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The Monticello news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028320/00124
 Material Information
Title: The Monticello news
Uniform Title: Monticello news (Monticello, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Will H. Bulloch
Place of Publication: Monticello Fla
Creation Date: April 19, 2006
Frequency: semiweekly[<1983-1994>]
weekly[ former <1925-1965>]
semiweekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Monticello (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jefferson County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Jefferson -- Monticello
Coordinates: 30.544722 x -83.867222 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1903.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 23, no. 22 (Nov. 20, 1925).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579629
oclc - 10124570
notis - ADA7476
lccn - sn 83003210
issn - 0746-5297
System ID: UF00028320:00124
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly constitution (Monticello, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
    Main: Letters
        page 5
    Main: Lifestyle
        page 6
        page 7
    Main: Sports
        page 8
        page 9
    Main continued
        page 10
    Main: Classified
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
Full Text

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SWednesday Morning






Monticello.


138TH YEAR NO.31 .50 CENTS


Published Wednesdays & Fridays


Sws

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 19. 2006


State Has Concerns With




Comp Plan Amendments


Officials To Discuss

Issue Thursday Eve


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


IN
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A SIGHT that is becoming increasingly common across the county is the clearing of
large pieces of land for development purposes. (News Photo)


Relay For Life Event
Relay For Life Event


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Opening Ceremonies for the
County Relay for Life begin at
6 p.m., Friday with a welcome
from Bill Bassett and Juanice
Hagan, followed by a prayer
offered by Reverend Jack Tilk.
The Jefferson ROTC will
continue with the Flag Presen-
tation and the National An-
them will be sung by Betsy
Gray.
Dignitaries Mike McCall of
WCTV and Doug Wainright,
honorary chairman, will be in-
troduced.
Judi Persons and Lisa Rea-
soner will assist as Emcees.
The Blood Mobile will arrive
at the site about 3:30 p.m. and
will remain until 8:30 p.m.
The Survivorship Ceremony
will begin at 6:15 p.m. with a
Survivor Recognition given by
Cricket Edwards.
Debra Bishop, Survivor and
Master of Ceremonies will tell
her survivor story.


The Victory Lap for Survi-
vors will commence followed
with a Victory Lap for Care-
givers. Both will be accompa-
nied with songs sung by
Melissa Garvey and Dan
Gerth.

Festivities
To Include
Reception,
Music, Sale
& Awads

These laps will be followed
with a lap for sponsors, a lap
for team captains, and a lap for
school youth, all to recorded
music.
Bishop will make a few clos-
ing remarks before inviting the
survivors to a reception at the
survivor tent.
At 7 p.m. Hagan will intro-
duce the 2006 Steering Com-
mittee; Sally and Fred
Beshears will recognize this
year's sponsors; Bassett will
recognize the American Can-


=riday
cer Society staff; Ellen Cline
will introduce the 2006 Relay
Teams and announce the
"Spirit Award" winner.
Judging of the campsites,
food, costumes will take place,
as the photographer begins
taking team pictures.
A Barbershop Quartet will
entertain at 7:30 p.m. and team
fundraising events will go on.
At 8 p.m. the first bank de-
posit will be made at the Sher-
iffs mobile command site for
teams.
Also at 8 p.m., dancers from
The Edge studio will entertain
on stage.
Luminaria sales will end at
8:15 p.m. and the ceremony
will begin at 9 p.m. with Joyce
and Mike Steele doing the in-
troductions.
After music by Bagpiper,
Sean McGlyn; Prayer and
Song, by Leilani Marsh;, Sur-
vivor Story, Laura Floyd; the
Luminaria Lap will occur.
Onsite games and sales begin
at 9:45 p.m.
(See Relay Page 6)


The Department of Commu-
nity Affairs (DCA) has re-
sponded to two proposed
Comprehensive Plan amend-
ments affecting a total of 450
acres with various concerns,
objections and recommenda-
tions.
One amendment calls for the
rezoning of a 73-acre parcel
east of US 19 at Freeman Road
from Agriculture 5 (one dwell-
ing per five acres) to Agricul-
ture 3 (one dwelling per three
acres).
The second calls for the re-
zoning of two parcels totaling
377 acres near the historic
community of Waukeenah
from mixed-use suburban resi-
dential (four dwellings per
acre) and Agriculture 3 to resi-
dential (one dwelling per acre).
The County Commission ap-
proved both amendments in
late December despite wide-
spread protests from concerned
citizens and neighboring prop-
erty owners.
The DCA divides its report
into two sections, one dealing
with the two amendments' con-
sistency with Florida Statutes
and the second dealing with
the amendments' consistency
with the State Comprehensive
Plan.
In general, the state agency
finds that both proposals --
which essentially pave the way
for eventual development --
are located in environmentally
sensitive areas and that the two
applications lack sufficient in-
formation to justify present ap-
proval -- points raised by the
citizens at the commission
meeting.
The DCA's cited objections
and concerns are mostly di-
rected at the Waukeenah site, a


project proposed by Lifestyle
Land Development out of cen-
tral Florida.
Specific to the Waukeenah
area Comprehensive Plan
amendment, the DCA notes
that the rezoning would allow
a maximum of 377 houses,
versus the 298 allowed by the
existing designations (188 for
the mixed-use suburban resi-
dential category and 110 for
AG-3 category).
The DCA further notes that
portions of the property are se-
verely limited for the use of
septic tanks, while the entire
property "lies within a region
that is moderately vulnerable
for contamination to the super-
ficial aquifer" (this concern ap-
plies equally to the US 19
site).
"The parcel contains 77
acres of mostly forested wet-
lands, some of which are clas-
sified as Priority 1 for conser-
vation by the Florida Natural
Areas Inventory (FNAI)," the
DCA report notes. "Portions of
the site contain 4-6 species re-
lated to priority wetlands for


listed species. The amendment
has not demonstrated suitabil-
ity of the site for the proposed
amendment. It is not clear how
the amendment protects natu-
ral resources, including wet-
lands, habitat and groundwater
quality."
The DCA recommends that
the county provide additional
data regarding the character
and extent of the wetlands and
identify the location and extent
of significant habitat.
"The analysis should also
demonstrate how the superfi-
cial aquifer would be protected
from septic tank impacts," the
report states.
Under the transportation ele-
ment, the DCA notes that the
data and analysis was inade-
quate to demonstrate the abil-
ity of the transportation facili-
ties to support the proposed
land-use at the locally adopted
Level of Service (LOS).
"The impacts of the amend-
ment were not calculated
based on the most intensive
development scenario," the
DCA notes. "Therefore, the
amendment lacks sufficient
data and analysis relating to
transportation impacts and has
not demonstrated consistency
with the statutory requirement
(See Comprehensive Page 2)


ALAN SAUCIER, right, here talking with Planning Offi-
cial Bob Arredondo, represented Lifestyle Land Devel-
opment, the developer that wants to place an upscale
division on a combined 377 acres near the historic
community of Waukeenah. (News Photo)


City Officials Consider Letting

Developers Build Model Homes


All

Will Vill


jT A1


C I



RILEY PALMER, the developer behind the Crooked Creek subdivision and other pro-
jects in the city, has asked the City Council for permission to build a model home to
better market his development. (News Photo)


LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer

In the not too distant future,
folks may be able to see the
type of houses that will charac-
terize new residential develop-
ments in the city.
The City Council is consid-
ering an-ordinance that would
allow developers to build
model homes between the pre-
liminary and final plat ap-
proval stages. Normally, a
developer can't construct a
structure until after the final
plat approval.
The proposed ordinance,
which has been referred to the


building inspection committee
for discussion, would spell out
the conditions under which a
developer can construct a
model home.

Developer
Riley Palmer
Initiated The
Discussion

Developer Riley Palmer
raised the issue before the City
Council on April 4. Palmer
was seeking permission to
construct a model home on his
Crooked Creek subdivision
just west of town.


Palmer said the model home
would allow him to market his
development at the same time
that he was putting in the in-
frastructure, thus giving a
jump-start on the process.
"The home is for marketing
purposes only," Palmer ex-
plained, adding that it would
be temporarily hooked to wa-
ter and electricity but not to
the sanitary sewer system.
He said Tallahassee and
other municipalities allowed
developer the option.
Palmer's high-end develop-
ment consists of some 85
acres, on which he plans to
place about 80 houses.


Kicks Off On


I I


i









PAGE 2, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS. WED., APRIL 19, 2006


Wainright Named

Relay For Life

Honorary Chairman


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


REP. CHRISTOPHER SMITH was the guest speaker at a crats. Pictured are, from left Judy Mount, Jackson
barbecue Tuesday, April 11, sponsored by local Demo- County DEC Chair, Ana Marie Sanchez, and Smith.


Rep. Christopher Smith Speaks

TO Democrats At Barbecue Here


Representative Christopher personally, as a dedicated fam-
Smith, Florida House Demo- ily man and concerned citizen,
cratic Leader, was the guest and professionally, as a hard
speaker at a barbecue supper working attorney and success-
for voters in Precincts 5 and 6 ful legislator.
and other county Democrats, He stressed in his remarks
Tuesday. that he is most proud of the
Democratic Executive Com- facts that Democrats care,
mittee Chairperson Eleanor about children and families,
Hawkins reports that Smith and seniors, about access to
spoke about what it means to adequate health care, about
him to be a Democrat, both protecting the environment,


Comprehensive Plan


(Continued From Page 1)
to provide adequate facilities at
the adopted LOS."
The DCA recommends the
aendidnent be revised to in-
clude the required analysis
necessary to support the in-
crease in development poten-
tial.
States the recommendation
in part: "The analysis should
demonstrate coordination of
land-use with the planning and
provision of public facilities.
..Should the analysis show that
a road segment falls below the
adopted LOS, revise the five-
year Capital Improvement
Schedule to include any
needed improvements."
Under the Need category, the
DCA notes that the county
failed to prove data showing a
need for an additional 377
units that the proposed amend-
ment would create.
"No population projections,
vacant land-use analysis, or
other professionally accepted


needs assessment was pro-
vided by the county," the re-
port states.
The agency recommends that
the county cure the problem by
providing population projec-
tions and a vacant land analy-
sis or other professionally
accepted methodology to de-
termine whether the amend-
ment is needed.
Under the School Concur-
rency category, the DCA notes
that the amendment will result
in an increase in residential
density, resulting in a net in-
crease of 377 houses.
States the report: "No data
and analysis has been submit-
ted to demonstrate that the ad-
ditional units would not result
in an adverse impact to the ex-
isting or projected public
school facilities within the
school district.
The DCA recommends that
county officials work with the
(See Comprehensive Page 3)


and about giving all people a
fair chance to realize the
American Dream.
The crowd gave Smith a
standing ovation and enjoyed
an animated informal question
and answer session.
The barbecue supper fea-
tured barbecued pork,
coleslaw, baked beans, and all
the trimmings, rounded off
with three kinds of cobbler, all
prepared by Chuck Husbands
and members of the Jefferson
County Democratic
Committee.
This was an authentic barbe-
cue, with the meat prepared
outdoors in a smoker, and the
cobblers baked in Dutch ovens
under a layer of hot coals.
The event was held at the
Mays House, a facility for-
merly housing Dr. Roca's of-
fice, now owned by Carrie
Ann Telllefsen and Denise Vo-
gelgesang.
The building has been reno-
vated and will soon be used as
a base for their catering serv-
ices.
Hawkins announced that the
next event planned by the local
party is a sponsorship and
staffing of the Second Annual
Book Sale to benefit the
Friends of the Library, 9 a.m.,
Saturday April 29, at the li-
brary.
Books to be donated to the
sale can be left at the library or
picked up. Call Shelley Wat-
kins at 997-1099 for informa-
tion.


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Learn more at www.tmh.org.


Events planned for May in-
clude a reception for Alex
Sink, Democratic Candidate
for CFO, to be held May 8, at
the Opera House, and a picnic
in precinct 14, Lamont, with
details to be published later.
To learn more about becom-
ing involved with local Demo-
cratic Party, call Gladys Roann
at 997-5209, or Hawkins at
997-2863, or the Democratic
Office at 997-3113.
Those in attendance at the
barbecue included: Mayor Ju-
lie Conley, Property Appraiser
David Ward, County Commis-
sioners Junior Tuten and Gene
Hall, School Board Member
Beverly Sloan, City Council-
man Tom Vogelgesang, Con-
gressman Allen Boyd's wife,
Cissy Boyd, Shirley Washing-
ton, candidate for School
Board, district 3, and Brenda
Sorensen, candidate for Clerk
of Court.


The Steering Committee for
the 2006 County Relay For
Life will recognize Doug
Wainright as its first Honorary
Chairman, at the County event,
April 21 and 22.
The Honorary Chair is a po-
sition of great admiration and
respect concerning the battle
against cancer.
Like so many others in the
community, Wainwright has
fought his own battles with the
disease as a true champion.
What has set him apart has
been his willingness to openly
share his experience and com-
mit himself to lead a
community-wide fight against
this dreaded disease.
His contributions in the last
four years to the Relay For
Life program have set the stan-
dard for others to meet and has
placed Jefferson County in the
limelight as one of the state-


wide leaders for per capital
contributions to the American
Cancer Society.
- Wainright's fearless leader-
ship has resulted in inspiring
success for the Relay, and has
established a legacy that con-
tinues with volunteers who
have received the torch from
him.
The overnight fundraising
event for the fight against can-
cer begins 6 p.m. Friday, April
21 and will conclude at noon
on Saturday, April 22, on the
Track of the former JCHS, on
Water Street.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

The District School Board of
Jefferson County Announces A
Workshop To Which The
Public Is Invited.


Date: April 27, 2006
Time: 6:00 p.m.
Place: 1490 W. Washington St.
Monticello, FL 32344


Subject: New Policy Language Regarding
Reduction of Staff and Language of
Job Descriptions


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Teams Embody

Many Countries


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Groups participating in the
County Relay For Life, an-
nounce the countries they rep-
resent and the activities
planned during the 18 hour
event on Friday and Saturday.
Capital City Bank, Ireland,
snacks and candy, and a
chance drawing for a grill.
Presbyterian Church, Mexico,
a chili dinner and breakfast.
Elizabeth Baptist Church,
USA, breakfast.
Christ Episcopal Church,
Scotland, shortbread and High-
land games.
Farmers and Merchants
Bank, USA, face painting, an
Easter Bonnet Parade, and
sack races.
Wacissa United Methodist
Church, homemade ice cream.
First Baptist Church, Ireland,
chili and hot dogs, bottled wa-
ter, breakfast, and flashy jew-
elry.
Curtis Morgan Garage, Italy,
spaghetti dinner and children's
games.
State Farm Insurance Com-
pany, Taiwan, egg drop soup,
fortune cookies, cold drinks,
and chance drawings for gas
cards.


County Health Department,
Mexico, bake sale, strawberry
shortcake, nachos/cheese, Pi-
fiata, cake walks, and
blink/glow items.
First United Methodist
Church, USA, hamburgers,
fries, milkshakes, and break-
fast.
C&S Fencing, will represent
Jamaica.
County Sheriffs Office,
USA, hamburgers, hot dogs,
and cold drinks.
Altrusa of Monticello will
represent Germany.
Progress Energy, USA, Sau-
sage Biscuit Breakfast.
The Boys and Girls Club
will represent South Africa.
Jefferson Correctional Insti-
tution, Mexico, will have a
chance drawing.
Rotary Club will have a
Guatemala Breakfast.
Riley Palmer Construction
Company, Argentina, will hold
a chance drawing.
Aucilla Christian Academy,
New Zealand will conduct
youth activities.
Jefferson Elementary School
will represent Germany.
Minister and Deacons Union
2, Tallahassee Memorial Hos-
pital, and Fire Rescues will
conduct miscellaneous. activi-
ties.


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Two Monticello residents
were involved in a single-
vehicle crash Friday morning,
which resulted in the male
driver being fatally wounded
and the female passenger to
be critically injured.
FHP reports that at 7:55
a.m. on CR-259, .6 miles
south of Nash Road, Ansel
Norton, 74, of 83 East Glenn
Road, was driving his 1989
Toyota Corolla, northbound,
traveling above the posted
speed limit of 55 MPH, with
passenger Venessa Dubose,
42, of 46 Norton Road.
Norton drove off of the east


shoulder and over corrected
the steering and lost control
of the vehicle.
FHP reports that Norton
made several attempts to gain
control of the vehicle as the
vehicle began to rotate side to
side, crossing over from lane
to lane.
Norton drove off of the road
way onto the west shoulder
with the front left of the vehi-
cle.
Norton died at the scene and
Dubose was transported to
TMH.
Neither Norton or Dubose
were wearing their seat belts.
Whether or not the crash was
alcohol related is still under
investigation.


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 19, 2006 PAGE 3
Country Mile Donates

Computer Modems

For Key Club Project


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Country Mile Computers and
Ashley and Richard E. Hotz
donated 20 computer modems,
at a retail cost of more than
$1,000 to the Monticello Ki-
wanis.
These Single MDM Modem
Blaster V-92's were given to
David Frisby, president of the
local Kiwanis Club to pass on
to the Kwanis Key Club stu-
dents for their service project.
The project entails the re-
pairing of computers for dis-


bursement to high school
students .that are unable to af-
ford a computer.
The School Board donated a
surplus of computers to the Ki-
wanis Key Club members for
this project.
The Florida Kiwanis chal-
lenged all clubs to partner with
groups, organizations, or pri-
vate entities to do something
good for youths.
Country Mile Computers is a
local business that offers sales,
diagnosis, repair, maintenance,
installation, upgrades, net-
works consultation, and free
pick-up and delivery.


Teen Center Views

Safe Driving Program


DAVID FRISBY, left, accepts 20 computer modems
from Richard Hotz, master technician of Country Miles
Computers, for Key Club students to use in repairing
donated computers. (News Photo)



ACA Schedules Its

Annual Spring Auction
ings and sporting goods; and
FRAN HUNT services including land clear-
Staff Writer ing, lawn, electrical work; and
the traditional class art
Aucilla Christian Academy project, which entails the art-
will host its annual Spring works of K-3 through sixth
Auction Saturday, May 6 at grade students that parents
the Jefferson County Country traditionally bid against each
Club. other for.
Jackson said that silent auc-
The silent auction will be- tion items also include do-
gin at 6 p.m., with dinner and nated retail items, paintings
live auction to follow at 7 and computers rebuilt by stu-
p.m. dents at ACA in the computer
class.
Tickets are $25 each and "You can always get a good
dinner includes steak, baked computer at a good price,"
potato salad, bread, drink and said Jackson.
dessert. Tickets can be purchased at
Spokesman Danny Jackson the ACA office or through
;a t,,,e ... i ,,,;,e .. ;r,, any ACA Board Member..


asc mere areay
of items in both auctions.
Items include agricultural
items such as hay, feed, fertil-
izer, trees, sod, and the like;
plantation hunts for deer, tur-
key and quail; food items in-
cluding a half side of beef,
half side of pork and a quan-
tity of chicken; vacation out-


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

FHP Trooper Daniel Jones
recently gave a presentation
to youth at the Teen Center
about safe driving.
Jones showed a 15-minute
video which discussed the
dangers and consequences of
driving under the influence of
drugs/alcohol.
Following the video, Jones
took the students outside and
gave a presentation about the
importance of wearing a seat
belt using the FHP rollover
simulator to show the differ-
ence between wearing a seat
belt and not wearing one.


Spokesperson Gladys Roann
said that Teen Center staff
and STARS thanked Jones for
his presentation.
In related news, The Teen
Center Babe Ruth baseball
team will sponsor a dance at
the center, 8 p.m. until 11:45
p.m., Saturday, April 22.
Admission is $3 per student.

American Heart 0
Association.
Fighting Heart Disease
andStroke

It keeps
more than
memories
alive.


Comprehensive Plan Amendments


(Continued From Page 2)
School Board to provide an as-
sessment of how elementary,
middle and high schools will
be impacted by the proposed
amendment.
"First, the analysis must
identify the potential number
of students that could be gen-
erated by this amendment," the
report states. "Second, the ex-
isting school capacity must be
identified. Third, future school
capacity must be projected by
including impacts associated
with these amendments as well
as overall student growth."
It further states, "If it cannot
be demonstrated that the Jef-
ferson County School District
can accommodate the student
demand that could be gener-
ated by the proposed amend-
ment through its five-year
work plan, either do not adopt
the amendment as proposed, or
coordinate with the School
Board to identify other actions
that would address the school
impacts created by the amend-
ment."
The DCA also instructs the
county to take steps to ensure
the protection and preservation
of archaeological, cultural and
historical resources potentially
on both properties.
The agency finds the two
amendments are inconsistent
with various provisions of
Chapter 187 of Florida Statute,
having to do with consistency
with the State Comprehensive
Plan.
Specifically, the DCA finds
the amendments inconsistent
with those provisions concern-
ing water resources and the
identification and protection of
water recharge areas; concern-
ing natural resources and con-
serving wetlands and other


natural areas; and concerning
land-use and directing devel-
opment to areas that have the
land, water resources and serv-
ice capacity to accommodate
growth in an environmentally
acceptable manner, among
other things.
The DCA report informs lo-
cal officials that correction of
the noted objections is neces-
sary for the agency's compli-
ance review.
"Objections that are not ad-
dressed may result in a deter-
mination that the amendment
is not in compliance," the
DCA letter notes.
The DCA report is a reflec-
tion of concerns, objections
and comments raised by its
own staff or by the staffs of
other state agencies that re-
viewed the amendments.


These other state agencies
include the Department of En-
vironmental Protection, the
Department of Transportation
and the Department of State.
County commissioners are
scheduled to discuss the DCA
report 6 p.m. Thursday in the
courtroom.


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With The

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PAGE 4, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 19, 2006



Monticello News
(SSN 0746-5297)-USPA 361-620)
Published by Monticello Publishing Co., Inc.

RON CICHON
Publisher

RAY CICHON
Managing Editor

# ~LAZARO ALEMAN
Senior Staff Writer


Published Wednesdays and Fridays Twice Weekly
Periodicals Postage Paid at Monticello Post Office
Subscription in Florida $45.00 per year.
Out of State $52.00 per year.
POSTMASTER send addresses to: Monticello News
P.O. Box 428, 1215 North Jefferson Street
Monticello, FL 32345 Phone: (850) 997-3568
Fax. 850-997-3774
E-Mail: MonticelloNews@earthlink.net

:MiMMMMA11MRMf"""PBB :::ERMERMS tWM ~::~~J;~


U


From Our Photo File


L J :
















s t ers. ( s File P




KAY FOLAND, assistant principal of Howard Middle School, introduced the staff dur-
ing an Open House in Sept., 1990i Parents then had the opportunity to visit with


I


Seniors Target 'I


Personal Security opinion & Comment


Many older Americans are
taking steps to help secure
their personal safety and secu-
rity, especially as they balance
the desire for independence
with the challenges of declin-
ing health.
The good news is that crime
rates affecting older Ameri-
cans are actually lower then
they may seem. The U.S. De-
partment of Justice reports that
the number of violent crimes
has decreased during the last
decade.
The even better news is that,
by taking a few simple safety
precautions, seniors can reduce
their risk and increase their
sense of security in their daily
lives.
Check door locks. Replace
any nonfunctioning or poorly
installed locks. Make sure that
your garage is equipped with a
sturdy lock as well..
Install exterior lighting. A
well-lit home can deter night-
time break-ins.
Make your house look occu-
pied. When you're out of
town, use light timers to mimic
your normal routine. Cancel
newspaper and mail delivery,
so that papers don't pile up
outside.
Know your neighbors. Keep
neighbors' phone numbers
near your phone with emer-
gency information. Inform
neighbors of your travel plans
and any scheduled deliveries
or home maintenance appoint-
ments.
Install an alarm. Security


From Ou

TEN YEARS AGO
April 17, 1996
Judge Felix Johnston Jr. pre-
qualified this week for re-
election.
In an effort to prevent work-
place accidents and at the same
time reduce its Workman's
Compensation fees and possi-
bly avoid litigation, the County
Commission is considering im-
plementing safety procedures
for its work force.
Brenda Sorensen announced
her candidacy for Clerk of
Court on Monday with the fol-
lowing statement:
A number of calls from con-
cerned residents about random
gunfire in Roostertown has
prompted city police to in-
crease surveillance in that area.
Megan Gorga, a junior of
Jefferson County High School,
has been chosen as Girls State
Representative for the Ameri-
can Legion Women's
auxiliary.
TWENTY YEARS AGO
April 16, 1986
More than 100 persons medi-
cal services at Saturday's
health fair.
Although the number of eld-
erly veterans in Jefferson
County is expected to increase
annually until the turn of the
century, Veterans Affairs Offi-


'Strength' Test Did Him In


My father' was one of four
brothers, all characters in their
own right. One of his brothers
was a politician and business-
man, another a male nurse and
businessman and the third
owned a print shop for many
years, sold it and went to work
in the printing department of a
daily newspaper.
All of these fellows had a
sense of humor and adventure.
In fact, my father and his old-
est brother once performed as
magicians in a traveling show.
But it is the brother who was
a male nurse and owner of a
paint and glass shop that I re-
call today.
Somewhere in his travels hei,
picked up a "Test Your -
Strength" machine that he dis-
played prominently in his
shop.
For a mere five cents you
could be determined to be 1.
superman, 2. very strong, 3.
strong, or 4. weak.
The machine had two large
knobs on it and the object was
to twist the knobs while a me-
ter .decided your relative
strength.
Well, the fact is the machine
didn't test your strength, it had
a dry cell battery that shot


Publisher's

Notebook


Ron Cic/ion


volts of power into your arms
as you turned the knob.
So, the test was to see how
much of a jolt you could en-
dure.
Visitors would eye the ma-
chine and many would dig in
their pockets for a nickel, de-
posit it in the machine and start
turning the knobs. It didn't
take very long before they let
go as they got a pretty good
jolt.
The "Test Your Strength"
machine became a topic of
conversation.
Folks who had tried it would
kid my uncle, "You still got
that thing here?"
"Sure do," he'd say. Wanna
try it?"
"Nope," the veteran strength
testers would say. They'd had


enough of that machine.
It was the new visitor to the
shop who would become in-
trigued with the machine.
"Hey," they'd ask, "Does
this thing really work?"
"Yes it does," my uncle
would respond.
Some of the more fit custom-
ers would promptly pull a
nickel out of their pockets and
"test their strength."
A couple of seconds of
power shooting into their arms
and they'd let go.
Those customers who didn't
think they were very fit found
no attraction to the machine.
Well, one day this burly gi-
ant of a man came in to order
some windows for his house.


companies offer a wide range
of alarm options, including
systems that provide medical
alert services.
Stay safe on the street. Al-
ways walk in well-lit areas.
Ask a friend to accompany you
or tell someone where you're
going.
Neighborhood involvement
is another key to deterring
crime on a street or block.
Seniors who want to protect
their homes and help raise
awareness in the community
can join neighborhood watch
groups. Those interested in
forming a group can contact
the National Association of
Town Watch (www.National
Town -Watch.org) for informa-
tion.
Don't let fear of crime get
you down. "When seniors feel
unsafe, they may begin to
withdraw from normal activi-
ties," said Scott Perry, execu-
tive vice president and chief
operating officer of Bankers
Life and Casualty Company,
an insurance company that
specializes in the senior
market.
"Over time, fear and reduced
activity can lead to feelings of
social isolation and
depression."
Perry's company, a national,
life and health insurer special-
izing in the insurance needs of
seniors, encourages seniors to
recognize security issues and
take steps to feel safe in their
homes and communities.




r Files

cer Bob Knecht says it will not
cause a financial strain in his
office.
Since the new animal control
ordinance went into effect
April 1, the city has been busy
picking up stray and unleashed
dogs all around town.
THIRTY YEARS AGO
April 15, 1976
Mrs. Doris Bishop has
opened a beauty salon in Au-
cilla. Name of the new shop is
My Suburban salon.
U.S. Sen. Richard Stone will
attend the unveiling of the Bi-
centennial National Music
Council Plaque awarded to the
Monticello Opera House at 3
p.m. Sunday, April 25.
Congressman Don Fitqua
will be here at 10 a.m. Thurs-
day to present a replica of the
Betsy Ross flag to county
commissioners. The flag had
flown over the U.S. Capitol.
FORTY YEARS AGO
April 8, 1966
Chris Hamilton was awarded
Start Student at Jefferson
County High School and he
named Mrs. Katherine Mays as
his Star Teacher.
Ray Foster and Chris Hamil-
ton were awarded the Kiwanis
Club scholarship at a recent
meeting of the Healthways
board of directors.


cans have been screaming for
years at our Democratic and
Republican lawmakers to put
an end to this criminal activity.
Finally, the loud voice of the
American people can no
longer be ignored following
9/11 along with our concern
for personal and national secu-
rity.
Make no mistake about it.
The operative word here is m-
migration. As a matter of fact
it isn't "immigration" at all! It
is a blatant act of breaking our
laws by sneaking into our
country to reap the benefits of
hard working American citi-
zens and their tax dollars.
Trying to candy coat it by re-
naming the illegal criminal
participants "undocumented
workers" should be an insult to
the intelligence of all Ameri-
cans. Additionally, there is
concern that many of these
people don't want to become
American citizens at all, but


simply want to.earn money to
send home to support family or
salt away back in their native
country.
The Democrats don't want to
do anything realistic because
they see a 12% national voting
block that favors the demo-
cratic party. (What could pos-
sibly be more important than
that?!) The Republicans don't
want to do anything realistic
either because some Ameri-
cans are addicted to the cheap
labor that keeps many indus-
tries alive, prices down and the
lawn cut.
So, who then suffers? It is
the vast majority of the rest of
us who have to foot the bill for
everything from expensive
medical care to providing ille-
gal alien children an education
in already overcrowded class-
rooms. Millions of tax dollars
are spent every year to meet
federal requirements to* pro-
vide bilingual (Spanish) ver-


He kept eyeing the machine
and after a long time, asked the
familiar question, "Does this
thing really work? My uncle
was ready with his standard
Answer, "Yes it does."
The huge customer dug out a
nickel and put it in the ma-
chine. With hands like hams
and arms like tree limbs, he
grabbed the two knobs and
wrenched them with all his
strength.
F He got major shock and
froze.
Slowly he lifted the ma-
chine over his head, still not
turning loose of the knobs
Which kept the juice flowing,
and started walking around in
circles.
SThere were a few onlookers,
me included, who watched this
scene with amusement.
After circling the room with
the machine over his head, the
big man ran out the door
and down the street, apparently
never letting go of the knobs to
stop the voltage.
My uncle ran to the door and
shouted after the man, "Hey,
come back with my machine!"
They giant never did and
what happened to him and the
machine remains a mystery to
this day.



king
sions of everything from
voting ballots to driver's tests.
If there has ever been a time
for national unity speaking
with one voice it is now on this
"immigration" issue. Sadly
and predictably, our national
legislators just can't resist
making it a political football.
Now that this paramount issue
has been raised before the
American voting public, there
is no backing down.
The ultimate danger is that
our national leadership will
misread the significance that
American households (Demo-
crat & Republican) place on
this issue by approving some
watered down legislation with
no "teeth" or chance of realis-
tically ending this national di-
lemma once and for all.
(See Immigration Page 9)


Bad Law Needs Repeal


TOM DE WEESE
Columnist

Congress is going through
the process of trying to fix the
Endangered Species Act
(ESA). Why do they think it
needs fixing? Because, quite
simply, the ESA is the worst
law ever to be enacted by Con-


gress
For thirty two years the ESA
has taken control or private
land out of the hands of the
owners in the name of protect-
ing endangered species.
Yet, the ESA is actually re-
sponsible for the destruction of
whole industries and the towns
they supported, as lumber
mills are shut down for lack of


cut trees.
Farmers and ranchers have
lost vital grazing land. Ur-
gently needed minerals are left
in the ground and imported
from foreign countries because
the ESA blocks mining efforts.
The ESA has become a very
powerful tool, used by radical
environmentalists who want to
stop literally any use of certain


lands for any purpose. They
have made up endangered spe-
cies like the Spotted Owl,
which actually flourishes
throughout the Northwestern
part of the nation.
Environmentalists have used
the ESA to block the building
of hospitals and airports, al-
(See Bad Law Page 9)


I ,


I~4rkEPirPC~reC ~- --~li~


_I I


Immigration Plan Lac


DENNIS FOGGY
Columnist

What exactly is a "Compre-
hensive Immigration Plan"?
Dumb me, I always thought
that the United States had a
pretty good immigration plan!
My mother and grandparents
immigrated to America from
Europe under that plan. My
mom took the initiative to
study and become a natural-
ized citizen despite the fact
that my father was already an
American. So why all of a
sudden are our politicians all
wound up talking about devel-
oping a comprehensive immi-
gration plan?
Illegal immigration!
Frankly, the totally out of con-
trol massive pouring of Span-
ish speaking people over our
porous southern borders has fi-
nally reached a tipping point.
The vast majority of Ameri-








MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 19, 2006 PAGE 5


Letters...


Honorary Chair Wainright


Reflects On Relay For Life


Dear Editor:
Four years ago, I introduced
myself to the American Cancer
Society and volunteered to
head up Relay for Life in Jef-
ferson County.
My reason for doing so was
to fulfill a commitment I made
to myself, my oncologist, and


to God: that if I survived my
throat cancer, I would some-
how become involved with
helping others who are af-
flicted with the deadly disease
we call cancer.
At that time, I did not know
what the Relay was about, but
upon realizing the importance


and how past dollars raised
from this event had spear-
headed advancements in the
detection and treatment of can-
cer, I knew the cause was war-
ranted. Thus my dedication
to make Relay a success in our
community became a determi-
nation.


Citizen Thanks DCA For


Objections To Rezonings


Dear Editor:
Over the past months, there
have been several hearings be-
fore thb County Planning
Commission and then the
County Commission, concern-
ing proposed rezoning off US
19 south of I-10, and off CR
259, at Waukeenah and the
proposed Comprehensive Plan
Amendment that would be
necessary for them to proceed.
At every hearing, there was
standing room only, with the
vast majority of those in atten-
dance expressing sincere con-
cerns over many aspects of the
proposals.
As the meetings progressed,
the citizens and landowners of
the county also began express-
ing their dismay at what they
perceived was a dismissal of
their concerns over aspects of
the proposed rezoning by most
of those on the Commissions.
Both land use amendments
were eventually approved by
the Commission.
Fortunately, both proposals
were required to be sent to the.
Department of Community Af-
fairs (DCA) for approval.
The DCA in its Mach 7, 2006
letter with Objections, Recom-
mendations, and Comments
(ORC) Report, did not approve


the amendments.
The DCA has raised the
very same issues and concerns
that were voiced by those in
attendance before both Com-
missions, as their several meet-
ings, with respect to the Wau-
keenah amendment.
*Natural Resources: "Por-
tions of the amendment site are
severely limited for the use of
septic systems..
This site lies within a region
that is moderately vulnerable
for contamination to the Sur-
ficial Acquifer.
"The amendment has not
demonstrated suitability of the
site for the proposed amend-
ment. It is not clear how the
amendment protects natural re-
sources, including wetlands,
habitat and groundwater qual-
ity."
We citizens and landowners
expressed our grave concern
over the issue at every
meeting.
*Transportation: "The pro-
posed amendment was not
supported with adequate data
and analysis to demonstrate
the ability of transportation fa-
cilities to support the proposed
land use at the locally adopted
Level of Service (LOS)."
We citizens and landowners


expressed our concern over
this issue at every meeting.
*Need: "The County has not
provided data showing a need
for an additional 377 units that
would be created by the pro-
posed amendment. No popula-
tion projections, vacant land
use analysis, or other profes-
sionally accepted needs assess-
ment was provided by the
County."
We citizens and landowners
expressed our concern over
this issue at every meeting.
*School Concurrency: "No
data and analysis has been sub-
mitted to demonstrate that the
additional (377) units would
not result in an adverse impact
to the existing or projected
public school facilities within
the Jefferson County School
District."
We citizens and landowners
expressed our concern over his
issue at every meeting.
*Cultural and Historical Re-
sources: "The DCA com-
ments that the potential impact
on cultural and historic re-
sources needs to be verified.
According to the Depart-
ment of State, the Lifestyles
Land Development amend-
ment site contains recorded
and/or historical resources."
"Also, the US 19 amendment
has at least a moderate ar-
chaeological site probability."
This, too, was discussed at
the meetings by concerned
citizens and landowners.
Sad to say, the majority of
members of both Commissions
ignored, or otherwise dis-
missed these very real con-
cerns by their fellow citizens,
and proceeded as if these is-
sues did not exist, or were too
insignificant to warrant further
research, and a second look.
We can all be grateful that at
least the DCA is there to pay
attention to these critical
issues, and to look out for us
common folk.
This county is destined to
grow, and we accept that. We
must, however, keep trying to
deliver the message to our ap-
pointed and elected representa-
tives that it has to be "Smart
Growth," rather than the Urban
Sprawl that would be the result
of amendments such as these,
if they were left unchallenged.
Thank you, DCA, for ac-
complishing what we citizens
and landowners could not.
Robert L. Parke



Doers Club

TO Meet

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The DOers Diabetes Support
Group will be hosting a meet-
ing 6:30 p.m., Thursday April
27 at the Union Hill AME
Church in Wacissa.

The session will be pre-
sented by Bonnie Mathis, sen-
ior health educator of the
Health Department.

The topic covered will be
the fact that two of three peo-
ple with diabetes die from
heart disease and stroke mak-
ing the link between diabetes
and heart disease and stroke.

Everyone is welcome at at-
tend.


Dear Editor:
Well, it's that time again.
Thursday at 6 pm our County
Commissioners will be voting
upon the adoptions of two
Comp Plan amendments. The
re-zonings include 73 acres on
US 19 South and 377 acres in
Waukeenah to higher densities
The Department of Commu--
nity Affairs has issued its re-
port with concerns on the pro-
posed amendments.
Their concerns center upon
natural resources, transporta-
tion, schools, and the actual
need for more density.
Comments are also made
concerning preserving the cul-
tural and historic resources on
the sites.
The entire ORC report may
be viewed at the Planning De-
partment or online at
www.dca.state.fl.us.
These were the same issues
raised by hundreds of citizens
and surrounding property own-
ers at previous public hearings.
We must continue to voice
our opinions and rights to our
local government. This will be
an important fact if and when
the DCA gives its final intent
to approve or disapprove.
Whether we like it or not,
growth and development are
coming to Jefferson County.
The city and county are filled
with developers promising
sugarcoated ideas. They all
want to be our "friend". In re-
ality, they are only looking out


for themselves and not for Jef-
ferson County.
Unfortunately, the majority
of our planners and county
commissioners are not looking
toward our future. Only dollar
signs are dancing in their
heads. They forget that higher
densities and residential devel-
-opments do not make the tax
base.
It costs everyone when the
infrastructure is not in place to
support it. Seems they are put-
ting the cart before the horse.
You would think that Com-
missioners would be more
concerned about the current
problems within the County.
Their focus should be on
solving them, instead of add-
ing more burdens. Tunnel vi-
sion is only a quick Band-Aid
fix. Every decision made to-
day has an effect on our future.
We only need to look at our
neighboring counties to see the
problems that can occur.
Some are now even limiting
development because they
grew too fast, too soon.
Please take the time to attend
the meetings and make your
concerns be known. We still
have a voice in these issues,
before we have to say good-
bye to the hometown atmos-
phere we pride ourselves on.
We need to wake up before
our sleepy little community is
destroyed before our very
eyes.
Sincerely,
Don and Cindy Lee


Barnhart To Speak To Group


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County Com-
munity Coalition will meet
9:30 11:00 a.m. Tuesday,
April 25 at the library.
Guest speaker is Cetta Barn-
hart, Healthy Start community
health educator.


She will discuss criteria and
availability of free doula serv-
ices as well as the Group Pre-
natal Care Program, operating
in this county.
For more details about this
meeting or other community
agencies working for Jefferson
county, contact Donna Hagan
at 948-2741.


Dear Editor:
Lately the headline news
stated that retired generals
want Secretary of Defense
Donald Rumsfeld's resigna-
tion.
As a retired military 'man, I
constantly follow the activities
of our military units.
When 1 served in the first
War in Iraq, we were, sup-
ported by more than 30 UN
Countries.
We were there to take care of
business. Once we reached our
destination in Baghdad, the
Commander in Chief stopped
the action.
We came home, but a lot of
us had the gut feeling that this
was not the end of the
situation.
I retired in 1993 after 20
years of service because I did-
n't like the down sizing going'
on in the military.
Most of these generals re-
tired and turned down promo-
tions because of Rumsfeld.
My wife asked me why they
didn't make these statements
while they were on active
duty.
First of all, they would have
been committing professional
suicide. Secondly, they didn't
want to demoralize their men.
Thirdly, they didn't want to
be painted as unpatriotic.
Some weight must be given
to the statements of these six
retired generals. Between them
they probably have more than
150 years of military service.
They are all combat veterans
themselves, and they are doing
this to save lives, not for per-
sonal gain.
They know we should have
learned from Viet Nam, from
the Russian mistakes in Af-
ghanistan.
I study Military History, and
I'm sure these retired soldiers
do also.
We should have had an exit
strategy before we entered Af-


When was


the last


time you


made an


investment


,that saved


lives?


The first year, with the help
of Diane Freeman, business
leaders, schools, churches,
elected officials, and citizens
of the community, Jefferson
County set the gold standard
for this event in small commu-
nities across America.
Per capital, we raised in ex-
cess. of $5 per citizen. This is
an unprecedented amount and
shows the dedication of a
small community to help in the
fight against cancer.
The second year of my chair-
manship, Jefferson County led
the way as the most successful
Relay (on a per capital basis) in
Florida, exceeding the collec-
tions from the previous year
by 25 percent.
What a great way to show
support in the fight against
cancer, as it is ultimately re-
search that is going to give
hope to those persons in the
future who will be diagnosed
with cancer.
In accordance with the rules
established by the Cancer So-
ciety, I completed my tenure
as Chairperson for Relay, at
the conclusion of the 2004


ghanistan and Iraq.
Every time one of our na-
tional elected officials are in
the area, I ask them the same
question. They all agree.
Questioning the strategy of
wars does not make one unpa-
triotic. It's part of being in a
democratic society.
We should call, mail, or
write our elected officials. Let
them know that it's time to
bring our troops home.
' Negotiate with the UN to get
peace keeping forces (Prefera-
bly from the region) there by


Relay.
For me, the fight against can-
cer continues, as does my
commitment to Relay.
As it turns out, I will not win
my fight against cancer.
Twelve months ago, I was ter-
minally diagnosed with lung
cancer, that stemmed from the
throat cancer I had five years
earlier.
May this information I am
sharing with you be a reminder
that cancer never sleeps. Can-
cer is not going away, unless
we continue to participate in
our effort to raise the funds
needed for research to eventu-
ally eliminate this dreadful dis-
ease.
I have been asked by this
year's Relay Steering Commit-
tee to hold the position of
Honorary Chairman of the
2006 Relay.
It was with reluctance that I
accepted. I say this because
my cancer is not special nor
different from anyone else's,
and it is important to me that
everyone understands the way
Ifeel.
I was asked to accept this po-


the end of the year.
The US provides the UN
with much of its funding.
Secretary Rumsfeld is on his
second tour as Secretary of
Defense.
I served under him. The mili-
tary needs new ideas and
strategies, not just for Iraq and
Afghanistan, but for the future
of the free world.
One of the six retired gener-
als would probably make a,
good Secretary of Defense.
Sincerely,
Gerrold Austin


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sition because I was viewed as
having made Relay a success
in our community, but it is
you, the citizens of Jefferson
County, not me, who make this
a successful event year after
year.
For that I am forever
grateful.
As Honorary Chairman, I am
delighted to see this event con-
tinue to grow and prosper un-
der the leadership of Jaunice
Hagan.
She has done an outstanding
job. I also want to say that as
Honorary Chairman, there is
one thing, that I will take full
credit for, and that is my selec-
tion of Jaunice to succeed me,
and if anything, the choice I
made was my real contribution
to Relay in our community.
As for me, I am ready for the
Relay, and its "18 Hour Trip
Around the World," to begin.
Please join us at the High
School Track, 6 p.m. Friday as
we continue to make a differ-
ence in the fight against
cancer.
Douglas Wainright















PAGE 6. MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 19, 2006


Lifestyle


'AN


Reams Retires After 45

Years At Lamont PO


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

After 45 years of service and
nearly 2 million miles of trav-
eling the county's roads, Lau-
rie Reams has decided to retire
from his duties as the rural car-
rier for the Lamont area.
He was born in Lamont to
the late Amanda and Alvis
Reams.
His father was the postmas-
ter and town pharmacist, and
his mother was an elementary
school teacher for more than
40 years.
After a three year stint in the
Army, Reams received a de-
gree in Public Administration
from Florida State University,
while working part time at the
Lamont Post Office.
He received his appointment
as the Lamont rural carrier in


1962, following David
Walker's 45 years of service.
Reams married the former
Carolyn Sheffield that same
year, and found time to help
raise four children: Patricia,
Laura, Hugh, and Kirk.
Over the years, the Lamont
route has grown to serves sev-
eral outlying areas, making it
one of the state's largest.
The Reams' family and
friends would like to cordially
invite all his patrons and any-
one who would like to join in
celebrating his illustrious ca-
reer of service to the public for
the last 45 years.
The celebration is scheduled
in downtown Lamont at 2 p.m.
on Sunday, April 23.
Refreshments will be pro-
vided.
RSVP to Lamont Postmaster
Gerald Bailey 997-3070.


RONALD SCHOCH AND JENNIFER WARD



Lee Resigns Prom

Hospice Position


PEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Big Bend Hospice Advisory
Council and staff invite the
public to join them in honoring
Jan Lee, RN from 3 7 p.m.
on Tuesday, April 25.
A reception will be held in
Jan's honor at the First United
Methodist Church located at
302 North Jefferson Street in
Perry.
"It is with some sadness that
we are hosting this reception,
because Jan has announced she
will be leaving our Big Bend
Hospice family to join the
Taylor County Health Depart-
ment.
While we are pleased that
she will be serving our com-
munity in public health nurs-
ing, we are sad that she is
leaving our team," said Laura


Aucilla SHARE

Distribution

Saturday

DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer


Pickup and Distribution day
for the Aucilla SHARE is
scheduled for 9 10:30 a.m.
Saturday at the Central Baptist
Church located at 655 Tindell
Road, Aucilla.
Registration Copy and Vol-
unteer Service Reports will
need to be turned in upon arri-
val.
Volunteer Service is any-
thing you do for someone
other than family that you are
not paid for.
There is no food storage fa-
cility available so, the monthly
food packages must be picked
up at this allotted time or, be
forfeited, and sold to someone
else.
Cash donations for gas ex-
penses will gladly be accepted
at the checkout table.


Cheney, family support coun-
selor.
"Jan has been our leader and
mentor. Her compassion and
caring served as a standard for
our teams in Jefferson, Madi-
son, and Taylor counties."
She has been working for
Big Bend Hospice for almost
14 years. During that time, she
has touched the lives of many
families in Jefferson, Madison,
and Taylor counties.
"Everyone is invited to stop
by and wish Jan well in her
new role at the health depart-
ment and to thank her for her
contributions to our commu-
nity and the families she has
cared for as a hospice nurse,"
adds Catherine Arnold, com-
munity relations for Big Bend
Hospice.
Arnold can be reached at
566-7491 for more informa-
tion regarding the reception.

Help your community
when a disaster strikes!
Become a trained Disaster
Services Volunteer by contacting
the Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross at 878-6080
or visit our web site at
www.tallytown.com/redcross.
American
Red Cross


Friends Of Library


TO Reorganize


LAURIE REAMS, left, accepts a plaque from Lamont
Postmaster Gerald Bailey, commemorating his 45
years with the Post Office.


Jennifer Ward Will

Marry Ronald Schoch


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

Janet and Mitchel Ward of
Monticello announce the en-
gagement of their daughter,
Jennifer Michelle Ward, to
Ronald Matthew Schoch, son
of Karen and John Schoch of
Dunkirk, MD.
Ward is the granddaughter of
the late Mr. and Mrs. Curtis
McDuffie of Denton, GA. and
the late Mr. and Mrs. Costillo
Ward of Monticello.
Schoch is the grandson of
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Steeger
of Amarillo, TX. and Norma
Schoch and the late Robert
Schoch of Mitchville, MD.
Ward is a 1996 graduate of
Aucilla Christian Academy


and received a BS in Speech
Language Pathology/Audiol-
ogy and an MS in Speech Lan-
guage Pathology from Florida
State University.
Schoch is a 1994 graduate of
Southern High School in Har-
wood, MD. and received a BS
in engineering Mechanics from
the United States Air Force in
Colorado Springs, CO.
He presently serves in the
United States Air Force as an
F-16 pilot and is stationed at
Cannon AFB in Clovis, NM.
The wedding will take place
6 p.m. at the First Baptist
Church in Monticello on Sat-
urday, July 15; 2006:
All family and friends are in-
vited to attend. Local invita-
tions will not be sent.


State Farm Relay Drawing

Offers Gasoline Cards


DEBBIE SNAPP
Staff Writer

The State Farm Relay For
Life team is offering an oppor-
tunity to win gasoline.
Winners will receive gas
cards which are valid in or out
of state.
Tickets are $5 each for the
Chance Drawings, or 5 tickets
for $20, 13 for $50, and 30
tickets for $100.
Grand Prize is $200 worth
of gas, and Second Prize is


$50 worth of gas.
Cash and checks need to be
collected by Friday. Make
checks payable to The Ameri-
can Cancer Society.
Call a member of the team at
997-8282 for more informa-
tion.
All proceeds benefit the
American Cancer Society
through the Jefferson County
Relay For Life.
The Drawing will be held at
the Relay event April 21 and
22. Winners do not need to be
present.


Relay For Live Fundraiser


(Continued From Page 1)
At 10 p.m. there will be a
second team bank deposit
made of monies raised through
fundraising events, and an-
other Survivor Story, followed
with more entertainment.
Youth programs will begin at
11 p.m. with Flag Football,
Charades/Pictionary, and a
Scavenger Hunt, and more en-
tertainment by August Again.
At midnight, youth programs
continue with activities and
games, including Volleyball,-


Trivia Pursuit, Karaoke, Cap-
ture the Flag, skits, and the ul-
timate Frisbee competition.
Recorded music from DJ
Ron can be heard throughout
the location from 3 until 6
a.m., with a wake-up call and
music at 6 a.m.
Breakfast will be available at
6:30 a.m. with a prayer from
Jimmy Brookins at 7:30 a.m.
along with a Survivor Story,
and wake-up exercises and

(See Relay Page 12)


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Friends of the Library
of Jefferson County is in the
process of reorganizing.
Fundraising and a member-
ship drive are planned for the
group which has as its pur-
pose supporting the library
and its programs.
A short business meeting in
the library community room,
led by Carl Hanks, president
of the group is set for 6:45
p.m. April 27.
Thomas Hogle, a local
authority on coin collecting
and numismatics, will give a
presentation at 7 p.m.
All members are encour-
aged to attend. Anyone inter-
ested in the subject is
.welcome.
The by-laws and reorgani-
zation will be completed.
Other programming will
be planned throughout the
year, such as musical presen-
tations, volunteer appreciation
tea, chess games, and other


subjects of interest to the
group.
Committees are being ap-
pointed to help with some
projects to improve the build-
ing.
Applications and informa-
tion are available at the front
desk in the library.
At 8 a.m. until noon, April
30, the democratic Party will
hold a book sale at the library.
The proceeds will go to the
Friends of the Library to be
spent for needed items such
as books, improvements to
the building, ad Friends ac-
tivities throughout the year.

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MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 19, 2006 PAGE 7


Dollie Ruth Fountain
Dollie Ruth Fountain age 90,
'a Mother, Homemaker and re-
tired owner and operator of the
Florida Motel, Gas Station,
Mobile Home Park and Res-
taurant died Friday, April 14,
2006, in Tallahassee, Florida.
Services were Tuesday,
April 18, 2006 at 2:00 p.m.
Beggs Funeral Home Monti-
cello Chapel in Monticello,
Florida. Interment followed
at Roseland Cemetery. Visita-
tion was Monday, April 17,
2006 at Beggs Funeral Home
Monticello Chapel from 7:00
to 9:00 p.m. Donations may
be made to: Big Bend Hospice
1723 Mahan Center Blvd. Tal-
lahassee, Fl 32308-5428 or
First Baptist Church Building
Fund P.O.Box 493 Monticello,
Fl 32345.
Dollie was a life long-resi-
,dent of Jefferson County. She
was a Worthy Grand Matron
,Order of Eastern Star Chapter
116, Grand Ruth Order of
Eastern Star for the state and
president PTA Jefferson
County. Dollie was a member
of First Baptist Church Monti-
cello, Florida.
Dollie is survived by three
sons: Robert L. Fountain III
(Jeanette) of Monticello, Terry
Fountain (Bo) of Tallahassee,
Jack W. Fountain (Gloria) of
Live Oak. One sister Flora Ja-
cobs of Renton, WA. Nine
grandchildren and nine great
grandchildren. She was pre-
ceded in death by her loving
husband of 58 years Robert
Fountain, Jr.
William F. Jacobs
William "Bill" F. Jacobs Jr.
age 73 of Tallahassee, died
Friday, April 14, 2006 in Tal-
lahassee.
A native of Waynesburg,
Pa., he had lived most of his
life in Tallahassee. He was em-
ployed with the City of Talla-
hassee, Electric Utility-Power
Engineering Division as a Util-
ity Drafting Design
Technician, he was an Army
veteran with service in Korea,
was a member of VFW, was a
member of the American Le-
gion and served as Post Com-
mander of American Legion
Post #13 in Tallahassee for 3
years. Bill was active in the
past in coaching youth leagues
in Tallahassee for many years.
He coached Peewee football
and T-Ball in the Atom League
and also active as a scout
leader of Boy Scout Troop 105
and the Cub Scouts. He loved
to dance and was a member of
the Rug Cutters in the past. He
graduated from Leon High
School and attended the Uni-
versity of Florida.
He is survived by 4 sons:
Bill Jacobs III and wife Shelia
of Swainboro, Ga., Kent Ja-
cobs and wife Mary of Glen
St. Mary, Fl., Mike Jacobs and
fiancee Sherry of Woodville,
Fl. and Karl Jacobs and wife
Ann of Baldwin. 1 daughter
Audrey Brumbley and husband
Richard of Monticello. 13
grandchildren: Justin Grindle
of Tungwater, Wa., Daniel
spears and Cutter Jacobs of
Swainsboro, Ga., Ashleigh and
Chellie Jacobs of Tallahassee,
Byron and Stephanie Jacobs of
Glen St. Mary, Steven Jacobs
of Jacksonville, Amber Jacobs
of Woodville, David Lee Ja-
cobs of Baldwin, Dana Pedron
and husband Matt of Live Oak,
Josh Tolleson of MacClenny,
and Heather Bryan and hus-
band Josh of Sanderson. 2
great-grandchildren: Madison
and Emily Pedron of Live
Oak, 3 brothers John W. Ja-
cobs and wife Jeanie of Talla-
hassee, David K. Jacobs and
wife Eleanor of MacClenny,
Earl B, Jacobs and wife Roz of
Royal Palm Beach. He was


preceded in death by his par-
ents William Jacobs Sr. and
Audrey "Lamb" Jacobs.
The service will be 10:00
a.m., Tuesday, April 18, 2006
at Beggs Apalachee Chapel in
Tallahassee, interment will fol-
low at Oakland Cemetery also
in Tallahassee. Visitation
(viewing) will be April 17,


2006 from 6-8 at the Apa-
lachee Chapel. Memorial con-
tributions can be sent to
American Legion Post #13,
229 Lake Ella Dr.,
Tallahassee, Fla. 32303.
James Francis Schrader
James Francis Schrader, 76
died Wednesday, April 12,
2006 in Crawfordville.
The service will be at 11
a.m. Tuesday at St. Elizabeth
Anne Seton Catholic Church in
Crawfordville, with burial at
the church cemetery. Family
will receive friends from 6 to 8
p.m. Monday at Bevis Funeral
Home of Tallahassee (850-
385-2193), with a Rosary serv-
ice at 7:30 p.m. Memorial
contributions may be made to
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church Building
Fund, 3609 Coastal Highway,
Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Jim was a native of Massil-
lon, Ohio, and spent many
years of his life and career in
Indianapolis. He moved to Tal-
lahassee in 1976 and to Shell
Point in 1985. He was a mar-
keting representative for the
Sperry/Unysis Corp. and was a
longtime member of the Talla-
hassee Quarterback Club. He
was a member of Good Shep-
herd Catholic and St. Elizabeth
Anne Seton Catholic churches.
He had served in the U.S.
Army during the Korean War.
He is survived by his wife,
Maxine Perkins Schrader,
whom he married Valentine's
day 1953; three sons, James J.
Schrader of Casselberry, Rob-
-ert T. Schrader of Glenwood
Springs, Colo., and John A.
Schrader of Tallahassee; two
daughter s, Linda B. Schrader-
Nahoom of Lloyd and Lisa L.
Muller of Altamonte Springs;
four grandsons Joseph, Jared,
Tommy, and Adam; three
granddaughters Blair, Sarah,
and Sydney and a niece Becky
Schrader.
Vivian Kinsey Shears
Vivian Kinsey Shears age
76, died at Hospice House on
Monday, April 10, 2006 in
Tallahassee.
She was a native of Jefferson
County, born May 3, 1929, to
Dovard and Anita Kinsey but
made Tallahassee her home.
She will be remembered as a
dedicated wife, mother, and
grandmother. She was a friend
to many and loved by all
whose lives she touched. She
was preceded in death by her
husband of 38 years, Richard
F. Shears, owner of Richard's
Home Repair. She worked for
a brief time after her children
were grown as a school bus
driver for the Leon County
School system. Before Rich-
ard's death she acted as his
secretary, receptionist and ad-
visor.
She is survived by two sis-
ters, Hoyt Sheffield of Jeffer-
son County and Louis Stewart
of Pensacola: three daughters,
Connie Clark of Tallahassee,
Cathy Barker (and husband
Joe) of Pensacola and Susan
Jamison (and husband Calvin)
of Crawfordville; six grand-
children, Richard G. Berry
(and wife Teresa) of Tallahas-
see, Heather Berry of Tallahas-
see, Susan Mauvray of
Pensacola, Rachael and Wade
Jamison of Crawfordville, and
Matthew Clark of Tallahassee;
and three great-grandchildren.
Memorial contributions may
be made to Big Bend Hospice,
1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tal-
lahassee, Fl 32308. Culley's
Meadow Wood Funeral
Homes (877-8191) is handling
arrangements.
Carlton Lamar Vinson
Carlton Lamar Vinson age
67, a farmer died Saturday,
April 15, 2006, in Tallahassee,


Florida.
Services will be Wednesday,
April 19, 2006 at 11:00 a.m. at
Beggs Monticello Funeral
Home Monticello Chapel in
Monticello, Florida. Interment
will follow at Olive Baptist
Church Cemetery. Visitation

(See Homes Page 9)


Norton Retires After 40


Years In District Schools


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

After 40 years of service in-_
District Schools, Jim Norton
is retiring.
He has been a teacher, as-
sistant principal, principal and
Director of Adult Education.
Norton is a gradaute of
FAMt where he majored in
math.
In 1966, he was hired at his
alma mater, Howard Acad-
emy as a ninth grade math
teacher, where he spent the
next 19 years.
In 1985 he became assis-
tant prciapl at JCHS.
In January, 1991, he was
named the principal of Jeffer-
son Elementary School,
where he spent the next nine
and a half years.
In 2001, Norton was moved-


JIM NORTON has been an
instructor, assistant prin-
cipal, principal, and direc-
tor. He was served at all
three District Schools and
at the District Office, dur-
ing his tenure with the
school system. (News
Photo)


Heart Associaton's

New CPR Technique


Consumer Science Extension
Agent Heidi Copeland relates
that the American Heart Asso-
ciation (AHA) has imple-
mented a major change in
CPR, which places emphasis
on effective chest compres-
sions. Those training for CPR
will learn the new technique.
Copeland explains that in
cardiac arrest, there is no
blood flow.
Chest compress ions create a
small amount of blood flow to
vital organs, such as the brain
and the heart.
The new guidelines recom-
mend a compression to venti-
lation ration of 30:2, rather
than 15:2, which is 30 chest
compressions followed by two
mouth to mouth breaths.
Effective chest compres-
sions should be done by push-
ing hard and fast.
The better the compression,
the more blood flow is pro-
duced, hence the reason for the
new technique.
"Done properly, high quality
CPR will save -lives," Cope-


Pet First Aid

Course

Rescheduled

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Pet First Aid Course
sponsored by the Humane So-
ciety,'which was written up in
the Wednesday, April 12
Monticello News, has been
changed from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m., May 6, to the same
times on June 10.
The course will take place
in the Humane Society offices
on West Washington Street.
The rescheduling was due
to a scheduling conflict.
The conflict arose because
an Adopt-a-thon at Petsmart,.
will be conducted that week-
end, and some of those volun-
teering for the event also wish
to attend the course.
Watch the Monticello News
for additional information, as
the time draws nearer.



Hoop Game

Fundraiser

Set Friday

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Residents are invited to at-
tend the Relay For Life "The
Final Hoop" game, noon Fri-
day at HMS gym, where ce-
lebrities including Phil
Barker, Gerrold Austin and
David Frisby, will be among
those taking on the HMS All-
stars.
The All-stars are HMS bas-
ketball players from the boy's
and girl's teams.
Admission is $1 per person
and concessions will be sold.


land states.
First Aid topic covered in-
clude:, where to take the pulse
of a cat or dog, how to prop-
erly perform CPR, what to do
about embedded objects, se-
vere bleeding, treatment for
shock, how to properly re-
move the animal from the
scene of an accident.
Properly stabilizing a pro-
truding object, properly secur-
ing and wrapping an eyeball
out of the socket, proper ban-
daging and splinting tech-
niques, and the proper
respiration and heartbeats in
different cats and dogs ac-
cording to size.
Rice will bring a "Recessy-
Fuzzy", life-size cat to be
used for practice by class par-
ticipants. During this portion
of the course, participants
learn how to check for heart-
beats, and the best positions
to feel them, and actual mouth
to muzzle rescue breathing.
Each participant practices
each technique on the cat.
After completing the class,
participants are given a CPR
face shield and a card stating
that they had completed the
class.


to Howard Middle School as
it's principal.
After two years of service at
HMS, in 2003, Norton moved
to the District Office to re-
place retiring Director of Vo-
cational and Adult Education,
Albert Thomas.
Norton said the changes in
jobs has been very good for
him over the years. "If I had
remained in the classroom all
this time, I would have proba-
bly burned out."
He added that the benefit of
the changes was being able to
work with and understand the
needs of students at all age
levels.
Norton was asked to de-
scribe the absolute highlight
of his career; "It would have
to be when I went to Howard
as the principal," said Norton.
"I was a student there, I
graduated there and came
back there as a teacher, then I
later became the principal.
You could' ;' .te a better
story," he said.
Norton ..cQlled the days
of integration in the schools.
"Back then, it was the parents
who were apprehensive about
it," said Norton. "The stu-


dents didn't seem to care."
He added that after integra-
tion, there was a big change
in education for the black
populous.
"The level of education rose
for blacks, and the expecta-
tion of blacks also rose."
Thinking back on his career,
Norton added, "I would not
change one day. It's been a
great ride, I've met some great
people along the way, and I
have made many good
friends."
When asked how he would
like students and parents to
think of him in years to come,
he responded, "I hope along
the way I have touched their
lives. I want them to remem-
ber that Jim Norton was al-
ways a fair man and an honest
one."
During his time with the
school system, Norton also
served as a coach and athletic
director at Howard.
"I'm big on education, and
it allowed me to be where I
am today. I would Have never
achieved what I have without
an education.
He concluded that he still
plans to coach area youth in
baseball. "I want to volunteer
at the high school if they'll
have me," he quipped. "And I
will continue to coach the A's.
I will always be around the
kids."


~~~.. .s ~~~r--~~5r5ff. f~f..f::f
.v.2 .--'~f;2~f
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->C


Saturday, April 22 10 am to 7 pm
Sunday, April 23 10 am to 4 pm
ADMISSION IS FREE


*Fine Arts & Crafts *Seafood *Wildlife Exhibits
*Live Music *Sand Sculptors *Costume Pet Parade
Festival is located on Carrabelle's Riverwalk
For information call The Carrabelle Area Chamber of Commerce

(850) 697-2585














PAGE 8, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 19, 2006
I


Sports
.. . . .


JCHS Boys Qualify

For Regional Meet


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Several members of the Jef-
ferson County High School
boy's track and field team
qualified during the district
competition and will move on
to regional competition, after
clinching an overall second
place finish.
The regional competition is
slated for 10 a.m., April 22 at
Chiles High School.
Jon Dady finished first in
the 110 hurdles with 15.2 sec-
onds, first in the 300 hurdles
with 41.0 seconds, first in the
triple jump with 41' 9".
Daryl Young took first
place in the 100 meter with
11.3 seconds, first in the 200


meter with 235 seconds, and
first place in the long jump
with 21' 7".
In the 4 x 100, the team of
Dady, Young Lucius Wade
and Breon Parker took first
place with 44.1 seconds.

Parker took second place in
the 110 hurdles with 16.3 sec-
onds, and second in the 300
hurdles with 43.3 seconds.
Jordan Blair qualified for
regional in the discus-throw,
when he threw for 115'.
And the team of Kevin
Bowers, William Wade,
Quantez Burke and Lucius
Wade qualified in districts
and will also travel to re-
gional to represent JCHS in
the 4 x 400 and 4 x 800
relays.


Warriors Fall To

Branford 6-4


BILL BROWN

Aucilla Warriors lost their
fifth game of the season to
Branford, 6-4.
As has been the downfall in
recent losses, errors, both
mental and physical, bases on
balls, and opposing batters
getting hit by the pitch, these
lapses contributed to the loss
in nine innings.
Entering the bottom of the
seventh, Aucilla was on the
short end of a 3-1 score.
However, we managed to
score three to tie and go into
extra innings.
A scoreless eighth led to
Branford scoring two in the


ninth to win, when Aucilla
could not score in their at-bat.
Casey Gunnels pitched the
first eight innings, giving way
-to Dustin Roberts in the ninth.
Roberts was tagged with the
loss, for his second of the
year; Gunnels gave up four
hits and struck out ten.
Offensively, the Warriors
generated eight hits, paced by
Gunnels with three for five,
one RBI and a triple.
Catcher Josh Carswell and
Chris Tuten had two hits
each; Glen Bishop hit safely
once, to closeout the Aucilla
offense.
This brings the season re-
cord to a15-5, and 7-0 in dis-
trict play.


Fencers Beat Kiwanis,

Chicken Delight


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

C & F Fencing defeated Ki-
wanis 12-7 and Chicken Del-
ite, 17-7 in recent coach pitch
action
Coach Mike Holm said that
timely hitting was the key to
the victory against Kiwanis.
He added that both teams
played a good game of de-
fense.
The Fencers were led by
Alex Campbell, who hit an
over-the-fence home run.
Casey Demott was three for
three with two triples; Ty
Chancey two for three; Shawn
Blue, two for two with a dou-
ble; Doug Gulledge, two for
two; Emma Witmer, Jake Ed-
wards, Sherquez Ivey, Brian
Bowman and Brandon Holm,
all went one for two.
C & F scored six runs in the
first inning and six in the sec-
ond, to make a commanding
lead early in the game, and
held on for the win.
In the game against Chicken
Delite, Handley made an un-


assisted double play;
Gulledge, Chancey and De-
mott turned an infield double-
play; shortstop to second, to
first.

Demott led C & F with his
first over-the-fence homer,
going two for three; Holm,
three for three with a triple
and a double; Ivey, two for
three and a double; Gulledge,
two for three and a double;
Witmer, one for three with a
double; Bowman and
Chancey both went one for
three; Alex Campbell, one for
three with a triple and Blue,
one for two.


Last Cas t

Charters


car"1. I"4
ea444he44


Director Tells Park

Spring Sport Scores


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Recreation Park Director
Kevin Aman reports latest
scores in spring sports at the
park.
In T-ball action, Jefferson
Builder Mart downed Capital
City Bank, 20-17; Bishop
Farms' beat Rotary, 15-13;
Capital City Bank defeated
Rotary 18-14 and the Builders
downed Bishop Farms, 22-11.
In Coach Pitch action,
Chicken Delite squeaked by
State Farm Insurance, 12-11;
Hiram Masonic Lodge
downed Kiwanis, 6-4; C & F


9T


JON DADY goes over the hurdle during a JCHS practice
session. In the meet, he scored first in the 110 hurdles
with 15.2 seconds. (News Photo)



6 Lady Tigers Move

On To Regional Meet


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

Lady Tigers track and field-
team did well during the
Cairo invitational and during
the recent district competi-
tions, six Lady Tigers quali-
fied to compete at regionals.
Competing in the regionals
are: Shanice Brooks, Alexia
Huggins, Keandra Seabrooks,
Quanesha Franklin, Ceata
Crumity, and Jazmaun Hall.
The regional competition is
set 10 a.m., Saturday, Apirl
22. at Chiles High School.
If they qualify the girls go
on to state completion 1 p.m.,
Friday, April 28, in Jackson-
ville.
At Cairo, in the 4 x 100, the
team of Alexia Huggins,
Keandra Seabrooks, Deidra
Arnold and Quanesha Frank-
lin, placed fourth with 55.0
seconds.
In the 4 x 200, the team of
Shanice Brooks, Huggins, Ar-
nold, and Franklin, placed
third with one minute, 40 sec-
onds. They were awarded
medals in the event.
In the 100 meter, Huggins
placed fourth with 14.1 sec-
onds and Franklin placed fifth
with 14.3 seconds.
Jazmaun Hall threw the
shot-put 27 feet and threw


the discus 53 feet. She did not
place.
In the district competition,
the Lady Tigers took fifth
-place overall.
In the long jump, Seabrooks
came in fourth with 13'9"; and
Franklin came in fifth with
13'4".
In the shot-put Ceata Cru-
mity came in fourth with 25
feet; and Hall came in third
with 26 feet.
And in the discus-throw,
Crumity came in second with
75 feet; and Hall came in
sixth with 56 feet.
In the 100 meter hurdles,
Seabrooks came in sixth with
19.9 seconds; and Brooks
came in seventh with 21.23
seconds.
In the 4 x 100, Brooks,
Franklin, Seabrooks and Hug-
gins came in second with 54.2
seconds.
In the 200 meter, Franklin
took third place with 29.2 sec-
onds; Seabrooks ran a 29.8;
Brooks ran a 31.2; and Hug-
gins ran a 32.0.
In the 100 meter, Huggins
took fourth with 14.1
seconds; and Franklin took
fifth with 14.2 seconds.'
In the 300 meter hurdles,
Brooks ran a 63.0.


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Fencing inched past State
Farm Insurance, 4-3; Chicken
Delite won 11-3 over
Kiwanis; and the Fencers
-downed Hiram Masonic
Lodge, 22-2.
In Cal Ripkin action, Farm-
ers and Merchants Bank beat
Jefferson Farmers Market,
8-4; Williams Timber de-
feated Monticello Milling,
8-6; the Farmers downed the
Millers, 13-9; and the Bank-
ers won over Williams Tim-
ber, 7-3.
In softball action, Jackson's
Drug Store clobbered Joyner's
Travel Center, 11-1; and
came back for a second win,
11-8.


Lady Tigers Fall

TO Rickards 5-3


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High-
School varsity softball team
lost to Rickards 5-3, and stand
6-6 on the season.
"I'm really upset about the
loss," said Coach Earline
Knight. "The last time we
played Rickards, we beat
them, and we beat them bad.
"I guess Jefferson just took
the game for granted," said
Knight,. "We made some
costly errors and just were not
playing serious ball that night.
We must have gone in think-
ing this is going to be easy.
"Those errors were costly to
us. Four of Rickards' five
runs were unearned runs due
to errors."
On the mound, Jemaria Cuy-
ler pitched the game, striking
out four and giving up six hits
and five walks.


At the plate, Knight said the
Lady Tigers couldn't muster
more than four hits between
them.
Majetta Jefferson went two
for three with one run; Kiarra
Powell, one for three; Ireshia
Denson went one for three
with one run; and Latoya
Footman, one run.

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Immigration Plan


(Continued From Page 4)
Ultimately, the evil is in the
details of any "comprehensive
immigration plan" cooked up
in Washington. Ronald Regan
tried implementing policies to
stop illegal immigration in the
80"s and they fell flat -on their
face. All of the plans I have
seen proposed by our legisla-
tors thus far are also doomed
to that same fail. When every
concept is preference by the
statement, "Well it is impracti-
cal to roundup and deport
eleven million illegals", any-
thing and everything else that
follows is useless. It is like be-
ginning a conversation to cor-
rect a teenager's misbehavior
by saying, "Well I can't really
do anything about it, but--."
I strongly support a guest
worker program. I believe it
begins by first putting a dead
stop to illegal immigration by
placing military personnel on
the border. Either nationalize
the national guard or use
someone like the 82nd Air-
borne with all their sophisti-
cated detection devices as a
temporary measure until our
border guard forces can be
beefed up and equipped.
'Just their presence will be
99% effective. Next we need a
strong message to those who
are here illegally. They have a
short time to register and get
fingerprinted or they will be
arrested and deported.
Certifiable documentation of
people who have lived here for
five years or more with no
criminal activity will be issued
guest worker visas upon re-
entry into the United States as
designated reentry points.
Anyone here illegally for less
than five years will be pro-


vided special documentation
for having resided here previ-
ously and must leave the coun-
try and reenter where they will
be given special consideration
for a guest worker visa.
For any of you pessimistic
"nay sayers", remember, these
people made it to where they
are today without any federal
assistance and they can make it
out of the country and back
just as quickly once the word
gets out.
Why is this a workable plan.
1. It eliminates the "amnesty"
issue that creates such strong
emotional response from the
vast majority of Americans. 2..
It provides citizenship oppor-
tunities for those who have
worked hard and kept their
nose clean. 3. It provides no
advantage to either political
party. The Republicans get the
workers of, industry and the
Democrats get the voters from
the predominant Spanish
speaking base. 4. It eliminates
the nebulous "getting in line"
nonsense, because there is no
actual line. 5. Best of all, legal
Americans win because it re-
duces their tax dollars going to
support illegal aliens and in-
creases the overall federal
revenue by increasing the tax
base.
I know that this idea won't
"fly" because it makes too
much sense. Additionally, this
is such a powerful issue that
both political parties can't pass
up the opportunity to find a
way to stick their finger into
their opponents eye. Oh well!
Let's check in again at election
time in a couple of years and
see how well legislators have
actually done to resolve this is-
sue.


Bad Law Needs Repeal


(Continued From Page 4)
ways claiming to find an ob-
s'ICe sand fleJ or snail Jaiier..,
buried somewhere in the sand.
Los Angeles International Air-
port urgently needs to build
new runways, but environmen-
talists claim the 108 acre plot
of land is home to the River-
dale fairy shrimp that some-
times live in swampy areas.
The entire community of
Klamath Falls, Oregon has
been literally choked to death
as its water supply was shut off
to protect a sucker fish that is-
n't endangered. The law suits
begin. The costs go up. The
projects die. Jobs are lost. It
happens time after time.
The ESA is also used by in-
dustry to hurt its competition.
The Surdna Foundation, which
was created with money from
the timber fortune of the John
E. Andrus estate, makes grants
in the millions of dollars to a
wide array of environmental
groups whose sole purpose is
to enforce the Endangered
Species Act.
In one case, documents show
that Surdna made grants in ex-
cess of one million dollars in
"an emergency action to pro-
tect forests and save the envi-
ronment." As a result of those
grants and the actions they
paid for, thirty-six lumber
mills were closed in Northern
California, 8,000 loggers lost
their jobs, and the price of
lumber, now in severe
shortage, rose dramatically.
Who gained? Surdna, which
owns its own timber operation
that was left unharassed by en-
vironmental legal action.
Surdna earned a profit of $2.7
million from the otherwise
devastated timber.industry.
Yet, all of this pain and suf-
fering is for absolutely
nothing, as far as endangered
species are concerned. In-
credible as it may sound to the
average American, in the 32
years since the ESA has been
on the books, just 34 of the
nearly 1,300 U.S. Species
listed have made their way off
the endangered list.
Of this number, 9 species are
now extinct, 14 appear to have
been improperly listed in the
first place, and just 9,(.6% of
all species listed) have recov-


ered sufficiently to be delisted.
A less than 1% recovery rate
proves the ESA does nothing,
to protect endangered species-'
it just makes special interest
groups and the government
more powerful.
No law should have this kind
of power over a free Ameri-
can people. To believe that
Congress has any shot at fixing
such a bad law is to also be-
lieve in the Easter Bunny. It's
not going to happen. The fix
may, in fact, be worse than the
original as the radical environ-
mental groups see an opportu-
nity to actually strengthen the
law.
Current efforts to fix the
ESA are now before Congress.
The House has already passed
the "Threatened and Endan-
gered Species Recovery Act
(TEWSRA, HR 3824), spon-
sored by House Resource
Committee Chairman Richard
Pombo (R-CA).
Supporters of the ESA were
outraged by TESRA' efforts to
at least provide some compen-
sation to besieged property
owners Consequently, driven
by the insistence of the envi-
ronmental movement, much of
pro-property language has
been gutted or watered down.
The Senate how has several -
versions of its own, all worse
than the House version. The
fact is, the ESA is the holy
grail of the environmental
movement. It will not allow
even a single comma to be
changed without all out war.
There is only one valid an-
swer to this outrageous situa-
tion. Repeal the ESA and, if


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 19, 2006 PAGE 9

ACA Girls Win 3, Lose 1,

Stand 17-4 On The Season


FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Acad--
emy varsity softball team won
three of its four last games, to
stand 17-4 on the season.
The Lady Warriors were de-
feated by Madison 16-6 in


Lady Bees

Stand 5-3 On

The Season

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer


w. V. v





---." *- *'.^ i l '




CHELSEY' KINSEY readies
for the lead off from first
base during a recent ACA
practice session. (News
Photo)



'A's' Lose

14-4 TO

Bainbridge

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Monticello A's baseball-
team lost 14-4 to Dry Spring
of Bainbridge last week.
Coach Jim Norton attributed
the loss to seven errors. "We
just could not catch the ball,"
said Norton.
Joe Jones pitched the first
three innings, striking out
three, and giving up three
hits, three runs and walking
none.
James Wesley pitched the
remainder of the game.giving
up six hits, three walks and 11
runs, five of which were due
to errors.
At the plate, the A's could '
only muster seven hits.
Wesley hit three singles;
Jones, one single; and Ronald
Graham, two singles.
The next game is slated for 3
p.m., in Quincy, Sunday.



Tigers Lose

To Maclay

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Jefferson County High-
School varsity baseball team
lost to Maclay 14-2, standing
1-10 on the season.

The Tigers had a total of ten
strikeouts during the game.
"It was a game of ups and
downs for us," said Assistant
Coach Jim Norton.
"We lost by the mercy-rule
again," said Norton. "I guess
you can say we've been get-
ting our kids home early so
they can study," he quipped.
Demario Rivers pitched the
entire game, giving up nine
base hits due to errors of his
team mates, two walks and
struck out one.
At the plate, Rivers went one
for three with one run; Curtis
Hightower went two for three
with two singes and one run;
Shayne Broxie went one for
two with a double; and Breon
Parker went one for three
with a single.


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The Howard Middle School-
softball team wrapped up the
season standing 5-3 on the
Sseasonl
The past four games slatted
for the Lady Bees were wins
due to forfeits.
Those games included a
double-header against Havana
and a double-header against
Steinhatchee.
Coach Corinne Stephens
said that both schools called
to cancel the face-offs shortly
before each were scheduled.
She concluded that the sea-
son of the Lady Bees closed
on a positive note.
"They are a young team,
but I continued to see im-
provement throughout the
season," said Stephens. "I
know that I have something
positive to build on next
year."


ACA JVS Fall

TO FL. High

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Aucilla Christian Acad--
emy JV baseball team ended
its season with a loss to Flor-
ida High 12-1.

Casey Anderson pitched the
first of the game, striking out
one, and giving up seven hits,
three walks and two hit-by-
pitch.

Marcus Roberts came in for
the final two innings. He
struck out one and gave up-
one hit.

Anderson scored the lone
run with what began as a walk
to first.
The only Warrior hit was-
made by Luke Whitmer, who
had a single.
The team stands 7-7-1 on
the season.


five innings due to the ten-run
rule.
Brittany Hobbs pitched, giv-
ing up 14 hits, striking out
none and walking three.
Chelsey Kinsey went one
for two with two RBI; Lind-
sey Day, two; and Mallory
Plaines, one for two with.one
RBI.
Lady Warriors beat Carra-
belle 10-4.
Hobbs pitched, striking out
none and walking none.
At the plate, all Lady Warri-
ors but two on the team roster
scored at least one run.
Day went three for four, one
double, one RBI; Nicole
Mathis, two for three with
three RBI; and Joanna Cobb
two for four with two RBI.
ACA squeaked by Florida
High for a 3-2 win.
Coach Roslyn Bass said that


the Lady Warriors played a
great defensive game.
Hobbs pitched the first five
innings, striking out two and
walking one.
Paige Thurman pitched the
final two, striking out one and
walking one.
At the plate, Hobbs went
two for four with one RBI;
Mathis, two for three; Day,
one for three; and Thurman,
one for three with one double
and one RBI.
The Lady Warriors blanked
Maclay in a 12-0 game called
due to the ten-run rule.
Hobbs pitched four innings,
striking out four and walking
three; and Day pitched the fi-
nal inning, striking out two.
Day went three for three
with four RBI; Bethany Saun-
ders two for three with a dou-
ble and three RBI; and Kinsey
two for three with three RBI.


Homes Of Mourning


(Continued From Page 7)
will be Tuesday, April 18,
2006 at Beggs Funeral Home
Monticello Chapel from 6:00
to 8:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers
donations may be made to the
American Cancer Society 241
John Knox Rd., #100 Tallahas-
see, Florida 32303.
Lamar was a life long resi-
dent of Jefferson County. He-
was a member of the National


Rifle Association, Three Riv-
ers Hunten Club and Farm and
was named Family of Jefferson
County in 1987.

Lamar is survived by two
sons Carl Russell Vinson
(Karen Jones finance), Jason
Vinson of Monticello and one
daughter Marie Larson (Keith)
of Tallahassee and three
grandchildren.


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PAGE 10, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 19, 2006


-The City Council of the City of
Monticello proposes to adopt the
following ordinance: AN
ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA
AMENDING THE CODE OF
ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA
DELETING TREE
PRESERVATION PROVISIONS
FROM CHAPTER 66 AND
ADDING A NEW SECTION
ENTITLED "TREE PROTECTION
AND REMOVAL STANDARDS"
UNDER CHAPTER 54, ARTICLE
IV (LAND DEVELOPMENT
REGULATIONS); AND
PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE. The entire
text of the ordinance may be
inspected at City Hall, 245 S.
Mulberry Street, Monticello,
Florida between the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Public hearing on
the ordinance will be held on
Tuesday, May 2, 2006 at 7:00 p.m.
at Monticello City Hall. Interested
persons may appear at the meeting
and be heard with respect to the
proposed ordinance.
4/19. c
INVITATION TO BID: The Board
of County Commissioners of
Jefferson County will receive bids
on or before 5:00 p.m., Monday
.April 24, 2006 on the following:
Commercial grade Z-Turn riding
lawn mower. 52" to 54" cut, 25 to 27
horsepower engine, include all
.warranty information, include
'delivery price to the Jefferson
County Recreation Park, Mamie
-Scott Drive in Monticello, Florida.
All bids must be submitted in sealed
'envelopes plainly marked "BID -
.Z-Turn Mower" and be mailed or
'delivered to the Board of County
Commissioners, Courthouse, Room
-10, Monticello, Fla. 32344. The
'Board reserves the right to accept
,or reject any, or all bids and to
accept the bid which they feel is in
the best interest of Jefferson
County.
4/14, 19, c
The City Council of the City of
Monticello proposes to adopt the
following ordinance: AN
ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF
MONTICELLO, FLORIDA,
AMENDING SECTION 90 OF
THE CODE OF ORDINANCES OF
THE CITY OF MONTICELLO,
FLORIDA TO ESTABLISH A
WATER SYSTEM
DEVELOPMENT CHARGE;
FUNCTIONS; CHARGES
LEVIED, AND PROVIDING FOR
AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The entire
text of the ordinance may be
inspected at City Hall, 245 S.
Mulberry Sn, S ri. 1M1.nlikell.
ylorida between the hours of 8:00L
j.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday through
Friday. Public hearing on the
ordinance will be held on Tuesday,
May 2, 2006 at 7:00 p.m. at
Monticello City Hall. Interested
persons may appear at the meeting
and be heard with respect to the
proposed ordinance.
/19, c
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4/19, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR IN
aND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY,

If It Happens In
S Jefferson County.
'You'll Read II In The
SMonticello News


FLORIDA IN RE: ESTATE OF
KIM H. RANDERSON Deceased.
Case No.: 06-CP-41 Probate
division. NOTICE TO
CREDITORS: The administration
of the estate of Kim H. Randerson,
deceased, whose date of death was
January 10, 2006; is pending in the
Circuit Court for Jefferson County,
Florida, Probate Division; File
Number 06-CP-41; the address of
which is Jefferson County
Courthouse, Room 10, Monticello,
Florida 32344. The names and
addresses of the Personal
Representative and the Personal
Representative's attorney are set
forth below. All creditors of the
Decedent and other persons having
claims or demands against
Decedent's estate on whom a copy
of this notice is required to be
served must file their. claims with
this court WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All
other creditors of the Decedent and
other persons having claims or
demands against Decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS)
NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT
FILED WITHIN THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED. The date of first
publication of this notice is April 19,
2006. Mary L. Wakeman,
McConnaughhay, Duffy, Coonrod,
Pope & Weaver, Florida Bar
Number: 0694703 Post Office
Drawer 229, Tallahassee, Florida
32302 Telephone: 850-222-8121,
Facsimile: 850-222-9766: Attorney
for Personal Representative,
Williams Scott Randerson, 9215
Waukeenah Highway, Monticello,
Florida 32344, Personal
Representative.
4/19, 4/26/06, c
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA GENERAL
JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE
NO:. 05-233-CA US BANK
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE PLAINTIFF VS. JANIE
LAWRENCE, IF LIVING AND IF
DEAD, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
ASSIGNEES, LIENORS,
CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND
ALL OTHER PARTIES
CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY
THROUGH UNDER OR AGAINST
JANIE LAWRENCE; ISRAEL
LAWRENCE, IF LIVING AND IF
DEAD THE ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES AND ALL
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST ISRAEL LAWRENCE;
JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS
UNKNOWN TENANTS IN
POSSESSION DEFENDANTS) RE
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE: NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Order
Granting the Motion to Reset
Foreclosure Sale dated April 10th,
2006 entered in Civil Case. No.
05-233-CA of the Circuit Court of
the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for
JEFFERSON County,
MONTICELLO, Florida, I will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash at NORTH DOOR of the
JEFFERSON County Courthouse,
COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
MONTICELLO, Florida, at 11:00
a.m. on the llth day of May, 2006
the following described property as
set forth in said Summary Final
Judgment to-wit: BEGIN AT THE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE


SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE -
NORTHEAST QUARTER OF
SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 1
NORTH, RANGE 3 EAST,
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA, THENCE RUN EAST)
FOR A DISTANCE OF 130 FEET
MORE OR LESS TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING OF THE LAND
HEREIN CONVEYED. FROM
SAID POINT OF BEGINNING,
RUN EAST FOR A DISTANCE OF
255 FEET MORE OR LESS,.
THENCE RUN SOUTH FOR A
DISTANCE OF 175 FEET MORE
OR LESS, THENCE RUN-
NORTHWESTERLY ALONG THE
EDGE OF A ROAD 255 FEET.
MORE OR LESS, THENCE RUN
NORTH A DISTANCE OF 148.
FEET MORE OR LESS TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID
PROPERTY BEING A PART OF
THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF I
THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF
SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 1
NORTH, RANGE 3 EAST,,
JEFFERSON COUNTY,
FLORIDA. Dated this l1th day of
April, 2006, Carl D. Boatwright,
Clerk of the Circuit Court; IN
ACCORDANCE WITH
AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES, ACT, persons with
disability needing a special
accommodation should contact
COURT ADMINISTRATION, at
the JEFFERSON County
Courthouse at 850-997-3595,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) OR
1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay
Service. DAVID J. STERN, P.A.,'
801 S. UNIVERSITY DRIVE
SUITE 500, PLANTATION, FL
33324.(954) 233-8000
4/19, 4/26/06, C
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
JEFFERSON COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION IN RE:
ESTATE OF ELIJAH TERRELL,
Deceased File Number 06-40-PR
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION:
The administration of the estate of
ELIJAH TERRELL, deceased, File
Number 06-40-PR is pending in the
Circuit Court for Jefferson County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is Jefferson
County Courthouse, Room 10,
Monticello, Florida 32344. The
name and address of the personal
representative and of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below. ALL INTERESTED
PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
,,.
All persons on whom this notice is
served who have objections that
challenge the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of this Court are
required to file their objections with
this court WITHIN THE LATER
OF THREE MNONTIIS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All
creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whon a
copy of this notice is served within
three months after the date of the
first publication of this notice must
file their claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE


WE TAKE THE
DENTS OUT OF
ACCIDENTS


ON THEM. All other creditors of
the decedent and persons having
claims or demands against the
estate of the decedent must file their
claims with the court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THE. All other creditors of the
decedent and persons having claims
or demands against the estate of the
decedent must file their claims with
this court WITH THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
The date of this first publication of
this Notice is April 19, 2006
Attorney For Personal
Representative: T. Buckingham
Bird P.O. Box 247, Monticello, FL
32345, 850-997-3503, FL Bar ID#
0006176; Wanda Terrell, 26 R.J.
Road, Monticello, Fl 32344.
4/19, 4/26/06, c


Notice To Owner Re: Barbecue
Grill Notice is hereby given to
Owner of Barbecue Grill located at
Rudy Scheese Welding CO. If not
picked up in 30 days from 4/12/06
date of this first publication. It will
be sold. Rudy Scheese Welding
Company.
4/12,4/19, 4/26,5/3, c
Notice The Jefferson County Board
of County Commissioners will hold
a Workshop at 4:00 p.m., Thursday,
April 20, 2006, at the Jefferson
County Courthouse, Courtroom,
Monticello, Florida, to discuss
procedures for appointments to
various boards and committees.
Danny Monroe II, Chairman
4/19, c
Monticello Trading Company
located in the heart of downtown
Monticello. Tired of all that clutter
and need money? Come see us with
your used furniture, collectibles, &
antiques. Booths for rent at
reasonable prices. 509-3517.
4/12, 14,19,21, 26,28, c

HELP WANTED
Notice of Job Opening
Jefferson County Board of
County Commissioners is seek-
ing applicants for a Part-time
Gate Attendant at the County


oSolid Waste Department. Job
description and applications
may be obtained at the Solid
Waste Department located at
1591 Waukeenah Street, Monti-
cello, Florida. Hours and days
of this position are: Friday and
Saturday 6:30am-4:00pm and
then Sunday and Monday
6:30am-10:30am then
3:00pm-7:00pm. Essential Job
Functions are: Loads and un-
loads heavy material, from
trucks. Moves equipment and
large bulky objects. Performs
custodial duties. Maintains
grounds. Rakes grass and wa-
ters plants. Weed flower beds.
Shapes hedges and trims grass
on right-of-way. Pick up boxes
and other materials left by resi-
dents. Needs to get along well
with people and be able to direct
and explain where the different
types of materials are to be dis-
posed of. Minimum qualifica-
tions are : Knowledge of
operation, maintenance, capa-
bilities, limitations and safety
aspects of equipment. Ability to
understand and comply with
oral instructions. Ability to
read street and traffic signs.
Ability to perform manual
labor. Skill in using hand tools.
Education and experience
needed: One(l) year experience
in performing manual labor.
Licenses, Certifications or regis-
trations: Possess of a valid Flor-
ida Drivers License and a valid
Social Security Card. Applica-
tions will be accepted until
4:00pm, April 26, 2006 at the
Solid Waste Department located
at 1591 Waukeenah Street.
Equal Opportunity/Affirmative
Action Employer. Drug Free
Workplace. Drug testing is a re-
quired part of the preemploy-
ment physical. Applicants with
a disability should contact the
above office for accommoda-
tions. For additional informa-
tion please call 342-0184.
4/7,4/12,14,19,21,C
Cashier, available to work shift
work and weekends @ Capital
City Travel Center. Call Sharon
@ 997-3538, ex. 4


1/25, tfn, c
Help Wanted at JCKC evenings
Monday Saturday 7 p.m. 11
p.m. Computer experience and
general office skills required.
Mail short resume to JCKC,
P.O. Box 400, Monticello, Fl
32345.
4/19, 21, 26, 28, c
History Instructor, North
Florida Community College,
Madison, Fl. Full time faculty
appointment beginning August,
2006. The successful candidate
will teach History courses
through the sophomore-level.
These include American
History, History of Western
Civilization, Race and Ethnicity,
African American History. and
World History. Qualifications:
A master's degree (from
accredited institution) with a
minimum of 18 graduate
semester hours in History.
Community college teaching
experience is preferred. In
addition to teaching duties,
position will include: established
office hours; serving on College
committee; professional
development; participating in
Department and College
activities. Some classes taught
may be right and/or dual
enrollment courses on NFCC
campus and/or satellite
campuses. Send
applications to Director HR,
North Florida Community
College, 325 NW Turner Davis
Drive, Madison, Florida 32340.
Only complete application
packets will be considered.
Complete application packet
requires letter; resume and
application; copy of Transcripts
(unofficial okay). Application is
available on website at
www,nfcc.edu Questions: Call
Mrs Enid Kozlowski
(850)-973-1636) or' email to
kozlowskie@nfcc.edu.
Application packet must be
received by April 18,2006. EOE
4/7, 12, 14, 19, c
Licensed Therapist #2267a:
Masters Degree from an
accredited University or College
with a major in the field of


o f' ofLakel City

.o f$p niIlit In: s
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Interior & Exterior Restoration
Sand Blasting Transom & Hull
Custom Paint* Buffing
Insurance Claims
Fiberglass Fabrication


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BURNETTE PLUMBING & CARROLL HILL AUTO,ELECTRIC, INC. Northside Mower and

ELL SERVICE "Complete Auto Electric Repair Service" SmallEngine Repair
SFamily Owned Since 1902 Min Sto rage For Hustler, Poulan, Homelite MTD, Cub Cadet,
Plumbing Repairs ~ Wells Drilled Fixtures-Faucets Pumps Snapper, Murray & More, Warranty
Replaced ~ Sewer & Water Connections Tanks Replaced ~- 315 Waukeenah Hwy. Repairs for all makes & models.
Water Heater Repairs All Repairs 1/4 Mile off US 19 South Pickup & Delivery Service available
i r 997-25315 / lThomasville Road 115 Albany Rd. Pickup & DeliveryService Available
99 -2 35(on arroll) 229-226-0717 562-2962




CUMMING S APPLIANCES I LEE FULLER ~ OWNER MONTICELLO'S ONLY LOCAL HEATING & COOLING COMPANY

S850-997-78 MoRRIS FULLER PAINTING LLC STEWART
80-997-768HEATING & COOLING INC.

850-997-5132 Office (850) 6712286 Sales Service Installation Change Outs

90 DA WARRANTY ON ALL APPLIANCES Cell (850) 284-6134 Residential.* Commercial

CHRISTOPHIER CUMMINGS OWNER lI .,8366 Guerry Lane, Tallahassee, FL 32317 Family Owned a Office: (850) 342-3294

Lic. & Insured Lic. # RA0067121 CELL: (850) 509-2903













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997-3568


MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 19, 2006 PAGE 11

..... .....ER TI
-o- .~~f a N-- 0.:-I- el



W _- ,e-.-' ...-a.yN onJ. or.F".Wi- -.'
.. '-: : Call Oura- 'ssified Department al:


ELP .. .-: .. ,, ,,,-- MOE $,-


counseling social work,
psychology, or a related human
services field and two years of
professional. Experience in
providing services to persons
with behavioral illness. Some
local travel required. License
required. Substance abuse
knowledge preferred. Shift:
Variable hours. Some late
afternoon work required.
OPS-FEMA CRISIS
COUNSELOR (#2262) A
Bachelor's Degree from an
accredited university or college
with a major in counseling,
social work, psychology,
criminal justice, nursing,
rehabilitation, special education,
health education, or a related
human services field; or other
Bachelor's degree from an
accredited university or college
with one (1) year of full time or
equivalent work or volunteer
experience in a social service,
health care, or related field.
Shift Variable.
For more information and a
complete listing of available
positions:
www.apalacheecenter.org (850)
523-3217 or (800)226-2931
Human Resources 2634-J
Capital Circle NE, Tallahassee,
Fl Pre-Hire Drug Screen &
FDLE background check An
Equal Opportunity/Affirmative
Action Employer Drug-Free
Workplace.
4,19, c
Need weekend respite care for
elderly women with Alzheimer's
disease. References and
background check required.
(850) 322-9667
4/19, 21 pd
Free room, board, and small
monthly stipend in exchange for
light housekeeping and cooking
for elderly male in his home.-
References and background
check required. (856) 322-9667
(ly message)
4/19, 21 pd
The City of Monticello is
accepting applications for the
position of Criminal
Investigative Sergeant. This
position requires a minimum of
a high school diploma and
Florida Police Standards. The
candidate must have broad
experience as an Investigator,
experience as a supervisor of
investigative units, experience as
an internal affairs investigator
and also live within 25 miles of
Monticello Police Station. The
ideal candidate should have
some advance education and
some experience in training. The
position requires a background
check. Salary and benefit
information available upon
request. Submit application and
resume to: City of Monticello
Police Dept. 195 S. Mulberry
St., Monticello, FL 32344 by
April 24, 2006 EOE/DRUG-Free
Workplace.
4/12, 14, 19, c
MONTICELLO: Part-time
janitorial position available
immediately. Please call


681-3148 for more information.
4/12, 14, 19, 21, 5/3, 5, 10, 12, c
Capital Area Community
Action Agency, Inc. Seeking
experienced human resource
officer for non-profit w/100+
employees. Required
Qualifications: high level
experience in personnel
operations and management,
payroll, benefits and insurance,
w/excellent technology, and
public relationship skills,
extensive knowledge and
experience with federal
wage/hour, workman's comp,
and EOE requirements.
Minimum of 5 years experience.
Preferred: Bachelor degree in
Personnel management, public
administration, or a related field
of study. Recent experience as a
personnel director/manager
may be substituted on a
year-for-year basis above the
minimum experience for the
degree. The deadline to apply is
5 p.m. Friday April 28, For an
application, job description or
more info call 222-2043.
4/19, c

FOR RENT
Prime downtown office space
now available in Cherry Street
Commons. Jack Carswell,
997-1980.
11/30, tfn, c
1 room efficiency apt. 450 Sq.
Ft. $250 per month call
907-6492 leave message.
4/19, c, tfn,
C'ffice for RENT 238 W.
Washington St. Call 997-2646
M-F, 9_5 available May 1st
3'31 tfn
1900 Sq. Ft. Mobile Home on 3
acres, very private, direct access
to lake. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths,
large metal building with
electricity- 1 acre fenced $750
month. 1st, last, and security
deposit. Available 5/1/06 call
850 508-7928
4/19, npd
House For Rent! 3 bedroom, 1.5
bath great location only $625
ppr month. Please call 339-2850.
4/19, 21, 26, 28, pd
AUTOMOTIVE
No Credit Checks Just Low
Down Payments on Good Cars
& Trucks
2 and 4 Door Model As Low As
$750 down 850-536-9111 ~
www.JumpinJims.con Ask For
Mr. Deal.
11/2, tfn
1993 Ford F250 New Tires,
brakes, tune-up. Reduced
$1,000 to $3,500.
1995 Ford Crown Victoria new
tires, looks and drives like new.
Reduced to $3,500 below NADA
Book. 997-6806
tf:i, c
I.
SERVICES
Health Care Equipment
Jackson's Drug Store. We bill
Medicare Call for a assessment
of your needs. 997-3553. UPS
available


REGISTERED NURSES
ICU, IMCU, CCU, CPU, CATHLAB
$5000 Recruitment Incentive
(With one year of experience)
Archbold Hospital in Thomasville, GA is currently hiring RNsfor
the above full-time positions. Variety o shifts available. We offer
an excellent benefit package and competitive salaries. CON-
TACT: Nurse Recruiter, 229-228-2713 or email:
rtaylor@archbold.org EOE




REGISTERED NURSE

HOME HEALTH

$1500-$3000 Recruitment Incentive
FT Positions
ALSO
Per Visit Positions $35 per visit -
premium pay for admissions

Archbold Home Health Services is currently seeking
qualified applicants for the above positions to serve
Leon, Madison and Jefferson Counties.
One Year of home health experience preferred. We of-
fer competitive compensation and an excellent benefit
package. CONTACT: Nurse Recruiter, Archbold
Medical Center. Phone 229-228-2713,
FAX: 229-551-8733. rtaylor@archbold.org
Visit our web site: www.archbold.org EOE


1/19, tfn
Private Duty, Elder Care 24
hrs/7 days Home 850-997-0162
Mobile 850-544-7052
4/7, 12, 14, 19, 21, 26, 28, pd

Peters Satellite -- Your Dish
Satellite dealer. We offer
equipment, installation, repair,
parts, and prompt service. We
also offer Go-Karts, utility
trailers and lawn mowers.
Located at: 1150 Old Lloyd
Road, Monticello, Fla.
850-997-3377.
tfn, 1/25
We welcome the faithful, the
seeker and the doubter. Christ
Episcopal Church, three blocks
N of the courthouse. Sunday
services at 10:30 a.m. 997-4116.
4/19, c
Backhoe Service: driveways,
roads, ditches, tree & shrub
removal, burn piles. Contact
Gary Tuten 997-3116, 933-3458.
4/28, tfn
Healthy Weight Loss available
only at Jackson's Drugs,
Hoodiacol is designed to curb
the appetite, burn fat and
increase energy levels resulting
in considerable weight loss over
time. Hoodiacol consist of 3 key
ingredients incorporated into
rice bran oil with natural
flavoring to give it a palpable
taste. In addition to weight loss,
you may see benefits for the
hair, skin and nails from the
Omega 3 and Omega 6 found in
rice bran oil. Hoodia gordonii is
a cactus found in the Kalahari
Desert of South Africa.
Unsurpassed as an appetite

Drivers & Owner Operators:
Excellent Home-Time! 99% Pre-
Loaded! 80% Drop & Hlook!
Great Pay & Benefits! CDL-A
3yrs. exp. browntrucking.com
770-344-2028


suppressant, it not only limits
appetite but increases the sense
of satiety. This tends to limit
total caloric intake by 30-40%
without experiencing hunger.
Significant weight loss should
result from such a drop in
caloric intake.
5/18, tfn
Appliance Repairs: washers,
dryers, stoves, refrigerators.
Owned and operated by Andy
Rudd, 997-5648. Leave
Message.
2/11, tfn
Mr. Stump: Stump Grinding.
509-8530, Quick Responses.
6/2, s/d, tfn
Private Duty Elder Care, 24 hrs,
7 days H 850-997-0162 M
850=544-7052
4/7,12,14,19,21,26,28

FOR SALE
Registered 6 year old Dark Bay
Thoroughbred Philly $2000.
Call Mike 519-6506.
4/19, 21
Crepe Myrtle starting at $1, red
and white, 342-3246, ask for
Ricky.
4/12, 14, 19, 21, 26, 28. pd
Rhode Island Red Roosters for
sale, $10 each. Call 997-0901,
leave message.
4/19, 21, 26, 28, pd
Appaloosa Horse nice riding
horse. Best offer. Call 997-3368.
4/14, 19, ,1


House For Sale!!
1430 Florida Ave
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
Large Screened back
porch Beautiful Lot
Work in Process To reno-
vate home buy early at
$94,500 before price
goes to $110K to 115K
997-6806


Registered Nurses Incentive

Care Units Cath Lab
$500 Recruitment Incentive (With one year of experi-
ence) Archbold Hospital, in Thomasville, GA is currently
hiring RNs for the above full-time positions. Variety of
shifts available. We offer an excellent benefit package and
competitive salaries. CONTACT: Nurse Recruiter,
229-228-2713 or email rtaylor@archbold.org EOE








6690 SW Sundown Creek Road, Greenville, FL
FRIDAY -:- APRIL 28 -:- 10:00 A.M.
Beautiful Plantation With Large Majestic Oaks


* Great Cattle and Horse Farm
*1 1/4 Miles 1-10 Frontage
* Great Development Potential
* Quail Hunting Operation
* Large Food Plots Contain Both
Natural & Planted Habitats For
Quail & Other Wildlife
* Abundant Game Quail,
Deer & Turkey


I


*(2) Large Barns
* ,r:iil H njn' rI
* 3200' Approved Pratt Ranch
Grass Landing Strip (# 20 FD)
* Fenced & Crossfenced
*Well Stocked Duck Pond
*4" Well
* Planted Longleaf Pines


LARGE GUEST LODGE
S4 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths,
S4000S Sq. Ft., Kitchen
with Built-Ins
PLUS A LARGE SELECTION OF
WELL MAINTAINED EQUIPMENT


Rowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc. Broker
800-323-8388 Participation
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Assistant Managers & Customer

Sales Associates


Seeking highly motivated, experienced and
enthusiastic professionals for the Greenville
area. Convenience Store experience desired.
All shifts available. Excellent opportunity for
advancement. Competitive Salary, Bonus,
Benefits and opportunity to join a progressive
and fast growing company. Fax resume to:


Fast Track Foods #411

ATTN: Bertie

Fax: (850) 948-2678

Phone (352)494-7550


KxUUy& k I -IlIN
I~J I~ 1-1111IF-%.


515 N. Je. rrwmn &
I~wm"e~a M I o
(a5O 991 i516t~a~


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Pam Kellr
Afe4r J~rnkhu

REM Xtihr
Xsb,bw 1+ aba
Sarah lipwfmder
(C~veU '.lc Afrd
John IlBawkin
kI- rginl zaI ow
.Ifarea e ICW
3"aret Leving


5li0J3SY



510-95)2
212-416"
528-li 9
5094.1191
509-18"
S56-IJIM
$09-4414


(850) 997-4340

www.TimPeary.com
Country Living 2000 double wide 3 bed-
room 2 baths, screened porch on a very
pretty 1.6 acres in Lloyd Acres $74,900

Mixed Use Property 12 plus partially
cleared acres on US 19 south near Dennis'
Trading post only $16,500 per acre

Price Slashed! 2 bedroom 1 bath home
with small fenced yard, family room $0s7,50
Now $76,500

Peary Doest It Aqain! Under Contract-


Priced to Sell 1993 Fleetwood 3 bedroom
2 bath home on 2.5 acres in Lloyd Acres
paved road frontage $76,500

Aucilla Forest & Meadows 2.5 mostly
wooded acres Only $36,500


Traditional House in Town 3 bedroom
home in town at East Anderson St. $155,000

Horse Farm 29 acre horse farm big double-
wide w/ fireplace, stables, round pen in remote,
oaks, pond, north of Greenville only $329,000

Quiet Location 2 adjacent lots on Partridge
Lane 100'x220' in the City $15,500 each

Freeman Road 26.46 acres of pasture land
with easy access to 1-10, US 19 and US 27 Only
3,500 per acre

On the Top of the Hiqh Hill Lovely 3 bed-
room 2.5 bath yellow brick home circled with 10
year old planted pine near US 90 and SR 59, 50
acres in planted pines, swimming pool, detached
garage, barn nice field near US 90 and SR 59
only $1,200,000

Peary Does It Aqain! 2 under Con-
tract-One Left Choice Buildinq Lots
in Town on Morris Road call for details $10,000
to $40,000

Peary Does It Aqain! Under Contract
Cox Road 10 mostly wooded acres just a
few miles North of town $12,000 per acre

Prime Commercial Property US 19
South near Pizza Hut 6.5 acres $650,000

Peary Does It Aqain! Terrific Land In-
vestment 5 acres under contract 5 avail-
able on the east side of town high and dry in
quiet location with lots of game, 9 year old
planted pines, profit from both appreciating

land and growing pine Now $9,500 per

Peary Does It Aqain! Near Lake Hall
Under Contract 2 wooded acres $26,500

Home Site close to town on West Groo-
verville Road only $14,500

Peary Does It Aqain! Christmas Acres
Under Contract -3 bedroom 2 bath mobile
home on 3 acres with a big deck, carport and
a workshop $96,000

Realtor Tim Peary
850-997-4340
See all our listings)
www.TimPeary.com
Simply the Best!


I










PAGE 12, MONTICELLO, (FL), NEWS, WED., APRIL 19, 2006


Blood Mobile Seeks


Donors At Relay Friday


ELIZA LePORIN
Blood Bank Coordinator

A blood donation can give a
"good day" to someone with
cancer; help a Sickle Cell
child avoid a crisis; allow a
sick patient to travel or par-
ticipate in a memorable fam-
ily event; and offer a patient a
speedy recovery from surgery
and the chance to live for a
cure.
Jefferson County churches,
'businesses and schools have
partnered for years with the
Southeastern Community
Blood Center (SCBC) to host
blood drives.
During the past year there
have been 10 sponsored blood
drives in the area. Residents
turned out to show their sup-
port for blood donations by
giving 80 units of blood.
Based on America's Blood
Centers statistics, 60 percent
of the population is eligible to
give blood, yet only five per-
cent of the population
donates.
Five percent of the eligible
County population of 14,502
equals 435 people who could
potentially give blood every
56 days.
The SCBC and the Kiwanis
Club of Monticello encourage
residents to come and help
save lives on Friday April 21
at the Relay For Life at the
Jefferson County High School
track, 4 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
The blood mobile will be
conveniently located by the
track. All donors will receive
a red SCBC lunch cooler as a
thank you for their donation.
To make an appointment to
donate blood on April 21,
contact Kiwanian Robert Ma-
zur at 599-8956 or e-mail,
robert_mazur@ml.com.


"SCBC is proud to be a part
of the Relay For Life of Jef-
ferson County for the third
year and invites the commu-
nity to come out and partici-
pate by donating blood to
help save cancer patients
lives," said Jeanne Dariotis,
SCBC CEO.
Being a blood donor is safe,
simple, and very fulfilling. As
many as three different pa-
tients can be helped with just
one donation.
Each unit of whole blood is
broken down into three main
parts, red blood cells, platelets
and plasma. Therefore, with
each whole blood donation,
up to three lives can be saved.
Blood products are used for
a variety of medical treat-
ments, in addition to emer-
gency accident victims.
Surgical patients use red
blood cells. Cancer patients
and bone marrow transplant
recipients need platelets to
prevent hemorrhaging.
Plasma is used to treat burn
patients, dehydration, and
shock, fight infections and re-
place clotting factors.
Giving blood takes less than
one hour. With each blood
donation only lasting 42 days,
the supply must be replen-
ished.
Locally, 750 blood dona-
tions are needed each week.
Anyone who is healthy, at
least 17 years old, weighs 110
pounds and has a picture ID
can donate.
For more information about
donating blood contact SCBC
at 850-877-7181, 800-722-
2218 or at www.scbcinfo.org.
All locations are open Mon-
day through Friday 9 a.m. un-
til 6 p.m.. The Riggins Road
location is also open
Saturday, 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.
The SCBC Is a community


based nonprofit blood center
and a member of America's
Blood Centers. SCBC pro-
vides blood to families in 26
counties in North Florida and
South Georgia and travels six
blood mobiles to 2,900 blood
drives each year. SCBC is
the sole supplier of blood to
Tallahassee memorial Hospi-
tal and Capital Regional
Medical Center in Tallahassee
and Archbold Memorial Hos-
pital in Thomasville.


Relay
(Continued From Page 6)
stretches with Jamie.
Kathy Holiday and the First
Baptist Choirs will entertain at
8 a.m.
At 9 a.m. Bassett will intro-
duce Carmen Cummins as
Master of Ceremonies. The
Boys and Girls Clubs will con-
tinue the entertainment fol-
lowed by another Survivor
Story.
The third team bank deposit
will take place and final call
for Early Bird teams.
Live band entertainment will
follow.
Closing Ceremonies will be-
gin at 11 a.m. with a Survivor
Story and presentation of the
Team Awards. Ending this 18-
Hour event to raise money in a
community effort to find a
cure for cancer.


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i and Designer Baths.


"Hug me, hold me, love me, and I'll be your friend for
ever and snuggle up and keep you warm," Marco the
cat. (News Photo)


.Become an American Red
Cross Disaster Services
Volunteer

The Capital'Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross is seeking.to
train Disaster Services Volunteers
in your community. Contact us at
850/878o6080 or visit our.website
at www.tallytown.com/redcross.

+ American
Red Cross


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DAYTONA BEACH SCORES
Call today 1-866-741-8317
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'Marco' Is

Pet Of Week

FRAN HUNT
Staff Writer

The Humane Society has-
named Marco as the
adoptable feline Pet of the
Week.
Marco is a male, tabby and
white cat, approximate date of
birth, Sept., 2005.
He is neutered and all vacci-
nations are up to date.
Marco is quite rare in both
looks and personality.
He has a bobbed tail, and he
is extremely affectionate.
When he is removed from
his cage, Marco is insistent on
steadying a person's face with
one paw gently on each
cheek, and he begins kissing.
He also gives hugs around the
neck.
"He just loves being affec-
tionate," said Bautista.
To adopt Marco or any of
the other many animals at the
shelter call 342-0244.


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