on Morris Road call for details
$10, 000 to $40, 000

Pearv Does It Aqain! Under Contract Cox
Road 10 mostly wooded acres just a~few miles
North of town $12,000 per acre

Prime Commercial Property US 19 South
near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

PearV Does It Aqain! Terrific Land Invest-
ment 5 acres under contract 5 available on the
east side of town high and dry in quiet location
with lots of game, 9 year old planted pines, profit
from both appreciating land and growing pine
Now $9,500 per

PearV Does It Aqain! Near Lake Hall Under
Contract 2 wooded acres $26,500

Home Site close to town on West Groover-
ville Road only $14,500

Pearv Does It Aqain! Christmas Acres
Sold -3 bedroom 2 bath mobile home on 3 acres
with a big deck, carport and a workshop $96,000

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
Simply the Best!
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!-
Simply the Best!


Price Slashed! 2 bedroom'l bath home with
small fenced yard, family room $87,500 Now.
$76,500

Pear V Doest It Aqain! Under Contract-


Priced to Sell 1993 Fleetwood 3 bedroom 2
bath home on 2.5 acres in Lloyd Acres paved
road frontage $76,500


*2.5'Acres in NE area of county, private dirt road, mo-
bile homes allowed, rolling~~hills terrain;, large mer-
chantable pine trees just $10,000 per acre.
.*6.42 acres, East on U.S. 90, pond, well, septic, home-
site, nature at ii7-9 best, only $ 14,900 per acre
* Fixer Upper, 5 room cracker house, porches, poor
condition, Greenville, needs everything, $30,000 As Is.
*Tuck~ed ini the shade of the old oaks, 3 Bd/2bth, DW,
on 4.11ac, carport, fireplace, porches, $139.500
SLittle farmhouse, 2/2, on 5.69 ac, mostly wooded,
grain bin, pole barn/shed, $155,900
*Huge Brick Home, 5 acre hilltop, workshop, garage,
$419,000 overlooks woodsy duc~k pond
Don't see what you want here, let meA check MLS
for you, I have access to, hundreds of listings.

Lynette C.'Sirmon, Realtor Associate,
R. Winlston Con ntell, Realtor
850-933-6363 Mobile or After Hdurs 850-948-5000


,,~i"""'"'" ""~ ~BT~,~~~~


I uu Can Depend On The

Mobticello NewsClassifieds

Fd0r The Best Results!!:


1 865 N. Jefferson St.

(Next To Discount Beer & Cigarettes)

Approx.. 40' X 80' Builing, 1/2 Acre plus or minus


$1959000,-- (603)793-6796








PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., MAY 5, 2006


Progress Energy, Ist Baptist Tree

Giveaway Celebrates Arbor Day


Progress Energy, 1st Baptist Join Forces

GAYE HANNA, Carl Livingston, Daniel Barrett, Jamie Teague, Bob Hanna, Jason
House, and Larry Watson helped distribute trees in celebration of Arbor Day. (News
Photo)


Jamie's Body Works

To Hold Springtime

Celebration Saturday


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Jamie's Body Works pre-
sents "A Springtime Celebra-'
tion," 3 p.m. Saturday at the
First United Methodist Church
Fellowship Hall.
Little Angels Preschool
warm-up songs include:
"Chitty Chitty Bang Bang,"
and "Splish Splash."
Tumbling Routine Songs in-
clude: "I'm a Believer," and
"I'm On My Way."
Tumblers are: Brian Camp-
bell, Joshua Eades, Isabella
Herndon, Mylie Rogers, Gene-
see Sego, Rebekah Tucker and
Ashlyn Williams.
Little University warm-up
songs include: "Pig on Her
Head," and "Telephone."
Tumbling Routine Songs
are: "Ease on Down the
Road," versions 1 and 2.


Tumblers include: Mateus
Bitencourt, Brandon Hannon,
Anna Key, Ryan Long, Han-
nah Pitts, Gabbie Smith, and
Zackary Wolfe.
Studio Class for six to ten
year olds includes: BOSU Bal-
ance Trainer Expo: Car Wash.
Tumbling Routine includes:
"All Things Just Keep Getting
Better," and "Move Your
Feet."
Tumblers are: Mikayla Fil-
lyaw, Carly Joiner, Nicole Lit-
tle, Abigail Morgan and Kelci
Register.
Studio Class for three to five
year olds warm-up songs in-
clude: "Monkey in the
Middle," "Linus and Lucy."
Tumbling Routine numbers
are: "Stuck on You," "All
Shook Up," and "Let Me Be
Your Teddy Bear."
Tumblers are: Grace
Beshears, Abby Boyd, Lindsey
Davis, Riley Hamrick, Taylor


Knecht, Auburne Mobley,
Mylie Rogers, Mary Rose
Schwier, and Olivia Walton.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

In celebration of Arbor Day,-
Progress Energy in coopera-
tion with First Baptist Church
of Monticello gave away a se-
lection of trees, Saturday.
On hand tending to the trees
and helping with the givea-
way were Daniel Barrett,
Bob Hanna, Gaye Hanna, Ja-
son House, Carl Livingston,
Jamie Teague, and Larry
Watson.

.Along with the trees they
distributed a colorful poster of
'Trees of the North Florida
Urban Forest', that included
detailed information on se-
lecting and planting the right_
tree for the right place.

Handouts with Progress En-
ergies tree trimming policies
and wise planting choices
were also passed along during
the tree pick up.


OPENING NOVEMBER 2006.
THE Wca
OF DAYTONA BEACH.
The Ultra-Luxurious Oceanfront
Condominium with Concierge Services
and Golf & Spa Privileges.
Oceanfront Pool with Sun Terraces
and Lush Gardens
Ultra-Luxury 2 and 3 Bedroom
residences with Fireplace, Panoramic
View Balconies, Gourmet Kitchens
and Designer Baths.


Call today 1-866-741-8317
www.oceanvistasdaytona.com


Cehebratiurg Flrloru's Div'erse
FLORI DA Hage at the Stephen Foster
Folk C'Lhulre Center State Paik
FOLK FES11VAL rinhire Spiings, FL
husic. HERITAGE. LEGEND. MAY 26-2S. 20106
Experienice o14-fashioned fiojrji -'Euntdling,crifi' and culture,
-plus Rosanne Cash andml 'r !'uu pr-firnwr .
Visit-FjoridaFolkFesii al.c>,trm t, W.s,or calU I-i77-6FL-FOLX.-
Spo,,,o In Part B;
Flolrida H.i a,,gnls rCnria il Comcafl,,f polugL- t. .C Dlchjilbl.aCg Inc.
Co, r Is I I. igb i.A.W Iw 'l' Red L'LD D.2-4,'. .s In
*e '.L%.**l''' ,t'* b..


LITTLE


WHITE HOUSE


cdcaiil~e


Open Mon. Wed., Fri. 10 AM 4 PM Closed on
Thursdhys Sat. 10 AM 1PM
370 N. Jefferson St.

Monticello, Florida

(850) 997-1591
Owned & Operated by: Janet Collins


Democrats To Host Meet,

Greet For Alex Sink, Chief

Financial Officer Candidate


County voters will have the
opportunity to meet and greet
Alex Sink, Democratic candi-
date for Chief Financial Offi-
cer, as barbecue fundraiser 7
p.m. Monday, at the Opera
House.
Local Democratic Party
Chair Eleanor Hawkins states
that locals will be impressed
with Ms. Sink, who has more
than 25 years of financial ex-
perience.,
She was president of the
largest bank in Florida, manag-
ing more than $40 billion in
assets and supervising more
than 9,000 employees in 800
branches.
As vice chair of Florida Tax-
Watch, a non-profit research
institute that advocates fiscal
responsibility in government
and cost savings for taxpayers,
she has long advocated for


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

The Watermelon Festival
Committee met Monday eve-
ning to solidify details for the
fast approaching 56th Water-
melon Festival.
This year the Antique Car
Show will be a drive in. Own-
ers will participate in the Festi-
val Parade and subsequently
exhibit their vehicles in the
FMB parking lot.
The event will be informal
and no prizes will be awarded.'
The Rodeo is scheduled for
Friday and Saturday, June 16,
and 17 and promises to be the
usual extravaganza.
The Rodeo will be repre-
sented in the parade as is cus-


tomary.
Pageant contestants are in
rehearsal, with 16 competing
for Little King and Queen, and
Five entrants each for the Prin-
cess and Queen Pageants.
Platform events will be coor-
dinated by Betsy Gray and
FMB.
The Committee plans a page
in the Festival Booklet to rec-
ognize sponsors.
With the festival Kickoff
Dinner set for Thursday, June
1, the committee will meet
again May 15 and May 30 to
finalize last minute details.

Monticello News
Keeps You
Informed!!
1


...r
7 2,. *; ; .-'- "' .: .*
:. ",.'^ ,^:- ^;: -; !


greater government account-
ability to the people.
She believes that govern-
ment should live within its
means and must have a solid
financial plan for the future.
Traveling extensively
throughout the state as a pro-
fessional, and with her family,
Sink believes that cities large
and small want Florida's gov-
ernment to maintain account-
ability.
The event is hosted by a
committee of local Democrats
chaired by Max and Sharon
Bilinski.
Max emphasized that the
dinner is free, but contribu-
tions to the Sink campaign are
welcome and encouraged.
The committee hopes that
voters will turn out to meet Ms
Sink and learn about her plans
for the future of Florida.


Southeast Regional Cancer Center, a member of The North Florida Can-
cer Netwvork ,s pleased to bring proven, state of the art treatment to the
people of North Florida. TomoTherapy is a new high, effective form of
treatment delivery and is ideal for the treatment of prostate cancer.
Southeast Regional Cancer Center w.as the fourth facility to begin treat-
ment with this new technology and we are proud to be pioneers in this
new frontier.

Dr. Rost has spoken around the world on the use and benefits of Tomo-
therap\ for cancer patients. This technology\ allows the patient to receive
the most accurate, non-invasive treatment a'.ailale for prostate cancer.

TomoTherapy has provided our patients ith a better quality of life, with
few or no side effects. \our treatment is done on an outpatient basis,
with easy accessibility to \our physician and nursing staff. If you would
like to find out more about TomoTherapy please contact us for more in-


formation.


Monticello


Christian


Academy









Now Enrolling K-12 Grade For
'06 '07 School Year
1590 N. Jefferson St.

Monticello, Fl. 32344

997-6048


Drive In Car Show

Planned For Festival


Mxict~uas G