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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00125
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: April 21, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00125
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
    Main: Letters
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
    Main: Sports
        page 8
        page 9
    Main continued
        page 10
    Main: Classified
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
Full Text








Simple
Actions
Conserve Enerc

Editorial, Page 4


LIER".Lo Z+-.. )-..-
404 LI3RARY ZE'I
UNIViRSItY OF Ft2PJDA
GAI IESVILLE, FL. 32611


Nuriifla r-Anter


ly


Plans volunteer
Banquet


Story, Page 6


Coach Hughes,
Player Gulnels
Honored At'ACA

Story, page' .
I -. .,,l ,r C -_


;g l i p 0 4 3 w ., -F ~
60 OUbstp 1'


[ Friday Morning


Monticello


138TH YEAR NO.32, 50 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


ws
FRIDAY, APRIL 21, 2006


Planners


On


Green


Concentrate




Subdivisions


Goal Is To Preserve

The Rural Character


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Meetings of the Planning
Commission's subcommittee
working to establish governing
rules for future development in
the county are beginning to
draw greater public participa-
tion.
Case in point, Monday
night's meeting, which concen-
trated on conservation subdivi-
sions and which drew eight
people, not counting the three
subcommittee members.
Conservation subdivisions,
loosely defined, are
environment-friendly develop-
ments that seek to protect natu-
ral resources and preserve
green space.
The Atlanta Regional Com-
mission (ARC), in a document
the subcommittee distributed,
Monday, describes conserva-
tion subdivisions as "residen-
tial or mixed-use develop-
ments in which a significant
portion of the lot is set aside as
undivided, permanently pro-
tected open space, while
houses are clustered on the re-
mainder of the property."


Akin to golf course commu-
nities, conservation subdivi-
sions feature natural forests,
meadows, wetland, community
gardens or farmland instead of
manicured golf courses.
Monday's discussion was
typical of the subcommittee's
discussions thus far: free-
wheeling, thoughtful and
thought-provoking Points of
view expressed were varied, as
were the participants and the
organizations they represented.
The latter consisted of Neil
Fleckenstein, of Tall Timbers
Research Station; Hines Boyd,
a local resident and possibly a
developer of-the county's first
conservation subdivision; Ar-
nie Rogers, representing the
St. Joe Land Company;. Cindy
and Don Lee and Tom La
Motte, members of the Jeffer-
son County Citizens for a Sus:
tainable Future -- a group
calling for planned and man-
aged growth; and Planning Of-
ficial Bob Arredondo and
county planner John McHugh.
Members of the subcommit-
tee are Brad Mueller, Angela
Gray and Corwin Padgett.
One of the first questions
that arose Monday was how


conservation subdivisions dif-
fer from clustering, which the
county already encourages.
The difference, Mueller ex-
plained, is that conservation
subdivisions aim to protect and
preserve uplands, or what de-
velopers consider useable,
"buildable" land.


Clustering, by practice -- if
not by design -- has been used
(or abused, according to the
point of view) -- "to push wet-
land credits up the hill".
SMeaning that developers
now tend to cluster only when
a particular property contains
wetlands that by law can't be


developed. By clustering, the
developer gets "housing cred-
its" for the underwater portion
of the land, thus capitalizing
on the particular zoning desig-
nation of the property.
"We're talking here of the
protection of upland, useable
land," Mueller said. "That's the


SUBCOMMITTEE MEMBERS review plans for a model conservation subdivision. The
subcommittee is trying to come up with guidelines for conservation subdivisions thai
it can present to the Planning Commission for discussion and a recommendation to
the County Commission. From left, Angela Gray, Brad Mueller and Tom La Motte, a
citizen interested in planning matters. (News Photo)


difference."
Another point he emphasized
was the critical need for com-
munications and education to
sell the public on the idea of
conservation subdivisions.
That's because, although gen-
erally density-neutral overall
(conservation subdivisions
normally don't contain more
houses than the particular zon-
ing designation pennits), the
county may want in some in-
stances to offer incentives to
encourage developers to em-
brace conservation subdivi-
sions.
Variously called "carrots" or
density bonuses, the idea is to
allow a developer to put in
more houses than the zoning
designation allows, provided
the latter agrees to do a conser-
vation subdivision.
The problem -- a political
one -- is selling the idea of
higher density to residents al-
ready up in arms about the in-
creasing densities in the
county.
Conservation subdivision
proponents say it will take
communications, education
and statesmanship to convince
the public that increasing den-
sity in one area is desirable for
the overall good of the county
in the long run.
(See Planners Page 2)


Conservation Subdivision


Is Slated For Ashville Area


..



THE TEMPO is beginning to pick up in the elections of-
fice. From left, Elections Supervisor Marty Bishop and
Deputy Elections Supervisor Lee Davis. (News Photo)



Two More Candidates

Announce For Office


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

Two more candidates for
elective offices have stepped
forward, according to Elec-
tions Supervisor Marty
Bishop.
The latest two are Kirk
Reams, a Democrat seeking
the Clerk of Courts office; and
incumbent Beverly Sloan,
seeking reelection to the
School Board, District 2, seat.


The Clerk of Courts office is
a partisan race; the School
Board race is nonpartisan.
The two other candidates in
the Clerk of Courts race are
Brenda Sorensen, a Democrat,
and Wendy Moss, a Republi-
can.
The fact that two Democrats
are now vying for the office of
Clerk of Courts means a pri-
mary is required. The primary
is scheduled for Sept. 5.
No other candidate has an-
nounced for the School Board,
District 2, race.


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

A conservation subdivision
is already in the works for the
county.
The Planning Commission
last week reviewed and recom-
mended for approval the
Aylesbury Plantation subdivi-
sion, a project being fronted by
Hines Boyd, with SIF Land
Inc.
Located in the northeast part
of the county one mile south of
Ashville on the west side of
US 221, the property is part of
a plantation that dates from the
early 1800s.
The proposed subdivision
takes in 111 acres, 17 of which
are wetlands and another 30 or
so of which will be dedicated
to open space. The plan is to
cluster 47 home sites on the re-
maining acreage, with lots
ranging in size from 5/10s of
an acre to 1.3 acres.
The plan also calls for 2.5
miles of interconnected nature
trails to wind through the
property and a green buffer
zone to shield the houses from
view from the road.
"We want to keep the feel
and rural character of the
county," Boyd told planners as
he took them through a power-
point presentation showing the
various features of the land.


He pointed out that the prop-
erty is zoned mixed-use subur-
ban residential, which allows
far more houses than the 47 his
group plans to put in. He said
his group had chosen the lower
density in the interest of pre-
serving the area's rural charac-
ter.


"This is a classic example of
letting the land tell you what to
do," Boyd said. "We literally
walked the site to decide
where to put the houses. This
area is very important to us.
Some of our ancestors owned
this land.
"We know this county is go-


ing to grow. It will be all right,
as long as we don't move too
fast, so that the new people can
learn our culture. Otherwise
we will be overwhelmed. Plan-
ning has a lot to do with it (as-
suring a managed growth). We
have thought a lot about who
(See Conservation Page 2)


City Agrees To Entend Water

East To County Development


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

City officials approved an
agreement guaranteeing city
water to a county development
east of town.
City officials approved the
agreement April 4, following
the recommendation of the Lo-
cal Planning Agency (LPA).
As part of the agreement, de-
veloper James MacFarland as-
sured city officials that the
subdivision's governing docu-
ment would contain language
guaranteeing annexation into
the city as soon as any part of
the property became contigu-
ous with the city.
City officials wanted it
clearly understood -- and un-
derstood by every potential
home buyer -- that should any


parcel become contiguous with
the city, the entire subdivision
would be annexed, regardless
of the desire of any one prop-
erty owner or groups of own-
ers.

Developer
Agrees To
Install An
8" Mainline

MacFarland assured them
that this provision would be in-
cluded in the deed restrictions
for every parcel.
The Wolf Creek subdivision
is located about two miles east
of town on the north side of
US 90.
The development plans call
for a project consisting of 33
houses, clustered on 43 acres


of the 108-acre parcel. The re-
maining 65 acres of the prop-
erty are designated conserva-
tion easement, according to the
agreement worked out by the
developer and the county.
As part of the agreement
worked out with the city,
MacFarland will pay the cost
of the water extension and the
city will reimburse him up to
$41,250 as and when the 33
houses connect to the system.
The $40,425 is calculated on
the connection fee of $1,150
per house, including the instal-
lation of the meter.
It's expected that the reim-
bursement will be made over
time, as the developer is sell-
ing only lots and it will be up
to property buyers to construct
the houses.
(See Water Page 2)


I


~- I I I I~ Is IC I i IL II ~' s~L









PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 21, 2006
A. i- ;> r~mn/ ;8- a ta~ir3& e-i : iA efMt.- --*** 5. .. 5'.i- .,; ;-ii'sa1a~


NEIL FLECKENSTEIN, right, of Tall Timbers Research Center, regularly attends
events here having to do with planning and zoning matters. Fleckenstein participated
in Monday's discussion on conservation subdivisions. Here he talks with Dick Bailar.
(News Photo)


Conservation Subdivision


(Continued From Page 1)
will be buying here and how
we can make them feel part of
the rural community."
Boyd said the open space
will be deeded to the home-
owners association as common
land.
"The governing document
will make it very difficult for
the open space to be
developed," Boyd said.
He said people often had a
misconception of what rural
living entailed.
"People want to live in the
country until they realize they
have to spend $40,000 on a
tractor and then spend most of
their time on the tractor to
keep their property
maintained," Boyd said.


"We're hoping people will pool
their resources and pay dues so
the property can be
maintained."


For more information on the
development, go to
www.aylesburyplantation.com


County Students Honored

At NFCC Awards Ceremony


Outstanding local students
were recognized at the annual
Honors Convocation held at
North Florida Community Col
lege, April 13.
Among those honored and
the awards received were:
Ashley Box, Accounting
Award; Joseph Neil Graves,
Educator Preparation Institute
Award; and Mark Urschler,
Brain Bowl.
Who's Who Among Students


in American Junior Colleges
named Kyle Hansen, Dorothy
Holden, Merredith Merchant,
and William Tolbert, of Jeffe-
son County as 2005-2006 re-
cipients.

Who's Who is a prestigious
honors program that selects
and recognizes outstanding
students for their academic ac-
complishments and scholastic
contributions.


Planners Concentrate


(Continued From Page 1)
How? By preserving the ru-
:ral character of the land and
assuring -- both by conserva-
tion easement or covenant --
that open spaces remain open
'in perpetuity.

"You have to look beyond
:the perception of density and
look at the overall impact on
'the county," Mueller argued.

Ultimately, goes the argu-
ment, everyone benefits from
the arrangement in both in-
creased property values and a
better quality of life, even
those resident in the immediate
vicinity of the development.
Not to mention developers,
who realize lower infrastruc-
ture costs and higher priced
lots, according to published
studies of existing conserva-
tion subdivisions.
On Monday, the subcommit-
tee -- with the input of the
other participants -- tried to es-
tablish preliminary, minimum
standards for the drafting of an
ordinance on conservation
subdivisions.

--QneO.-oefthe first--issues-dis-
-cussed was establishment of
:the minimum acreage needed
-to be eligible for a conserva-
'"tion subdivision.
Suggestions ranged from 40
to 80 to 100 acres or more, to
setting no minimum acreage at
all.

"Off the top of my head, I
don't see why we need mini-
mum acreage," Arredondo
said.
Boyd agreed.
"The idea is to give develop-
ers an incentive to do what we
want,)' Boyd said. "If the goal
is to get the behavior we want,
why set limits."
Mueller disagreed.
"My gut feeling is that you
need it," h. said. "Otherwise, i!
will be abused. I can see it
being abused-if it's too small."
In the end, the subcommit-
tee agree to recommend a
minimum between 80 and 100
acres, underscoring the fact
that the numbers were subject
to revision when the Planning
Commission and the County
Commission took up the issue.
"This is very preliminary,"
Mueller kept emphasizing.
A second issue was deter-
mining the minimum set-aside
acreage, or useable land (ex-
cluding wetlands, slopes, road
easements, etc.) that a devel-
oper should have to dedicate to
open space.
Suggestions ranged from a
40 to 50 percent set aside, with
the possibility of a density-
bonus granted if the developer
agreed to dedicate a higher
percentage of the property to
open space.
"I think some increased den-
sity is necessary as a carrot,"
Padgett said.


Arredondo struck a caution-
ary note.
"If you give density bonuses,
they need to be kept to a mini-
mum," he .said. "Otherwise,
you defeat what you're trying
to do."

Another issue was determin-
ing what the density bonus
should be, or if a density bo-
nus should even be given.
One point of view was that
granting the density bonus de-
feated the aim of conservation
subdivisions.
The opposing viewpoint was,
that, absent such an incentive,
what would prompt developers
to put in conservation subdivi-
sions, given the prevalent rural
nature of the county at present.
A developer, in other words,
doesn't have to put in a conser-
vation subdivision now to
benefit from the surrounding
open land.
It's a fact that conservation
subdivisions mostly exist at
present on the fringes of high-
densit. urban areas, where
open-space is at a premium.
But in rural counties such as
Jeffiersn,-where open land is
still relatively common, the
pressure to offer conservation
subdivisions is nonexistent.
"We're different," Boyd said.
"What incentive is there to de-
velopers if we don't offer a
carrot. In 20 years, clustering
has been used mostly to gain
wetland credits. You have to
give developers a strong incen-
tive or in 10 years we'll be
having the same discussion."
Arredondo reiterated his pre-
vious concern.
"I think you're defeating the
purpose of conservation subdi-
visions if you give a lot of bo-
nuses," he said. "I like to see
us start with no bonuses or a
minimum bonus and see how it
works out. We don't have to
give away the farm."
Mueller took a middle of the
road stand, arguing that den-
sity bonuses were desirable,
but should be limited.
He suggested a 10 to 20 per-
cent density bonus as a maxi-
mum, underscoring the fact
that developers undertaking
conservation subdivisions
were already benefiting from
lower infrastructure costs and
higher valued properties.
The Lees agreed, to the de-
gree they thought incentives
should be minimum or nonex-
istent. It was their opinion that
developers would come, re-
gardless of any obstacles or re-
strictions.
"You need to set high stan-
dards and be stringent," Cindy
Lee said. "You can always
lower the standards, but you
can't raise them later."
The last issue to come up
was the availability of afford-
able housing, an issue that
some already see as a problem


that is only going to get worse
with time.
The question is how to pro-
mote affordable housing in
conservation subdivisions, or
if the issue should even be
tackled.

A proponent of affordable
housing in general, Gray drew
the line at forcing developers
of conservation subdivisions to
provide such housing. At the
same time, she recognized that
such developments tend to-
ward the high end, in effect ex-
cluding lower and moderate
income families.

"This is going to be a real is-
sue downstream," Padgett said.
One thought for encouraging
affordable housing was to
award .a density-bonus to de-
velopers willing to include
such housing in their projects.
Rogers suggested a different
option. That option was to im-
pose some kind of fractional
fee, along 'the lines of the
documentary stamp charge,


which revenues could then be
dedicated to the promotion of
affordable housing. Such an
approach, he said, would be
better than forcing developers
to set aside land for affordable
housing.

"It's a serious issue that
needs to be thrashed out," he
said.
The next meeting of the sub-
committee is scheduled for 7
p.m. Monday, May 8.


Water
(Continued From Page 1)
Per the city engineer's rec-
ommendation, the developer
will install an eight-inch main-
line.
The engineer determined that
an eight-inch mainline will
provide sufficient pressure to
serve the subdivision, as well
as provide capacity for other
customers that lie between the
city and the subdivision and
that may decide to connect to
the system.


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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 21, 2006 PAGE 3


Small Businesses

Lunch, Learn Topic


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Chamber of Commerce-
sponsored another Lunch and
Learn on a recent Wednesday
afternoon featuring Jerome Os-
teryoung, Ph. D., executive di-
rector and professor for the
Jim Moran Institute for Global
Entrepreneurship, College of


AT A RECENT Lunch and Learn session at the Chamber of Commerce, Jerry Ostery-
oung spoke about small business entrepreneurs. From left Frank Blow, Osteryoung,
and Gary Wright. (News Photo)



Warm Weather increases


Sales Of Plant, Seeds


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

With the coming of spring-
and warm weather, a survey
of local plant and seed dealers
report an increase in sales.
Trisha Wirick, Co-owner of
Edenfield's Hardware, said
plant sales are going very
well.
"In March, sales were up 17
percent, and April looks as if
it's going to be a good month


'Mr. Hat' IS

Pet Of Week


"Mr. Hat" has been named-
canine Pet of the Week by the
Humane Society.
He is a male Golden Re-
triever mix with gold eyes,
approximately one year old.
He is neutered and all vacci-
nations are up to date.
Shelter Caretaker Cheryl
Bautista describes him as be-
ing extremely lovable and af-
fectionate.
"He's very devoted to hu-
mans and is good with other
dogs," said Bautista. She
added that he would also be
good with children.
To adopt Mr. Hat or any of
the other many animals at the
shelter call 342-0244.


too," said Wirick.
"With the extreme lack of
rain lately, the number one
seller right now is garden
hoses," said Wirick.. "We
can't seem to be able to keep
them in stock, a people water
lawns and plants."
Of the plants sold, Wirick
said among favorites this year
are bell pepper and eggplant.
"I didn't think that egg plant
was that popular in Jefferson
County, but it seems to be our


best seller," said Wirick. "It's
the first thing that sells out."
She added that annuals in-
cluding Bigonias and Impa-
tience are also selling quite
well.
Dickson Hughes of Monti-
cello Milling reports that the
sales for both seeds and plants
are up from that of last year.
"We're selling quite a few
seeds and plants," said
Hughes. "The sales seem to
be a little bit up on the plants
as compared to last year, the
seeds sales are about the
same.
He reports that favorites of
residents include okra, squash
and snap-beans.
Harold Malloy, CO-owner
of Malloy's Nursery reports
that landscaping. sales are also
up.
"It's as good as I've ever
seen it," said Malloy. "We
will be running out early this
year."
He added that there is still a
lack of planting material
available including shrubs
and shade trees, "Those hur-
,ricanes we had a couple of
years ago, depleted the
supply, so as demand for
planting material goes up, the
supply availability goes
down."


Business at the Florida State
University.
He is director of the Entre-
preneurship Program, and
Small Business Management
Professor of Finance.
He is also a columnist for the
Tallahassee Democrat, writing
two columns a week for the
paper.
He offered tips on how en-
trepreneurs can be more suc-


Ghost Trackers Plan Haunted

Tour, Ghost Hunt April 29


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


The Big Bend Ghost Track-
ers will be conducting the
Haunted Tour and Ghost
Hunt in the old 1827 Ceme-
-tery April 29, beginning at 8
p.m. in front of the Chamber
of Commerce, and spaces are
still available for those who
wish to attend.
BBGT Founder Betty Davis
said Wednesday that mem-
bers are expecting a large
group of attendees during the
event.
"Presently, we are expecting
a lot of out-of-towners, in-
cluding a large group from
Lake City," said Davis.
The tour is $10 per person.
And the Ghost Hunt, which
will be conducted after the
tour, is also $10 each.,



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Davis concluded that the
tour and ghost hunt always re-
sult in many getting ghostly
photos. "No one has ever left
disappointed," she said.
To reserve a spot on either
or both, call BBGT at 508-
8109.


cessful and profitable. He
explained the "come in, up
sell, come back" process of
business to the group.
He gave advice on customer
service, advertising ideas, net-
working is a plus, web pres-
ence is valuable, and public
relations imperative.
He claims that cold calling
works and qualifying clients is;
a good policy, as it could make
the difference in getting paid:
or not.
Compete on quality and serv-
ice, not price.
Set goals and expectation,
and inspect what you expect.
Recognize your employees
for their good work, right then,
not the next day. Appreciate
staff in a timely manner, and
celebrate successes, were tac-
tics Osteryoung stressed.
.Marianne Arbulu is coordi-
nating these monthly events
with the Chamber. She can be
reached at 577-1300 for infor-
mation on upcoming Lunch
and Learn events.


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ronment. The amount received from-a sale of a CD at current market value may be less than, equal to
or more than the amount initially invested. Early withdrawal may not be permitted. You pay no additional com-
missions, annual fees or periodic charges. Yields quoted are net of all commissions. The estate feature allows
heirs to redeem the certificates of deposit upon the death of an owner at $1,000 per CD, subject to limitations.
CDs require the distribution of interest and do not allow interest to compound. CDs offered through Edward
Jones are issued by banks and thrifts nationwide. $5,000 minimum investment per issuing institution.

To learn about a CD strategy that makes sense,
call or visit our local investment representative today.
Robert J. Davison.
205 E. Washington St.
SMonticello, FL 32344
S850-997-2572


"MR. HAT'


DCF Outpost Office At

Health Department


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Vicki Abrams, operations,
manager for District 2B re-
ports that the County Depart-
ment of Children and Families
be accessed in the county.

An Outpost office is set up
in the County Health Depart-
ment building to provide infor-
mation regarding services
available to residents.

Hours are from 8:30 a.m. -
12 p.m. and 1:00 4:30 p.m.
every Tuesday.


For questions about benefits,
or to report changes, call 1-
866-325-6021.
For all other inquiries, call 1-
866-762-2237.

Do not call the Health De-
partment.

To apply for food stamps,
cash, or Medicaid benefits,
apply online at:
www.dcf-access.dcf.state.fl.us/
accessflorida/access
For those without Internet
access, the applications may be
mailed or faxed.
Call Abrams at 488-9217 or
additional information.


SOUTHEAST
REGIONAL CANCER
SCENTE'R A.M E- BE3 ft
OF THE NORTII
FLORIDA C A.NCE R
NETWORK, HAS
BEEN PROVIDING
THE PEOPLE OF
NORTH FLORIDA
AND SOUTH-
GEORGIA THE .
HIGHEST QUALITY
OF CANCER CARE
SINCE 1989
DEDICATEDT.O
BRINGING YOU THE
ADVANCES OF
TOMORROW TODAY.

2003 Centre Pointe Blvd
Tallahassee FL, 32308


Southeast Regional Cancer Center and the North Florida Cancer Network
were established to promote the finest principles of medical care. Can-
cer Care is more than just treatment. It is using the best option for each
patient. It is having the technology to solve each problem individually
with grace and elegance. It is no longer acceptable to have side effects
and complications just because you have cancer. It is not acceptable to
have less than the best. You deserve the best care with no exceptions.


The North Florida Cancer Network can provide all the options needed for
Your best care. We have the newest proven techniques for your well be-

ing. You are a part of our family, part of our whole community not just a


AEiIEYHOD RAII
SSE onday- Saturday
iJCl 7:D0 p.m.

Monticello, FL 850-997-2561


Phone: 850-878-2273
Fax: 850-671-5900


patient. Although we have the most advanced technology in the world it
is the way we use it that sets us apart. After all, living well means individ-
ual care and attention, everyday, every year for the rest of our lives. We


are in this together.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


SOUTHEAST REGIONAL

A MEER OF N FIA CANCER CRE R
A MEMBER OF NORTH FLORIDA CANCER CARE NETWORK


WE'REM-OR


EdwardJones"
MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING









PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FR., APRIL 21, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net
.... .... .........


Simple Actions


Conserve Energy opinion & comment


At a time of record high en-
ergy prices and increased at-
tention to global warming,,
nearly everyone is looking for
ways to save energy, save
money on utility bills, and help
to protect the environment.
Here are simple actions you
can take, recommended by the
U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency.
1. Look for products that
have earned the Energy Star
for energy efficiency. Energy
Star-qualified products prevent
greenhouse gas emissions by
meeting strict energy effi-
ciency criteria.
The Energy Star label comes
on more than just appliances
-look for the government-
backed symbol on electronics,
lighting, ceiling fans, dehu-
midifiers, room and central air
conditioners, and many other
products.
2. Replace your five most
frequently used light, or the
bulbs in them, with enery-
efficient, compact fluorescent
models that have earned the
Energy Star. This action alone


will save you $60 a year.
3. Cool your home smartly-
Get your cooling system ready
for summer by cleaning or re-
placing air filters, and having a
contractor do a pre season
checkup in the spring. Proper
maintenance keeps your sys-
tem running at peak perform-
ance and can help you save en-
ergy dollars this summer.
4. Seal up your home-
Adequate insulation and home
sealing can help you save on
cooling bills and improve your
home's overall comfort when
it's hot outside.
5. Share these tips with
friends and family. Help
spread the word that energy ef-
ficiency is good for our homes
and the environment.
Most people don't realize
that the average household can
be responsible for nearly twice
the greenhouse gas emissions
as the average car.
These simple steps will help
you save energy and money,
while also contributing to a
better environment for your
family and community.


Task Force Set Up

For Sports Wagering


By REX M. ROGERS
Columnist

The National Association of
Intercollegiate Athletics
(NAIA) is taking the threat of
sports wagering seriously.
Believing that all forms of
cheating via sports wagering
undermines fair competition
and debilitates individuals
involved, the NAIA Council of
Presidents has established a
task force on sports wagering.
I am privileged to serve as
the chairman of the 2005-2006
NAIA Council of Presidents
Sports Wagering Task Force,
along with Dr.. Rosemarie
Nassif of Holy Name
University (CA), Dr.. Thomas
J. Trebon of Carroll College
(MT), Dr. Ted Brown of
Martin Methodist College
(TN), Dr.. Doug of Houston
Baptist University (TX), Dr..
Don Jeanes of Milligan
College (TN), and Mr. Kevin
Dee of the NAIA.
The task force is developing
sports wagering policy recom-
mendations for the NAIA that
focus upon athletics staff
members and student-athletes
of NAIA member institutions.
The purpose of the recommen-
dations will be to protect the
well-being of student-athletes,
to protect the integrity of com-
petitive sports, and protect the
mission of the NAIA as an or-
ganization committed to devel-
oping "Champions of
Character."
NAIA's "Champions of
Character" program empha-
sizes Respect, Responsibility,
and intercollegiate level in the
country, and it serves as a di-


rect response to the continued
decline of the culture of sport
in America. Via "Champions
of Character," the NAIA rein-
forces not only athletic partici-
pation but also education for
life.
Youth begin gambling at
ever younger ages now aver-
aging about 12 years of age.
Typically, sports provide the
context of initial youth gam-
bling experiences. It may
seem like harmless entertain-
ment to youth, but it is not.
Youth also typically begin
gambling because an adult
opens the door for them. This
is a sad story but one that we
can change.
I encourage you to check
with your favorite college or
university athletic department
to learn what it may be doing
to further honest competition
and healthy student-athletes by
prohibiting sports wagering on
intercollegiate athletics.
(Rex M.. Rogers, PHD., a
syndicated newspaper colum-
nist in almost 100 newspapers
and president of Cornerstone
University, Grand Rapids,
Mich)



Letters

To The Editor

Welcomed
Limit Letters to
500 Words or Less


Sign and Include
Phone Number


,-


Short Takes & Other Notions


BY MERRY ANN FRISBY

Criticism and censure is best
done in a small setting. My
husband says that the manage-
ment rule is "praise in public
and criticize in private." Each
one of our kids always thought
that they got the most punish-
ment because they often did
not know about what their
brothers and sisters got.
People do not always follow
that rule. I recently read that
President Hu Jinatoa chastised
the entire Chinese people. He
asked them not to be greedy,
lazy or unpatriotic. "Love, do
no harm to the motherland...
uphold science: don't be igno-
rant and unenlightened." How
do you think that is going to
work out?
We in America have tried the
public way too. Do you re-
member, "Just say no?" It did


not work. All the abstinence
pledges popular in the last dec-
ade, produced as many chil-
dren out of wedlock as the
general unpledged population.
These public efforts launched
on a national scale might have
worked at a smaller level or
person to person.
The Tallahassee Housing
Authority had trouble with fel-
ons living in the apartments
meant for families. Not all the
police in the city, working to-
gether, could stop this. When
they hired women from the
apartment complexes as man-
agers, the women stopped it.
They knew everyone who
lived there and knew who
should not be there. Mostly
these apartments are now quiet
and peaceable places to live.
I believe censure can be a
valuable tool in a town as
small as Monticello. I was
driving downtown when a


woman was about to cross in a
crosswalk. I always stop for
walkers in the crosswalks, and
prepared to stop this time.
She must have thought I was
planning to continue and she
threw up her hand in the uni-
versal "Stop" gesture. I did
stop and waved at her to de-
note that I had seen her. This
caused a stream of curse words
to erupt from her; I can only
assume that she thought I was
'dissing' her.
Another woman walking on
the sidewalk stopped, put her
package down, wagged her
finger at this cursing woman,
peered over her glasses at the
cursing woman and said "Tsk
Tsk." This act of censure was
very ,effective. The curser
slinked down the street.
It seems to me that in a small
town, people are more likely to
take another to task and hold
each other accountable. I sus-


Are we Really Alone?


BY DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist


Humans have always won-
dered if we are alone in the
universe. Could it be possible
that in all of the vastness of
outer space, earth is the only
place where life actually
exists?
The fact that many people
are very unsettled by this
thought is quite natural. No
one wants to envision an exis-
tence completely alone and the
very thought of us being the
only living creatures in all of
the universe just doesn't sit
well.
Accordingly, people tend to
grasp at straws to conger up
any hope that would prove the
existence of life coming from
outer space. I remember the


rash of reported flying saucer
"sightings" starting in the fif-
ties which in turn initiated nu-
merous television shows and
movies about space aliens
(good and'evil).
These only tended to bolster
the extraterrestrial believers
numbers and somehow justify
the possibility of life beyond
earth. There was never any
hard scientific evidence to sup-
port the movies or the personal
sightings.
So what is the possibility that
there really is other life out
there? I used to ask this ques-
tion of my students when I be-
gan teaching the unit on space.
It was more a mathematical
question of odds and probabil-
ity than a realistic question
with a definable answer. I
would ask "How about one in
a million? --- Or maybe even


one in a billion that life exists
somewhere else in the
universe?" Most students
started feeling comfortable
that, although remote, one in a
billion is a pretty good chance
for life to exist elsewhere. I
momentarily left them with!
that thought while I started ex-
plaining the vastness of our
universe.
A good estimate of our own
Milky Way Galaxy is that is
contains five hundred billion
stars. Given that each star is in
actuality a sun like ours, then it
is reasonable to believe that
many of these suns most likely
have planets circling around
them like our own solar
system.
One could conclude,
therefore, that not just the
possibility, but moreover a real
probability exists that one, two


pect this because they know
and like each other. I recall,
once upon a time, a particu-
larly unpleasant government
meeting, when a usually re-
served and polite commis-
sioner blew up. Someone in
the audience said "that is not
very Christian" and he stopped
dead in his tracks. I know this
commissioner and the censor
are.friends and.remain .friends
to :li:, d. .. : ,
I personally appreciate a
friend telling me if I am out of
line. Only friends will tell you
that you have spinach in your
teeth, your enemies won't say
a word, they will just let you
walk around looking stupid.
So to my friends in Monti-
cell: If I may play President Ji-
natao for a moment;
Stop for pedestrians in the
crosswalks.
* Do not throw burning
(See Short Page 5)





or three planets in our own
Milky Way could hold other
life forms.
If so, that would be an
astronomical odds of one in
five hundred billion! The odds
of you winning the Florida
Lottery are only in
twenty-three million.
Using the Hubble Telescope
that can see deeper into space
than ever imagined, scientists
believe there are as many as
five hundred billion different
galaxies like our Milky Way.
Using simple mathematics,
that would mean that if there is
only one planet in each
universe with living things,
then the universe would have
at least 500 billion places
where life could exist!
So did God allow life to be
created in other parts of the
(See Alone Page 5)


Testing Creates Anxiety


Standardized tests are be-
coming increasingly common
at all levels of public and pri-
vate schooling. For many stu-
dents, these tests can be a
source of anxiety. But by fol-
lowing some simple strategies,
both students and their parents
can be fully prepared for suc-
cess on test day:
Tip #1: Read all directions
carefully! Oftentimes in test-
taking environments, the
adrenaline gets pumping and
students read through instruc-


tions too quickly.
Taking the extra time to slow
down and make sure they un-
derstand the question not only
saves students from making
wrong answers but also saves
time in the long run.
Tip #2: Listen attentively to
the teacher or proctor. It's
very easy to let anxiety take
over while waiting for the
teacher to start the exam. Talk
to your child about taking a
deep breath and not getting
distracted from the directions


the teacher is giving.
Tip #3: If the directions are
confusing, ask! Your child's
teacher is there to help explain
unclear directions. It is always
better for your child to ask and
be told by the teacher that they
can't answer the question than
to not ask at all.
Tip #4: It's OK to take a
break. Time management is
important, but not if it means
that your child is going to burn
out before the end of the test.
If your child says that tests


feel overwhelming and ex-
hausting, tell him that it's OK
to put his pencil down and
close his eyes, stare out the
window for a moment or just
take a few deep breaths. Just
don't lose track of time!
Tip #5: Manage time well.
Good time management is
critical to good test taking. It
doesn't matter if your child is
in 3rd grade or graduate school
no one wants to run out of time
on a test.
(See Testing Page 5)


From Our Photo File


1
.. -. .. .. ,


J.C. CRIME WATCH Committee, in Oct, 1990, had a booth and sign up opportunity at
the annual Trade Fair. County Agent Larry Halsey signed up for the program. The
booth was manned by Police Chief Nelson Blount and Casa Bianca group member
Cookie Clark. (News File Photo)


I


I


II'


AW~F-




















Dear Editor:
Before I moved to Monti-
cello, I lived in the second
fastest growing county in the
nation..
I served on the school board
and the city planning commis-
sion for four years. I, unfortu-
nately, was a part of that
sprawling growth.
That said, I did bring some
of my materials with me, in
particular the Comprehensive
Plan Book. I have attended the
local meetings and am dis-


Alone?
(Continued From Page 4)
universe? I don't have a clue
and we probably won't know
that answer in our life time. I
know that' He created it here
on earth and gave us a book of
instructions called the Bible.
Given that God can do what-
ever he wants and using com-
mon sense, mathematical odds
and probability calculations, I
am one who tends to believe
that life surely must exist else-
where in the vastness of space.
To believe otherwise seems
to be a bit self important and
self-serving. I -am not going
out on any limb to pretend that
I understand God's infinite
wisdom and reasoning, espe-
cially when it come to His
marvelous creations.
But, even the most skeptical
of nonbelievers would have to
concede that with at least 250
trillion stars out there, our sun
is not likely to be the only one
with a planet containing life.
As a side note, I am indeed
fortunately, this is not the
1500's where a paper with
ideas like this would surely
have me burned at the stake in
the Monticello City Square.

Short Takes
(Continued From Page 4)
smokes out the window. Fire
hazard is high now.
* Reserve the handicapped
parking spaces for those that
really need it.
* School bus drivers, slow
down for walkers.
* Tell me if I have spinach in
my teeth.


turbed to see the same mis-
takes occurring that plagued
us.
No suitable answers were
originated when I was on a
Commission, and I see no suit-
able long term answers being
originated now in Jefferson
County.
Jefferson County had an Ag
5 zoning which is ideal, short
and long term.
If adhered to, this zoning
will prevent most of the squab-
bles going on.
Locally I see many viola-
tions that result in pockets of
substandard housing, as well
as overpriced housing.
The acquifers are already be-
ing stressed and contaminated
all over Florida.
Ponce de Leon was looking
for the fountain of youth, not
realizing it was right under his
feet. The Panhandle is as close



Testing
(Continued From Page 4)
Every question gets equal
weight, so it is in your child's
best interest to skip questions
that are particularly difficult
and save them for the end.
And if your child finishes
early, answers should be dou-
ble checked!
These tips come from
SCORE! Educational Centers,
a division of Kaplan, Inc., and
a leading provider of after
school learning programs for
children prekindergarten
through 10th grade.
S Since 1992, SCORE! has
helped more than 250,000 stu-
dents of all learning levels
reach their academic potential
in math, reading, writing and
more.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 21, 2006 PAGE 5


Letters...


Resident Decries High


Density Developments


to paradise as the mosquitoes
and heat allow.
It is a poor idea to have high
density developments spring-
ing up at will. Our infrastruc-
ture and environment will not
support them, and they do not
pay for themselves, regardless
of what the developers claim.
Unless the developers put in
roads, septic, sewer, water,
fund the garbage pickup, build
the schools, hire the teachers,
buy the supplies, and the rest,
the present owners are the ones
to feel the burden.
Yes, it is also personal. The
need for a new high school
doubled my taxes. The rise in
property values added another
$200 to my tax bill.
Every child added to the
rolls not only brings in a pit-
tance from the State, they cost
the county mega bucks in serv-
ices.
The rule of thumb is that
each home adds two+ children
to the system. An 80 house de-
velopment adds, on the aver-
age, 160 children in need of an
education.
The current failing grades
are being blamed, for one, on
parents. How does one get a
future crop of parents involved
when the present crop isn't?
There is a shortage of teach-
ers in Florida, but what they
don't tell you is that shortage is
of just-out-of-college teachers.
Experienced teachers cost, and
most districts like to save
money.
It's a patchwork quilt being
planned, if planned at all. It's a
team of wagons with each
horse pulling far more than its
share.
It should be one wagon with
one team of horses pulling it.
If one wants to know what's
going on, follow the money.
Janet Reaves


to mate' every 4Tfrstjte
Soha & Lovweat Shon $100.95




-1501CAPITL CIRCLE NkV--bi~L[
57-i6044


Ashley M. Box, of Monti-
cello, has been named a Colle-
giate All-American Scholar.
She attends North Florida
Community College and was
nominated by Mary Ann
Wheeler.
The United States Achieve-
ment Academy, (USAA)
which made the
announcement,
established the program to of-
fer deserved recognition to su-
perior students who excel in-
academic disciplines.
The Collegiite All-Ameican




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866-632-4718 | info@snowyowlcamp.com


Experience a taste of the finest Thomasville eateries during
this veening offun, food and spirits!


FEATURING:
1884 Paxton House Inn Bed & Breakfast ~ Barberitos ~ Blue Bell
Creameries Cakes by Bobbie ~ Carl's Bed & Breakfast Scones ~
Debbie's Main Street Restaurant ~ Ernestine's Old Fashion Peanut
Brittle ~ Fish Bonz ~ Flowers Foods ~J's Wine & Spirits ~ Melhana-
The Grand Plantation ~ Noanne Gwynn Creative Catering ~
Receptions for You & Arrington Catering ~ Red Olive Catering &
Restaurant ~ Richards Grille (Henderson Food Service) ~ Ryan's
Family Steakhouse ~ Savannah Moon Bakery & Cafe ~ The Eating
Edge ~ Southern Charm/ "The Garden Renee' White's Chocolate
SFlorida Coca-Cola Bottling Company
ENTERTAINMENT:
The Thomas University Jazz Ensemble
Brock Derringer

Sponsors:
Chef "de Cuisine" WALB, Skyline Graphics, Thomasville Times Enterprise
"Pastry" Chef Archbold Foundation Chef "de Garde Manger"
Ameris, Commercial Bank, Farmers & Merchants Bank, Thomas County
Federal, Thomasville National Bank "Line" Chef Flowers Foods
South Georgia Surgical Associates, P.C. THomasville Orthopedic Center


For more information contact the Thomasville Cultural Center

229-226-0588

RIIB""VT1W =.......l~~wi~r~;~~~


Writer Quotes Thoughts Of

Brilliant Minds About War


Dear Editor:
Concerning Dennis Foggy's
"Let Generals Win Wars," Win
Wars! Amen! Or? Oppose!
Rather than expressing my
own two cents I offer
Thoughts and Philosophy of
some brilliant minds:
"More than an end t o war,


we want an end to the begin-
ning of all wars."--FDR in an
address written for a Jefferson
Day Dinner, broadcast April
13, 1945.
"War, on the one hand is
such a terrible, such an atro-
cious thing, that no man, espe-
cially a Christian man, has the


right to assume responsibility
of begginnimg it."--Nikolave-
vitch Tolstoi.
"War hath no fury like a
combatant." Charles Edward
Montague, "Dramatic
Values,"--1911.
"Oh, if I were Queen of
France, or still better, Pope of
Rome, I'd have no fighting
man abroad, no weeping maids
at home; all should be at
peace, or if kings must show
their might, why, let them who
make the quarrel be the only
men to fight."--Charles
Jefferys. Jeannettte and Jean-
not, stanza 4.
"Were only kings themselves
to fight, there'd be an end to
war."--Jeanette's answer,
stanza 4.
Charles Piliero

OUR LIFELINE
IS TOLL-FREE
Grab the line and
let us help you.

THE VOICE OF HOPE
1-800-572-1717
-Dl usc Dy
** If k'taoia


Scholar must earn a 3.3 or
higher GPA.
Only scholars selected by a
school official or other quali-
fied sponsor are accepted.
Fewer than 10 percent of all
college students are recognized
for this prestigious honor.
Box is the daughter of Lau-
ren and Steven Box, of Monti-
cello.
Grandparents are Helen and
David Harnist, of Monticello,
and Doloris and Robert
Hafner, of Lake Hopatcong,
NJ.


GOSPEL SING
4 featuring


47 THE CAVALIERS FROM PERRY
S SATURDAY, APRIL 22ND @ 7:00



7 Lamont United

a Methodist Church

j Lamont, Florida
J7 Join us for refreshments after the sing J

J-J J


Ashley Box Named

All-American Scholar


Subscribe




Today




To Receive







The Monticello




News


I I I L I


p- I I


InStt













PAGE 6, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 21, 2006


Lifestyle


- I -I


. . .



I ~ ~ mm


Senior Center

Cookbook Sale

To Fund Projects


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Jefferson Senior Center has-
compiled a cookbook to raise
funds for projects at the
S Center.
The cookbook is available at
local merchants now, and at
the Senior Citizen Center, for
$12.


SENIOR CENTER has complied a cookbook to be used as a fundraiser to help sup-
port projects at the Center. From left James Clark who shared his recipe for his fa-
mous seafood gumbo Bobbie Krebs, director of Center, Nan Baughman, board
member. (News Photo)


Center Schedules

Volunteer Banquet


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The community is invited to-
join the staff of the Jefferson
Nursing Center in a Volunteer
Celebration honoring dedi-
cated volunteers at 7 p.m. on
Saturday, April 29 at the Cen-
ter.
These volunteers give freely
of their time in order to bring
cheer, music, conversation,
and worship to the lives of the
residents.
To show appreciation to the
volunteers, the Annual Volun-
teer Banquet will include spe-


cial recognition, honors, and
gifts.
Mae Kyler, social service di-
rector and Voncell Thomas,
activities director are asking
local merchants and commu-
nity members for door prize
donations.
The gift items will be used as
door prizes at the banquet, in
the name of the donor.
"As always, we appreciate
your continued support and
willingness to assist us in say-
ing "thank you" to those who
do so much for our residents,"
adds Kyler.
"And thank you for your
support in helping us make this


Homes Of Mourning


Alfred B. "Al" McCoy
Alfred B. "Al" McCoy, 77, a
retired administrator, died
Sunday, April 16,"2006.
The service will be 2 p.m.
Friday at Bethel AME Church,
501 Orange Ave., Tallahassee,
with military honors per-
formed by the U.S. Air Force
Honor Guard. Burial will be
later at Royal Palm Cemetery
in St. Petersburg. Viewing was
4 to 7 p.m. on Thursday at
Gethsemane Missionary Bap-
tist Church, 302 Wallis St.,
Tallahassee. Tillman Funeral
Home in Monticello (850-997-
5553) is handling arrange-
ments. Memorial contributions
may be made to M&M Educa-
tional Athletic Group Inc.,
1914 Blue Sage Court, Bran-
don, FL 33511.
Mr. McCoy attended Florida
A&M University from 1947 to
1951, after graduating from
Gibbs High in his native St.
Petersburg in 1946. He was a
star second basement at
FAMU and made the All
Southern Intercollegiate Ath-
letic Conference, becoming the
first second baseman to earn
this distinction.
In 1956, McCoy became the
10th black player to sign with
the Major League Philadel-
phia Phillies. Three months
later, his major-league stint
was cut short following a knee


injury.
McCoy had an extensive ca-
reer as an educator, teaching in
New Jersey, Pennsylvania,
New York, California, Texas
and Florida. He retired from
education in 1994.
Al McCoy had also worked
as an Equal Employment Op-
portunity officer for the city of
Tallahassee. He was director
of alumni affairs for Florida
A&M University, program
specialist and acting director of
the Florida Human Relations
Commission, a legislative ana-
lyst for the Florida House of
Representatives' Appropria-
tions Committee and a teacher
in various school districts
around the country,
Al was a member of Kappa
Alpha Psi Fraternity and a past
board member of numerous
civic organizations, including
the Tallahassee Urban League.
Survivors include his sons,
Vincent McCoy (and wife
Sonja) of Brandon and Chris-
topherEddington of Roselle,
N.J.; a daughter, Gail Edding-
ton of Roselle; two brothers
Clarence McCoy (and wife
Ruby) and Samuel McCoy,
both of St. Petersburg; a sister,
Juanita McCoy Oliver of St.
Petersburg; six grandchildren;
a great-grandchild; and several
nieces, nephews, other rela-
tives and countless friends.


a memorable event for our vol-
unteer," says Thomas.
RSVP as soon as possible to
help know how much food to
prepare. Call 997-2946.


Refuge House

Lunch, Learn

Scheduled.


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Refuge House will hold a.
lunch and meet workshop 12-1
p.m. on Thursday, April 27 at
the Chamber of Commerce.
Outreach Counselor Dessie
Harvey reports that the meet-
ing will be held to discuss
"Sexual Predators and Jeffer-
son County."
She notes the FDLE has a
link on its website which will
allow access to information on
the sexual predators in the
county and neighborhoods:
http://www3.fdle.state.fl.us
Contact Harvey if you plan
to attend at 342-3518.


The cookbook committee
consists of Chairman, Mary
Ann Van Kleunen, and mem-
bers of the Board of Directors
-Louise Chitwood, Jane Cox,
Amanda Ouzts, Jan Wad-
sworth, and Ruby Whitson.
Artists for this book were
Jane Cox and Nancy Scarboro.
The committee thanks all
who gave of their time and en-
ergy in collecting and submit-


Churches Convene At

Quarterly Conference


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Third Quarter Confer-
ence for Bethel AME Church,
New Bethel AME Church,
Philadelphia AME Church,
hosted at Mt. Pleasant AME
Church, convened 2 p.m.,
April 9, with Presiding Elder
Oscar Williams in charge.
The meeting was opened by
Williams at 2:15 p.m. with the
song "Nobody But You,
Lord."
A Prayer was offered by Sis:
Queen Mosley.
Scripture taken from St.
Mark 11:1-9 was read by Rev.
David Williams:
Offertory Appeal was made
by Rev. Helen Johnson-
Robinson; and the Presiding
Elder was presented by Rev.
Willie Edd Brown.
Conference Secretaries were
Shaundra Buggs, Patricia H.
Gallon, Eddie Gallon, Jr., and
Mary Keaton.
Conference Marshals were
Henry Mays, Eric Shields, and
James Robertson.
Conference Reporters were


3 Churches Join In

5th Sunday Worship


RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

Rev. Victoria Poole Smith is
the guest speaker at the Fifth
Sunday Community Worship
Service hosted by Bethel AME
Church, 11 a.m. Sunday.
Memorial MB Church and
Greater Fellowship MB
Church will join in the service.
Bolen Community Choir will
provide the song service.
Poole is a native of Jackson-
ville and earned her Bachelor
of Business Administration
Degree from Edward Waters
College, and a Masters Degree
of Business Administration in
accounting from Florida Met-
ropolitan University.
She is a graduate of the In-
terdenominational Theological
Center School of Religion in
Atlanta.


Mary E. Hagan, Brandi
Gallon, and James Robertson.
Elder Williams delivered an
Inspirational Message on Eco-
nomical Growth.
Business Reports were given
from officers from all churches
and a Memorial Service was
held for deceased member Sis.
Doris G. Herring with Bro.
James Robertson speaking on
her life.
The Elder provided informa-
tion on upcoming District and
Conference events.
Prayer and Benediction was
completed by Presiding Elder
Oscar C. Williams.


ting recipes and assisting with
the sale of the cookbook.
Without this help, this book
would not have been possible.
The book includes low-fat
recipes, and recipes in memory
of loved ones.
There are 136 pages of reci-
pes that include Appetizers,
Relishes, and Pickles; Soups,
Salads, and Sauces; Meats and
Main Dishes; Vegetables;
Breads, Rolls, and Pastries;
Cakes, Cookies, and Desserts;
Beverages, Microwave, and
Miscellaneous; and a few of
Chef Langford recipes.
After 40 years of service,
Langford retired from the mili-
tary as a Master Chef includ-
ing 30 years in food service.
At present, he is working with
the First United Methodist
Church cooking teams.
The book also includes sev-
eral pages of helpful tips and
information.
The committee will have a
table set up at the Monticello
Downtown Get Down in May,
at the Watermelon Festival
Fashion Show and Luncheon
in June, and at other Festival
events.
"We encourage all to support
our senior citizens and pur-
chase a cookbook," said Chair-
man Van Kleunen.
She can be contacted at 997-
3986 for more information
about the book and for store
locations.
Books may also be ordered
by contacting other members
of the Board Whitson at 997-
4232, and Ouzts at 997-4553.


Thomasville

Christian School

Invites you to their
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, APRIL 23, 2006
at
1040 Glenwood Drive
From 2:30 4:00 p.m.

Curriculum on hane for review
View Uniforms
See model classrooms and new playground
Opportunity to hear a presentation about the
school and to ask questions
Registration packets available

REGISTER NOW- LIMITED ENROLLMENT!
A AVAILABILITY WILL BE ON A FIRST COME BASIS
K5 thru 6th grade
(a grade will be added each year)
For more information call
(229) 227-1515 www.tcschool.org
"They will be called oaks ofrighteousness, a planting
of the Lord, for the display of His splendor. "
Isaiah 61:3


u ." RIVERFRONT
FESTIVAL
Saturday, April 22 10 am to 5 pm
Sunday, April 23 10 am to 4 pm
ADMISSION IS FREE

*Fine Arts & Crafts *Seafood *Wildlife Exhibits
*Live Music *Sand Sculptors
Festival is located on Carrabelle's Riverwalk
For information call The Carrabelle Area Chamber of Commerce

(850) 697-2585









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 21, 2006 PAGE 7


Lamont Baptist Church Sets


Dedication, Open House


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Commemorating the two--
year anniversary since the La-
mont Baptist Church was to-
tally destroyed by flames, the
congregation members will
host the official dedication
ceremony 2 p.m., and open
house, 3 p.m. Sunday, April
30.
Refreshments and finger
foods will be served.
Though the building had
not yet received its finishing


touches, the congregation
members hosted the first serv-
ice in the building on Christ-
mas Day.
"There's no day more fitting
for the first service held in the
Lord's new church than that
of the day celebrated as the
day of Christ's birth," said
Gerald Bailey.
SThe 7,000 square foot struc-
ture, is made of decorative
block that is prefinished and
never requires upkeep.
The church seats approxi-
mately 135 people and has a


Fire Rescue Team


Raises $1,053


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Fire Rescue collected $1,053-
plus change during the Relay
For Life team's boot drive at
Courthouse Circle Friday af-
ternoon and Saturday morn-
ing.
Though team leader Carla
Piggott had expected to raise
$1,200-$1,800, she attributed
the holiday weekend for the
slight decline in donations.
"A lot of people were out of
town for the holiday
weekend," she said.


Friday afternoon, EMTs and
firefighters manned all four
sides at the Courthouse Cir-
cle collecting from vehicles
as they drove by.
Saturday, however, the
number of those collecting for-
the boot drive was cut in half.
"We received a call and two
of the firefighters had to leave
and respond," said Piggott.
To further raise funds for
the American Cancer .Society,
Fire Rescue will sell Bradley
sausage dogs and drinks at the
Relay For Life, 6 p.m Friday
at the Water Street location.


Church News Notes


BELL from the Lamont Baptist Church destroyed by fire
some two years ago, hangs above the sign of the new
church. (News Photos)



JCHS Informs Parents

Of Coming Events


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Jefferson County High
School PTSO will meet 6:30
p.m., Monday, in the media
center.
In other school news, JCHS
Awards Night will be con-
ducted 7 p.m., May 11 in the
old JCHS auditorium.
"We hope that all parents
and members of the commu-
nity will join us for this occa-
sion," said JCHS Curriculum
Coordinator Marghuerite Bul-
loch.
JCHS will be hold
student/parent conferences
from April 24 through May
12. Homeroom teachers will
be calling parents to make ap-
pointments for these confer-
ences
Parents who have not re-
ceived a call by April 24, are
asked to call Ms. Speed at the
front office, 997-3555, to
make an appointment.
"During this conference, we
will be able to look at your


student's proposed schedule
for next year, discuss their
credit and FCAT scores, and
talk about their Individual
Student Success Plan, which
covers any remediation or en-
richment your student will be
taking," said Bulloch. "We
will also discuss Grade Point
Average (GPA) and gradua-
tion requirements. Informa-
tion on scholarships and en-
listment in the armed forces
will also be available," Bul-
loch said.
She added that JCHS will
be offering three dual enroll-
ment courses in 2006-2007, in
partnership with North Flor-
ida Community College.
All county high school stu-
dents who meet the qualifica-
tions are welcome to enroll in
Computer Applications and
American History for the first
semester (Aug.-Dec.)
Also open is a Building
Construction course, which
will last from Aug., 2006 un-
til May, 2007.
For more information about
the dual enrollment courses,
contact Bulloch at 997-3555.


New Bethel AME Church
will hold its annual Youth
Program 11 a.m. Sunday.
Speaker is Jabari Paul, youth
minister of Philadelphia PB
Church ofTallahassee,
Junior Choir and Junior
Ushers from Fellowship MB
Church are the guest choir and
ushers. Dinner will be served
after the program.
***
Elizabeth MB Church cele-
brates Family and Friends Day
4 p.m. Sunday. Guest Church
is Bethel AME Chuch.
***
Old Greenville AME Church
will hold its annual family and
Friends Day 3 p.m. Sunday.
Speaker is Minister Timbre
Denmark of Ford Chapter
AME Church. Dinner will be
served after the program.
S**
New Bethel AME Church in
conjunction with Elizabeth
MB Church and the Second
Harvest Food Bank will pro-



Peck FAMU

Graduate

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Kimberly S. Peck recently
graduated from Florida A&M
University, with a Bachelor of
Science Degree in Political
Science.

She is an honor graduate.

Peck is a resident of Monti-
cello and is the daughter of Al-
ice and John Peck and the
granddaughter of Emma Stub-
bins and the late Milton Stub-
bins, and the late Lucinda and
Marcus Peck, all of-
Monticello.

She is a 2002 graduate of
Jefferson County High School,
and a member of New Bethel
AME Church.


Carrabelle to Ochlockonee Bay
Bay and Flats Fishing
Winter Grouper Trips
i i: Wjl i Tour ;


L t --- -------


Bt.S


vide food to needy' under the
USDA Commodities Program,
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, at
New Bethel.
***
New Hope Church on East
Palmer Mill Road, invite all
women to a Mothers, Daugh-
ters, and Friends Tea Party, 11
a.m. to. 1 p.m. Saturday, May
6. Scones, salad bar and
freshly brewed teas will be
served. Price is $5.

Guest speaker is Janie Neely.
Call 997-1119 for special
ticket prices.
***
Shiloh AME Church in Au-
cilla will hold a 50 States Pro-
gram 11 a.m. Sunday. Speaker
is Minister Lucious Wade with
the Holy Ghost Revival Center
rendering songs of praise.
***
Elizabeth AME Church will
hold a Men's Day Program 11
a.m. Sunday. Speaker is Rev.
John Jones.


fellowship hall in the rear.
Entering the entry way
doors, one passes through in-
tricately carved solid mahog-
any doors, shipped from
South America, and very in-
tricate antiqued-silver iron
work handles grace the doors.


The body of the church fea-
tures a cathedral ceiling with
wooden beams and crystal
chandeliers.

The pews are crafted with
red fabric, white-lacquer
carved design sides, and have
a brass name plate on the arm
rests, of longtime families of
the past and present at the
church.

(See New Church Page 8)


Red Hat Ladies

Meet In Thomasville


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Monticello Red Hats
met in the parking lot of
Dunn's Furniture on a recent
Saturday to carpool to Toscoga
Market Place in Thomasville,
GA.. for their regular monthly
meeting.
"The setting was delightful
and the antiques beautiful,"
says member Mary Nowell.
Queen Mum Thelma Bird-
well was not in attendance due
to stomach flu so, members
joined forces to help the meet-
ing run smoothly.
Nowell recognized first
timer Deanie King, mother of



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Barbara Bills, who promptly
asked to become a member.
Though there are a few April
birthdays among the members,
none of these were present.
Former Queen Mum Minnie
Stokley graciously agreed to
host the May meeting of the
Red Hats. The location of this
meeting will be decided as the
meeting date draws near.
It was agreed by the group
that the Watermelon Festival
Luncheon will take the place
of the June meeting.
Nancy Kinnee gave the In-
vocation after which lunch was
enjoyed by all.
After lunch, many of the
members looked over the
many antiques on display.








Central
Church of Christ
US 19 South at
Cooper's Pond Road
997-1166
Sunday:
10 AM Bible School
11AM Worship Hour
5 PM Evening Worship
Wednesday:
.7 PM Bible Study

The Lord our, ii.
God, the Lord is
one. Love the
Lordyour God,
with allyour
heart and with all
your soul and
with allyour
'strength.
Deut 6:4-5


JBLE YOUR INVESTMENT IN ONLY 1 YEAR!

Builders Lots Available in the
Fastest Growing Areas of Florida


IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY

DIAL 911


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If It Happens In Y AE
Jefferson County,
You'll Read It In The The elderly. Their loved ones. Your community. V volunteerss
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NMonticello News There are no limits to caring.





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LAMONT BAPTIST CHURCH will hold its Dedication
Ceremony and Open House Sunday, April 30.


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PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 21, 2006


Sports


ACA Tennis Team Stands


7-6 On The Season


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Acad-
emy varsity tennis team
wrapped up the regular season
on a 7-6 record, after winning
two of the three final games.
The Lady Warriors fell to a
5-2 loss against Robert F.
Munroe.


In singles action, Courtney
Connell lost to Mandy Clark,
0-6 and 0-6; Kaitlin Jackson
lost to Meg Summerford, 0-6
and 0-6; Rebekah Aman lost
to Beth Summerford, 0-6 and
1-6.
Elizabeth Shirley downed
Jessica Joyner, 6-4, and 6-3;
and Caroline Mueller de-
feated Ivie Thomas in the first-


match, 6-3, lost the second, 5-
7, and took the win in the tie-
breaker, 10-4.
In doubles action, Connell
and Shirley lost to Clark and
Beth Summerford, 3-8; and
Jackson and Mueller, lost to
Meg Suumerfield and Tho-
mas, 1-8.
The Lady Warriors blanked
Suwannee County for a 7-0
win.
Connell defeated Nikki
Johnson, 8-5; Jackson
downed Tori Henderson, 8-3;
Aman defeated Brittney Lax-
ton, 8-0; Shirley beat Mi-
chelle Poole, 8-0; and Mueller
Downed Angela Debono, 8-3.
In doubles action, Connell
and Shirley downed Laxton
and Johnson, 8-1; Jackson
and Mueller blanked Poole
and Debono, 8-0; and sarah
Sorensen and Nikki Hamrick
lost to Tori Wood and Nikki
Garrison, 5-8.
ACA squeaked by NFC for
a 4-3 win.
In singles action, Connell
fell to Alex Harte, 2-6 and
2-6; Jackson downed Katie
McClure, 7-5 and 6-0; Aman
defeated Eurie Rho by forfeit-
due to injury; Shirley beat
Kim McClure, 7-5 in the first
match, lost the second, 4-6
and lost the tiebreaker, 1-6;
and Mueller won by forfeit.
In doubles action, Connell
and Shirley lost to Harte and
Kim McClure, 8-9; and Jack-
son and Mueller defeated Rho
and Katie McClure, 9-8.

'A'S' Game

Canceled
The Monticello A's baseball
team remain at a' 1-1 season'"
after the game slated against
Quincy, was canceled.
Coach Jim Norton accred-
ited the cancellation to the
Easter holiday and activities.
The A's will continue play
against Thomasville, 3 p.m.,
Sunday, here.


MAXIE MILLER, of Mood Swings team six, serves the ball during a recent practice
session.


Mood Swings Win 2

Of 6 Tennis Matches


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello Mood
Swings ladies A-league tennis
team, won two of six matches.
last week against the Thomas-


New Church
(Continued From Page 7)
The sound system imitates a
live orchestra playing during
every service.
towards the rear of the
building are the nursery, pas-
tor's office, four classrooms,
and the fellowship hall and
kitchen.
Throughout the entire struc-
ture, flower boxes are set into
the walls near the ceilings, to
contain donated arrange-
ments.
A copy of the time capsule
is in the entryway of the new
building along with the Bible,
pulpit, and cross that some-
how survived the fire, and all
News articles published per-
taining to the church and the
fire.


ville Ace-N-U.
The #1, Katie Brock and #3
player Susan Goodwin, won
the first set, 6-3, lost the sec-
ond, 1-6 and came back to
take the tiebreaker, 6-1.
Team #2, Patty Hardy and
Cindy Wainright, won the


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Fighting Heart Disease
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sets, 7-6 and 6-2.
Playing in the #3 spot, were
#4's Laura Kirchhoff and
Angie Delvecchio, who lost
the sets, 5-7 and 6-7.
Playing in the #4 spot were
# 5's, Trisha Wirick and Lind-
sey Taylor, who lost the first
set, 3-6, won the second, 6-3
and lost the.tiebreaker, 2-6.
In the #5 spot were #6's
Maxie Miller and Jennifer El-
lis, who lost 1-6 and 4-6.
Substituting in the #6 spot
were Hanna Buckley and
Janie Deal, who lost 3-6 and
4-6.
The Mood Swings will play
against the Killearn
Special-K, 9:30 a.m., Thurs-
day at Tom Brown Park.



NOW AVAILABLE!
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Balls Cues
Other Supplies
So Drinks Beer *Wine -
850-668-7665
1698 Village Square Blvd. Tallahassee
Open Noon'til 2 am 7 DasaWeel


FLORIDA DISABLED OUTDOORS ASSOCIATION
This event welcomes people with any type of disability, their
families andfriends. Come out and try everything from
sit-waterskiing to kayaking to power soccer!


BILL BROWN

With only three games re-
maining in the regular season,
Aucilla stands 17-5 after wins
over Carrabelle and Brooks
County last week.
The Carrabelle win brings
ACA's district record to 8-0,
and assures the Warriors of
the number one seed in the
district tournament.
The Carrabelle game on
Tuesday was a 10-2 win with
Chris Tuten pitching a com-
plete game to record his
eighth win against one loss.
He gave up four hits, two runs
and struck out five.
Aucilla collected eight hits
off two Carrabelle pitchers,
with Josh Carswell leading on
two for three and two RBI.
Glen Bishop had a double,
single, and three RBI, fol-


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Aucilla Christian Academy-
varsity baseball team Coach
Ray Hughes, was named by
the Florida Athletic Coaches
Association as the District 4,
Class 1-A Coach of the Year.
Warrior Casey Gunnels
was named Player of the
Year.
"Casey's work ethic and
commitment to be the best he
can be, both on the field and
off, is part of what allowed
him to receive this honor,"
said Principal Richard Finlay-


lowed by Casey Gunnels, one
for three, one RBI.
Tuten, One for two; Dustin
Roberts, one for four, one
RBI; and A. J. Connell, one
for two.
On Thursday, Brooks
County fell to the Warriors by
a score of 6-3, on the five-hit
pitching of Roberts. He
struck out three and recorded
his sixth win of the year.
Tuten had the hot bat, get-
ting a double, single and two
RBI in two official at-bats;
Matt Bishop broke out of mid
slump, getting two hits and a
RBI in two official at-bats.
Glen Bishop, in the double-'
header role, delivered a dou-
ble and two RBI; Carswell
accounted for the other Au-
cilla hit with a double and one
RBI.
The last home game is 4
p.m., Friday, against FAMU
High.


son. "He is an outstanding
young man."
"And I can't say enough
about Ray Hughes," said Fin-
layson. "He's done so much
for Aucilla in his years as a
coach. He's a spiritual leader
and is a true inspiration to the
kids."
Finlayson said that winners
of the honor are chosen by
coaches within the same dis-
trict. "This shows how es-
teemed Ray is among his
peers," said Finlayson.
He concluded, "Aucilla is
extremely proud to have two
of its own chosen for this
honor."


Warriors Fall To Altha

2nd Time This Season
could not get one across the
BILL BROWN plate.


For the second time this
year, Aucilla Warriors lost a
game to Altha and their ace
pitcher, Kilpatrick, 3-0.
The game was closer than
the 8-3 loss earlier, but the
Warriors could not manage a
score.
All scoring took place in the
bottom of the second when
Altha converted three walks
and three hits, along with Au-
cilla miscues, into three runs.
The Warriors managed to
get two runners to third, but


Chris Tuten pitched what
may have been his best game
of the year, giving up four
hits and walking four. His
support consisted of five sin-
gles, all in different innings,
and none coming with a run-
ner in scoring position.
Warrior batters hitting
safely were; Tuten and Casey
Gunnels with two singles
each and Stephen Dollar, one
single.
The record is now 17-6.
Tuten is 8-2 from the mound.
Two games remain before
the district tournament in Car-
rabelle, April 24-27.


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I I








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 21, 2006 PAGE 9


Tigers Split Games, Now

2-12 On The Season


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High
School varsity baseball team
now stands 2-12 on the sea-
son after winning one of two
games by forfeit and losing
the second, 13-3.
In the game slated against
FAMU, the Tigers won by
forfeit.
"FAMU never showed up,"
said Assistant Coach Jim Nor-
ton.
In the game against Madi-
son, the Tigers were trounced
for a 13-3 loss.
"We played excellent base-
ball until the fourth inning,"
said Norton. "We were kick-
ing that ball all over the field
and couldn't catch a basic fly-
ball and kept missing the ba-
sic grounders."
He added that 11 of Madi-
son's runs were due to Jeffer-
son errors. "We were mess-


ing up big time, Madison
would get three or four on
base and all it took were those
lucky hits to beat us."
Norton said that starting
pitcher Shayne Broxie did
well on the mound, pitching a
two-inning no-hitter and giv-
ing up three hits in the third.
All together, he allowed two
runs and no walks, until the
fourth when Tiger errors
caused seven unearned Madi-
son runs.
Amez Ammons pitched the
fourth, giving up five runs,
striking out no batters, and al-
lowing three hits.
At the plate, Norton said the
Tigers were hitting well.
Demario Rivers went two
for three with one run; Curtis
Hightower, two for two;
Breon Parker, two for three;
Broxie, Telvin Norton, Pat-
rick Cherry, and Ammons, all,
went one for three; and Mal-
colm Norton and Nick Parker
each scored one run.


NFCC AWARD recipients, from left, Mark Urschler, Jo-
seph Neil Graves, and Amy Lewis.


BREON PARKER catches a
fastball at the plate, dur-
ing a recent JCHS practice
session. (News Photo)


Please do not encourage -
Florida's wildlife to do
things that are not '
natural. Help keep
our wildlife safe.

LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF LAND
DEVELOPMENT CODE
PROPOSED CHANGE:
Jefferson County Planning
Commission will have a public
hearing on the following
proposed land development
code change on May 11, 2006 at
7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter
as such matter may be heard, in
the courtroom of the Jefferson
County courthouse located at
the intersection of U.S. Highway
90 and 19. The meeting may be
continued as necessary.
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
ORDINANCE NO. AN
ORDINANCE OF JEFFERSON
COUNTY FLORIDA,
RELATING TO
MODIFICATIONS TO
APPROVED RESIDENTIAL
SUBDIVISION
DEVELOPMENT ORDERS;


PROVIDING FOR FINDINGS-
OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR
PURPOSE; AMENDING
LAND DEVELOPMENT
CODE SECTION 9.00.03, DEFINI-
TIONS; AMENDING LAND DE-
VELOPMENT CODE SECTION
9.01.05,
DEVIATIONS TO A FINAL
DEVELOPMENT ORDER;
PROVIDING FOR
SEV ERABILITY; PROVIDING
FOR CONFLICT; PROVING
FOR AUTHORITY; AND
PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE. From the
Florida "Government in the
Sunshine Manual", page 36,
paragraph c: Each board,
commission, or agency of this
slate or of any political
subdi% ision thereof shall include
in the notice of any meeting or
hearing, if notice of meeting or
hearing is required, of such
board, commission or agency,
conspicuously on such notice the
advice that, if a person decides
to appeal any decision made by
the board, agency, or
commission with respect to any
matter considered at such
meeting: or hearing, he or she
will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings, is made, which
record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the
.appeal is to be based.
4/21, c
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING: The Jefferson
County Commission will review
and make its decision regarding
a proposed major subdivision.
The proposed major subdivision
is to be located about one mile
south of unincorporated
Ashville on approximately
111.48 acres on a portion of
parcel numbers
05 2N 7E 0000-0021 0000 and
05-2N-7E-0000-0020-0000.
Interested parties may present
their concerns at the Jefferson
County Commission meeting on
May 18, 2006 at 6:00 p.m., or as
soon thereafter as such matter
may be heard, in the courtroom
of the Jefferson County
Courthouse located at the
intersection of U.S. Highway 19
and U.S. Highway 90 in
Monticello, Florida 32344. The
meeting may be continued as
necessary. From the Florida
"Government in the Sunshine
Manual", page 36, paragraph c:
Each board, commission, or


agency of this state or of any
political subdivision thereof
shall include in the notice of any
meeting or hearing, if notice of
meeting or hearing is required,
of such board, commission, or
agency, conspicuously on such
notice, the advice that, if a
person decides to appeal any
decision made by the board,
agency or commission with
respect to any matter considered
at such meeting or hearing he or
she will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings, is made which
record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based. Prior to
the meeting interested persons
may contact the Jefferson
County Planning and Building
Department at 850-342-0223 or
write the Department at 445
West Palmer Mill Road,
Monticello, FL 32344 and
provide comments. The
development proposal may be
reviewed during business hours
at the Department office.
4/21, c
The Jefferson County Planning
Commission will hold a
workshop on April 27, 2006 at
7:00 p.m. The workshop will be
to discuss subdivisions, and
service areas. The meeting will
be held in the Courtroom of the
Jefferson County Courthouse
located at the intersection of US
Highway 19 and US Highway 90
in Monticello, FL. The meeting
may be continued as necessary.
From the Florida "Government
in the Sunshine Manual", page
36, paragraph c: each board,
commission, or agency of this
state or of any political
subdivision thereof shall include
in the notice of any meeting or
hearing if notice of meeting or
hearing is required, of such
board, commission or agency
conspicuously on such notice,
the advice that, if a *person


For details

www.hrmcacclair


decides to appeal any decision
made by the board, agency, or
commission with respect to any
matter considered at such
meeting or hearing, he or she
will need a record of the
proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of
the proceedings, is made, which
record includes the testimony
and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
4/21, c


Monticello, Trading Company
located in the heart of
downtown Monticello. Tired of
all that clutter and need money?
Come see us with your used
furniture, collectibles and
antiques. Booths for rent at
reasonable prices. 509-3517.
4/12, 14, 19,21,c
The City of Monticello is
accepting applications for an
Equipment Operator in the
Water/Sewer Department.
Applicant must present a
current Florida Drivers License,
Class B Commercial; a High
School Diploma or equivalent;
and Social Security Card.
Applicants with prior
experience in Water/Sewer
Pipeline Repair or Installations
are encouraged to apply. The
City of Monticello is an equal
opportunity employer and does
not discriminate against race,
color, religion, sex, ancestry,
place of birth, handicap, or
national origin. The City of
Monticello is a drug free
workplace, and new employees
must pass a pre-employment
drug and alcohol test.
Applications are available at
City Hall, 245 So. Mulberry
Street, Monticello, Florida,
Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 4
p.m., and will be accepted until
1:00 p.m., on Friday, April 28,
2006. Don Anderson, City
Superintendent.
4/21, 4/26/06, c


ate go to:'
y/drscareers


-- --- --- -- --- --- -- -- -- ---nn fl---*..---lfl---l f--1-fl---f f---' l---l l---f f---


Rea Estafr


VIRGINIA G. BLOW
Broker Associate Kellyandlly
850.509.1844 Properties
rlo Mfftke/efchtt~oiwtt,/. : .tb-eriAP1B

COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL LAND
4 YEAR TOP ASSOCIATE INCOME PRODUCER
EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED


&


Mor1eI I 6


SABOR REAL


ESTATE


MARK VOLLERTSEN


iMiA$s[ Realtor
SALES ASSOCIATE OPPT
850-997-1691 OR 8501459-4864
MARKRV7@AOL.COM
"SERVICE' YOU DESERVE / PEOPLE YOU TRUST"
RESIDENTIAL ~ COMMERCIAL ~ INVESTMENT ~ LOTS ~ ACREAGE


Realor -Asso ia
Cel 5067-04


Got Land?

Thinking about buying or selling land? Contac the land
specialists at SouthVest Land Group, Inc. We can assist you with professionall
service and a friendly, no-pressure atmosphere.
Sellers All we do is land. Your property doesn't take a
backseat to houses or anything else. We'll tke photos and
use maps and exhibits to highlight your property for buyers.

Buyers Whether it's a single lot or large acreage, a
recreational retreat or timber tract, we can help you find that
perfect property.
Contact us today for a confidential discussion regarding your real estate needs.
Simply call or send us an e-mail message at southvest99@aol.com. We
Look forward to hearing from you.


'MI


850-9
0O


John A. "Al" Russell, Broker

06-0017 thVe 850-508-4242
office Land Group, Inc. i


.-_.--mu' mdA,~AU .. --~-~ -
- ------- -- --- I-- ----I I- TI---- ~I -- -zns-- -


DIGITAL
RECEPTION
SERVICES, INC.
Satellite TV Installers
i *a iM E.


Top 10 Things To Do When Selling Your Home:
#1. Call Lynette C. Sirmon
*She'll take care of the other 9!)
"We didn't expect it to be that easy!" That's what you'll
typically hear from Lynette's long list.of satisfied
clients. From her years of experience selling real estate,
Lynette knows exactly how to make sales come together
quickly and easily. When it's time to sell your home or
land for top dollar, all you need to do is make
one simply phone call...
850-933-6363 MB or 850-948-5000 After Hours
R. Winston Connell, Realtor
310 S. Jefferson St., Monticello, FL 32344
I


^s~


H~ ii-=--,..


I








PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 21, 2006

WA ~IE


Need weekend respite care for
elderly women with Alzheimer's
disease. References and
background check required.
(850) 322-9667 (Iv message).
4/19, 21, pd
Boyd Sod Farm is looking for a
licensed CDL driver for local
deliveries of agricultural
products. Contact us at
877-388-3977
4/21, 26, c
Jefferson County Board of
County Commissioners is
seeking applicants for a
Part-time Gate Attendant at the
County Solid Waste
Department. Job description
and applications may be
obtained at the Solid Waste
Department located at 1591
Waukeenah Street, Monticello,
Florida. Hours and days of this
position are: Friday and
Saturday 6:30am 4:00pm and
then Sunday and Monday
6:30am 10:30am then 3:00pm -
7:00 pm. Essential Job
Functions are: Loads and
unloads heavy material from


trucks. Move equipment and
large bulky objects. Performs
custodial duties. Maintains
ground. Rakes grass and water
plants. Weeds flower beds.
Shapes hedges and trims trees.
Cut grass. Plants and fertilizes
flowers. May operate
tractor-mower in mowing grass
on right-of-way Picks up boxes
and other materials left by
residents. Needs to get along
well with people and be able to
direct and explain where the
different types of materials are
to be disposed of. Minimum
qualifications are: Knowledge of
operation, maintenance,
capabilities, limitations and
safety aspects of equipment.
Ability to understand and
comply With oral instructions.
Ability to read street and traffic
signs. Ability to perform manual
labor. Skill in using hand tools
Education and experience
needed: One (1) year experience
in performing manual labor.
Licenses, Certifications or
Registrations: Possess of valid


Florida Drivers License and a
valid Social Security Card.
Applications will be accepted
until 4:00 p.m., April 26, 2006 at
the Solid Waste Department
located at 1591 Waukeenah
Street Equal Opportunity/
Affirmative Action Employer.
Drug Free Workplace. Drug
Testing is a required part of the
pre-employment physical.
Applications with a disability
should contact the above office
for accommodations. For
additional information please
call 342-0184.
4/7, 12, 14, 19, c
MONTICELLO: Part time
janitorial position available
immediately. Please call
681-3148 for more information.
4/12, 14, 19, 21, 5/3, 5, 10, 12, c
English Instructor (Pending
Board Approval) North Florida
Community College, Madison,
Florida: Anticipated opening
for Full time. faculty
appointment beginning August,
2006. The successful candidate
will teach) English/Literature


courses through the accredited institution) with a
sophomore-level. Qualifications: minimum of 18 graduate
A master's degree (from semester hours in English


and/or Literature. Community
college teaching experience is
preferred. In addition to


A Division of Wyche Incorporated
180 S. Cherry St. Monticello, Fl 32344 (850)997-3271 fax (850)997-3345
Email: WPM1232@aol.com

PROPERTY FORRENT
815 N.Jefferson St. 1/1 Avail. Now
640 E. Washington St. 1/1 Avail. May 15
1386 Noel Dr. 3/2 Avail. Now
2536 Old Lloyd Rd. 1/1 Cottage Avail. Now

':COMINGSOON.,
560 S. Waters St. 3/2 June 15
1064 S. Waters St. 3/2 Avail June 15
S,435 E. Washington St. 4/11/2 Avail. June 15
CALL FOR APPOINTMENT


BUSINESS




DIRECTORY


Portable Toilets DOUG'S TREE & LAWN Register's
Billy Simmons Septic SERVICE Regisers M -
850-509-1465 ell 0 Trimming 0 StumpGrinding 315 Waukeenah Hwy. Lawn & Landscaping
850-997-0877 home o Mowig AerialD-evice
Clean Portables for construction sites, 0 Removal Bush Hogging (1/4Mile Off US 19 South) Mention This Ad & receive
family reunions, parties 0 Maintenance. A 10/%o Discount
Events and Types 997-0039 Lic. & Insured 997-2535 11025 East Mahan 877-4550


B &M Tractor Service CARROLL HILL AUTO ELECTRIC INC. LA Craig
Specializing in Food Plots, Bush Hogging, L'-UTA Craig
Liming & Fertilizing, Spraying, and Fencing
"Complete Auto Electric Repair Service" Larichiuta
Richbourg Nursery, Inc. O0 Lloyd, FL32337
TL. *Limerock
Brad McLeod 99 Richbourg Road L t
Cell: (850) 210-2942 Mack McLeodi o a
Cel:850)i 10-2942 Mack Le Monticello, FL 32344 Thomasville Road 115 Albany Rd. n997-6788
HoCe: (850) 997-1451 Home: 850 997-3091
10534 South Saul Rd. Lamoni, FL. 32336 Tel. 850- 997-3764 (on Carroll Hill) 229-226-0717. '0bp Soil
Fax 850-997-8388


Your Local Professional Painters
Interior-~ Exterior
Lic. & Ins. #4676







Septic Tank & Land Clearing
Complete Septic Service & Repair
Lot Preparing & Land Clearing
Thomas B. Scott, Sr.
Rt 1 Box 137
Lamont, FL 32366
ph:997-5536 cell: 933-3620


We accept all manufacturer coupons.

1-10 Chevron
Black & Mild Cigars (original) +tax
$1.79 (5 ct. pk) $32.99 (20pk 5ct Ct)
Copen Hagen (Silver Top Only) +tax
$4.39 can $39.99 Roll
Grissly (All Flavors) + tax
$1.79 can $8.22 Roll '% can)
Longhorn (All Flavors) + tax
$1.29 can $6.09 Roll (5 can)
Kayak (All Flavors) + tax
$1.11 $5.19Roll(5 can)
Free Crystal Lighter with Carton
Marlboro $3.04pk $8.80/3pk $26.99 carton
305's $1.57pk 3pk $4.47 & 1400 ct $13.30 2ct
DTC's $1.70pk 3pk $4.80 $15.20 cart: &
$14.40 2 cart.


Residential & Commercial Lic.#cgc #1507547

YEAGER CONTRACTING Co. INC.
CUSTOM HOMES




PH: 997-2296 CELL: 508-2383


JEFJERSON PLACE APARTMENTS
1468 S. WAUKEENAH ST.OFFICE 300
MONTICELLO, FL 32344
1+ 2 BEDROOM / HUD VOUCHERS ACCEPTED
CALL 850-997-6964 TTY-711


owwI


L~1


S E W GO THE EXTRA MILE FOR YOU!
997-6500
WHEN YouNEED To SOLVE COMPUTER PROBLEMS.
SAME DAY & NEXT DAY ONSITE SERVICE
*Diagnosis Repair *Upgrades *Installations *Consutations
'Tutorialsi*Removal of Viruses, Adware, Spyware


a YourHous


Call for quality work
45 Years In The Trade
Jerry Cole Painting Corp.
850-997-7467 850-544-2917
*Residential ~ Commercial *Interior ~ Exterior


THURMAN TRACTOR SERVICE
MOWING~ 'HARROWING'~
FOOD PLOTS
LIC. & INS.

James Thurman, LLC
850-997-5211
850-545-0139


Since 1977
*Licensed *Bonded *Insured
Residential & Commercial
FREE ESTIMATES ~ 997-4100

]KI 1 1 rttrwI R


U


Si llm-The Decorator's MR. MERCHANT
M ng er Warehouse, LLC THIS SPACE


260 N. COULD BE
Washin- Cherry Street YOURS FOR

Cl8 4578i, glhom, Furnishing & Accessories ONLY $10.00

MONTICELLO S ONLYLOCAL HEATING & COOLING COMPANY

STEWART A&S Flooring, L.L.C. 0
HEATING & COOLING INC. 43 Years experience Keaton Tire Repair
Sales Service Installati, TILE, CAPET, VINYL, "Service Is Our Business on and off the Road
SR n Commercial LAMINATE, REPAIRS & SALES
Residential Commercial
342-9922 HOME EDD KEATON 850-997-0903 Shop
Family Owned Office: (850) 342-3294 570-6593 CELL TRAVS KEATON 850-264-6871 CelFax
Lic. # RA0067121 CELL: (850) 509-2903 LICENSED & INSURED Lamont, FL 32336 850-997-5443 Home


B 1 Ultimate

Unage Auto

877-7222
TyroiieDavi Very large selection to choose from
ales Manager A All trade-ins are welcome
Best rates as low as 4.5%
A Free warranty on every vehicle sold
Trade -ag
P,, ,1, or P9 .G00D (REDIT BAD (REDPIT,
pus It ticl
W avAe 1ve, iT 001NT MAAfR
eor Everyone[

TYRONE,;I'hIe'smaking it
hpenTeUtiaeWi









MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 21, 2006 PAGE 11


..To Elace Your Ad





-997-3568


I

teaching duties, position will
include: established office
hours; serving on College
committees; professional
development; participating in
Department and College
activities. Some classes taught
may be night and/or dual
enrollment courses on NFCC
campus and/or at satellite
campuses. Send applications to:
Director HR, North Florida
Community College, 325 NW
Turner Davis Drive, Madison,
Florida 32340. Only complete
application packets will be
considered. Complete
application packets requires
letter; resume and application;
copy of Transcripts .(unofficial
okay). Application is available
on website at www.nfcc.edu.
Questions: Call Dr. Barbara
McCauley (850-973-1640) or
email to mccauleyb@nfcc.edu.
Application packet must be
received by May 9, 2006 EOE
4/21, 26, c
Free room, board, and small
monthly stipend in exchange for
light housekeeping and cooking
for elderly male in his home.
References and background
check required. (850) 322-9667
(Iv message)
4/19, 21 pd
Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4
1/25, tfn
Evening Monday Saturday
7:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.
Computer experience and
general office skills required.
Mail short resume to JCKC,
P.O. Box 400, Monticello, FL
32345.
4/19, 21.26, 28, c

-SERVICES
Backhoe Service: Driveways,
roads, ditches, tree and shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
-Gary Tuten @ 997-3116,
933-3458.
tfn


Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd. 997-5648. Leave
message.
2/11-tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, quick responses.
6/22, tfn
Peters Satellite -- Your Satellite
Dish dealer. We offer
equipment, installation, repair,
parts, and prompt service. We
also offer Go-Karts, utility
trailers and lawn mowers.
Located at: 1150 Old Lloyd
Road, Monticello, Fla.
850-997-3377
1/25, tfn, c
Private Duty. Elder Care 24
hours/ 7 days a week. Home
850-997-0162 mobile
850-544-7052
4/7, 12, 14, 19, 21, 26, 28, pd
Healthy Weight Loss available
only at Jackson's Drug,
Hoodiacol is designed to curb
the appetite, burn fat and
increase energy levels resulting
in considerable weight loss over
time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key
ingredients incorporated into
rice bran oil with natural
flavorings to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss,
you may see benefits for the
hair, skin and nails from the
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in
rice bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is
a cactus found in the Kalahari
Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite
suppressant, it not only limits
appetite but increases the sense
of satiety. This tends to limit
total caloric intake by 30-40%
without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should
result from such a drop in
caloric intake.
s/d 5/18, tfn
Home Health Care Equipment -
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
NOW AVAILABLE
1/19-tfn


Housing Vouchers

We accept all vouchers
2/2 $615 ~ 3/2 $715 ~ 4/2 $895 $50 dep.
Pool & Youth Activities

575-6571 ;.








6690 SW Sundown Creek Road, Greenville, FL
FRIDAY -:- APRIL 28 -:- 10:00 A.M.
Beautiful Plantation With Large Majestic Oaks


* Great Cattle and Horse Farm
*1 1/4 Miles 1-10 Frontage ,
* Great Development Potential
* Quail Hunting Operation
* Large Food Plots Contain Both
Natural & Planted Habitats For
Quail & Other Wildlife
* Abundant Game Quail.
Deer & Turkey


I


* (2) Large Barns
* .I, ,I ll H I- ji
* 3200' Approved Pratt Ranch
Grass Landing Strip (# 20 FD)
* Fenced & Crossfenced
* Well Stocked Duck Pond
* 4"Well
* Planted Longleaf Pines


LARGE GUEST LODGE
4 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths,
4000 Sq. Ft., Kitchen
with Built-Ins
PLUS A LARGE SELECTION OF
WELL MAINTAINED EQUIPMENT


SRowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc. Broker
-- 800-323-8388 Parti on
RS 10% Buyer's Premium AU479 AB 296 Welcomel




VIRGINIA G. BLOW
Broker Associate

850.509.1844
NEW 4 / 3 REMODELED HOME 2420 +/- SF
Beautiful landscaped yard and walks, new custom
kitchen, windows, large in-law suite w/2 exterior
entrances, front patio and rear deck, large concrete
driveway and gravel drive with live oaks. Fenced
back yard with workshop. Hardwood and tiled
floors. A great in town location! $235,000
$115,000 3/2 Mobile HM / 3 AC, extras, Lloyd Acres
S109,000 (each) 3/2 Two homes totally renovated, Marvin
5129,900 2/2 IIM / 2. 5AC, wood floors/walls, N. Forest
S129,900 3/2 BM / lot, beautiful hardwood floors, York
5163,000 3/2 BM/1 AC, historic fixer upper, Gamble
$295,000 Profitable 7 apartments, York and Hagan
$650,000 9,470 SF COMMERCIAL BLDG., Hwy 19 N.
RETAIL/ OFFICES/WILL LEASE(BUILD TO SUIT)
S 50,000 (each) 2 adj. city lots with view of Courthouse!
S125,000 7 +/- AC's pasture w/woods, Waukeenab Hwy.
S265,000 16. 5 +/- AC'S Lake Miccosukee Frontage
S400,000 20+/- AC's w/pond, landscaped, Red Fox Run
Will divide, Two 10 AC lots at $225,000 each
COLDWELL BANKER KELLY AND KELLY PROPERTIES
EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATEn


J~I~j~


4 year old tan and white
Chihuahua dog named Rocky,
in Vicinity of Clark Rd. Please
call 997-3463.

GAV G -.2 ,
Estate Yard Sale: Furniture,
Table & Chairs, Knic Knacs,
Collectibles, etc. Saturday, April
22, from 8 til 2 Rain or shine.
1140 E. Pearl Street.
???
Garage Sale Saturday, April 22,
7 a.m. noon. Old Tables,
dishes, clothes, Lots of stuff.
Holy Hills, 1550 Beech Rd.
4/21, pd
' -- -' r- -

Metal roofing save $$$ Buy
direct from manufacturer. 20
colors in stock with all
accessories. Quick turn around!
Delivery available toll free
(888)393-0335.
4/21-fcan
Washer/Dryer $200. 997-2433 ~
570-0211. Leave Message.
4/21, 26, pd

Truck Topper: Fiberglass,
White, Ford Long Bed, Good
Conditions. 997-6575
4/21, 26, pd
Wolf Tanning beds buy direct
and save! Full body units from
$22 a month! Free color catalog.
Call today! (800) 842-1305
www.np.etstan.com
4/21-fcan
Registered 6 year old Dark Bay
Thoroughbred Philly $2000
Call Mike 519-6506.
4/19, 21 pd
Appaloosa Horse nice riding
horse. Best offer. Call 997-3368.
4/14, 19, 21, c
Crepe Myrtle starting at $1, red
and white, 342-3246, ask for
Ricky.
4/12, 14, 19, 21,26, 28, pd


Prime downtown office space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980.
11/30 tfn,c
House For Rent! 3 bedroom, 1.5
bath great location only $625
per month please call 339-2850
4/19, 21, 26, 28
pd.
Office for Rent 238 W
Washington St. Call 997-2646
M-F 9-5 available May 1st
tfn
1 room efficiency apt. 450 sq. ft.
$250 per month call 997-6492
leave message.
4/19, tfn,c



1993 Ford F250 New Tires,
brakes, tune-up. Reduced
$1,000 to $3,500.
1995 Ford Crown Victoria new
tires, looks and drives like new.
Reduced to $3,500. Below
NADA Book. 997-6806
tfn, c
No Credit Checks Just Low
Down Payments on Good Cars
& Trucks. 2 and 4 Door Model
As Low As $750 down
850-536-9111
www.JumpinJims.com Ask for
Mr. Deal
11/2-tfn


House For Sale!!
1430 Florida Ave
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
Large Screened back
porch Beautiful Lot
Work in Process To reno-
vate home buy early at
$94,500 before price
goes to $110K to 115K
997-6806


REGISTERED NURSES
ICU, IMCU, CCU, CPU, CATHLAB
$5000 Recruitment Incentive
(With one year of experience)
Archbold Hospital in Thomasville, GA is currently hiring RNs.for
the above full-time positions. Variety of shifts available. We offer
an excellent benefit package and competitive salaries. CON-
TACT: Nurse Recruiter, 229-228-2713 or e-mail:
rtaylor@archbold.org EOE



REGISTERED NURSE

HOME HEALTH

$1500-$3000 Recruitment Incentive
FT Positions
ALSO
Per Visit Positions $35 per visit -
premium pay for admissions

Archbold Home Health Services is currently seeking
qualified applicants for the above positions to serve
Leon, Madison and Jefferson Counties.
One Year of home health experience preferred. We of-
fer competitive compensation and an excellent benefit
package. CONTACT: Nurse Recruiter, Archbold
Medical Center. Phone 229-228-2713,
FAX: 229-551-8733. rtaylor@archbold.org
Visit our web site: www.archbold.org EOE







7. VA44 CA



Assistant Managers & Customer

Sales Associates


Seeking highly motivated, experienced and
enthusiastic professionals for the Greenville
area. Convenience Store experience desired.
All shifts available. Excellent opportunity for
advancement. Competitive Salary, Bonus,
Benefits and opportunity to join a progressive
and fast growing company. Fax resume to:


Fast Track Foods #411
ATTN: Bertie

Fax: (850) 948-2678
Phone (352)494-7550


KELLY & KELLY
PROPERTIES
215 N. Jefferson St.
Monticelo, Fl 32344
(850) 997-5516
www cbkk.com
Pery Location:
(850) 223-2370


SPrbw Is T70 Puifui TL, to
PhLua New ReDO&
60Arrersfki k lfadwld*20 Yew
plw~dephin5 5480,000
11.68 Acres an 19 N. Zc.,dwbxd
use BurdinmesvRudwm S 233,600
U 3 lo& agoable %Wdh m mgWz
dL1uce t Lo douulam w a
S&PAWg at S 75,00
.20 acres Ao nAe Sopckhpp River.
reaflfer tLe sa mekeidggel-a-mis
WalfffteAI PFropen S 69,SO0
* 3 Lots walar an WaukermA Hi.ny
Grrat Locadom, highi rhte vviikrpaufd
Pines. Sylrmug w t59US,


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com
Country Livinq 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only $16,500 per acre

Price Slashed! 2 bedroom 1 bath home
with small fenced yard, family room $0756
Now $76,500

Peary Doest It Again! Under Contract-


Priced to Sell 1993 Fleetwood 3 bedroom
2 bath home on 2.5 acres in Lloyd Acres
paved road frontage $76,500

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly
wooded acres Only $36,500


Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big double-
wide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote,
oaks, pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane 100'x220' in the City $15,500 each

Freeman Road 26.46 acres of pasture land
with easy access to 1-10, US 19 and US 27 Only
3,500 per acre

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Peary Does It Aqain! under Con-
tract-Buildinq lots Town on Morris Road
call for details $10,000 to $40,000

Peary Does It Aqain! Under Contract
Cox Road 10 mostly wooded acres just a
few miles North of town $12,000 per acre

Prime Commercial Property US 19
South near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Peary Does It Aqain! Terrific Land In-
vestment 5 acres under contract 5 avail-
able on the east side of town high and dry in
quiet location with lots of game, 9 year old
planted pines, profit from both appreciating
land and growing pine Now $9,500 per

Peary Does It Aqain! Near Lake Hall
Under Contract 2 wooded acres $26,500

Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500

Peary Does It Aqain! Christmas Acres
Under Contract -3 bedroom 2 bath mobile
home on 3 acres with a big deck, carport and
a workshop $96,000

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
Simply the Best!
(maps, plats, virtual Tours
Realtor Tim Peary Sells Real Estate!
Simply the Best!


I









PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, FRI., APRIL 21, 2006

Relay For Life Survivor

Dinner Draws 60 Attendees


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


The 2006 Relay For Life-
Survivors Committee wel-
comed cancer survivors and
their family and friends Tues-
day evening at the Opera
House, for the annual Survi-
vor's Dinner.
Upon arrival, attendees were
asked to fill in a Participant
and Survivor Registration
form, and were given bright
purple T-shirts, sashes, and
pins.
Pamphlets filled with infor-
mation on transportation help,
signature programs, and pa-
tient services in Florida for
cancer patients and their care
givers, were distributed.
The House was elaborately,
decorated in shades of purple
right on down to the dinner-
ware and flowers around the-


podium.
Attendees were then honored
with a dinner of ham, maca-
roni and cheese, a crunchy
sweet potato souffle, green
beans, slaw, and fresh baked
pies, home baked by the ladies
of the Monticello Woman's
Club.
The 60 some attendees were
encouraged by the speakers
and were moved near tears by
the survivors in the audience
who shared their stories and
their lives.
Judy Kleynen, ARNP was
introduced after Opening Re-
marks from Bill Bassett, Jua-
nice Hagan, and Cricket Ed-
wards.
She spoke briefly about can-
cer advocacy and education
before she introduced speaker
Julie Holt, ARNP who spoke
about the procedures and treat-
ments of bladder, kidney, and
prostrate cancers, and the pro-
gress made in the fight against


these cancers.
Kleynen then introduced-
speaker Jo Davis, Instructor at
FSU, who spoke about the
new and updated treatments
and breakthrough vaccines for
cervical and skin cancers.
The survivor stories all
ended pretty much the same,
with them crediting their fam-
ily, friends, church families,
and the kindness and wisdom
of their medical staff for help-
ing them through a difficult
time, and for their continued
help.
Hagan introduced her side-
kick and helper Molly Wahl
who proceeded to delight the
audience with her stories and
advice.
Hagan ended by stating that
rain or shine, the Relay event
will take place at the site of the
old Jefferson County High
School track beginning at 6
p.m. Friday.


AMONG guests at the Relay for Life Survivor Dinner Tuesday, are at left, survivor Ola
Hall, Veronica Moore and Beverly Sloan.
-
.. ...-7 +:.:':+ a ,,- "' "" + % + :. -'"


.1'





SPEAKERS at the survivor dinner include: Judy Kleynen, ARNP, Julie Holt ARNP, and
Jo Davis, insturctor at FSU. (News Photos)


KEEP THE GREEN LIGHT SHINING
Thanks to MDA research, the future
looks brighter than ever.

1-800-572-1717

MDW
Muscular Dystrophy Association
www.mdausa.org




CASH NOW iIAs seen

FOR STRUCTURED SETTLEMENTS, on V. .
ANNUITIES and INSURANCE PAYOUTS

(800) 794-7310
J.G. Wentworth means CASH NOW
for Structured Settlements!


MARK YOUR CALENDAR


85th
Annual


z


Rose Show


& Festival


April 27-29 Thomasville, GA

A Weekend Filled with Fun!


Art in the Park "Bark in the Park" Dog Show
*Rose City Care & Truck Show


.? .. l i ^ '. f; ','. .
*"A^ .. ,'"- '' "

The Timberland Ford Famil) Extends
Our Welcome Mat to Your Family!


. L.''-" '- -.- "....i... .... ..
2006 Ford F150 4x4,,.A,,"
25,745 Original Price
-1270 Timberland Family Discount
-3000 Rebate
-1000 Perfect Match (Ford Credit)
-1000 Customer Participation
19475 YOUR BEST PRICE
wsi s v-. -as EN'-i y5


PRESENTING...

TIMBERLAND FORD

FAMILY PLAN...

All prices plus tax. tag, title & state fees. Plus Dealer fees. Rebates
apply where applicable. Not responsible for typographical errors.
Pictures for illustration only.


You will Receive Employee Pricing
on ALL New Ford Vehicles


,No Hassles... No Gimmicks!
All Vehicles Will Be Clearly Marked with Our New Pricing!


S12006 Ford Expedition ...,a...
*33,480 Original Price
: -2384 Timberland Family Discount
* -4000 Rebate

* -500 N. Florida Dealer Rebate
* -1000 Perfect Match (Ford Credit) *
* ,
+ -1000 Customer Participation *
* :
* 24,596 YOUR BEST PRICE +
O* *


*2006 Ford Fusion ..,.... i
17,795 Original Price ,
* -803 Timberland Family Discount
S-500 Customer Rebate
S-1000 Perfect Match (Ford Credit)
-1000 Customer Partisapation
S14,492 YOUR BEST PRICE


www.timberlandford.com


2006 Ford F150 4x2,..,,,,F,
,20,935 Original Price
-1095 4.26 V6 Discount
-569 Timberland Family Discount
Si"-3000 Rebate
-1000 Perfect IMatch (Ford Credit)
-1000 Customer Participation
. 14,261 YOUR BEST PRICE

Offer Good Thru End of April 2006
850-584-6178 800-763-4589 2441 South Byron Butler Parkway, Perry, FL



BERL4,V


A


"0


Sponsored by: 2 Parades Street Dance Rose Flower Show


R For complete Event Listing visit
- www.downtownthomasville.com or call (229)


227-7020


*h I


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T E L E V I 'S 1 0 N